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Crime Beat: Selected Journalism 1984-1992 [Limited Numbered First Edition Signed by Author]

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Before he became a novelist, Michael Connelly was a crime reporter, covering homicide beat in Florida and Los Angeles. Here are reproduced narratives of these articles, from initial accusation along path of prosecution. Divided in three sections: Cops, Killers, and Cases.


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Before he became a novelist, Michael Connelly was a crime reporter, covering homicide beat in Florida and Los Angeles. Here are reproduced narratives of these articles, from initial accusation along path of prosecution. Divided in three sections: Cops, Killers, and Cases.

30 review for Crime Beat: Selected Journalism 1984-1992 [Limited Numbered First Edition Signed by Author]

  1. 5 out of 5

    Bill Kerwin

    Sometimes, to appreciate what a book is, it is necessary to be aware of what it is not. Crime Beat is not a collection of true crime essays by a well-known and respected veteran novelist, winner of every prize in the crime writing field. Crime Beat is a heterogeneous collection of old newspaper pieces written by a reporter in his early 30's who has just won a Pulitzer Prize. "Just-the-Facts-Ma'am" reporting is hard to do, and young Connelly shows his mastery of it in each piece included here. He Sometimes, to appreciate what a book is, it is necessary to be aware of what it is not. Crime Beat is not a collection of true crime essays by a well-known and respected veteran novelist, winner of every prize in the crime writing field. Crime Beat is a heterogeneous collection of old newspaper pieces written by a reporter in his early 30's who has just won a Pulitzer Prize. "Just-the-Facts-Ma'am" reporting is hard to do, and young Connelly shows his mastery of it in each piece included here. He writes clearly and plainly, ordering his words so that we can visualize every thing he describes and infer many things he chooses not to, like the bone-weariness of seasoned detectives and the occasional vigilante-style violence of cops on the street. In each case, he manages to tell a good story without lapsing into sentimentality or cynicism. Anybody on the hunt for polished essays, however, will be disappointed. These are pieces written for a deadline by a reporter anxious to introduce a general audience to an evolving story and then keep them updated about its continually changing landscape. Four or five pieces in a row may tell the same tale, omitting some facts and adding others, as the story begins to take shape. The hunter of polished essays may find this repetition infuriating, but I thought this aspect of the book one of its most interesting. I enjoyed this glimpse of a good reporter at work, keeping his public informed. I definitely recommend this book. It's not great literature, but it is great reporting. And--I almost forgot--it is introduced by a fine, thoughtful essay by that veteran crime novelist that some of you readers are looking for.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Diane Wallace

    Ok read! Good storyline with some interesting plotlines but the writing could have been better (paperback!) huge Connelly fan!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    I know that I am one of many who thoroughly enjoys the work of Michael Connelly, with his gritty stories of Harry Bosch and others working on solving (or defending, sometimes even reporting) crimes that occur throughout the greater Los Angeles area. Some may know that Connelly began his career as a crime beat reporter, amassing much of the story ideas he would later make popular through the cases on which he reported. This book is a collection of reports, both backgrounds and follow-ups, that Co I know that I am one of many who thoroughly enjoys the work of Michael Connelly, with his gritty stories of Harry Bosch and others working on solving (or defending, sometimes even reporting) crimes that occur throughout the greater Los Angeles area. Some may know that Connelly began his career as a crime beat reporter, amassing much of the story ideas he would later make popular through the cases on which he reported. This book is a collection of reports, both backgrounds and follow-ups, that Connelly penned during his reporting career. With an introduction that gives the reader the insight into how Connelly witnessed his first criminal at the age of sixteen and the subsequent investigation made him want to report on crimes, the author paints a picture of how this type of writing soon got into his blood and helped him to craft the descriptions that pull readers into the stories. With the collection divided into three parts, the reader can see reports that feature the police, the criminals, and the unknown victims. Seeing the cases develop and those who worked hard to catch the perpetrators, Connelly shines a light on those with the badges and guns, though he does not only present the positive side of those in blue. The reader can see Connelly’s depiction of the criminals as well, with backstories on their lives and what might have led them to the life of crime before they were caught, or eluded capture and disappeared. The final section seeks to focus the attention the victim who was left without a clear identity, be it because they fell through the cracks of the system or the brutality they faced left them unrecognisable at the time of initial reporting. With some wonderful tie-ins to cases that Harry Bosch would eventually face (note, the book came long before anyone ever heard of Renee Ballard), Connelly shows his tireless fans that fact and fiction do something intertwine and make for entertaining reading. Recommended to those who love true crime seen through the eyes of the roving reporter, as well as the reader who has come to love the writing of Michael Connelly over the years. While I am not an avid reader of true crime novels, I like to see where authors get their ideas. Many pull on experiences from their past (or current) professions and blur the lines effectively to keep things working well for their reading public while offering a degree of anonymity and keeping lawsuits at bay. While I have been a longtime fan of Connelly’s work (all series), it is interesting to see where some of the ideas emerged. I have watched a few seasons of the Amazon Prime show, Bosch, which pulls its ideas from the books, but this was even more interesting, as I could see from where the initial germination of writing ideas eventually blossomed. The cases are all over the place, from robberies to murder, kidnapping to assaults. All included both sides of the law, as well as a victim, pulling the reader into the middle, much like Connelly must have been as he used his access to case files and the like. The curious reader will see just how detailed things can get when a reporter has earned the trust of the police, though also kept his independence and is able to point out foibles in the system. Connelly writes in such a way that the reader cannot help but want to know more, seeking to eke out as many details as possible. While some attentive readers will see the parallels between the cases and the eventual books, anyone can enjoy this, with Connelly’s easy to digest prose and attention to detail. Well worth my time as I await another Michael Connelly publication, which just so happens to have a reporter as the protagonist! Kudos, Mr. Connelly, for all your hard work on the beat, which you have been able to turn into a stellar collection of novels that have stood the test of time. Love/hate the review? An ever-growing collection of others appears at: http://pecheyponderings.wordpress.com/ A Book for All Seasons, a different sort of Book Challenge: https://www.goodreads.com/group/show/...

  4. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This was interesting due to understanding the roots of Connelly's writing. Several of the stories covered here are the real events that played out in his novels & the characters contributed a lot, too. That said, it's true crime or newspaper reporting, often done in parts with summaries that duplicate what I had just heard. Yuck. I don't care for true crime & tend to skim newspaper articles on it, so listening to every single repetitious word was painful. Still, I'm glad to understand Connelly's This was interesting due to understanding the roots of Connelly's writing. Several of the stories covered here are the real events that played out in his novels & the characters contributed a lot, too. That said, it's true crime or newspaper reporting, often done in parts with summaries that duplicate what I had just heard. Yuck. I don't care for true crime & tend to skim newspaper articles on it, so listening to every single repetitious word was painful. Still, I'm glad to understand Connelly's foundation. It makes Harry Bosch even better.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    Let me start by admitting that I am a huge Michael Connelly fan and love almost everything he writes. This book however was a collection of his newspaper reporting from the '80s and at times was very interesting giving a good insight into his work but generally there was not enough to keep me fully entertained.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Aditya

    Crime Beat is a collection of newspaper reports that Connelly wrote about the stories he covered over the course of his successful journalistic career. There are twenty two cases, all of them consisting a series of articles. All of them are about three decades old and very few of them are interesting. The original articles might have been touched up a bit to resemble something akin to traditional narratives but they betray their origins. Facts are repeated (as is par for the course in follow ups Crime Beat is a collection of newspaper reports that Connelly wrote about the stories he covered over the course of his successful journalistic career. There are twenty two cases, all of them consisting a series of articles. All of them are about three decades old and very few of them are interesting. The original articles might have been touched up a bit to resemble something akin to traditional narratives but they betray their origins. Facts are repeated (as is par for the course in follow ups published days later in a newspaper) every other page and almost one-fourth of the book is redundant. Occasionally Connelly's articles are supplemented by reports from other journos covering other aspects of the crime and Connelly's writing is better. Connelly's writing has always been bereft of any signature style and often appears generic. This makes him an odd choice to publish feature pieces that he wrote when he was even less polished as an author. However he always knows what he is talking about and his plots have an insider's look at the procedural aspect of police work. Crime Beat successfully shows where and how he honed that definitive aspect of his writing. This was the only unread Connelly left for me and I wanted some insights into the evolution of one of the most commercially successfully crime authors of his generation. My completionist nature was satisfied but I did not glean much in form of insights. It is clear he would go on to adapt themes and plotlines from his real life experiences notably in Trunk Music (Bosch #5). But the raw source material is simply not interesting by itself. Connelly should have provided fewer cases as 22 is too large a number when all of them follow the same repetitive structure; or analysed just a couple of them in much greater detail for this book to have any sort of meaning. Not even recommended to Connelly fans or true crime lovers because at the end of the day it is a random collection of dry, thirty year old newspaper clippings. For what it's worth I really struggled to finish it. Rating - 2/5.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Ben

    For Crime Beat, Connelly dug through his archives to serve up a series of articles he wrote for newspapers in Florida and California during his formative years as a writer. Unstructured and repetitive, this pseudo-collection is nothing that would sell were not the Connelly brand stamped on the cover (he must have been gunning for a yacht). Apart from an unexplored tag line about the influence of his reporting years on his writing and a brief aside about the importance of the "telling detail" in t For Crime Beat, Connelly dug through his archives to serve up a series of articles he wrote for newspapers in Florida and California during his formative years as a writer. Unstructured and repetitive, this pseudo-collection is nothing that would sell were not the Connelly brand stamped on the cover (he must have been gunning for a yacht). Apart from an unexplored tag line about the influence of his reporting years on his writing and a brief aside about the importance of the "telling detail" in the introduction, this book plays its cards close, revealing little of biographic interest. I know I'm being fairly hard on this one, but I felt that the author missed an opportunity to instruct through his experience rather than reprint old news.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Joyce

    The ostensible rationale for this collection of stale journalism pieces is to demonstrate Connelly's contention that working the crime beat is a great way to learn the craft of crime novelist. Unfortunately, you guessed it, the book ends up utterly undermining his own argument. It's hard not to conclude that Connelly is one of the rare birds who are simply good at two different crafts -- because the tiny nuggets of anything resembling novelistic interest panned out in Connelly's newspaper pieces The ostensible rationale for this collection of stale journalism pieces is to demonstrate Connelly's contention that working the crime beat is a great way to learn the craft of crime novelist. Unfortunately, you guessed it, the book ends up utterly undermining his own argument. It's hard not to conclude that Connelly is one of the rare birds who are simply good at two different crafts -- because the tiny nuggets of anything resembling novelistic interest panned out in Connelly's newspaper pieces (mostly from long-forgotten cases from the 80's and early 90's) don't seem at ALL sufficient to fuel the bestselling intensity of his Harry Bosch stories.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Another great from Michael Connelly!! I've read the Bosch books, Lincoln Lawyer novels, and now this from his days as a Journalist/Crime Reporter! This was not a bad read.... A little slow at times, but it read like any newspaper piece! It wasn't a jam-packed essay on the topic, it seemed like he was given a word limit and put "just the facts". It was a great read, I enjoyed it because I see just where he came up with the ideas for ALOT of his books!!(Trunk Music, The Poet, Black Box, and many mo Another great from Michael Connelly!! I've read the Bosch books, Lincoln Lawyer novels, and now this from his days as a Journalist/Crime Reporter! This was not a bad read.... A little slow at times, but it read like any newspaper piece! It wasn't a jam-packed essay on the topic, it seemed like he was given a word limit and put "just the facts". It was a great read, I enjoyed it because I see just where he came up with the ideas for ALOT of his books!!(Trunk Music, The Poet, Black Box, and many more!!!) Very fun!! I hope he keeps cranking out more fun, fast paced reads for years to come!!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Connelly of course is the guy who writes the Harry Bosch thrillers set in LA - never a top favourite of mine because his writing is a little drab, but his plots are generally good (except when they're execrable (A Darkness more than Night)). Connelly was/is a journalist, and this is a collection of his crime reporting. And it's a complete waste of time, a pure ego exercise: the writing is very pedestrian, with the stories apparently reprinted as they originally appeared in the papers, including Connelly of course is the guy who writes the Harry Bosch thrillers set in LA - never a top favourite of mine because his writing is a little drab, but his plots are generally good (except when they're execrable (A Darkness more than Night)). Connelly was/is a journalist, and this is a collection of his crime reporting. And it's a complete waste of time, a pure ego exercise: the writing is very pedestrian, with the stories apparently reprinted as they originally appeared in the papers, including the parts of later articles that summarise the facts in the earlier ones we've just finished reading; there's no attempt to flesh out the background with additional research, or even fill us in on what happened afterwards, in the case of some where the reports just stop without closure. There's a pretentious introduction ("Moments. It all comes down to moments."), which bad as it is is the most interesting thing in the book; or at least in the first third of the book, which is as far as I got before putting it on the recycling pile. One to avoid.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rebecca McNutt

    Compiled of numerous articles on true cases over the years, Crime Beat is a very basic and technical true crime book.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Marcie

    I thought this was fabulous...anyone else might find it a huge bore, though. This book contains the kernels, seeds, of inspiration, the experiences and sights and sounds that stick with you and then coalesce into a future work. And I am so-o-o-o jealous! Michael Connelly and I were both working as newspaper reporters at the exact time...his press pass shows a goofy, curly headed kid who gets to ride shotgun with the cops for a week, the homicide division no less. Meanwhile mine shows a girl with I thought this was fabulous...anyone else might find it a huge bore, though. This book contains the kernels, seeds, of inspiration, the experiences and sights and sounds that stick with you and then coalesce into a future work. And I am so-o-o-o jealous! Michael Connelly and I were both working as newspaper reporters at the exact time...his press pass shows a goofy, curly headed kid who gets to ride shotgun with the cops for a week, the homicide division no less. Meanwhile mine shows a girl with stupid straight bangs and a pissed-off expression, assigned to covering wedding stories for the bridal section and art exhibit openings. In 1986, girls were not allowed to cover the police beat or the court beat. We were assigned to the lifestyles or entertainment sections. I can remember my first day and asking the room in general "what the hell is peau de soie?" and the older, female reporter, "mother" of the department, smiling and saying "French for silk" as she slammed a drawer shut with her hip. This woman went on to write murder mystery novelettes for Harlequin romance...and I went on to prostitute myself in advertising where I would be paid a lot more money for knowing stuff like what peau de soie is. And Connelly went on to create an unforgettable character, Hieronymus "Harry" Bosch, the LAPD homicide detective who speaks for the dead. Harry is the compilation of all the real-life detectives Connelly knew, the cases...well, we all know truth is stranger than fiction, no doubt. In all honesty, he was not that great as a reporter. I bet he drove his editors NUTS with convoluted leads (supposed to be 25-30 words in length, one I counted at 46, why he didn't break into two?) and flowery, inappropriate, editorializing adjectives like "swift and efficient" killer and "bizarre cast of characters and seamy tales." Hmmmm. Use your verbs, man, not your adjectives, to color up a news story! So, he goes on to write, with great economy and word-restraint, stuff like: “In every murder is the tale of a city.” and "We all are circling the drain, he thought. Some are closer to the black hole than others. Some will see it coming and some will have no clue when the undertow of the whirlpool grabs them and pulls them down into darkness forever." Connelly found his correct place in the universe. And I'm one of his biggest fans. Thus, the book gets four out of five stars.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Sidna

    This book is for Michael Connelly fans. I'm not sure that anyone who has not read at least some of his books would enjoy it. For me, the best part of this book was the Introduction in which he tells about how he became interested in crime reporting. When Connelly was 16 he worked as a night dishwasher in a hotel restaurant in Fort Lauderdale, FL. On his way home from work one night he witnessed a man escaping after robbing a nearby store and shooting a man in the head. His experience in working This book is for Michael Connelly fans. I'm not sure that anyone who has not read at least some of his books would enjoy it. For me, the best part of this book was the Introduction in which he tells about how he became interested in crime reporting. When Connelly was 16 he worked as a night dishwasher in a hotel restaurant in Fort Lauderdale, FL. On his way home from work one night he witnessed a man escaping after robbing a nearby store and shooting a man in the head. His experience in working with the detectives, even though they never found the robber, got him interested in crime and he began reading the newspaper. Then he started reading books by crime writers, such as Joseph Wambaugh and Raymond Chandler. It is interesting that his experience led him to crime reporting and not to law enforcement. Connelly also tells about watching a particular detective as a crime reporter who became the basis for Harry Bosch. This was great fun to read. The rest of the book is a reprinting of stories that appeared under his byline when he was a newspaper crime reporter. The book is divided into three sections: The Cops, The Killers, and The Cases. Since they are newspaper stories and reporters must give all the details in each story, some of the information is repetitive if there are several stories about the same case. That is not what I expected this book to be. I thought Connelly would write about stories he covered as a reporter. In reading the stories, you can definitely see the story lines for some of Connelly's books. You also see how he developed his writing style. As a reporter, he tells a straight forward story without embellishment. He does the same thing in his books, which I love. I prefer linear writing to foreshadowing and most writers use way too many adjectives. The final 10 pages of the book are "The Novelist as Reporter" written by Michael Carlson. In this section, Carlson talks about Connelly's development from a reporter to a novelist. I was surprised to read that Carlson has written about Connelly for other publications. I love his books, but didn't know that people were writing about him.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kurt

    This is a collection of some of Connelly's journalism in Florida and Los Angeles, from a time before he started writing novels. For devoted Connelly fans, it holds its curiosities (I've read all four existing Lincoln Lawyer novels and the first three Harry Bosch novels), as many elements of real crimes and characters surface in Connelly's novels. On the whole, though, it is rather mundane, one article after another of someone getting robbed or murdered with enough words to cover the facts and el This is a collection of some of Connelly's journalism in Florida and Los Angeles, from a time before he started writing novels. For devoted Connelly fans, it holds its curiosities (I've read all four existing Lincoln Lawyer novels and the first three Harry Bosch novels), as many elements of real crimes and characters surface in Connelly's novels. On the whole, though, it is rather mundane, one article after another of someone getting robbed or murdered with enough words to cover the facts and elevate the style a little, but not enough words for Connelly to really let his gifts shine. One chapter, a series of articles to document a crime that became an execution that became a civil suit against the police department, even shows the same details turning up in each story with only a few new sentences, making it a very easy chapter to skim with mild frustration. The strategically brilliant afterword, by another author pointing out what the reader should have noticed in the monotonous pages of the collection, does highlight some details that I hadn't noticed, but it's not enough to make me want to read the book again or recommend it. This is only for die-hard Connelly fans or for people who just can't stop reading the crime articles in their local newspapers.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jan

    For me no one beats Michael Connelly for writing the absolute best police procedural/crime novels. I can't get enough of his Harry Bosch series, and eagerly await each new book in the series-which I usually read within days of its publication. But this collection of Connelly's columns from the 1980s that covers crimes in Florida and Los Angeles were, if I'm going to be honest, pretty dry and a bit boring. These columns are nothing like a Harry Bosch novel. Just the facts ma'am, as Detective Joe For me no one beats Michael Connelly for writing the absolute best police procedural/crime novels. I can't get enough of his Harry Bosch series, and eagerly await each new book in the series-which I usually read within days of its publication. But this collection of Connelly's columns from the 1980s that covers crimes in Florida and Los Angeles were, if I'm going to be honest, pretty dry and a bit boring. These columns are nothing like a Harry Bosch novel. Just the facts ma'am, as Detective Joe Friday used to say on Dragnet. And since there are follow-ups to the cases that Connelly is reporting on, we get those too, with all the previous info that we already knew repeated again. Sometimes there are two follow-up stories, so you end up saying, "jeez, I've already read all this twice before, now I have to read it again?" So yeah, not exactly thrilling reading. Did I mention I can't wait for the next Harry Bosch novel?

  16. 5 out of 5

    Grey Ghost

    I got this one as an audio book, which did not add to my enjoyment. A great disappointment, as this book is basically a reprint of Connolly's old newspaper articles about each of these cases, with little or no new information or insight. In addition, that fact means that there is a lot of repetition in each chapter as it appears that Connolly hasn't bothered to edit out the redundancies inherent in news articles printed about the same case on different days. To add insult to injury, the guy who r I got this one as an audio book, which did not add to my enjoyment. A great disappointment, as this book is basically a reprint of Connolly's old newspaper articles about each of these cases, with little or no new information or insight. In addition, that fact means that there is a lot of repetition in each chapter as it appears that Connolly hasn't bothered to edit out the redundancies inherent in news articles printed about the same case on different days. To add insult to injury, the guy who read the audiobook had a slight, somewhat offputting accent and sometimes slurred a little, as if he had been drinking. Save your money. If you really want to read it, pick it up at the local library - but I think you'll be disappointed, especially if you're a fan of Harry Bosch and Connolly's other fiction.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ally

    Having read most of Connelly's fiction books and loving them, I was initially quite excited to find out more about Connelly as a reporter, and hoped to gain some insight into how he started and where he got his insipiration. In some respects I suppose this book met that aim, in that you can see some brief glimpses into how Connelly uses his experience as a crime beat reporter to develop his characters and plots in his novels. However I really struggled to finish the book, and only really carried Having read most of Connelly's fiction books and loving them, I was initially quite excited to find out more about Connelly as a reporter, and hoped to gain some insight into how he started and where he got his insipiration. In some respects I suppose this book met that aim, in that you can see some brief glimpses into how Connelly uses his experience as a crime beat reporter to develop his characters and plots in his novels. However I really struggled to finish the book, and only really carried on out of respect for Connelly as an author. I found the articles in the book too repetitive, and without the huamn insights or flair of Connelly's other work. Overall, quite disappointing.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Only took a few hours to breeze through this one. Mainly just repeats of his newspaper stories when he was a crime reporter in FL and CA. (I'd be ticked off if I had paid retail for the book--I'm a fan but not a fanboy) Still, I found it interesting to see elements of his real life crime stories show up in his novels. Some stories are really interesting and some not so much. Worth a read if you can check it out from a friend or library. Not so much if you have to buy.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Anastasia

    Crime Beat by Michael Connelly is a collection of reports and articles from his time as a crime reporter and which provided the inspiration for his novels. It was interesting to read about the various crimes, some of which were never solved unlike in fiction. His novels though are much more exciting and satisfying. Crime Beat although interesting was quite tedious and repetitive in places.

  20. 4 out of 5

    William

    The very early days of Michael Connolly as a reporter. This book only for die-hard fans who want to see his development from hack to adequate writer. The good stuff comes much later than you see in this book though.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Shea Ivy

    Overall I liked this collection, but one qualm I did have was with the choice to include multiple pieces on the same subject (whether it was a particular crime, incident, offender, etc.) in one chapter, which made reading very similar information over and over again a little boring. Often when journalists cover a crime story, the "facts of the case" (can we tell I work in a legal setting yet?) remain fairly consistent, and all of the back story is rehashed up to the point of reporting. It was in Overall I liked this collection, but one qualm I did have was with the choice to include multiple pieces on the same subject (whether it was a particular crime, incident, offender, etc.) in one chapter, which made reading very similar information over and over again a little boring. Often when journalists cover a crime story, the "facts of the case" (can we tell I work in a legal setting yet?) remain fairly consistent, and all of the back story is rehashed up to the point of reporting. It was interesting to see subtle changes in a fact here or there, but for the most part, the pieces remained uniform in each chapter, which made it a little trying to read all of them.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Rach A

    The book is very, very repetitious and plain in text, as it is non-fiction and written by a reporter. So if those styles do not suit you, I suggest skipping this book. However, the insight to the 80s/90s of police work and battles they faced are similar to what are current in times. It did not take me more than a few days to finish this book and I would suggest reading it if you picked it up at a library or from a discount retailer. Keep an open mind and don't expect an award winning masterpiece The book is very, very repetitious and plain in text, as it is non-fiction and written by a reporter. So if those styles do not suit you, I suggest skipping this book. However, the insight to the 80s/90s of police work and battles they faced are similar to what are current in times. It did not take me more than a few days to finish this book and I would suggest reading it if you picked it up at a library or from a discount retailer. Keep an open mind and don't expect an award winning masterpiece. It is a simple read with interesting bits and pieces.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Be forewarned that this is not a novel or an autobiography. It is a collection of Connelly's news articles from his time as a journalist at the Florida Sun-Sentinel and the Los Angeles Times. In the articles, you can see the bones and foundation of Connelly's Harry Bosch novels, and I got a sense of Connelly finding the voice that eventually emerged in his fiction work. Certainly a must for Connelly completists. If your relationship with Connelly and Bosch are more casual, your mileage may vary.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Alan Teder

    Connelly Non-Fiction 1984-1992 Review of the Little, Brown & Co. hardcover (2006) Crime Beat collects a selection of writer Michael Connelly's crime reporting for the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel and the Los Angeles Times from the time before he began a successful crime fiction writing career with the release of The Black Echo (1992). The book is organized by themes such as Cops, Killers, and Cases, rather than chronologically. It conveys how Connelly was always building a human & character story Connelly Non-Fiction 1984-1992 Review of the Little, Brown & Co. hardcover (2006) Crime Beat collects a selection of writer Michael Connelly's crime reporting for the Fort Lauderdale Sun-Sentinel and the Los Angeles Times from the time before he began a successful crime fiction writing career with the release of The Black Echo (1992). The book is organized by themes such as Cops, Killers, and Cases, rather than chronologically. It conveys how Connelly was always building a human & character story into his straight crime writing, which is the feature that has continued into his fiction writing. I did not notice any particular inspiration for the later Harry Bosch novels, except for a case that was slightly similar to Trunk Music - Harry Bosch #5 (1997).

  25. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

    Very Well written. This Is a collection criminal news articles spanning 10 years. They are random. If you enjoy these types of stories for what they are, you will enjoy this. It’s an interesting selection of different types of crimes, victims and defendants. Some are sympathetic. Some are heartless. If you enjoy true crime stories, you will like these. If you want more involved drawn out stories, this may disappoint. I was fascinated in part because I don’t recall most news articles being this i Very Well written. This Is a collection criminal news articles spanning 10 years. They are random. If you enjoy these types of stories for what they are, you will enjoy this. It’s an interesting selection of different types of crimes, victims and defendants. Some are sympathetic. Some are heartless. If you enjoy true crime stories, you will like these. If you want more involved drawn out stories, this may disappoint. I was fascinated in part because I don’t recall most news articles being this involved. They are more like mini true crime scripts for a TV series. I enjoyed it for what it is. It doesn’t seem fair to dock points because it’s simple. It’s done well. 3.5.

  26. 4 out of 5

    AKT

    What a shame that as a thriller fan I just found out about Michael Connely’s novels. Obviously, I love murder stories, forensics, detectives. I am fascinated with the gripping anticipation and the drama between the victim and the perpetrator. But this is not crime drama, this is all real. The crime cases, the detective jobs, the narration of each story with the victims and the villains, this created a story of each fight for justice. Well-written that I promised myself to buy more of his novels.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sonny

    I really enjoy Michael Connelly's crime novels. About the best I ever read. I guess that was why I was so disappointed in this book. Now, I knew going in that this was not a novel but a book based on crimes he had covered as a journalist. As it turns out, these are mostly just reprinted newspaper articles about crimes committed in Florida and California. Mostly (if not entirely) verbatim. And to top it off they are not very interesting articles at that. Even though this book was a disappointment to I really enjoy Michael Connelly's crime novels. About the best I ever read. I guess that was why I was so disappointed in this book. Now, I knew going in that this was not a novel but a book based on crimes he had covered as a journalist. As it turns out, these are mostly just reprinted newspaper articles about crimes committed in Florida and California. Mostly (if not entirely) verbatim. And to top it off they are not very interesting articles at that. Even though this book was a disappointment to me, I am still a big Michael Connelly fan and look forward to reading his other novels.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amy "the book-bat"

    Due to the nature of the book being a collection of newspaper article collected from Connelly's time as a crime reporter, there is a lot of repetition, which kind of bogs down the flow of the writing and becomes a bit boring. If some of the repetition could have been edited out, it might have been a 4 star read. I thought the cases were interesting overall.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Margaret Sankey

    This is a collection of Connelly's work for South Florida newspapers and the LA Times on the crime beat--spare, journalistic accounts of human tragedy, a lot of it still unsolved. While the pieces themselves are frustrating in their bare bones, it is easy to see why Connelly finds novelization to be a satisfying closure, and precisely where the inspiration for a lot of the Bosch cases comes from.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Harry

    I'm amazed at the crimes people get away with. The sheer number makes it difficult to hold people to justice. It is also eye opening how one crime affects so many people-civilian and law officers.

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