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We live in a time of relentless change. The only thing that's certain is that new challenges and opportunities will emerge that are virtually unimaginable today. How can we know which skills will be required to succeed? In Five Minds for the Future, bestselling author Howard Gardner shows how we will each need to master "five minds" that the fast-paced future will demand: · We live in a time of relentless change. The only thing that's certain is that new challenges and opportunities will emerge that are virtually unimaginable today. How can we know which skills will be required to succeed? In Five Minds for the Future, bestselling author Howard Gardner shows how we will each need to master "five minds" that the fast-paced future will demand: · The disciplined mind, to learn at least one profession, as well as the major thinking (science, math, history, etc.) behind it · The synthesizing mind, to organize the massive amounts of information and communicate effectively to others · The creating mind, to revel in unasked questions—and uncover new phenomena and insightful apt answers · The respectful mind, to appreciate the differences between human beings - and understand and work with all persons · The ethical mind, to fulfill one's responsibilities as both a worker and a citizen Without these "minds," we risk being overwhelmed by information, unable to succeed in the workplace, and incapable of the judgment needed to thrive both personally and professionally. Complete with a substantial new introduction, Five Minds for the Future provides valuable tools for those looking ahead to the next generation of leaders - and for all of us striving to excel in a complex world. Howard Gardner—cited by Foreign Policy magazine as one of the one hundred most influential public intellectuals in the world, and a MacArthur Fellowship recipient—is the Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.


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We live in a time of relentless change. The only thing that's certain is that new challenges and opportunities will emerge that are virtually unimaginable today. How can we know which skills will be required to succeed? In Five Minds for the Future, bestselling author Howard Gardner shows how we will each need to master "five minds" that the fast-paced future will demand: · We live in a time of relentless change. The only thing that's certain is that new challenges and opportunities will emerge that are virtually unimaginable today. How can we know which skills will be required to succeed? In Five Minds for the Future, bestselling author Howard Gardner shows how we will each need to master "five minds" that the fast-paced future will demand: · The disciplined mind, to learn at least one profession, as well as the major thinking (science, math, history, etc.) behind it · The synthesizing mind, to organize the massive amounts of information and communicate effectively to others · The creating mind, to revel in unasked questions—and uncover new phenomena and insightful apt answers · The respectful mind, to appreciate the differences between human beings - and understand and work with all persons · The ethical mind, to fulfill one's responsibilities as both a worker and a citizen Without these "minds," we risk being overwhelmed by information, unable to succeed in the workplace, and incapable of the judgment needed to thrive both personally and professionally. Complete with a substantial new introduction, Five Minds for the Future provides valuable tools for those looking ahead to the next generation of leaders - and for all of us striving to excel in a complex world. Howard Gardner—cited by Foreign Policy magazine as one of the one hundred most influential public intellectuals in the world, and a MacArthur Fellowship recipient—is the Hobbs Professor of Cognition and Education at the Harvard Graduate School of Education.

30 review for Five Minds for the Future

  1. 5 out of 5

    ☘Misericordia☘ ~ The Serendipity Aegis ~ ⚡ϟ⚡ϟ⚡⛈ ✺❂❤❣

    So, there are bunch of ways to think: Respectful, disciplinary, synthetizing, creative, ethical, respectful - ones. Not too groundbreaking or reality-shattering or anything. An interesting fast read with a lot of bland text in-between the good pieces.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Richard

    Gardner, famous for his theory of Multiple Intelligences (the shocking (not really!) idea that genius is more than math and verbal, and that standardized tests such as the IQ and SAT ignore this reality), suggests a paradigm for 21st century education based on 5 cognitive abilities. Just as with his MI theory, Gardner's Five Minds doesn't strike the reader as anything new or revolutionary as you are reading it: his is the sort of genius that sneaks up on you. Yet he has neatly organized and deli Gardner, famous for his theory of Multiple Intelligences (the shocking (not really!) idea that genius is more than math and verbal, and that standardized tests such as the IQ and SAT ignore this reality), suggests a paradigm for 21st century education based on 5 cognitive abilities. Just as with his MI theory, Gardner's Five Minds doesn't strike the reader as anything new or revolutionary as you are reading it: his is the sort of genius that sneaks up on you. Yet he has neatly organized and delineated what are to some extent common-sense thoughts in a society that has drifted away from such ideas in its education policies. Gardner's five minds are: 1. disciplinary - mastery over a period of 10+ years of one school of thought, amid a broad liberal education (that one should know "a little about everything and a lot about one thing") 2. synthesizing - the ability to think laterally, integrating cross-disciplinary knowledge into theories, metaphors, narratives, taxonomies, connections 3. creating - maintaining and harnessing the childlike creativity into the adult world of disciplinary and professional fields 4. respectful - being aware of personal and cultural differences and having a right mind towards a multicultural society 5. ethical - behaving in a just manner None of these categories is ground-breaking in and of itself, but the assertion of these 5 as a schema for education and thinking as an adult is intriguing. The appendix sets out in sketchy detail how these might be implemented across various levels of education and in different stages of life; I'm sure others will surely fill in the details.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hope Harris-Gayles

    This book was ok. I think the major lesson is that heavy academics should have journalists co-write or ghost write for them (ala Steven Levitt with Freakonomics). Gardner's thesis is sound, and I think he makes a good point for the types of minds we'll need in the future. But I think rather than a 167 page book, we would have all been better served by a nice 5-10 page article. My advice: read the cliff notes or find an article he's written about this. The ideas are worth knowing, but the book is This book was ok. I think the major lesson is that heavy academics should have journalists co-write or ghost write for them (ala Steven Levitt with Freakonomics). Gardner's thesis is sound, and I think he makes a good point for the types of minds we'll need in the future. But I think rather than a 167 page book, we would have all been better served by a nice 5-10 page article. My advice: read the cliff notes or find an article he's written about this. The ideas are worth knowing, but the book is not worth reading.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Rhesa

    Howard Gardner, a Harvard Jewish professor of psychology, is famous of his "Multiple Intelligences" theory, in his book "Intelligence Reframed" published in 1999, he outlines 8 types of intelligence: 1] Linguistic: Ability to talk, write & do public communication 2] Logic-Mathematic: Ability to think systematically-logically & chronologically 3] Visual-Spatial: Ability to think & work through the medium of images 4] Musical: You know what it means... 5] Kinesthetic: ability to use body to achieve so Howard Gardner, a Harvard Jewish professor of psychology, is famous of his "Multiple Intelligences" theory, in his book "Intelligence Reframed" published in 1999, he outlines 8 types of intelligence: 1] Linguistic: Ability to talk, write & do public communication 2] Logic-Mathematic: Ability to think systematically-logically & chronologically 3] Visual-Spatial: Ability to think & work through the medium of images 4] Musical: You know what it means... 5] Kinesthetic: ability to use body to achieve something remarkable, eq: athletes & comedian 6] Inter-personal: Ability to work effectively with other people, having empathy & understands people's inner motivation & need. eq: Religious leaders & politicians [are thet really do? hmm..:] 7] Intra-personal: Ability to do critical self reflection, eq: Philosopher & thinker 8] Natural: Ability to appreciate & conserve nature Here in this book (Five Minds of the Future- 2007), Gardner advances his idea by giving preposition that based on his multiple intelligences theory and the context of our present complex reality, he outlines 5 kinds of mind critical for the future, they are: 1] Disciplinary Mind - A mastery of a particular branch of knowledge. It's interesting when he said niormally it takles 10 years for somebody to have a litle grasp of mastery of his chosen field 2] Synthesizing Mind. Ability to synthezise many kinds of ideas from many disciplines to a whole integrated unity. 3] Creating Mind - Ability to create new ideas & questions, ability to bring clarity of complicated manners. 4] Respectful Mind - an awareness and appreciation of "the other" or the differences among man. (how many stupid public figure made a stupid racial joke in front of the public and later regret it?) 5] Ethical Mind - an ability to fulfill responsibility as fellow man & citizen I find this book is interesting, well laid out and argued, bit boring sometimes though, while it's not fantastic or ground breaking, it's good overall, I appreciate that Gardner includes ethical & respectful thinking into his description. I reckon schools (elementary to high school) might adopt this kind of cognitive map into their system, and human relations manager might also need to read this one .

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tricia

    Such an interesting read. I’ve been chewing on many of his points in the first few chapters about the disciplined mind, synthesizing mind, and creative mind. Once he gets into the respectful mind and the ethical mind it became increasing clear that the worldview directs that trajectory. This is the first book I’ve read focusing on modern education and a view toward the future. I was intrigued by his positive outlook of globalization and the Internet age (since so much of what I read about it is Such an interesting read. I’ve been chewing on many of his points in the first few chapters about the disciplined mind, synthesizing mind, and creative mind. Once he gets into the respectful mind and the ethical mind it became increasing clear that the worldview directs that trajectory. This is the first book I’ve read focusing on modern education and a view toward the future. I was intrigued by his positive outlook of globalization and the Internet age (since so much of what I read about it is negative, cautionary, or minimizing). I don’t endorse all of his ideas but I respect and appreciate what he’s doing in the book.

  6. 5 out of 5

    David

    This book is being categorized as Leadership and I have seen it shelved with the business books. In this book, in particular its description of the Respectful and Ethical minds, Gardner straddles a middle ground between developmental psychology (he cites Erik Erikson as a mentor and hero) and what used to be called civics. It addresses the skills that are necessary for success - discipline, some form of creativity, deep literacy in the tools of our profession - but just as importantly Gardner lo This book is being categorized as Leadership and I have seen it shelved with the business books. In this book, in particular its description of the Respectful and Ethical minds, Gardner straddles a middle ground between developmental psychology (he cites Erik Erikson as a mentor and hero) and what used to be called civics. It addresses the skills that are necessary for success - discipline, some form of creativity, deep literacy in the tools of our profession - but just as importantly Gardner looks at how these skills (or lack of) play out in certain social and professional settings, and encourages us to ask, Who do we want to be in order to fulfill these roles in a manner that serves more than our individual desires? I encountered several moments that reminded me of the need to cultivate my own talents plus the need to be aware of the consequences of failing to apply them ethically, responsibly and respectfully.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Begüm Saçak

    In this book, Howard Gardner, the creator of Multiple Intelligences idea, comes up with new types of intelligences that are essential to succeed in our modern world. These intelligences or minds seem more like macro intelligences compared to some other types of intelligence models he proposed earlier (musical, kinesthetic etc.). In other words, these intelligences seem like ways of thinking or approaches that all people can adopt and cultivate with some effort: disciplinary mind, synthesizing mi In this book, Howard Gardner, the creator of Multiple Intelligences idea, comes up with new types of intelligences that are essential to succeed in our modern world. These intelligences or minds seem more like macro intelligences compared to some other types of intelligence models he proposed earlier (musical, kinesthetic etc.). In other words, these intelligences seem like ways of thinking or approaches that all people can adopt and cultivate with some effort: disciplinary mind, synthesizing mind, creating mind, respectful mind, and ethical mind. The types of intelligences offered in this book might sound like cliches, but in reality, once you read the examples and think about your own life and workplace, it is possible to see how important to cultivate and practice these mindsets for a better future of knowledge and humanity. This book also makes you question your own life, your abilities, and how well you serve to the needs of the community by employing these habits of mind. This book should be read primarily by educators, and also by those who aspire to be better citizens.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Sierra The Book Addict

    This book gives an interesting perspective on one man's ideas of the mind, and how we use it intellectually, how he considered that we use the five minds, to not only benefit one's future but to use it in situations that are not just ours. It gives a modern perspective on how we should use the information to make us think more into the future. I found this book to be quite interesting, and it gave me a perspective of the future and how to use my mind differently.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Simon Traynor

    If your going to research Gardner, PLEASE START HERE! I don't think Gardner ever intended his multiple intelligence theory to get so out of hand! Perhaps he tried to reach an audience of business CEO's, psychiatrists and counselors, yet it was teachers who accepted him and that's where it got out of hand. Teachers can be terrible students; rather than thinking about the content of a classroom in which they find themselves (in this case Gardner's previous books), they tend to focus on how they wo If your going to research Gardner, PLEASE START HERE! I don't think Gardner ever intended his multiple intelligence theory to get so out of hand! Perhaps he tried to reach an audience of business CEO's, psychiatrists and counselors, yet it was teachers who accepted him and that's where it got out of hand. Teachers can be terrible students; rather than thinking about the content of a classroom in which they find themselves (in this case Gardner's previous books), they tend to focus on how they would teach the content and improve it. That is where multiple intelligences became a monster that lead to classrooms, schools and ultimately districts trying to be innovative and effective by teaching each lesson through each of Gardner's intelligences...all the time! WPHEW! That's exhausting! Teachers and administrators didn't have time to read all of Gardner's material. They ended up taking the most exciting bits and transforming classrooms into entertaining circuses of information which, while they may appear to engage more students, may actually be contributing--in part--to a world of over-stimulation. We forget to teach children how to chill out and just listen. We don't allot time to process or decompress information. Rather, information gets presented over and over again in a shiny new medium for all the visual learners, and then through an even louder medium for all the auditory learners, and then in a skit for all the tactile learners, and in a field trip through the woods for all the natural learners...and on and on. This book appears to say to those loyal followers of Gardner, "Hey! Take it easy!" Taking a step back from twelve intelligences to 5 'minds', Gardner decides to give teachers, who already have too much to do, a smaller book they can read through during their preps. Either that, or he just quickly pumped out another 'theory' and scribbled it into book to make a quick buck. In either case. I think he's a genius and this was a much needed refresher on Gardner.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Richard Stephenson

    Pros: Good detail and evidence of research on the supposedly well defined different intelligences that have been observed through the ages. (Mostly) well written, decently presented, and (as always) I appreciated the audiobook format. Cons: A little dense at times though this was expected given the nature and presentation of this book. Very light on “take-away” information as I found myself simply agreeing with the author’s conclusions as opposed to making notes on how to improve my life (my expe Pros: Good detail and evidence of research on the supposedly well defined different intelligences that have been observed through the ages. (Mostly) well written, decently presented, and (as always) I appreciated the audiobook format. Cons: A little dense at times though this was expected given the nature and presentation of this book. Very light on “take-away” information as I found myself simply agreeing with the author’s conclusions as opposed to making notes on how to improve my life (my expectations obviously too high for this book). I also have a bit of a qualm with the lack of any real focus put on a “new mind” or “over-shadowing mind” that might encompass, influence, and form these minds he presents… namely, the spiritual. His theories have a static air about them and don’t seem to take into account time, progression, and “self-actualization”. Assessment: I probably wouldn’t read it again and wouldn’t recommend a retail buy for this one. Borrow or bargain store – go for it. I made a blog post, too: http://richardstep.com/2010/07/02/rev...

  11. 4 out of 5

    Ilya Mrz

    “disciplined,”“synthesizing,”“creative,”“respectful” and “ethical. Take-Aways People use many different ways of thinking to solve everyday problems. As societies change, certain thinking capacities become more important. Currently, the forces of globalization, rapid scientific progress and technological innovation are increasing the demand for five specific forms of thought. These five forms are “disciplined,”“synthesizing,”“creative,”“respectful” and “ethical.” People need deep knowledge of at least o “disciplined,”“synthesizing,”“creative,”“respectful” and “ethical. Take-Aways People use many different ways of thinking to solve everyday problems. As societies change, certain thinking capacities become more important. Currently, the forces of globalization, rapid scientific progress and technological innovation are increasing the demand for five specific forms of thought. These five forms are “disciplined,”“synthesizing,”“creative,”“respectful” and “ethical.” People need deep knowledge of at least one “discipline” or specialty. In addition, everyone should be familiar with the major disciplines, such as science and art. People need the ability to synthesize information. Creativity is becoming more important in the workplace. In an increasingly diverse world, respectfulness is critical to success. People must learn to act ethically and in accordance with the norms of their professions. Each form of thought has a “pseudo form” that you must guard against.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Muslim

    The amazing think about this book is that all the necessary qualities about the quintet minds are featured precisely and models are portrayed for all professional fields. It represents all the crucial ways to implement them as well. The book is about five different minds for the future that are needed for the individuals in the this fast-changing modern world in order to maximize gains and cultivate a very successfull society. Be it disciplined, synthesizing, creating, respectful, or ethical mind The amazing think about this book is that all the necessary qualities about the quintet minds are featured precisely and models are portrayed for all professional fields. It represents all the crucial ways to implement them as well. The book is about five different minds for the future that are needed for the individuals in the this fast-changing modern world in order to maximize gains and cultivate a very successfull society. Be it disciplined, synthesizing, creating, respectful, or ethical mind, individuals must learn to adopt them and incorporate them into their lives whether they are working in a company, university, or any other place. I recommend this book only for those who are reseachers or those who are engaged in studying for the purposes related to higher education because it neither a self-help book nor is it an easy one to everyone.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Claudia

    Maybe it was because I read this in one-hour chunks, but I never felt Gardner's passion for his five minds...I can see this as an extension of his multiple intelligences, and this concept really fits my thinking better than MI did...just kind of luke warm...His five minds, disciplined, synthesizing, creating, respectful and ethical, are vital for all of us. This is the goal of a quality education -- to create people who are disciplined, creative, respectful and ethical. His stories didn't resona Maybe it was because I read this in one-hour chunks, but I never felt Gardner's passion for his five minds...I can see this as an extension of his multiple intelligences, and this concept really fits my thinking better than MI did...just kind of luke warm...His five minds, disciplined, synthesizing, creating, respectful and ethical, are vital for all of us. This is the goal of a quality education -- to create people who are disciplined, creative, respectful and ethical. His stories didn't resonate with me, somehow; I felt like he could have said it all in what is his epilogue...maybe this wasn't a book, but a really long article. But, when you're Howard Gardner, you can write the book...

  14. 5 out of 5

    Amaury Sautour

    I like the way Gardner presents the 5 described minds. This book kind of gives you the incentive to go beyond simply "attending" your life: curiosity, ethics, creativity, knowledge, it doesn't just come in a second, it can be a life long experience that requires effort, but the effort is worth the pain. You need to be an active member of your world, need to be aware of the people around you and far away from you. Give away selfishness and be a 21st century human being!

  15. 5 out of 5

    JP

    Howard Garner articulates a call to action that we prioritize five types of thinking he sees as critical for success in the modern world. They are: discipline, synthesis, creativity, respect, and ethics. Gardner's case is compelling.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cone

    Interesting look at different aspects of the mind that should be developed in order to become a fully functional and successful member of today's society.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    I decided to read something out of my comfort zone (science), so I went to the beginning of the Dewey Decimal section of my local library and found this book. I got lucky. This is by the man who came up with the theory of multiple intelligences. Unlike that idea which describes innate abilities, this book recommends the best types of use of the mind for the future. The five minds are: 1) Disciplined - expertise in a field 2) Synthesizing - relating known material from many fields 3) Creating - gene I decided to read something out of my comfort zone (science), so I went to the beginning of the Dewey Decimal section of my local library and found this book. I got lucky. This is by the man who came up with the theory of multiple intelligences. Unlike that idea which describes innate abilities, this book recommends the best types of use of the mind for the future. The five minds are: 1) Disciplined - expertise in a field 2) Synthesizing - relating known material from many fields 3) Creating - generating new ideas 4) Respectful - considering and appreciating others points of view 5) Ethical - considering your actions with respect to workplace, discipline, community, and world My summaries can do justice to the deep ideas discussed in the nook. Gardner makes clear arguments and includes technical ideas from psychology, but never talks down to the reader. You may not agree with every one of his points, but you must admire how he presents them. One bright spot in the book is the use of numerous specific examples to illustrate his points. I personal found a lot of connection with my own training as a chemist in terms especially for the first three. The last two, I found especially appropriate in my role as a teacher educator where it is crucial to produce respectful and ethical secondary school teachers. There are a plethora of ideas about why these five minds are important and how to nurture them through family life, education, and work place practices. One can not read the book without being challenged on some aspect of their world view on education, work, and citizenship. I love books that are about ideas and make me think, and Gardner writes in a way that is understandable, clear, and enlightening.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Dadon

    As an educator, this book proved me as highly informative and helpful in broadening our mindset especially to achieve real success at a workplace. ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Personally, I felt this book is a must read to help our future generation kids to have these below Five Minds to be humanely flexible and reaching when they grow up and contribute toward a successful and happy community wherever they grow and work: 1. The Disciplined Mind --> to apply oneself diligently and continue beyond formal education. As an educator, this book proved me as highly informative and helpful in broadening our mindset especially to achieve real success at a workplace. ~~~~~~~~~~~~ Personally, I felt this book is a must read to help our future generation kids to have these below Five Minds to be humanely flexible and reaching when they grow up and contribute toward a successful and happy community wherever they grow and work: 1. The Disciplined Mind --> to apply oneself diligently and continue beyond formal education. 2. The Synthesizing Mind --> to array crucial information that makes sense to self and others. 3. The Creating Mind --> to go beyond existing knowledge and syntheses. 4. The Respectful Mind --> to respond sympathetically and constructively. 5. and The Ethical Mind --> to strive toward good work and good citizenship. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ Howard further talks on how these five minds are failed to focus on due to several obstacles that human are scared to explore and test through. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ The writing is very direct, rich with examples and absorbing. Though the five minds are applicable in every work field, the book is basically based in a school system, how students should be made reliable and capable through these five minds. ~~~~~~~~~~~~~ I highly recommend this book to every teachers, trainers and supervisors out there. Hope you will learn something great as I did

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sandeep Gautam

    In this book, Gardner makes a case for the importance of five types of thinking or minds for the future: the disciplinary mind (putting in 10,000 hrs to master a discipline and its way of thinking) , the synthesizing mind ( interdisciplinary linkages) , creative mind ( new ways of thinking or modifying a domain), respectful mind (respecting others) and ethical mind (doing work that is good). Some chapters/minds are much more clear than others, which remain fuzzy and inchoate. For those who are i In this book, Gardner makes a case for the importance of five types of thinking or minds for the future: the disciplinary mind (putting in 10,000 hrs to master a discipline and its way of thinking) , the synthesizing mind ( interdisciplinary linkages) , creative mind ( new ways of thinking or modifying a domain), respectful mind (respecting others) and ethical mind (doing work that is good). Some chapters/minds are much more clear than others, which remain fuzzy and inchoate. For those who are interested in education policy/ workplace design, this book will provide good thinking fodder and clues to what needs to be done. The problematic aspects of Gradner's writing consist in the high moral ground that he appears to take- for eg. advising ostracism of people who are unable/ unwilling to cultivate the five minds. Also he thinks too much from societal perspective, assuming what is good for society is good for the individual. Overall a decent read that makes you think.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Nithesh

    Many reviews here have mentioned that this book might is a collection of obvious ideas. I beg to disagree. It is very important for those who seek to improve themselves. It is a vital guide to educationists, managers and business leaders. One needs to read and understand Gardener's case studies and arguments to appreciate the importance of discipline, ethics, respect, synthesis and creativity. I want to place a special focus on respect and ethics, two things that are missing in our workplaces, p Many reviews here have mentioned that this book might is a collection of obvious ideas. I beg to disagree. It is very important for those who seek to improve themselves. It is a vital guide to educationists, managers and business leaders. One needs to read and understand Gardener's case studies and arguments to appreciate the importance of discipline, ethics, respect, synthesis and creativity. I want to place a special focus on respect and ethics, two things that are missing in our workplaces, politics and general discourse. If these ideas were indeed obvious, why have we failed to incorporate them? In the Indian context, discipline, creativity and synthesis are far from reality as many kids are not able to satisfactorily read and write in any language. It is also important to deploy these ideas in the right context and setup. Otherwise, one might risk the possibility of poor or counterproductive results.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Stefan H.

    While there are some solid points to be found, I believe, the read itself is gratuitous. I find Gardner to have interesting psychological theories and philosophical conceptions, but - so help me, God - I don't believe I will ever read another book of his. As competently mentioned by other users, the work would have been better done as perhaps an article. Sure, I grant that the reading might be worth the tedium to understand the views and what he means by the types of minds; however, you could li While there are some solid points to be found, I believe, the read itself is gratuitous. I find Gardner to have interesting psychological theories and philosophical conceptions, but - so help me, God - I don't believe I will ever read another book of his. As competently mentioned by other users, the work would have been better done as perhaps an article. Sure, I grant that the reading might be worth the tedium to understand the views and what he means by the types of minds; however, you could likely find a competent knowledge in reading the first three pages of every chapter, save for the final. Chapter seven can be read in its entirety as it is a summary of what he posits, which demonstrates that the ideations themselves are fruitful. I'll attempt his work on multiple intelligences, but if it is anything like this, I am going to loathe reading it with every inkling of my being.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dawn Colclasure

    I enjoyed reading this book. It gave me a lot to think about. I also thought of how the five minds featured here are a part of a person at different stages of their life. My favorite quote from the book: “It is up to the educational system as a whole—the educational system and n the broadest sense—to ensure that the ensemble of minds is cultivated. In one sense, this is a job of synthesis—making sure that all five kinds of minds are developed. But equally, it is an ethical obligation: in the yea I enjoyed reading this book. It gave me a lot to think about. I also thought of how the five minds featured here are a part of a person at different stages of their life. My favorite quote from the book: “It is up to the educational system as a whole—the educational system and n the broadest sense—to ensure that the ensemble of minds is cultivated. In one sense, this is a job of synthesis—making sure that all five kinds of minds are developed. But equally, it is an ethical obligation: in the years ahead, societies will not survive—let alone thrive—unless as citizens we respect and cultivate the quintet of minds vaporized here.” (Page 165) I agree. Good book!

  23. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    Interesting take in how successful (by what measure exactly?) people will need to think and behave in the future. Chapters 5 and 6–the respectful and ethical minds—drifted too far into speculation. Everything before felt grounded. I also wonder about that definition of ethics in regards to Lincoln. I won’t spoil it here.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Faramarz Abedi

    IT is such a brilliant and must work that every member of a society eager to internalize development in any aspect of their current and future lives should take it from their bookshelves and put it beside their bed to read, sleep and wake up with.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jose Mari

    An great follow up to the idea about multiple intelligences and their synthesis.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Konrad Joseph

    I've never rated a book 39 pages in - but Gardner's discussion on what real intellect means in today's world is so refreshing. Maybe a bit depressing. But at least someone else agrees with me

  27. 5 out of 5

    Heather Nelson

    Could have easily been edited down to an article and saved a lot of repetition. Way too long to get the point across.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Lexi

    Very interesting. Mostly focused on how to encourage the different kinds of 'minds' in formal education but I think as adults we can build the same skills.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Herve Tunga

    Good starting point for a long lasting reflection on how to improve education to face the challenges of today and tomorrow.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Edy Chandra

    Inspiring

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