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The first biography to be written with the cooperation of the Lynott Estate, Cowboy Song is the definitive authorised account of the extraordinary life and career of Thin Lizzy guiding spirit, Philip Lynott. Leading music writer Graeme Thompson explores the fascinating contradictions between Lynott's unbridled rock star excesses and the shy, sensitive 'orphan' raised in wo The first biography to be written with the cooperation of the Lynott Estate, Cowboy Song is the definitive authorised account of the extraordinary life and career of Thin Lizzy guiding spirit, Philip Lynott. Leading music writer Graeme Thompson explores the fascinating contradictions between Lynott's unbridled rock star excesses and the shy, sensitive 'orphan' raised in working class Dublin. The mixed-race child of a Catholic teenager and a Guyanese stowaway, Lynott rose above daunting obstacles and wounding abandonments to become Ireland's first rock star. Cowboy Song examines his key musical alliances as well as the unique blend of cultural influences which informed Lynott's writing, connecting Ireland's rich reserves of music, myth and poetry to hard rock, progressive folk, punk, soul and New Wave. Published on the thirtieth anniversary of Lynott's death in January 1986, Thompson draws on scores of exclusive interviews with family, friends, band mates and collaborators. Cowboy Song is both the ultimate depiction of a multi-faceted rock icon, and an intimate portrait of a much-loved father, son and husband.


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The first biography to be written with the cooperation of the Lynott Estate, Cowboy Song is the definitive authorised account of the extraordinary life and career of Thin Lizzy guiding spirit, Philip Lynott. Leading music writer Graeme Thompson explores the fascinating contradictions between Lynott's unbridled rock star excesses and the shy, sensitive 'orphan' raised in wo The first biography to be written with the cooperation of the Lynott Estate, Cowboy Song is the definitive authorised account of the extraordinary life and career of Thin Lizzy guiding spirit, Philip Lynott. Leading music writer Graeme Thompson explores the fascinating contradictions between Lynott's unbridled rock star excesses and the shy, sensitive 'orphan' raised in working class Dublin. The mixed-race child of a Catholic teenager and a Guyanese stowaway, Lynott rose above daunting obstacles and wounding abandonments to become Ireland's first rock star. Cowboy Song examines his key musical alliances as well as the unique blend of cultural influences which informed Lynott's writing, connecting Ireland's rich reserves of music, myth and poetry to hard rock, progressive folk, punk, soul and New Wave. Published on the thirtieth anniversary of Lynott's death in January 1986, Thompson draws on scores of exclusive interviews with family, friends, band mates and collaborators. Cowboy Song is both the ultimate depiction of a multi-faceted rock icon, and an intimate portrait of a much-loved father, son and husband.

30 review for Cowboy Song: The Authorised Biography Of Philip Lynott

  1. 4 out of 5

    Johnny Hirschfeld

    I think this is the 3rd book I've read about Phil Lynott and it's the best one yet because IMO it focuses on him more as a person and how he relates to the things that come into his live and revolve around him. The title of the last section "Sun Goes Down" is perfect, the title alone creates the mood for what you know is coming.... as Lynott himself sang "the sadness never ceases". In some books like Elvis's "Careless Love", you get the feeling that the people around him and their lack of motiva I think this is the 3rd book I've read about Phil Lynott and it's the best one yet because IMO it focuses on him more as a person and how he relates to the things that come into his live and revolve around him. The title of the last section "Sun Goes Down" is perfect, the title alone creates the mood for what you know is coming.... as Lynott himself sang "the sadness never ceases". In some books like Elvis's "Careless Love", you get the feeling that the people around him and their lack of motivation to help should take the blame for the downfall, but in "Cowboy Song" the author does a good job in spreading the credit to include Lynott himself at the top of blame mountain.. That being said, there seemed to be several mentions of Jimmy Bain being an awful influence which enlightened me to the issues that eventually caused his own demise this past year. As I huge Dio / Rainbow fan, at first I was happy to see his name. That changed to wincing every time he was mentioned. In the end, I got the feeling that the author had a grudge against him... but maybe he really was a drug fiend. There is great intel regarding the other players which was fascinating and at times you feel like you are in the room with Lynott and his band mates. The Tony Visconti mentions are priceless (Bowie was pissed because he was taking too long..., etc..). In the end there still are a lot of questions still circling Gary Moore and his ebb and flow in and out of the group - it's no fault of the author that he wasn't able to dig deeper than he did, but that alone (Moore / Lynott relationship) would make a great standalone 10 part mini-series. In "Cowboy Song", there were a lot of new stories and revelations and the writing is spot on - interspersing factoids and opinions in a respectful yet critical tone. However, the "critical" part is where the book loses that 5th star (I rated it a 4). The author is obviously in the know from back in the day, and uses that as a huge insider advantage but I think it also hurts the message. Those who discover Thin Lizzy after the fact, have a discography on even playing field. They aren't aware of the issues and didn't see the downfall of it's leader. They just hear the records with an open mind, and the author is unable to do that. Therefore IMO he is much too critical of almost every album that wasn't in their hey day. For example I became a Thin Lizzy fan when Thunder and Lightning came out. It was "my" Thin Lizzy album and I love it. My first "live" Thin Lizzy album was Life and I love it... Overtime, I got everything ever recorded and have my favorites (Black Rose) - and when I hear the later records (Renegade and Chinatown) I don't hear a has-been - I hear an amazing singer, amazing band and amazing songs. I find it somewhat offensive the author has written an "authorized biography" and is so negative towards the majority of Lynott's recordings. There should have been more consideration of the audience and more respect give to the reader. PS - Quick Question - how can there be an authorized biography about someone who has deceased? All that being said "Cowboy Song" - I'm still in love with you....

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cathal Kenneally

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Excellent is too small a word for this book. Right from a young age, Philip Lynott and Thin Lizzy has had an enormous influence on my musical tastes. Something about the studded wristband he and later Bruce Dickinson would sport. For me that was and to a certain degree is still the essence of cool. By all accounts he was a bit of Jekyll and Hyde character. Ever the consummate professional. Entertainer, poet, songwriter are just a few words I can use for him. He was the driving force behind the b Excellent is too small a word for this book. Right from a young age, Philip Lynott and Thin Lizzy has had an enormous influence on my musical tastes. Something about the studded wristband he and later Bruce Dickinson would sport. For me that was and to a certain degree is still the essence of cool. By all accounts he was a bit of Jekyll and Hyde character. Ever the consummate professional. Entertainer, poet, songwriter are just a few words I can use for him. He was the driving force behind the band. Unfortunately the book is tinged with sadness as his addictions got the better of him; he refused help from his friends, some of whom deserted him. A short book about a short life, some people will live longer but will not have the same achievements

  3. 5 out of 5

    Allan

    Love a music biography and always had a soft spot for Lynott when I was a kid. Have read at least 3 previous bios of him, but this is undoubtedly the best - well researched, and not pulling any punches about the flawed nature of the musician's personality, particularly in his later years.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ryan O'Neill

    An excellent biography on an Irish musical figure I'd never really given much thought to before despite his towering legacy. The author provides a well balanced and detailed portrayal of a man with huge ambitions, a calculating sensibility and a flawed personality, with great access to those who knew him best. It's relatively short and thankfully avoids going into reams of detail on lesser background figures and in-depth musical appraisals, as many biographers do, and instead focused on Lynott a An excellent biography on an Irish musical figure I'd never really given much thought to before despite his towering legacy. The author provides a well balanced and detailed portrayal of a man with huge ambitions, a calculating sensibility and a flawed personality, with great access to those who knew him best. It's relatively short and thankfully avoids going into reams of detail on lesser background figures and in-depth musical appraisals, as many biographers do, and instead focused on Lynott as an individual with a helpful history of his humble beginnings in Manchester and Crumlin to his tragic last days in London and America. It features an epilogue from his ex-wife which, though short, is heartbreaking to read and a fitting end to a hugely enjoyable book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Alan Taylor

    Growing up in late '70s Northern Ireland with all its divisions and troubles, music cut through the divide, across the border - Van Morrison, Rory Gallagher, Horslips and, later, the Undertones & Still Little Fingers. And above them all were Thin Lizzy, and Phil Lynott, our only real ROCK STAR. Yes he was from Dublin, the South, but he was ours, he lived the lifestyle, he loved the lifestyle and, unbeknownst to our young teenage selves, the lifestyle killed him... I read most of this book last we Growing up in late '70s Northern Ireland with all its divisions and troubles, music cut through the divide, across the border - Van Morrison, Rory Gallagher, Horslips and, later, the Undertones & Still Little Fingers. And above them all were Thin Lizzy, and Phil Lynott, our only real ROCK STAR. Yes he was from Dublin, the South, but he was ours, he lived the lifestyle, he loved the lifestyle and, unbeknownst to our young teenage selves, the lifestyle killed him... I read most of this book last weekend, and finished the last couple of chapters today, while listening to Thin Lizzy's back catalogue. Thomson writes well and perfectly captures the romance, the poetry, the celtic (self-) mythology, the excitement, the striving for success and, ultimately, the pain and fall. He doesn't flinch in tackling the drugs issues; he has spoken to all the key people in Lynott's life and they describe the man who set out to be a star, lived that life to the full, and ended in perhaps the only way he was fated to. He could have been so much more but perhaps it is fitting that he isn't.... I was too young to see Thin Lizzy live but Live and Dangerous was one of the first albums I asked my parents to buy for me. Thomson's biography fleshes out the man and the story but, for me, Phil Lynott will remain forever the leather-trousered, mirrored-bass guitar wielding outlaw rock star from that album cover.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Dorian

    I was close to giving this five stars, but it's too soon after finishing it for me to be objective. I'm still feeling a little overwhelmed by the turbulent emotion of it all. I have the impression of a unique story well told and I'm sure this will become a definitive reference for me, and for others. This is the best biography of Lynott I've so far read. It's not quite a definitive document, perhaps steering clear of one or two details that reveal the darker side of Lynott's character and behavio I was close to giving this five stars, but it's too soon after finishing it for me to be objective. I'm still feeling a little overwhelmed by the turbulent emotion of it all. I have the impression of a unique story well told and I'm sure this will become a definitive reference for me, and for others. This is the best biography of Lynott I've so far read. It's not quite a definitive document, perhaps steering clear of one or two details that reveal the darker side of Lynott's character and behaviour, but it comes closer than you might expect from an authorised biography. It is particularly good on the early years in Dublin leading up to the formation of Thin Lizzy, and excruciating in it's telling of Lynott's descent into drug addiction and his ultimate demise. My overwhelming feeling on completing this book is that this is a story about loss. Not just the loss of the man and the rock star in Salisbury Infirmary in 1986, but, perhaps more profoundly, the loss of the starry-eyed youthful singer and poet to a fatal pact with fame and fortune.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Dennis

    Loved this book - very well written and a great story. I read the last 100 pages on a flight back from Milan with Live and Dangerous on my headphones. Had me in tears by the end.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Wilde Sky

    The rise and fall of a UK rock star are described in this book. I thought this book was interesting - detailing a very complex character, with (at least according to this book) equal measures of creative and destructive impulses. His final years came across as very sad.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Roisin

    Wow! An emotional roller coaster of a ride! I'm not a massive fan of biographies, but Phil Lynott a black Irish man born in England, brought up in Ireland was an inspiration to this mixed-race lady when growing up and was a much admired character in Dublin and on the music scene in the 1970s/80s. The author gets deep into the things that inspired Phil to write and create music. Here, he dissects and reveals much about his childhood, the influence of family members in particular his mother Philome Wow! An emotional roller coaster of a ride! I'm not a massive fan of biographies, but Phil Lynott a black Irish man born in England, brought up in Ireland was an inspiration to this mixed-race lady when growing up and was a much admired character in Dublin and on the music scene in the 1970s/80s. The author gets deep into the things that inspired Phil to write and create music. Here, he dissects and reveals much about his childhood, the influence of family members in particular his mother Philomena, grandmother Sarah, and wife Caroline Crowther and his children. The author continues to explore in great detail his teenage years, his early music career, his time with Thin Lizzy and their different albums, besides post Lizzy projects, the successes and failures. His love of Irish culture, mythology and literature come alive, particularly the lyrics and songs that feature within and what inspired them. This biography is definitely the best I've read about him and gets a sense of the man, his character and attitudes. From his family and friends, including band members, and a host of people that worked with him and loved him, his mum, his wife, Scott Gorham, Brian Downey, Brian Robertson, Gary Moore, Midge Ure, Suzi Quatro, Gale Claydon and Tony Visconti among many others, the good the bad and the ugly unfolds and one his hooked. There is no sugar coating within these chapters and the harsh realities of Phil Lynott's lifestyle, the lack of care in his last years in regards to his health and his addiction to heroin unfold. Some of the male macho tropes that he wrote about, the renegade, the cowboy, the soldier, the rebel, the prisoner, the gang member, were the myths that he clung onto, extensions of the man and the stage persona that he perhaps took too seriously at times and that would eventually steal his life. We also see the sensitive family man, the kind friend and the wonderful poet, storyteller and music maker. It is definitely worth revisiting his back catalogue. Philip Parris Lynott, a sad loss, one of Ireland's sons, who lives on in the memories of those that knew and loved him and the music that he left behind.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Kahn

    The problem with writing a biography of an enigma like Phil Lynott is, given how long he spent hiding the truth from himself and the world, getting to real man is something of a challenge. Yes you can find the facts, the story of his birth - but what he felt? Thought? Those things are harder to find. And it's fair to say, Mr L wasn't one for advertising these things, busy as he was cultivating the Rock Star persona. Graeme Thomson is nothing if not diligent (a fact Lynott's ex-wife notes in her A The problem with writing a biography of an enigma like Phil Lynott is, given how long he spent hiding the truth from himself and the world, getting to real man is something of a challenge. Yes you can find the facts, the story of his birth - but what he felt? Thought? Those things are harder to find. And it's fair to say, Mr L wasn't one for advertising these things, busy as he was cultivating the Rock Star persona. Graeme Thomson is nothing if not diligent (a fact Lynott's ex-wife notes in her Afterword – tellingly her only contribution to the book), and facts and information abound. But there's the lack of depth lurking at every turn. Obviously early bandmates have lots to say, stalwarts like Scott Gorham (now of Black Star Riders) add insight to life alongside the Thin Lizzy legend, and we even get members of the final Lizzy line-ups – including Darren Wharton, who has been selling himself as the former keyboard player ever since even if it was at a time when Lynott was so out of it he'd barely have registered if he was wearing shoes. Biography's are, by their very nature, hard to write as (unless you're lucky enough top have a subject who's still alive) you are beholden to those around at the time for contribution and insight. The fact the mother of two of Lynott's children only gave the book a cursory nod tells you a lot about what Thomson managed to achieve. But while he delivered on the facts, the details are more noticeable for what was left behind.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Scott

    This is the ultimate biography of Phil Lynott, I have never read a biography with so much detail on a persons life ever before. From before Phil Lynott was even born, growing up, friends from his early years, getting involved with liking music, starting in bands in Dublin, moving to London, the hard graft of basically being a touring band 24/7, getting the first hit single, creating all the songs and albums with all the trials and tribulations. I can safely say there is no better biography of Ph This is the ultimate biography of Phil Lynott, I have never read a biography with so much detail on a persons life ever before. From before Phil Lynott was even born, growing up, friends from his early years, getting involved with liking music, starting in bands in Dublin, moving to London, the hard graft of basically being a touring band 24/7, getting the first hit single, creating all the songs and albums with all the trials and tribulations. I can safely say there is no better biography of Phil Lynott than this one. A hard rocker with a soft heart & soul. One of those rare breeds that have long gone, a rock star. A fatherless, black Irish one at that, you cannot be born more rebellious than that.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Allan Heron

    Lynott's life story is desperately tragic and this book tells his tale in a manner that whilst sympathetic does not avoid any of the harder issues surrounding that life. The book helped me to make linkages in Lynott's friends and colleagues and to better understand both the man and what drove him to make the music that he made. It was very much the tough/tender combination that made Lynott and Thin Lizzy such an attractive proposition. But that it was underpinned by such insecurity is the tragedy Lynott's life story is desperately tragic and this book tells his tale in a manner that whilst sympathetic does not avoid any of the harder issues surrounding that life. The book helped me to make linkages in Lynott's friends and colleagues and to better understand both the man and what drove him to make the music that he made. It was very much the tough/tender combination that made Lynott and Thin Lizzy such an attractive proposition. But that it was underpinned by such insecurity is the tragedy of Lynott's life. This is the third of author's Graeme Thomson's music biographies that I have read. I think he can be fairly described as a very safe pair of hands to deliver a well-researched, well-written piece of work on his subject.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    Rock memoirs are usually kind of "exciting" to read even though they're predictable. This one just has a dull feel throughout for some reason. I think it suffers most from the fact that it's mainly a compilation of prior interviews, and there was so little of substance given in interviews by Lynott. How could the story of "The only black man in Dublin," who became the first international Irish rock star before U2 ever took the stage, be dull? It probably doesn't help that Lynott's story is so de Rock memoirs are usually kind of "exciting" to read even though they're predictable. This one just has a dull feel throughout for some reason. I think it suffers most from the fact that it's mainly a compilation of prior interviews, and there was so little of substance given in interviews by Lynott. How could the story of "The only black man in Dublin," who became the first international Irish rock star before U2 ever took the stage, be dull? It probably doesn't help that Lynott's story is so depressing. His career was basically a long grind with little success, followed by about 4 years of huge success, followed then by a long descent into a heroin death. Pretty bleak, but still an interesting story that fills in some blanks for Thin Lizzy fans like me.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kay Smillie

    I will admit to liking Thin Lizzy without being a diehard fan but always found Phil Lynott interesting purely from what I read in the music press back in the day. It is just a shame he went down the self destructive route of drugs (and alcohol) ultimately leading to an early and untimely death. There is no doubt he would still be touring with Thin Lizzy if he had survived that dark period in the early 80s. Ray Smillie

  15. 4 out of 5

    Seán O'Grady

    Easily one of the best biographies I've ever read! The book goes through all of Phil Lynott's life from The Black Eagles/Skid Row days to the Lizzy Days and finally to his death. There's no boring or unnecessarily fluff in this book. All of it from start to finish is gripping. The last 3rd of this book in particular is very intense, painting a very clear picture of how depressed Phil truly was by the end of his life.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Michael Saunders

    I loved Lynott and Thin Lizzy. I was shocked when he died but knew little about his backstory and the journey this Dublin lad took from the back streets to rock n roll fame and fortune, the excesses of which led to unhappiness and death. A great read and one that left me glad to have witnessed him at his peak but sad how the journey ended. A true Rocker to the end. RIP Phil. You live on through your music.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ray Caisley

    Interesting. Not being a big "Lizzy" fan, I thought I'd give it a go. I remember him dying when I was a teenager and really only knew that another rock star had died from drugs. After reading this, you see what a deep and intense person he was, unfortunately, surrounded by a lot of people who were hangers on. Very talented man, who, with the support available today, could have been massive.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Macke

    A fascinating, unlikely, turbulent, sad story ... Philip is a totally unique character in the history of rock & roll and so inspirational and compelling in so many ways ... The sound of Thin Lizzy has always had a desperate, urgent quality and I now understand that its source is the tortured spirit of Phil Lynott A fascinating, unlikely, turbulent, sad story ... Philip is a totally unique character in the history of rock & roll and so inspirational and compelling in so many ways ... The sound of Thin Lizzy has always had a desperate, urgent quality and I now understand that its source is the tortured spirit of Phil Lynott

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fred

    I have long been a fan of Philip Lynott and while I've known his "story" for many years, I could not resist picking up this book. I am glad I did. Thomson delivers as thoughtful and as insightful an account as possible without slipping into idol worship. This book shares the tale of Lynott's almost simultaneous rise and fall. Often I've wondered if the components of personality responsible for prodding someone to become an artist are not the same components that destroy them. Perhaps the beginn I have long been a fan of Philip Lynott and while I've known his "story" for many years, I could not resist picking up this book. I am glad I did. Thomson delivers as thoughtful and as insightful an account as possible without slipping into idol worship. This book shares the tale of Lynott's almost simultaneous rise and fall. Often I've wondered if the components of personality responsible for prodding someone to become an artist are not the same components that destroy them. Perhaps the beginning and the end are not separate events at all. Perhaps the initiating drive/insecurities ignite a definable and predictable trajectory as one consolidated arc. Only the lucky escape the tragic end? In Lynott's case that seems to be a fair statement. Having read this book, I cannot imagine his life ending any differently. Old age--even middle age-- simply was not part of his arc. And his demise was unabashedly fueled by those igniting insecurities which finally sought resignation via drug abuse. Thomson steers clear of splashing sensational details about for the sole purpose of shocking the reader. He steers clear of building the pyre from which to sere his subject. His is a sober--and sobering--account of a charming, charismatic, talented, and flawed young man who achieved fantastic success through hard work and force of personality. Sadly, that personality lacked the ability to veer away from the predetermined end. ====Added below after some time to ruminate==== This book has long been on my TO READ list. Having been a Lynott fan since the mid 70's and having never read any of the other biographies about him, I was anxious to get my hands on this one. The book is well written, even if the story of Phil Lynott is a sad statement about the futility of fame and drugs as a antidote for insecurity. Like many others who steered their own demise, Lynott never got hold of his demons. Self medicating to compensate for his insecurities ultimately killed him. The demise of his beloved Thin Lizzy, the shifting cultural tastes towards Punk, the loss of heightened celebrity were exacerbated by the demands Lynott's id.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tommy

    Imperfect and raw. Cowboy Song is unorganized in its composition, often going from one year to the next and back again. Though, in the end, it tells the story of Phil Lynott as poet and folk hero, sensitive friend and bad ass rocker, womanizer and family man, and ultimately victim of his own fame. Long live Philo, the Rocker!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Steve Berry

    A Moving Read It was a bit of a no-brainer to pick up this book - appearing at a special price of 99p! Thin Lizzy are remembered very affectionately these days and this makes the reading of this honest, warm and sometimes harrowing story of their lead singer’s life (and death) very compelling.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    The rise and dear demise of the funky nomad: Phil Lynott, leader of the band Thin Lizzy, sexy, soulful, black and Irish... The combination of sex, drugs, and rock and roll fame took another talent from the world, but now when I listen to the music, I know the story behind the songs.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Well researched biography a bit dry in parts but on the whole a good read about the rock star Phil lynott his early life his fame with Thin Lizzy and his early fall from grace from drink and drug taking. The end was so sad and if he could have got help might have been so different

  24. 4 out of 5

    Steven Davis

    The heart warming and heart breaking tale of Philip Parris Lynott, he of Thin Lizzy and so much more. Added so much to my existing appreciation of Thin Lizzy's music, realising the full emotional reasoning behind Little Girl in Bloom and the like.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Peter P.

    Well worth a read if you are a fan of Phil Lynott and/or Thin Lizzy, or if you are interested in the music scene in Ireland in the 1970's. Lots of familiar characters from that period popping up in what is ultimately a very tragic story.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Barry Lowry

    Great read! Well researched, well written biography of a potential great who destroyed himself and his career with drink and drugs. Very sympathetic telling of a tragic story; RIP Philo ❤️

  27. 5 out of 5

    Gavin Norman

    What a sad ending to a life of such great achievement- good read but the rapid dissolution of talent and his band , family and life for the drugs is a tragedy

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tadhg Maccarthy

    4.5 stars. Well researched, well written. Captured the magic and the frailties of Ireland's first true rock star. Glad I got to see them in their prime. He was pure charisma on stage.

  29. 4 out of 5

    George Maliekal

    A very good telling of the Phil Lynott story. He was the leader of the quintessential Irish rock band Thin Lizzy whose life was cut short at 36. Their deep body of work includes classics like Whiskey in the Jar, Dancing in the Moonlight, but the song that the American audience usually remembers is their huge hit in the mid 70’s - The Boys are Back in Town. He was a great showman and Thin Lizzy’s live performances surpassed anything cut from the studio. I never got to see them live but I’ve liste A very good telling of the Phil Lynott story. He was the leader of the quintessential Irish rock band Thin Lizzy whose life was cut short at 36. Their deep body of work includes classics like Whiskey in the Jar, Dancing in the Moonlight, but the song that the American audience usually remembers is their huge hit in the mid 70’s - The Boys are Back in Town. He was a great showman and Thin Lizzy’s live performances surpassed anything cut from the studio. I never got to see them live but I’ve listened to their live album, Live and Dangerous numerous times. In my opinion, it is one of the all time best live albums.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    Moderately satisfying biography of Thin Lizzy and their frontman, but suffers from a bad case of hero worship. One loses count of the paragraphs which detail Phil Lynott's appearance and charm, and this further clouds the 3 dimensional portrait of him as a man and a musician. By the end, you don't feel satisfied, and the "enigmatic persona" diagnosis is boring. Good coverage of the band's numerous guitar players--of whom were some of the best of the 70s.

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