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In crime fiction traditionally England and London are the popular locations of the most devious criminals and the local scene is promoted by the local climate of fog, torrential rains, dark woods, and few local nuts like Jack the Ripper, that created the opposing myth of Sherlock Holms, Miss Marple and the imported Hercule Poirot. Even rivers like Thames, or austere buildi In crime fiction traditionally England and London are the popular locations of the most devious criminals and the local scene is promoted by the local climate of fog, torrential rains, dark woods, and few local nuts like Jack the Ripper, that created the opposing myth of Sherlock Holms, Miss Marple and the imported Hercule Poirot. Even rivers like Thames, or austere buildings like the London Tower, together with notorious political crimes like the beheading of a king after a popular revolution, a few queens and a prime minister and the murder of an archbishop have been used as fuel in the past to inspire fiction or historical writers to create world class novels, and promote an dark image similar to the Loch Ness monster generating revenues from tourists thrilled by dark mysteries, avenging ghosts, marauding hounds, poisonous snakes and ceremonial executions. After all these years it is logical and natural to expect that this scene will gradually fade away, as historical knowledge advance, and England is one of the safest tourist destinations with crime at a minimum. Gradually, readers are bound to recognize that historically there are other old cities and countries where Death had a much stronger presence through history. So for every reader of history it is well known that other cities like Rome and Constantinople are by far better suited locations for crime novels. Indeed, if few dead bodies have been damped into Thames for stealthy disposal, Tiber and Bosporus have been used as makeshift cemeteries for thousands of years. If few avenging ghosts have been haunting few old castles, how many more troubled souls must be lurking around the Great Walls of Constantinople, where Christianity fought off for many centuries barbaric tribes, or Muslim invaders? If Henry the VIII had six wives and few concubines, he is an immature adolescent playboy compared to Sultan Ibrahim the Mad who had several wives and one thousand concubines. How can few executions or murders of nobles and statesmen can compare with hundreds of similar crimes of disposals through all the years that the Roman, the Byzantine or the Ottoman Empire existed? A single Ottoman Sultan, Selim the Grim executed seven of his prime ministers, called Grand Viziers, few even by his own hand. How in term of violence can a beheading of a British King in the London Tower compare with several ceremonial strangulation of Sultans inside the Topkapi Palace, a testicle squeeze in Yedikule prison, or several Emperors' blinding in the Anema Prison? How can one compare the gruesome slaughter of few prostitutes by Jack with the execution of 30000 rebels in the Hippodrome by Emperor Justinian I, or 20000 Janissaries by Sultan Mahmud II? Sultan Mehmet III, for instance, executed in one night 19 brothers, whereas Selim the Grim and Suleiman the Magnificent murdered two of their own sons. It is also well known that Constantinople had been the city where Vlad Dracula the Impeller spent his childhood and received the greatest part of his education. Therefore, this author is well justified to have chosen Constantinople or Istanbul as the location of his new novel, that is closely connected with the so-called greatest crime of mankind, the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade. Few of the major villains have names and performed deeds similar with historical characters; however, the names have been mixed to augment mystery and suspense, not because the author has flanked the course of Byzantine history. If his style is a bit humorous, it is because he firmly believes that history is repeated only as a joke.


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In crime fiction traditionally England and London are the popular locations of the most devious criminals and the local scene is promoted by the local climate of fog, torrential rains, dark woods, and few local nuts like Jack the Ripper, that created the opposing myth of Sherlock Holms, Miss Marple and the imported Hercule Poirot. Even rivers like Thames, or austere buildi In crime fiction traditionally England and London are the popular locations of the most devious criminals and the local scene is promoted by the local climate of fog, torrential rains, dark woods, and few local nuts like Jack the Ripper, that created the opposing myth of Sherlock Holms, Miss Marple and the imported Hercule Poirot. Even rivers like Thames, or austere buildings like the London Tower, together with notorious political crimes like the beheading of a king after a popular revolution, a few queens and a prime minister and the murder of an archbishop have been used as fuel in the past to inspire fiction or historical writers to create world class novels, and promote an dark image similar to the Loch Ness monster generating revenues from tourists thrilled by dark mysteries, avenging ghosts, marauding hounds, poisonous snakes and ceremonial executions. After all these years it is logical and natural to expect that this scene will gradually fade away, as historical knowledge advance, and England is one of the safest tourist destinations with crime at a minimum. Gradually, readers are bound to recognize that historically there are other old cities and countries where Death had a much stronger presence through history. So for every reader of history it is well known that other cities like Rome and Constantinople are by far better suited locations for crime novels. Indeed, if few dead bodies have been damped into Thames for stealthy disposal, Tiber and Bosporus have been used as makeshift cemeteries for thousands of years. If few avenging ghosts have been haunting few old castles, how many more troubled souls must be lurking around the Great Walls of Constantinople, where Christianity fought off for many centuries barbaric tribes, or Muslim invaders? If Henry the VIII had six wives and few concubines, he is an immature adolescent playboy compared to Sultan Ibrahim the Mad who had several wives and one thousand concubines. How can few executions or murders of nobles and statesmen can compare with hundreds of similar crimes of disposals through all the years that the Roman, the Byzantine or the Ottoman Empire existed? A single Ottoman Sultan, Selim the Grim executed seven of his prime ministers, called Grand Viziers, few even by his own hand. How in term of violence can a beheading of a British King in the London Tower compare with several ceremonial strangulation of Sultans inside the Topkapi Palace, a testicle squeeze in Yedikule prison, or several Emperors' blinding in the Anema Prison? How can one compare the gruesome slaughter of few prostitutes by Jack with the execution of 30000 rebels in the Hippodrome by Emperor Justinian I, or 20000 Janissaries by Sultan Mahmud II? Sultan Mehmet III, for instance, executed in one night 19 brothers, whereas Selim the Grim and Suleiman the Magnificent murdered two of their own sons. It is also well known that Constantinople had been the city where Vlad Dracula the Impeller spent his childhood and received the greatest part of his education. Therefore, this author is well justified to have chosen Constantinople or Istanbul as the location of his new novel, that is closely connected with the so-called greatest crime of mankind, the sacking of Constantinople by the Fourth Crusade. Few of the major villains have names and performed deeds similar with historical characters; however, the names have been mixed to augment mystery and suspense, not because the author has flanked the course of Byzantine history. If his style is a bit humorous, it is because he firmly believes that history is repeated only as a joke.

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