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Here is the latest edition of the world's premier annual showcase of horror and dark fantasy fiction. This collection features some of the very best short stories and novellas by today's masters of the macabre — including such writers as Neil Gaiman, Glen Hirshberg, tanith Lee, ramsey Campbell and Charles Coleman Finlay. The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror also features th Here is the latest edition of the world's premier annual showcase of horror and dark fantasy fiction. This collection features some of the very best short stories and novellas by today's masters of the macabre — including such writers as Neil Gaiman, Glen Hirshberg, tanith Lee, ramsey Campbell and Charles Coleman Finlay. The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror also features the most comprehensive yearly overview of horror around the world, lists of useful contact addresses, and a fascinating necrology. It is the one book that is required reading for every fan of macabre fiction.


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Here is the latest edition of the world's premier annual showcase of horror and dark fantasy fiction. This collection features some of the very best short stories and novellas by today's masters of the macabre — including such writers as Neil Gaiman, Glen Hirshberg, tanith Lee, ramsey Campbell and Charles Coleman Finlay. The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror also features th Here is the latest edition of the world's premier annual showcase of horror and dark fantasy fiction. This collection features some of the very best short stories and novellas by today's masters of the macabre — including such writers as Neil Gaiman, Glen Hirshberg, tanith Lee, ramsey Campbell and Charles Coleman Finlay. The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror also features the most comprehensive yearly overview of horror around the world, lists of useful contact addresses, and a fascinating necrology. It is the one book that is required reading for every fan of macabre fiction.

30 review for Best New Horror 17

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kristine

    I couldn't put this book down for anything. When I was finished I was actually sad I'd reached the end of the book. This whole series will suck you in. Beware!! I couldn't put this book down for anything. When I was finished I was actually sad I'd reached the end of the book. This whole series will suck you in. Beware!!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Shawn

    This is a bit of an odd review for me as this was probably the very last book I read before I began reviewing everything on Goodreads. And so now, as I attempt to keep up with each year's new edition of TMBOBNH, I'm also trying to retroactively work-in reads or re-reads of earlier, un-reviewed volumes (and after that, big breath, doing the same for the Wagner series of YEAR'S BEST HORROR, not to mention catching up with the Datlow, which I'll initiate this year) so as to not be outpaced (I'd lik This is a bit of an odd review for me as this was probably the very last book I read before I began reviewing everything on Goodreads. And so now, as I attempt to keep up with each year's new edition of TMBOBNH, I'm also trying to retroactively work-in reads or re-reads of earlier, un-reviewed volumes (and after that, big breath, doing the same for the Wagner series of YEAR'S BEST HORROR, not to mention catching up with the Datlow, which I'll initiate this year) so as to not be outpaced (I'd like to get in 3 back volumes of MAMMOTH BOOK OF BEST NEW HORROR for each new volume, but that seems unlikely if I'm going to continue to read other things as well. So anyway, back to this volume. What I normally do when I read an anthology is check my extensive notes and skip reading any story that I noted as a definite "no", so as not to waste my time, but re-read everything else (okay up to excellent) as there's always the chance my tastes may have changed/matured/softened over time and those notes now cover a significant portion of my critical life, including periods when I was just finding my feet in certain areas which I now may have a stronger grasp on - plus, I want to generate a Goodreads review for the story. But, as I said, I read this volume within recent memory and so it's unlikely my tastes have changed too much *that* recently. So I decided to change things up a bit - not only did I not re-read the things I didn't like back in 2008 or so, I also didn't re-read the stories I judged just "okay", and so there won't be reviews for those either. Given that, I re-read 16 of the 22 stories here. 3 went up slightly in my estimation, while 2 moved down a notch. The "Year In", was, as I've noted before, equal parts frustrating and fascinating - such an unending welter of similar sounding horror works sure can be depressing. And, as usual, the reviews below are weakest to strongest (with the above caveat about the bottom line of "weakest" being foregone this volume), so skip ahead if you want to get to the good stuff,. Peter Atkins' "The Cubist Attorney" was one of those stories that slipped a notch (from "good but problematic" to "okay") on re-reading. A lawyer reads the will of a pretentious artists he met in passing years ago, dispensing odd, absurd holdings to the artist's equally pretentious triplet daughters, who are unfazed by the oddness. Then, there's a poetic ending that's not really much of an ending. I like poetically tilted stories with ambiguous endings as much as the next guy but this story seemed pretty anemic when taken as a whole. Brian Lumley's "The Taint" suffered a similar downgrade - it's a totally serviceable story, giving readers everything they require, but there's no spark in this extended tale, the umpteenth riff on H.P. Lovecraft's Deep Ones and "The Shadow Over Innsmouth". Here, a modern Innsmouth expatriate settles in a British fishing community, fathering a bright girl child and a misshapen, monstrous son. We pick up the story after the fact, with an elderly doctor trying to unravel the secrets of the girl and the man-brute and all, or pretty much all, is unwound as we'd expect. As I said, totally workmanlike and serviceable, but a little bland and boring . For those who absolutely crave a by-the-books Lovecraft pastiche, here it is, padding and all. Next, in the "good but somewhat flawed" category, we have three stories. David Herter's "Black And Green And Gold" starts with an academic recounting his time in Prague a few years before Communist rule ended, pursuing low-level research and doing low-level espionage when he's suddenly asked by what he thinks is a dissident group to meet with a very special personage in the catacombs under a cathedral. So far, so good and the story succeeds with atmosphere (gloomy, rainy, cold Prague) and mood (the furtive espionage angle comes across nicely) and the climax in the damp darkness is also effective... but, I'll be honest and say the "otherworldly" aspect is drawn a little too vaguely. (view spoiler)[Rusalka and water spirits (hide spoiler)] aside, just what it/their ultimate goals were was hard to fathom (pardon the pun). "One Of The Hungry Ones" by Holly Phillips is told from the damaged and addiction-hazed POV of a homeless young adult girl (not so much a hardened veteran as a "partied too far" free-spirit) who find herself interacting with a strange group of fashionable young people. The crowd occasionally invites her into decadent scenarios of excess, only to leave her back on the streets afterwards and she longs to crack the code of what she must do to gain their favor. This was a fine read for the first three-quarters (the author certainly seems to have either lived, or known people who have lived, a young life of sensuous intoxications) but I felt the ending let it down somewhat - we learn a little (not much, but a little) more than we (or at least I) needed to know about what's going on and then we get an ambiguous escape ending. Uneven - but I really enjoyed the majority of the story. Uneven is also an apt descriptor of Roberta Lannes' "The Other Family". This effective little story has two children, vacationing at the seaside with their parents, sneak out at night and help two other mysterious children of the neighborhood with some tasks. On returning home, they find their parents missing... Creepy, with good atmosphere and a fine, hopeless ending but here the uneven quality comes from the sometimes clunky writing. On to the unconditionally good stories: Tim Pratt's "Gulls" (which my horror short fiction podcast did a reading of, available here) is strong example of how you do nice, concise weirdness. A childless woman takes her young nephew to the public beach, where he strays beyond the fence that marks the private property section, host to a large family gathering. Creepy, effective and just the right, light strokes of character psychology and hint of subtext (the class concerns here strike me as very similar to those in Ramsey Campbell). Then there's "Glyphotech". If you told me you had a story that examined the creeping corporatization of our lives and minds using a horror tale metaphor lens, I'd be all over that, mostly because I did lots of temporary office work in the 80s and 90s and saw it all first-hand. Mark Samuels' story has a loyal company man refusing to participate in the corporation's strange new personality training seminars which seem coercive and sinister. The cultish brainwashing angles of these seminars is captured spot-on by Samuels and while I initially resisted the pulp tone of the writing, hoping for something a touch subtler, I warmed to it by the end. The main character's dialogue (stilted and overly formal after 20 years stationed in Japan) perhaps drew a *mite* too much attention to itself at times but it was also a canny writing choice, giving us a straightforward, conservative character resisting corporate power while not having him sound like a cliched teen rebel. On a different tack entirely is Gahan Wilson's "The Outermost Borough", where the famed macabre cartoonist does an extended black comic riff on the central conceit of "Pickman's Model" (or, perhaps more fittingly, an textual extension of his old single panel cartoon "I paint what I see"), giving us something like a horror version of James Thurber, filled with grotesques. "American Morons", meanwhile, is a very Richard Matheson-like spinning-out of a believable set-up (American travelers' car breaks down in Italy), adds a little real-world (Europe during the presidency of The Idiot Boy-King "W") and specific (inability to communicate with locals) uneasiness, builds suspense with some unnerving details (American travelers being killed and left in public places, screams coming from over the high-walled embankment by the road) and then let's fly. Effective and fun, almost like some strangely ominous European exploitation film. Clive Barker's "Haeckel's Tale" (which was adapted as an episode of MASTERS OF HORROR, iirc) was interesting, first off, as a chance to read a new piece of short fiction by a influential figure who mostly just turns out doorstop novels nowadays. Interesting also as a deliberately "old style" story, a tale related in a tavern of events occurring in the early 1800s. And interesting also as, despite the setting, Barker is still able to work in his major story concern, erotic horror. This tale of a student traveling cross country, who stops at a lonely cottage for shelter and uncovers a monstrous deal agreed upon between a doddering old woman, his voluptuous wife and a necromancer, an agreement which which involves the nearby cemetery, is a satisfying read. Ramsey Campbell hold one of his two slots in the book with "The Winner", where a music teacher retreats to a hellish seaside pub after the weather renders the ferry unusable, only to find a species of bar-flies and attendant cronies eager to question his every statement. Eventually, it becomes apparent that a dark and ominous event is planned for the mysterious competition they talk around and his attempts to flee by the rear door only take him further into the strange pull of whatever force it is the patrons serve, a force that extends beyond the place's immediate environs. A densely written study of (view spoiler)[the Siren myth (hide spoiler)] crossed with Campbell's always enjoyable urban horror approach. Well done. A moment now for an extended tangent about ambiguity in horror fiction, building out of a discussion of Adam L.G. Nevill's "Where Angels Come In". The use of ambiguity is an approach almost all horror stories utilize to some degree (in plot basics, for suspense and slow reveals), but there's a difference between that genre-tool level of ambiguity and a commitment to the use of ambiguity as a defining element. One way is the avoidance of the tidy resolution, instead gaining the cliff-hanger effect of the ambiguous ending - not so much regarding "fate", which is the easiest version, but more along the lines of character motivation. Here, the good writer will have planted strong resonance points throughout the story so that the ending sympathetically chimes off those carefully chosen preceding details, offering the reader a number of possible readings. But ambiguity of overall plot is an even-harder approach to master. Ramsey Campbell does this quite a bit and an extreme example can be seen in the work of Robert Aickman, whose stories are almost always baffling (but effective!) on first read and really require a slow, methodical re-read to fully crack their code. But the potential flaws in the ambiguous story approach are fairly obvious - it's easy to cheat and be lazy, if such a reading can even be said to apply in the subjective reading experience. But yes, cheat - ambiguity allows unfettered imagination to manifest because there's no need, nor need to fear, justifying your story details... because the story approach you're using isn't going to demand it in any way, so anything goes. You can manifest the visions of Hieronymus Bosch all you like, it's all going to end in a shrug anyway. But what of the poor reader? It's interesting to look at "Where Angels Come In" from this angle, as the basic story set-up is very easy to grasp. An English town suffers a long history of missing people, mostly children, the mystery of which seems to be tied to a very odd, old building fenced off from public access. One of the few escapees from this fate, a partially paralyzed boy, tells of his experiences inside that house - the rest of the story is flashback, with only a perfunctory return to the framing device for form's sake at the conclusion. What's funny here is that there *aren't* many resonances built into the story to explain what the boy and his friend find there - the child characters, while well-drawn, are not particularly deep (it is a short story, after all) and given the inexplicable sights experienced in the house, larger resonances in the outside world are vague. Instead, the author takes advantage of the ambiguity to stock the house with a wide variety of bizarre and sinister larvae, straight from Charles Nodier's SMARRA by way of SILENT HILL. So what makes the story work so effectively in this case is the basic writing skill - Nevill really has a knack for atmosphere (building the place up with rumors and urban school legends) and pacing/time control twinned with vibrant scene setting (particularly when the boys become trapped in the house by these inexplicable things - no two alike! - I realized that it's a very cinematic piece). Even when we know we can't get a satisfying ending to the larger mystery, and have no sense of deeper resonance, the story still succeeds on its writing (oddly, even with the "monster rally" plethora of strange creatures, I wouldn't really call it a "monster story"). Following on these thoughts on ambiguity is the excellent (if caveat-able) "Sickhouse Hospitality" by Terry Lamsley, pretty much a novella for all intents and purposes. A savvy if less-than-respectable man tracks down his "client", another less-than-respectable man, to a brand new, high-tech, sprawling and mysterious medical facility attached to an old hospital. Our main character nearly gets lost inside the near-empty complex before he finds his "friend", then discovers even greater mysteries involving strange plants, technology and many, many rats, as he's press-ganged into patient status as well. More mystery abounds in the less than caring medical treatment he receives, the strange status of other patients and in the occasional snatches of conversation he can grab, until a growing problem suddenly forces an evacuation... or does it? This is a very engaging story that is sure to annoy a certain type of reader - said reader would be one who doesn't like *any* ambiguity in plot outcome or plot detail, especially at this length. Said reader could even be me, under different circumstances, where the author doesn't do as good a job keeping things interesting or the story flowing along - I'd normally find such a strange accumulation of plot details that don't all add up to be either annoying, stylistically assumptive or just plain lazy (see previous paragraph) but here I found it did a good job of maintaining an unreal tone in what is a very prosaic (if cold, off-putting and sterile) setting. The story seems to be a reflection on state-run healthcare versus corporate healthcare and the creeping of the latter into the former in Great Britain, with all its promises of high-tech care and efficiency masking the expected corporate disinterest in actual human suffering and focus on only those who can afford its ministrations. The (view spoiler)[rat attack (hide spoiler)] ending was a nice "resurgence of the Victorian" and the last line leaves much to ponder (but likely never solve), resonating the ideas of vast conspiracies and the working class public as guinea pigs for the moneyed classes. Good stuff and quite drolly funny at times. There were three fully excellent stories here. Joe Hill's "Best New Horror" is, simply put, a masterpiece - not just because in some sense the main character is me (harried & slightly burned out horror short fiction editor still dedicated to quality despite the vicissitudes of the field), nor that it does a marvelous job spinning an engaging and plausible story, nor even because of the masterful downshift into tense, suspenseful thriller mode as it ascends to its climax - No, it's because of that psychologically brilliant and totally believable moment of conflicted exultation that it ends on. "La Peau Verte" by Caitlín R. Kiernan is a well-written tale of a young artist in the city who supplements her income when she gets a gig playing the absinthe-derived "Green Fairy" at a swanky party for the wealthy/powerful/mysterious (see also the previous "One Of The Hungry Ones"). This story strand is woven together with her therapy sessions, childhood memories featuring visions of fairies and her deceased older sister, and the artist's friendship with an older gay man. It's a nice bit of dark fantasy, not really horror, but very engaging. Finally, there's Ramsey Campbell's "The Decorations", a Christmas-themed story about a little boy and his recently divorced Mom visiting her parents for the holiday. Grandmother, unfortunately, is mentally unstable and fixated on her elaborate decorations, especially the hollow plastic light-up Santa on the roof, onto which she projects a lot of her paranoia. Campbell has a certain rhythm to his writing and he does a great job knotting up the tension derived from a child's fear and half-understanding (but slowly coming into focus) interactions with the inexplicable adult world. I found the ending particularly powerful, as it succeeds masterfully at the difficult to pull off "supernatural or psychological?" ending ((view spoiler)[I honestly feel it's intended to be the latter... or perhaps both... as our focus has been misdirected to the Grandmother so effectively, and the juvenile mindset so well captured, that the realization of paranoid schizophrenia as an inherited trait, possibly triggered by the climactic scene, hit me like a ton of bricks (hide spoiler)] ), a profoundly sad ending, at that. And that's it for this time round. Currently reading this year's edition, then I really need to take a break from horror fiction for a while... but probably won't.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    I'm a total sucker for anthologies. Maybe it's a short attention span. I really enjoyed this book. Most of the stories I wouldn't even call horror. There were some good old fashioned ghost stories. I especially liked a really creative ghost story about a haunted IKEA. I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks about creepy things in normal environments, "What if..." Some of the stories were straight out fantasy. They could definitely be called dark fantasy, but I wonder if they get classified as ho I'm a total sucker for anthologies. Maybe it's a short attention span. I really enjoyed this book. Most of the stories I wouldn't even call horror. There were some good old fashioned ghost stories. I especially liked a really creative ghost story about a haunted IKEA. I'm glad I'm not the only one who thinks about creepy things in normal environments, "What if..." Some of the stories were straight out fantasy. They could definitely be called dark fantasy, but I wonder if they get classified as horror to sound more serious, or something. Or maybe because they don't fit in "sword and sorcery" fantasy? These yearly books have some of the most creative stories around. Though the story they picked from Joe Hill (I had already read it in 20th Century Ghost) was not his best, nor the most creative. Horror movies should follow horror stories, not the other way around. The Joe Hill story in this book sounded like it was based on any one of a number of recent horror movies and they all sound the same. There's way too many movies out there that follow the "Saw" movie formula and it's so old. (P.S. I haven't seen any of the Saw movies, but I've read their summaries on TheMovieSpoiler.com and I just don't think they're that creative. So many of the stories in this book were way more creative than the "horror" movies that are out.) I need to write a little blurb about short stories. My mom says she hates short stories because she feels like they end just as she's getting interested. The thing I love about short stories is that I think it's a sign of great writing when someone can transport me completely to another world in so few pages. These stories had me escape to so many worlds. I also liked that there were so many international authors. Some of the places that I was transported to included little corners of British geography and culture that are fascinating because they're different in little ways that we take for granted. We don't notice our culture around us because we take it for granted that it's the way the world is. When I read from an author who is coming from small town life in Britain and they surround me with details and aspects of their culture, I feel like I've had a glimpse into a new and exotic place, despite our shared language and some history. Once again, though, I'm completely critical of the swearing in a few of the stories. I think it's distracting from the story and jars me out of the world that they've created and back into the mundane. I also wonder if it's a little contrived. Does the author think they have to throw in an f-word to prove that they're current and edgy? So, as much as I would love for my friends who are readers to experience some of these other worlds (and especially that haunted IKEA) I can't recommend the book because of the language in some of the stories.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bogdan

    The big name here had story that I didn`t like so much. But stil there are quite good ones. Like: The Cubist's Attorney by David Atkins - an attorney gets hold on a strange case. The Ball Room by China Mieville, Emma Bircham and Max Shaefer - something`s not natural in the ball room of the kids. Good text, not so surprising ideea. But scary, nevertheless. Pinkie by Elizabeth Massie - one of the best here- Is there anything that a brilliant pig can`t do? :) ) Where Angels Come In by Adam L. G. Nevill The big name here had story that I didn`t like so much. But stil there are quite good ones. Like: The Cubist's Attorney by David Atkins - an attorney gets hold on a strange case. The Ball Room by China Mieville, Emma Bircham and Max Shaefer - something`s not natural in the ball room of the kids. Good text, not so surprising ideea. But scary, nevertheless. Pinkie by Elizabeth Massie - one of the best here- Is there anything that a brilliant pig can`t do? :) ) Where Angels Come In by Adam L. G. Nevill -we have a haunting house but the tone and the whole ideea it`s under the skilled mark of Adam Nevill. Best New Horror by Joe Hill -a very good story by the son of the King, that doesn`t try to beat his father name but it succeeding, step by step, to make his own way in the horror field. Mark Samuels – Glyphotech-an evil corporation wants to control the minds of the people and it`s succeeding Glen Hirshberg - American Morons in Italy -Americans in Italy! Terry Lamsley - Sickhouse Hospitality – an engaging story, good flow, interesting ideea, the end was not quite was I expected. It is meant to be like a shocker but I didn`t get it so much. Clive Barker - Haeckel's Tale. I knew this one. It`s a Barker tale and you don`t have to know anything else. Nine stories from twenty three. Not a bad score. But it could be better. Usually this is my percentage with the whole Best Of stuff.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Сибин Майналовски

    Ако не бяха разказите на Джо Хил, Дейвид Морел и оше един-два... двойката не ѝ мърдаше. Добре че са грандовете, та да вдигнат нивото...

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sabella Daiabczenko

    Like most anthologies - some of the stories are so-so, but a few are great! This series is DEFINITELY worth the time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    The stories that were good were very very good. The stories that were bad were horrid.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Vlad

    Из чего сделан автор? Как ни крути, а любой достойный автор хоррора сделан из фобий. Классификация страхов фактически необъятна, но составить о ней хоть какое-то представление позволяют жанровые антологии, составлением которых уже много лет занимается Стивен Джонс. И все они достаточно представительны, чтобы можно было с уверенностью сказать: литература сверхъестественного ужаса эволюционирует и осваивает новые территории. Кого-то это удивит, но главная тема современного хоррора – не вампиры, обор Из чего сделан автор? Как ни крути, а любой достойный автор хоррора сделан из фобий. Классификация страхов фактически необъятна, но составить о ней хоть какое-то представление позволяют жанровые антологии, составлением которых уже много лет занимается Стивен Джонс. И все они достаточно представительны, чтобы можно было с уверенностью сказать: литература сверхъестественного ужаса эволюционирует и осваивает новые территории. Кого-то это удивит, но главная тема современного хоррора – не вампиры, оборотни или зомби (эти персонажи давно уже мигрировали в фэнтези), а чисто социальные страхи, питает которые сама действительность. Это ксенофобия – и как ненависть к «чужому среди своих», и как боязнь самому оказаться в этой роли (великолепные рассказы Глена Хиршберга и Дэвида Хертера). Это ужас перед могуществом современных корпораций, которым ничего не стоит духовно кастрировать индивида и стереть его в порошок («Глипотех» Марка Сэмюэлса). Это недоверие к врачам, которые в наши дни все больше отдаляются от пациентов из-за взлета медицинских технологий (рассказ Терри Ламсли). Это страх, что границы узкого мирка, которые человек создал для себя, будут кем-то нарушены (безумная фантазия Кэрролл Эмшуиллер); страх потерять ребенка (рассказ-письмо Брайана Ходжа, лучший в сборнике) или саму свою личность («Это было» Дэвида Моррелла - вещица малооригинальная, но ладно скроенная). Маститый Рэмси Кэмпбелл, как и прежде, выуживает пугающие образы из глубин подсознания и дает им развернуться в будничной обстановке, а Джо Хилл, восходящая звезда жанра, задумывается: что будет, если игры с бесчеловечным перехлестнут с бумаги в реальную жизнь? Поставив себе задачу, каждый автор так или иначе с ней справляется – психологизма и убедительности у их творений не отнимешь. Другие истории сборника, написанные в более традиционном стиле, на этом фоне смотрятся бледновато. Один автор фактически переигрывает «Психо» («Пинки»), другой пишет гротескную шутку в стиле Генри Каттнера («На окраине»), третий – мрачноватую страшилку («Чайки»). Символично, что самый слабый рассказ антологии – «Куда приходят ангелы» Адама Невилла – был создан в подражание М.Р. Джеймсу, одному из главных представителей старой традиции, видевшей источник ужаса где угодно, но не в душе человека. Клайв Баркер выступил с неожиданно кислой «Историей Геккеля», которая страдает не только от извечных недостатков его стиля (схематичность образов, привычка сталкивать читателя с ужасным лоб в лоб, обилие секса), но и от все того же подражательства. «Порча» Брайана Ламли, наоборот, удалась: отталкиваясь от «Морока над Инсмутом», писатель создал глубокую психологическую драму – и в очередной раз доказал, что репутацию одного из лучших продолжателей Г.Ф. Лавкрафта заработал не зря. Особняком стоят эстетские новеллы Холли Филлипс и Кейтлин Кирнан с их изысканным мистицизмом и богатством красок, достойным пера Оскара Уайльда. Впрочем, изъяны отдельных рассказов получать удовольствие от чтения не мешают. Откровенно проходных вещей в антологии Стивена Джонса нет – каждая по-своему интересна. Авторы умеют вкусно подать незначительную деталь и тонко обыграть нюансы психики; все они способны с головой затянуть читателя в описываемый мир, а творения лучших из них и в самом деле вызывают холодок по позвоночнику. Да, настоящий автор хоррора сделан из фобий – и, если позволяет мастерство, щедро делится ими с читателями. И мы должны быть ему благодарны: в конце концов, предупрежден – значит вооружен.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Prospero

    An even mix of hits and misses in this large anthology. The better tales included: The Cubist's Attorney by David Atkins The Ball Room by China Mieville, Emma Bircham and Max Shaefer Gulls by Tim Pratt Pinkie by Elizabeth Massie (a real gem of dark humor) Where Angels Come In by Adam L. G. Nevill (the most frightening story) Best New Horror by Joe Hill (easily the most horrific and disturbing story in the collection) An even mix of hits and misses in this large anthology. The better tales included: The Cubist's Attorney by David Atkins The Ball Room by China Mieville, Emma Bircham and Max Shaefer Gulls by Tim Pratt Pinkie by Elizabeth Massie (a real gem of dark humor) Where Angels Come In by Adam L. G. Nevill (the most frightening story) Best New Horror by Joe Hill (easily the most horrific and disturbing story in the collection)

  10. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    Another amazing collection. "Best New Horror" (how clever) is the highlight, but also "The Ball Room," "Gulls," and "One of the Hungry Ones" were especially great. The only one I didn't really care for was "American Morons." It was just too obvious, and I found its anti-American sentiment a turn-off. Another amazing collection. "Best New Horror" (how clever) is the highlight, but also "The Ball Room," "Gulls," and "One of the Hungry Ones" were especially great. The only one I didn't really care for was "American Morons." It was just too obvious, and I found its anti-American sentiment a turn-off.

  11. 5 out of 5

    bluetyson

    The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror: The Year's Best Terror Tales (Mammoth Book of Best New Horror) by Stephen Jones (2006) The Mammoth Book of Best New Horror: The Year's Best Terror Tales (Mammoth Book of Best New Horror) by Stephen Jones (2006)

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jim Glover

    This is the first Best New Horror that I have read and wow! Loved the stories and I have to say the writing is phenomenal. Highly recommend this and can’t wait to dive into the other volumes

  13. 5 out of 5

    GD

    This is by far the most consistently good series of short horror stories, I've read four or five of them so far. It's pretty clear Stephen Jones doesn't really like splattery horror, though the Joe Hill story in this book is an exception. A lot of the usual suspects make appearances, the dorky Ramsey Campbell, Caitlin Kiernan, David Morrell, Brian Lumley, with varying results. If you like these kinds of stories, this is a great book for you. This is by far the most consistently good series of short horror stories, I've read four or five of them so far. It's pretty clear Stephen Jones doesn't really like splattery horror, though the Joe Hill story in this book is an exception. A lot of the usual suspects make appearances, the dorky Ramsey Campbell, Caitlin Kiernan, David Morrell, Brian Lumley, with varying results. If you like these kinds of stories, this is a great book for you.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jevron McCrory

    I'm sorry but I hated this collection. Other than a couple of stories, the rest promised the world and delivered nothing. I got sick of getting all excited, only for some stories to not only peter out, but to stop DEAD entirely! It's as if the writers reached their word count goal and just simply stopped writing. So many stories had zero point, actually went nowhere. I know they are short stories but come on! Nah! To see short stories done PROPERLY, read Clive Barker's Books of Blood. I'm sorry but I hated this collection. Other than a couple of stories, the rest promised the world and delivered nothing. I got sick of getting all excited, only for some stories to not only peter out, but to stop DEAD entirely! It's as if the writers reached their word count goal and just simply stopped writing. So many stories had zero point, actually went nowhere. I know they are short stories but come on! Nah! To see short stories done PROPERLY, read Clive Barker's Books of Blood.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Greg Kerestan

    Another solid volume, though not a classic in the series. "Best New Horror" by Joe Hill is a genuinely weird story, much better than a few other "horror writer/horror fan discovers his audience/idol is not what they appear" tales that have appeared in this series. But it's "The Ball Room" that truly hooked into my mind, since I remember playing in the ball room at Ikea as a child, long ago. Another solid volume, though not a classic in the series. "Best New Horror" by Joe Hill is a genuinely weird story, much better than a few other "horror writer/horror fan discovers his audience/idol is not what they appear" tales that have appeared in this series. But it's "The Ball Room" that truly hooked into my mind, since I remember playing in the ball room at Ikea as a child, long ago.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    I don't read a lot of horror but I found that I enjoyed this collection. I like the fact that new horror is more about psychology than it is about murder, ghosts, etc. I didn't care for some of the stories in this volume while others were exceptional. I don't read a lot of horror but I found that I enjoyed this collection. I like the fact that new horror is more about psychology than it is about murder, ghosts, etc. I didn't care for some of the stories in this volume while others were exceptional.

  17. 5 out of 5

    S.P.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Albert Kivak

  19. 5 out of 5

    Thrown With Great Force

  20. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  21. 4 out of 5

    Emma

  22. 5 out of 5

    Lizzy

  23. 4 out of 5

    Paul Montgomery

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jennifer Dury

  25. 5 out of 5

    Subhajit Das

  26. 5 out of 5

    Douglas Reedy

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lenny

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chrystal Hays

  29. 5 out of 5

    Randall

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sam Holland

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