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Why I Am so Clever

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'Why do I know a few more things? Why am I so clever altogether?'Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings from Ecce Homo, the last work iconoclastic German philosopher Nietzsche wrote before his descent into madness.One of 46 new books in the bestselling Little Black Classics series, to celebrate the first ever Penguin Classic in 1946. Each book gives re 'Why do I know a few more things? Why am I so clever altogether?'Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings from Ecce Homo, the last work iconoclastic German philosopher Nietzsche wrote before his descent into madness.One of 46 new books in the bestselling Little Black Classics series, to celebrate the first ever Penguin Classic in 1946. Each book gives readers a taste of the Classics' huge range and diversity, with works from around the world and across the centuries - including fables, decadence, heartbreak, tall tales, satire, ghosts, battles and elephants.


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'Why do I know a few more things? Why am I so clever altogether?'Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings from Ecce Homo, the last work iconoclastic German philosopher Nietzsche wrote before his descent into madness.One of 46 new books in the bestselling Little Black Classics series, to celebrate the first ever Penguin Classic in 1946. Each book gives re 'Why do I know a few more things? Why am I so clever altogether?'Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings from Ecce Homo, the last work iconoclastic German philosopher Nietzsche wrote before his descent into madness.One of 46 new books in the bestselling Little Black Classics series, to celebrate the first ever Penguin Classic in 1946. Each book gives readers a taste of the Classics' huge range and diversity, with works from around the world and across the centuries - including fables, decadence, heartbreak, tall tales, satire, ghosts, battles and elephants.

30 review for Why I Am so Clever

  1. 4 out of 5

    JK

    What a blast of self-awareness and ego from Nietzsche here. If I had half of the man’s knowledge, I’d be living a very good life. Broken into three sections on why Nietzsche is so wise, so clever, and why he writes such good books, this collection reads almost like a diatribe on how Nietzsche is so bloody cool. It’s quite self-aggrandising, and good tickle of his own ego, but impressive nonetheless. The man is unbelievably intelligent, yet this became old quite quickly. It’s quite a slog to get th What a blast of self-awareness and ego from Nietzsche here. If I had half of the man’s knowledge, I’d be living a very good life. Broken into three sections on why Nietzsche is so wise, so clever, and why he writes such good books, this collection reads almost like a diatribe on how Nietzsche is so bloody cool. It’s quite self-aggrandising, and good tickle of his own ego, but impressive nonetheless. The man is unbelievably intelligent, yet this became old quite quickly. It’s quite a slog to get through his words, and I can’t pretend to have grasped it all. Still, it’s a worthwhile read, and an interesting look into the brain of this sharp man.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    My first experience of Nietzsche and in conclusion... A pompus arrogant man who is crazier than a sackful of cats. YIKES!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Tosh

    Friedrich Nietzsche as a bite-size tasty piece of food. The public perception of him and his work is very wrong. One thinks of him as being uber-Nazi, but the fact is he's not that fond of Germany or German culture, and on top of that, although he's a fan of Wagner, there is much in his work that he's not fond of. This little book consists of three sections: "Why I am So Wise," "Why I am so Clever," and "Why I Write Such Good Books." Which by title alone shows off his sense of humor. These piece Friedrich Nietzsche as a bite-size tasty piece of food. The public perception of him and his work is very wrong. One thinks of him as being uber-Nazi, but the fact is he's not that fond of Germany or German culture, and on top of that, although he's a fan of Wagner, there is much in his work that he's not fond of. This little book consists of three sections: "Why I am So Wise," "Why I am so Clever," and "Why I Write Such Good Books." Which by title alone shows off his sense of humor. These pieces are taken from "Ecce Homo," the only book I read by Nietzsche. Weirdly enough, I bought this small book at Tower Records in Tokyo, and I read the main volume about twenty-nine years ago during a flight to Japan. It's a great book, either by the whole or in sections.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ramadevi

    Weird flex but okay.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Naima

    I wanted to dip my toes into a bit of Nietzsche. I tried, I was confused, I giggled and I was confused again. I marked a few interesting thoughts, but damn this man really loved himself. I think we can all learn a couple of things from Nietzsche when we talk about self care and self love. If only I could be 10% as confident and arrogant as he was. Curious to read more of him when my brain can actually process it.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia Bodrug

    Câteva din pasajele care mi-au plăcut: • Thinking of yourself as a destiny, not wanting to be 'other' than you are -that is under such circumstances the highest wisdom". • To become what one is, one must not have the faintest idea what one is. • To live alone one must be animal or a god - says Aristotel. There is yet a third case: one must be both - a philosopher. Câteva din pasajele care mi-au plăcut: • Thinking of yourself as a destiny, not wanting to be 'other' than you are -that is under such circumstances the highest wisdom". • To become what one is, one must not have the faintest idea what one is. • To live alone one must be animal or a god - says Aristotel. There is yet a third case: one must be both - a philosopher.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Kaju Janowski

    gibberish interleaved with genius ideas of a self-important madman, who seems not to know if he would appreciate my disdain or my occasional understanding more. Had hard time rating -- I wouldn't recommend this monkey talk to anyone, but I'm glad I've read it at the same time. gibberish interleaved with genius ideas of a self-important madman, who seems not to know if he would appreciate my disdain or my occasional understanding more. Had hard time rating -- I wouldn't recommend this monkey talk to anyone, but I'm glad I've read it at the same time.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Anka Räubertochter

    Let me sum this collection up for you: Nietzsche is the smartest person in the world, Germans are dumb and eat awful food, and women are inferior to men and want to be oppressed.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Hikaoru

    Bought it for a laugh. I mean, look at the title. Joke's on me. It was a collosal waste of time. He's full of himself and sexist to boot. Goodbye Nietzche, may your work never cross my path. Bought it for a laugh. I mean, look at the title. Joke's on me. It was a collosal waste of time. He's full of himself and sexist to boot. Goodbye Nietzche, may your work never cross my path.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Lone Wong

    This book essays and writing is a selection taken from his album, "Ecce Homo" before Friedrich Nietzsche descent into madness. And perhaps it is his last piece of notable work of his life. "On this perfect day, when everything has become ripe and not only the grapes are growing brown, a ray of sunlight has fallen on to my life: I looked behind me, I looked before me, never have I seen so many and such good things together. Not in vain have I buried my forty-fourth year today, I was entitled t This book essays and writing is a selection taken from his album, "Ecce Homo" before Friedrich Nietzsche descent into madness. And perhaps it is his last piece of notable work of his life. "On this perfect day, when everything has become ripe and not only the grapes are growing brown, a ray of sunlight has fallen on to my life: I looked behind me, I looked before me, never have I seen so many and such good things together. Not in vain have I buried my forty-fourth year today, I was entitled to bury it - what there was of life in it is rescued, is immortal. The first book of the Revaluation of all Values, the Songs of Zarathustra, the Twilight of the Idols, my attempt to philosophize with a hammer - all of them gifts of this year, of its last quarter even! How should I not be grateful to my whole life? - And so I tell myself my life." This book contains several chapters with ironic self-laudatory titles, such as "Why I Am So Wise", "Why I Am So Clever", "Why I Write Such Good Books". The wording of his title (Ecce Homo) was not meant to draw parallels with Jesus, but to suggest a certain kind of contrast. Nevertheless, the writing and philosophy of Nietzsche leave me mesmerized and bewildered. One must be experienced in order to understand the value of life. Quote his words, "Ultimately, no one can extract from things, books included, more than he already knows. What one has no access to through experience one has no ear for." Perhaps, I'm too green to understand what he is trying to interpret in his writing and philosophy. I definitely will come back for more once I start to study Nietzsche's philosophy. Perhaps the first book I should go for "The Birth of Tragedy" instead of this.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alin Andrei

    I've read this book with caution because I knew a little bit about Nietzsche and his philosophy and I advise everyone should do so. What took me aback was the sight of such self-confidence in a man and I admit, it was rather contagious. His philosophy is rather captivating, but one should not be lured straight away into it. Through his beliefs, he manages to make one reflect on the things one would take for granted. He brings up the close connection between Christianity and the instilling of the n I've read this book with caution because I knew a little bit about Nietzsche and his philosophy and I advise everyone should do so. What took me aback was the sight of such self-confidence in a man and I admit, it was rather contagious. His philosophy is rather captivating, but one should not be lured straight away into it. Through his beliefs, he manages to make one reflect on the things one would take for granted. He brings up the close connection between Christianity and the instilling of the normalisation of guilt and of the denial of envy, ideas that are considered as poisonous to one's good conscience in Nietzsche's beliefs. He thinks that envy is a basic human feeling and that guilt should not take root as it just lead to other unnecessary feelings. At first sight he may seem a rather egocentric persona, as he reaches beyond virtues and his views on idealism, including equality of sexes. Although he doesn't consider men equal to women, he sees women as far more superior and that the desire of equal rights is just a "sickness". What he certainly got right, though, is that life is not about the things that happen to us, but about how we see those things. It's all about our perception. Nietzsche realised that greatness can be achieved by embracing who we are and not desiring to be something else and to be grateful for what there already is. Due to the rather controversial principles of life, this book offers a new perspective on existence whose elements could as well be adopted into our own ways of seeing life, with the mention that we take on just what we believe is going to be in our own benefit.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marta :}

    Pretty sure I wouldn't have bothered with this one after 20 pages if it wasn't a gift. Pretty sure I wouldn't have bothered with this one after 20 pages if it wasn't a gift.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cassandra Stevens

    Maybe I just don't get it. Gona stop reading such tripe. Maybe I just don't get it. Gona stop reading such tripe.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    Well that was entertaining! I'm still not sure exactly what he hoped to achieve in this small volume. Was is meant to be humorous? Was it meant to be serious? I just don't know. But I know I enjoyed it! I recently read Jordan Petersen's '12 Rules for Life' and it reminded me a bit of that for a few reasons, not least of which is his arrogant and superior tone (incidentally I loved that book too!). Nietzsche gave the Germans and Christians a fair whack. Considering he was German himself (although Well that was entertaining! I'm still not sure exactly what he hoped to achieve in this small volume. Was is meant to be humorous? Was it meant to be serious? I just don't know. But I know I enjoyed it! I recently read Jordan Petersen's '12 Rules for Life' and it reminded me a bit of that for a few reasons, not least of which is his arrogant and superior tone (incidentally I loved that book too!). Nietzsche gave the Germans and Christians a fair whack. Considering he was German himself (although identified as a Pole) it did indicate a degree of self-loathing. He also talked a lot about the need for gut-health, nutrition and climate for good health. Nietzsche drools over Wagner and the French. But most of all he writes about his own greatness, apparently it is of the "rarest distinctions" to read one of his books! He even suggests his privileged readers should take off their shoes for the experience! He saved the topic of 'women' for the end, stating they are "unspeakably more wicked than men" but superior by far. And if ever you are in any doubt of how to "redeem" a woman, he suggests give her a child. After reading this book I thought it only fair I brush up on my Nietzsche (probably should have done that before I started!). His four tenets are as follows: own your envy; hate Christianity; no alcohol; and God is dead (i.e. culture should replace religion). It is said Nietzsche wrote this just before his "descent into madness". I can see that. It felt like a final rant from a torched brilliant mind. Definitely worth a read. Remember, as Nietzsche says "what doesn't kill us makes us stronger".

  15. 4 out of 5

    Deir Zahrani

    "Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings" explains exactly what's inside this book. English is not my first language, and I'm not very good at it. So you can imagine how hard it was for me to read such a book, written by the one that can be said as the greatest mind of all time. Reading this book, I feel like I had the chance to peek what's inside his head, through the keyhole. It explained how he loved books, Wagner, anything French perhaps, and despised anything Germans I g "Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings" explains exactly what's inside this book. English is not my first language, and I'm not very good at it. So you can imagine how hard it was for me to read such a book, written by the one that can be said as the greatest mind of all time. Reading this book, I feel like I had the chance to peek what's inside his head, through the keyhole. It explained how he loved books, Wagner, anything French perhaps, and despised anything Germans I guess. This is the first philosophical book I have ever read, and after reading this I figured out that it is HARD to just sit and think about anything existentially. Man... I was like a little kid who just seen circus for the first time, amazed and confused at the same time

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sander

    The epitome of arrogance (how much of it is really satirical?). This book contains some interesting ideas and quotes but isn’t really worth the effort overall. It does show the extreme intelligence (and sexism) of Nietzsche though.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Robbie Claravall

    52/100 Not clever enough.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bebedele

    Maybe I'm not clever enough to understand this book. Maybe I'm not clever enough to understand this book.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Raquel

    Why Is German Food so Bad?

  20. 5 out of 5

    Arnija

    Never have I ever read a book this short, yet never have I ever wanted a book to end faster..

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mădă

    'One will see that I would not like to see rudeness undervalued, it is the most humane form of contradiction by far and, in the midst of modern tendermindedness, one of our foremost virtues.' 'I myself, an opponent of Christianity, am far from bearing a grudge against the individual for what is the fatality pf millennia.' 'Shakespeare: what must a man have suffered to need to be a buffoon to this extent!' 'Ultimately, no one can extract from things, books included, more than he already knows. What one has 'One will see that I would not like to see rudeness undervalued, it is the most humane form of contradiction by far and, in the midst of modern tendermindedness, one of our foremost virtues.' 'I myself, an opponent of Christianity, am far from bearing a grudge against the individual for what is the fatality pf millennia.' 'Shakespeare: what must a man have suffered to need to be a buffoon to this extent!' 'Ultimately, no one can extract from things, books included, more than he already knows. What one has no access to through experience one has no ear for.'

  22. 5 out of 5

    Gustina

    I respect Nietzsche as a philosopher, but I can't respect his ego. I respect Nietzsche as a philosopher, but I can't respect his ego.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    fun and short !!!!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Marina Niscoveanu

    “When I picture a perfect reader, I always picture a monster of courage and curiosity, also something supple, cunning, cautious, a born adventurer and discoverer. “

  25. 4 out of 5

    Millie ✨

    Went miles over my head

  26. 4 out of 5

    Džiugas Babenskas

    Self-celebrating and self-mocking autobiographical writings. Weird flex, but okay.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Marjolein

    Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com Every week I read one Little Black Classic and this week's is Nietzsche supposedly self-mocking autobiography. I can be quick. To me, I found it less self-mocking and more like a man who is rather full of himself. Sure, he is exaggerating and it shows, but with this kind of snub undertones that go on to make it painfully clear he actually beliefs he is that clever. Either that, or I just didn't understand a thing of what he was trying t Read all my reviews on http://urlphantomhive.booklikes.com Every week I read one Little Black Classic and this week's is Nietzsche supposedly self-mocking autobiography. I can be quick. To me, I found it less self-mocking and more like a man who is rather full of himself. Sure, he is exaggerating and it shows, but with this kind of snub undertones that go on to make it painfully clear he actually beliefs he is that clever. Either that, or I just didn't understand a thing of what he was trying to say. Anyways, not an entertaining read. ~ Little Black Classics #102 ~

  28. 5 out of 5

    Julia Larsen

    Clearly at the last stages of his megalomania with his humor still intact. An uplifting read, and unlike what the title conveys, not too arrogant but rather motivating and insightful. Almost like a manual to living a slightly crazy but off-the-ground existence. Kept it in my bag for weeks to read whenever I felt a bit down.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alexandru

    Nietzsche being a troll close to his death. A good book for those considering Nietzsche a Nazi, since he mentions that he feels Polish and makes fun of German culture, describing it as a non-culture. A book about everything - cusine and French being the best one, music, dead father, mother and hated sister. A short and interesting journey into the ending life of a crazy philosopher.

  30. 4 out of 5

    phazleeanna

    "It also seems to me that the rudest word, the rudest letter are more good-natured, more honest than silence. Those who keep silent almost always lack subtlety and politeness of the heart; silence is an objection, swallowing down necessarily produces a bad character - it even ruins the stomach." "It also seems to me that the rudest word, the rudest letter are more good-natured, more honest than silence. Those who keep silent almost always lack subtlety and politeness of the heart; silence is an objection, swallowing down necessarily produces a bad character - it even ruins the stomach."

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