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Science Comics: Bats: Learning to Fly

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In Bats, we follow a little brown bat whose wing is injured by humans on a nature hike. He is taken to a bat rehabilitation center where he meets many different species of bats. They teach him how they fly, what they eat, and where they like to live. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topicdinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, In Bats, we follow a little brown bat whose wing is injured by humans on a nature hike. He is taken to a bat rehabilitation center where he meets many different species of bats. They teach him how they fly, what they eat, and where they like to live. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty year old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!


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In Bats, we follow a little brown bat whose wing is injured by humans on a nature hike. He is taken to a bat rehabilitation center where he meets many different species of bats. They teach him how they fly, what they eat, and where they like to live. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topicdinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, In Bats, we follow a little brown bat whose wing is injured by humans on a nature hike. He is taken to a bat rehabilitation center where he meets many different species of bats. They teach him how they fly, what they eat, and where they like to live. Every volume of Science Comics offers a complete introduction to a particular topic—dinosaurs, coral reefs, the solar system, volcanoes, bats, flying machines, and more. These gorgeously illustrated graphic novels offer wildly entertaining views of their subjects. Whether you're a fourth grader doing a natural science unit at school or a thirty year old with a secret passion for airplanes, these books are for you!

30 review for Science Comics: Bats: Learning to Fly

  1. 4 out of 5

    First Second Books

    Welcome to yet another Science Comics, an action-packed nonfiction graphic novel series for middle-grade readers! In this ultrasonic volume, Falynn Koch introduces us to a remarkable but misunderstood flying mammal: the bat!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I really like this series, that I discovered because of group discussion of graphic non-fiction in the Children's Books group. I thought I'd skim this because I thought that I knew enough about bats, but it turns out I learned a lot more. I did not realize that bats are not at all related to rodents, and are related to primates. They can live for decades. So if you find an injured one, or need to get one out of your house, call a professional; it's worth it. One unfortunate spread conflates I really like this series, that I discovered because of group discussion of graphic non-fiction in the Children's Books group. I thought I'd skim this because I thought that I knew enough about bats, but it turns out I learned a lot more. I did not realize that bats are not at all related to rodents, and are related to primates. They can live for decades. So if you find an injured one, or need to get one out of your house, call a professional; it's worth it. One unfortunate spread conflates scorpions and centipedes, which are arthropods, with insects. Not the same thing. (And 'bugs' are a whole 'nother discussion.) And the illustrations of the people were kinda ugly imo. But most of the bats are cute! And there's even a little plot, as our MC, Little Brown, overcomes his prejudices about other kinds of bats. Appendices are helpful and interesting.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ed Erwin

    My library is finally back open, for pickup at the door only. And my first library book is.... a kids comic about bats! Quite fun really, and I learned a bit. I hadn't realized some flying foxes have a 6-foot wingspan (perfect for social distancing). Some bats can actually catch and eat fish! Neato!

  4. 5 out of 5

    Donalyn

    The latest installment in the fantastic Science Comics series.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Beth

    Wanted to read one of the Science Comics graphic novels for kids, and this one was great. By the end I thought bats were adorable, knew a lot about their habitats, physiology and habits, and realized they are a huge ally to farmers and plants. Definitely recommend for mid-elementary to tween.

  6. 5 out of 5

    M Aghazarian

    I learned a lot! There are so many different kinds of bats!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Carla Johnson-Hicks

    This is not just a graphic novel. Science comics are full of interesting information, detailed illustrations, use of topic and more. In this book we meet a small brown bat that somehow ends up in an area where brown bats are not found. When he tries to eat insects flying around humans, he is swatted and ends up breaking a wing. The tour guide takes him to a vet who specializes and rescues bats. She sets his wing and puts him in a cages area. He is taken under the wing of Gray, a gray bat and This is not just a graphic novel. Science comics are full of interesting information, detailed illustrations, use of topic and more. In this book we meet a small brown bat that somehow ends up in an area where brown bats are not found. When he tries to eat insects flying around humans, he is swatted and ends up breaking a wing. The tour guide takes him to a vet who specializes and rescues bats. She sets his wing and puts him in a cages area. He is taken under the wing of Gray, a gray bat and meets the various other bats living there. Through these introductions we learn about habitats, food, family life, sizes, nesting, echolocation, homes etc. It is all done in a very interesting and entertaining way. There are some great diagrams and illustrations to add to the story. We learn about the efforts of people to repopulate the bat world by building bat houses and having insecticide free farms. This book can be used by all ages to learn about bats and how to protect them and in turn how to protect the planet. It should be in all libraries, school and public. A great resource. I received a copy of this book from the publisher via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    Bats are great! They eat bugs, pollinate flowers, and basically make life much better for us without our ever knowing. Unfortunately, they're not exactly fascinating enough to hold up an entire Science Comics entry. Falynn Koch does a decent job of wrapping bat facts up in a story about an injured bat being taken to the vet. A lot of that framing story feels like it's just taking up space, though, making it pretty forgettable. "Hey new bat, we have to introduce you to all these other bat species Bats are great! They eat bugs, pollinate flowers, and basically make life much better for us without our ever knowing. Unfortunately, they're not exactly fascinating enough to hold up an entire Science Comics entry. Falynn Koch does a decent job of wrapping bat facts up in a story about an injured bat being taken to the vet. A lot of that framing story feels like it's just taking up space, though, making it pretty forgettable. "Hey new bat, we have to introduce you to all these other bat species so that they can explain what makes bats special!" I think I would have been happier just hearing what makes bats special without the framing device. The art is great, though, and truly impressive considering the diversity and general weirdness of bats. Koch really captures the wide variety of bat faces while still maintaining a general cuteness that won't freak out wary readers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Rodrigues

    This graphic non-fiction is jam-packed with information about bats, and kids who love bats may enjoy the book. However, despite being a bat enthusiast myself, I struggled to get through it, because it was not holding my attention. It took a few tries. This is difficult to rate. 5 stars for tons of bat info. 1 star for excitement. So... 3 stars? A good, dry book about bats. I received this book via Netgalley in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marilyn

    I picked this up on impulse while at an event and am really glad I discovered it. Nice mix of basic and advanced information and fun little facts, with just enough narrative to keep things moving and get in some lessons on humans and bats co-existing. I'll be checking out the rest of the series, and recommending we pick up a copy of this one for the local nature center.

  11. 4 out of 5

    OpenBookSociety.com

    http://openbooksociety.com/article/sc... Science Comics: Bats By Falynn Koch ISBN 978-1-62672-408-2 Brought to you by OBS Reviewer Scott Review This is a beautiful alteration on the Science Comics line a book on, well bats, aimed at the younger reader. Prior books have been aimed at a tweenie audience, whereas this can easily be read by a younger reader. As stated before (and rather blatantly in the title) this subject on hand is bats and this is an informative, educational look at the only flying http://openbooksociety.com/article/sc... Science Comics: Bats By Falynn Koch ISBN 978-1-62672-408-2 Brought to you by OBS Reviewer Scott Review This is a beautiful alteration on the Science Comics line – a book on, well bats, aimed at the younger reader. Prior books have been aimed at a ‘tweenie’ audience, whereas this can easily be read by a younger reader. As stated before (and rather blatantly in the title) this subject on hand is bats and this is an informative, educational look at the only flying mammals. Filled with trivia and biological facts, for example on the nature of echolocation and the fact that the bat stems from the primate family, this is sure to entertain anyone who holds interest in bats, big or small, or wants to educate themselves on bat preservation such as making ‘bat-friendly’ shelters. Science Comics: Bats is a welcome addition to the line. The writing was what struck me immediately – not preachy, and only resorting to scientific nomenclature when absolutely necessary. It struck me that this is precisely like my long gone, dog-eared copy of Dinosaurs I had when I was eight. The diction is concise and written towards the younger reader. Following a bat that gets sent to a rescue shelter, the story revolves around his introduction to different species of his genus, and the daughter of the rather over-exuberant parents who unintentionally injure it causing her to become a volunteer at the veterinarian’s clinic. Through the two (more the bat than the girl – the bat is written less ‘scientifically) the reader is propelled into the wonderful and exotic world of bats. It whets your appetite and has further reading for both the younger and older reader in the back is a nice touch. The educational quality of this book cannot be understated. The artwork in Science Comics: Bats is also unique. Blending an Eisner-like cartoonish approach with biological artwork, Bats details the differences between different species. It’s not so cartoonish to be dismissed by the older reader but accessible to the younger ones. The panelation flows well, and aside from one or two oddly placed speech bubbles, is quite easy to follow. The linework is well done, and inking is as equally deft. Overall the artwork compliments the writing and almost keeps the story flowing. This is rare, but Koch pulls it off with elegance. The backgrounds suit the characterization, and all in all, this truly represents Eisner’s educational comics point in Comics and Sequential Art. I can’t do anything but recommend this book for anyone even remotely interested in bats. The educational content is enough, as said, to whet your appetite and point you in the right direction for further reading. Aimed at a younger audience, however, and this really is their playground. Like that copy of Dinosaurs I had in my youth, this book would have spurned my interest in chiropterology rather than herpetology (although I still think snakes and giant lizards are cool). Science Comics: Bats is a must buy that might spurn an interest in these wonderful and mysterious creatures. *OBS would like to thank the publisher for supplying a free copy of this title in exchange for an honest review*

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sesana

    Another Science Comic with a framing narrative. This one involves a little brown bat (actual name of the species!) who's accidentally injured by a panicked human and taken to a rehab center. Half of this framing narrative is from the perspective of the bat, and this is the part that didn't really work for me. His job is to be introduced to a huge variety of bats, and it gets formulaic. I would have much rather stay with the teenage girl who helped rescue him and the vet who stumbled into bat Another Science Comic with a framing narrative. This one involves a little brown bat (actual name of the species!) who's accidentally injured by a panicked human and taken to a rehab center. Half of this framing narrative is from the perspective of the bat, and this is the part that didn't really work for me. His job is to be introduced to a huge variety of bats, and it gets formulaic. I would have much rather stay with the teenage girl who helped rescue him and the vet who stumbled into bat rehab. It is, of course, informative, as Science Comics always are. I don't think it has the most interesting representation of that information, because it just isn't really integrated with the framing narrative. Again, I think it would have been more fluid if Koch had stuck to the teenage girl and vet part of the narrative and had the vet introduce the girl to all these bat facts. Still, I think this will appeal to anybody interested in bats, if only to see a lot of cool illustrations of very cool bats.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Ms. Shoshana

    I didnt know durians were pollinated solely by bats! Bats can skip that one in the future! Informative and colorful. Good for someone interested in beginning to learn about bats, although not useful as a reference because theres no table of contents or index. I personally am not a big fan of non-fiction wrapped in a fictional coating I wouldve preferred it if Dr. Reba was a real person, and there was some factual information about her in the end pages. The back had a short glossary and some I didn’t know durians were pollinated solely by bats! Bats can skip that one in the future! Informative and colorful. Good for someone interested in beginning to learn about bats, although not useful as a reference because there’s no table of contents or index. I personally am not a big fan of non-fiction wrapped in a fictional coating – I would’ve preferred it if Dr. Reba was a real person, and there was some factual information about her in the end pages. The back had a short glossary and some further reading materials, but the organization was a little strange. Why was the graphic about frequency and decibel just stuck in the back, instead of incorporated into the story? Still, a good title for a school or public library. I think this could be an easy book to sell a kid on!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Becky B

    Follow a little brown bat to a vet clinic who is injured by humans who misunderstand his actions. At the clinic the little brown bat learns all about other bats in the world, their eating habits, and where they like to hang out. This is what I'll dub very informative fiction. The book is structured in a graphic novel fiction story, but it is loaded with tons of real facts and info on bats. And the overall purpose is definitely to inform. I'd recommend reading this one with The Bats Scientists for Follow a little brown bat to a vet clinic who is injured by humans who misunderstand his actions. At the clinic the little brown bat learns all about other bats in the world, their eating habits, and where they like to hang out. This is what I'll dub very informative fiction. The book is structured in a graphic novel fiction story, but it is loaded with tons of real facts and info on bats. And the overall purpose is definitely to inform. I'd recommend reading this one with The Bats Scientists for a very well-rounded primer on bats and why humans should re-think how they think about these critters. I personally love that they eat so many mosquitoes. This does an especially good job of outlining the different types of bats. Recommended for curious kids.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    I like this graphic novel series called SCIENCE COMICS. They have a wide range of topics and being someone who is fascinated by bats, I was really drawn to this one. In this graphic nonfiction, a little brown bat is injured by a human and brought to a rehabilitation center where he is introduced to a wide variety of bats also being cared for. As he is introduced to his fellow bats we learn about the various species of bats who help us by pollinating plants, eradicating pesky insects, and I like this graphic novel series called SCIENCE COMICS. They have a wide range of topics and being someone who is fascinated by bats, I was really drawn to this one. In this graphic nonfiction, a little brown bat is injured by a human and brought to a rehabilitation center where he is introduced to a wide variety of bats also being cared for. As he is introduced to his fellow bats we learn about the various species of bats who help us by pollinating plants, eradicating pesky insects, and planting new fruit trees. Terrific illustrations and accessible facts, this is a great text for learning about a widely misunderstood creature.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Flora

    Very cute, and actually quite informative (so it does live up to its name), and the facts are presented in a visually appealing, graphical manner. Some of the bat puns were a bit cheesy, but maybe younger children would have enjoyed them more than I did. I ended up enjoying the book more than I thought I would - much of the scientific information presented later in the book did more than simply giving facts about bats, but also discussed the impact of human activities on bats, and how humans and Very cute, and actually quite informative (so it does live up to its name), and the facts are presented in a visually appealing, graphical manner. Some of the bat puns were a bit cheesy, but maybe younger children would have enjoyed them more than I did. I ended up enjoying the book more than I thought I would - much of the scientific information presented later in the book did more than simply giving facts about bats, but also discussed the impact of human activities on bats, and how humans and bats can learn to live peacefully together. This element lent the book a more "engaging" element, which helped bring the story and facts to life.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    I really quite enjoyed this entry in the Science Comics series. The combination of a fictional story about a young bat who is injured by a human tourist with factual information about bats makes for an interesting read. The efforts of a young girl and a vet to help the young brown bat heal complement the interactions of the different kinds of bats. Lots of fascinating information about bats, how they fly, what they eat, where they live, provides plenty of great facts for eager young readers. The I really quite enjoyed this entry in the Science Comics series. The combination of a fictional story about a young bat who is injured by a human tourist with factual information about bats makes for an interesting read. The efforts of a young girl and a vet to help the young brown bat heal complement the interactions of the different kinds of bats. Lots of fascinating information about bats, how they fly, what they eat, where they live, provides plenty of great facts for eager young readers. The graphics are attractive and accurate, including the scenes with the bats interacting (shown right-side up, but clearly shown as upside down). For students who enjoy graphic novels and learning about interesting factual topics this series is a great boon. This series is also a great way to encourage students who favor either fiction or nonfiction into expanding their horizons.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ellon

    This book is nominated for the Black Eyed Susan award this year. I put off reading it a while because, while I enjoyed it, the Dinosaur science comic from last year took me a while to read due to all the information in it. This one had lots of great information too but it was a little easier to understand. I liked the way the graphic novel gave the information while telling the story of the injured bat, although a few times the information panels that were separate from the story broke up the This book is nominated for the Black Eyed Susan award this year. I put off reading it a while because, while I enjoyed it, the Dinosaur science comic from last year took me a while to read due to all the information in it. This one had lots of great information too but it was a little easier to understand. I liked the way the graphic novel gave the information while telling the story of the injured bat, although a few times the information panels that were separate from the story broke up the story in an awkward way. This book has inspired me to make or buy a bat box!

  19. 5 out of 5

    SaraKat

    Wonderful tour of the types of bats in the world and the interesting niches they fill. The narrator is a bat and he goes through an injury and wildlife rehabilitation with a vet and a teenage intern. I learned a lot about bats that I didn't know. This book will appeal to kids because the parents are doofuses and the teenager is the hero. :) Hmm, being a teen and being a bat do have their similarities! Most people don't understand you, you stay up all night, you sleep through the day.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Shiloh Peacemaker

    I came across this interesting graphic novel in the Delaware Library, Orange branch. It was awesome! I just devoured it. It was so informational as well as it had a great story line. I will definitely reading more graphic novels from group, as I saw there were 3 others. :) Plus I will be visiting the Delaware Library, Orange branch again, even though it is 30 minutes away from my home. It was beautiful there!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Christa Seeley

    This is the second volume of the Science Comics series that I've read (the other being Flying Machines) and this was much better. The narrative structure was much more engaging. Felt like I was reading the story of Little Brown Bat with some extra facts sprinkled in, rather than just an illustrated chapter of a textbook. I think this would be a great comic for kids to help them learn about the different kinds of bats and the important role they have in our world.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Fernanda Fadel

    The idea of the science comics is really neat, to teach science in a fun way. The drawings are really good. I do learn new things with every comic I read. BUT I still think they lack a story line. With very few exceptions, it feels like reading a normal school book just with more pictures, which at times makes the comic a bit boring. I will still read all of them, but i wish there were more actual stories inserted among all the facts.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Melissa

    Everything you ever wanted to know about bats in one easy-to-read in one-sitting graphic novel! I did feel like I already knew everything presented here, but it would be fascinating to interested children, for sure. I especially liked the set up of someone inadvertently harming a bat in panic, and the bat going to a specialist to heal up and be released back in the wild, and the teenager volunteering to help there too! A creative way to learn more about bats.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Raven Black

    Fun story about bats. The bats tell their stories (in the wild and after they have been injured in various ways and are now being treated) with facts and fiction (fiction being bats of different species communicate in words). Mostly realistic images, this science book flows quickly, but allows for pauses. Great for the classroom or the curious child (or adult, I learned a lot about bats I did not know).

  25. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lee

    Loved this! I'm ordering the entire Science Comics (Get to Know Your Universe) series for my classroom. Titles include Dinosaurs, Volcanoes, Coral Reefs, Flying Machines, and coming up is Plagues. It's a series, but not written/illustrated by the same teams, so each book is unique. No cookie-cutter here!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jill

    This is the second book Ive read in this graphic novel science series, and they were both fantastic. I learned a lot of fascinating things about bats. The information is conveyed in clever and easy-to-understand ways, and the book never talks down to its audience. Highly recommended for kids and adults. This is the second book I’ve read in this graphic novel science series, and they were both fantastic. I learned a lot of fascinating things about bats. The information is conveyed in clever and easy-to-understand ways, and the book never talks down to its audience. Highly recommended for kids and adults.

  27. 4 out of 5

    LouLou

    Read review in its entirety at http://www.compassbookratings.com/rev... Who knew bats are so cool?! Publisher First Second adds another awesome book to their Science Comics series with Science Comics: Bats: Learning to Fly. With two to five full color panels on each page, illustrator Falynn Koch, engagingly exhibits a Little Brown Bats escapades. Facts are pleasingly integrated with the storyline when an accidental injury sends this Little Brown Bat to a rehabilitation center specializing in bat Read review in its entirety at http://www.compassbookratings.com/rev... Who knew bats are so cool?! Publisher First Second adds another awesome book to their Science Comics series with Science Comics: Bats: Learning to Fly. With two to five full color panels on each page, illustrator Falynn Koch, engagingly exhibits a Little Brown Bat’s escapades. Facts are pleasingly integrated with the storyline when an accidental injury sends this Little Brown Bat to a rehabilitation center specializing in bat care. It’s here that the Little Brown Bat and reader meet different species of bats, learn where they come from, how they survive, and all the awesome things they can do, especially their helpful contributions to their local environment. Interesting facts located at the end of the novel, along with a glossary of terms and suggested reading to learn more about the subject of bats, help top off this fun and informative graphic novel. A great read, this engaging novel is perfect for elementary-aged to middle grade children keen on learning about different species of animals.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    I liked bats before. Now I love them! Lil' brown bat gets injured and at the animal rescue hospital he meets all different kinds of bats and learns bat stats and facts. For a graphic novel format, this is sure full of info!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    October 2020 - a mix of factual panels and a story from a little brown bat's point of view. He's injured by a human, goes to a rehabilitation center, and learns all about other kinds of bats. Ben is really into bats, so he was really into both parts of the book.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

    Excellent. A blend of fiction and nonfiction that primarily serves as an informational text.

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