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The Stone Heart

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Kaidu and Rat have only just recovered from the assassination attempt on the General of All Blades when more chaos breaks loose in the Nameless City: deep conflicts within the Dao nation are making it impossible to find a political solution for the disputed territory of the City itself. To complicate things further, Kaidu is fairly certain he's stumbled on a formula for the Kaidu and Rat have only just recovered from the assassination attempt on the General of All Blades when more chaos breaks loose in the Nameless City: deep conflicts within the Dao nation are making it impossible to find a political solution for the disputed territory of the City itself. To complicate things further, Kaidu is fairly certain he's stumbled on a formula for the lost weapon of the mysterious founders of the City. . . . But sharing it with the Dao military would be a complete betrayal of his friendship with Rat. Can Kai find the right solution before the Dao find themselves at war?


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Kaidu and Rat have only just recovered from the assassination attempt on the General of All Blades when more chaos breaks loose in the Nameless City: deep conflicts within the Dao nation are making it impossible to find a political solution for the disputed territory of the City itself. To complicate things further, Kaidu is fairly certain he's stumbled on a formula for the Kaidu and Rat have only just recovered from the assassination attempt on the General of All Blades when more chaos breaks loose in the Nameless City: deep conflicts within the Dao nation are making it impossible to find a political solution for the disputed territory of the City itself. To complicate things further, Kaidu is fairly certain he's stumbled on a formula for the lost weapon of the mysterious founders of the City. . . . But sharing it with the Dao military would be a complete betrayal of his friendship with Rat. Can Kai find the right solution before the Dao find themselves at war?

30 review for The Stone Heart

  1. 5 out of 5

    emma

    I may rag on myself from time to time in reviews (okay, fine, frequently), but there is no time I hate myself more than when I say “review to come” on a graphic novel. I just don’t have a full review in me for this. A full review would be more words than there are in this book. Here is what I have to say about this: - surprisingly well-done themes related to colonialism and power and empire here - so fun - beautiful art And that’s it. Bottom line: Good stuff. ------- i really can't shake the Avatar vibes I may rag on myself from time to time in reviews (okay, fine, frequently), but there is no time I hate myself more than when I say “review to come” on a graphic novel. I just don’t have a full review in me for this. A full review would be more words than there are in this book. Here is what I have to say about this: - surprisingly well-done themes related to colonialism and power and empire here - so fun - beautiful art And that’s it. Bottom line: Good stuff. ------- i really can't shake the Avatar vibes (and don't point out that those were put in my head by the creator of Avatar blurbing this book because i'll lose all sense of self) review to come / 4 stars ------- in vain i have struggled. it will not do. i'm going to binge read this series

  2. 5 out of 5

    Heidi The Reader

    The Nameless City graphic novels are excellent for kids aged 10 to 14. The Stone Heart like The Nameless City is well drawn with diverse characters and a plot that can be followed by young readers. It presents the difficulties of balancing cultural expectations, politics, and belonging with the natural emotions of friendship and understanding. The kids, Kai and Rat, are from completely different social castes, but it doesn't matter to them. If only the rest of the world didn't live with prejudice The Nameless City graphic novels are excellent for kids aged 10 to 14. The Stone Heart like The Nameless City is well drawn with diverse characters and a plot that can be followed by young readers. It presents the difficulties of balancing cultural expectations, politics, and belonging with the natural emotions of friendship and understanding. The kids, Kai and Rat, are from completely different social castes, but it doesn't matter to them. If only the rest of the world didn't live with prejudiced blinders over their eyes, then life could be sweet in the Nameless City. But, that's not how it is. The General of Blades wants to make a council of all of the nations within the city walls to decide and rule on all matters of importance within the Nameless City. His son, the heir apparent, wants the power that he's been promised his entire life- to rule the city as the rightful conqueror. They can't both have their way. Meanwhile, rumors abound of the ancient power of the builders of the city itself. The monks may know something about it and, if in the wrong hands, this power could bring down the city that it helped to build. Highly recommended for reluctant readers. There's very little downtime in these pages. A huge thank you to NetGalley and First Second Books publishing for an advance reader's copy of this book.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    I’m loving this series especially designed for middle grade readers, The Nameless City, set in 13th century China, Hicks’s most challenging project thus far. I am especially a big fan of her Friends with Boys, which is this sweet, intimate family-based story, and The Adventures of Supergirl, which is hilarious. So this is completely different! And I normally prefer little intimate indie projects, but since I am already familiar with Hicks’s style and sensibilities, I knew I would like this. So t I’m loving this series especially designed for middle grade readers, The Nameless City, set in 13th century China, Hicks’s most challenging project thus far. I am especially a big fan of her Friends with Boys, which is this sweet, intimate family-based story, and The Adventures of Supergirl, which is hilarious. So this is completely different! And I normally prefer little intimate indie projects, but since I am already familiar with Hicks’s style and sensibilities, I knew I would like this. So this is fiction, not real historical fiction, but there are period costumes and architecture. It also features a densely multicultural city that is struggling with warring factions. The last volume featured an assignation attempt, where our two hero kids Kaidu and Rat (representing each of the two warring factions, two different castes) saved the day. In this one, The General of Blades wants a democratic solution for the Nameless City. His son wants the power he was long promised. Both can’t have their way. Is it possible for a democratic political solution across the divide? This volume has a messy answer, sending the city in turmoil. Can the two kids save the day again? At the end of this volume, it is really up in the air. Cliff-hanger! Stay tuned! This is an action-filled volume, which begins a tad slowly as we are given (as often happens with second volumes) some useful historical back story, but I think it’s a great series in the tradition of The Last Airbender. You have to remember: This is a solo project, more than 450 pages long thus far, all drawing and story done by Hicks! (Okay, I see now Jordie Bellaire did the coloring, but still!) It’s an awesome series of tweens and middle schoolers. And me! I read it in two sittings!

  4. 4 out of 5

    First Second Books

    This thrilling continuation of the series is jam-packed with adventure! Kaidu and Rat now have to deal with conflicts within the Dao nation and a possible war. To make matters worse, Kaidu finds a formula for a mysterious weapon that may lead to complete chaos.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lata

    The story gets dark in this book. Kai and Rat are still hanging out together, racing and eating, while Kai's father and the General of Blades continue efforts to put together a council for the Nameless City with representation from the different peoples of the City. The General's son resents the change to all his expectations and plans, and takes matters into his own hands. Meanwhile, it looks like Mura is more than just a wicked good fighter, and it's great how Faith Erin Hicks reveals how Mura The story gets dark in this book. Kai and Rat are still hanging out together, racing and eating, while Kai's father and the General of Blades continue efforts to put together a council for the Nameless City with representation from the different peoples of the City. The General's son resents the change to all his expectations and plans, and takes matters into his own hands. Meanwhile, it looks like Mura is more than just a wicked good fighter, and it's great how Faith Erin Hicks reveals how Mura's got her own, secretive plans. Looking forward to book three!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Y.

    4 1/2 Stars Review to come

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ashley

    Star Rating: —> 5 Stars MUCH better than the first installment! This really kept me on the edge of my seat! Phew— can’t wait to get my hands on the 3rd & final volume!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Nancy

    This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2018/09/1... Faith Erin Hicks’s second book in her The Nameless City trilogy shines! In the first book we were introduced to the fictional city Daidu, aka Dandoa, named by the Dao’s, the most recent conquering nation. However, due to centuries of conquest, the inhabitants of many different nationalities simply call it The Nameless City. This politically important Asian city sits alongside a mountain pass and is the only route to This review can also be found on my blog: https://graphicnovelty2.com/2018/09/1... Faith Erin Hicks’s second book in her The Nameless City trilogy shines! In the first book we were introduced to the fictional city Daidu, aka Dandoa, named by the Dao’s, the most recent conquering nation. However, due to centuries of conquest, the inhabitants of many different nationalities simply call it The Nameless City. This politically important Asian city sits alongside a mountain pass and is the only route to the sea, making it a critical location for trade and military movements. An ancient people carved a passageway through the mountain, but the technology they used has been lost to the ages. The main characters are teen Kaidu, a Dao recently of the distant Homelands who is sent to the city to train as a soldier, and a street-wise girl named Rat who has lived in the city her whole life. Their unlikely friendship helps prevent the General of All Blades from being assassinated in book one. In this second book, the plot is more character driven, and Kaidu and Rat’s back stories are fleshed out. Not only do we learn more about their families, we get a brief interlude that goes further into world-building, for Hicks has created a believable and exquisite city based on 13th century China. In addition, we are shown an authentic friendship and realistic banter between Kaidu, Rat and others. We are also given background on the General’s son Ezri and his mysterious green-eyed bodyguard Mura. Ezri and Mura are shown to be calculating and murderous, and both make decisions that can only lead to the ruin of the tenuous treaties that the Dao nation was making with other kingdoms. They storm the monastery named The Stone Heart, which houses irreplaceable books including a mystical tome that they believe will give them powers to dominate all the surrounding nations. What they do next sets in motion the narrative for the final book The Divided Earth. I eagerly look forward to how Hicks will wrap up this powerful graphic novel series. Her art work and storytelling are absolutely first rate!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Molly

    I somehow read this without realizing that it was the second volume in a trilogy, so now I am going to have to go back and read the first. Even without the background of the first volume, the story was easy enough to follow. Faith Erin Hicks rarely disappoints me with her art and stories, and this was no exception. Sort of a political thriller, but also a story about friendship and the importance of striving to do the right thing (even when it's dangerous or difficult). Really excited to read th I somehow read this without realizing that it was the second volume in a trilogy, so now I am going to have to go back and read the first. Even without the background of the first volume, the story was easy enough to follow. Faith Erin Hicks rarely disappoints me with her art and stories, and this was no exception. Sort of a political thriller, but also a story about friendship and the importance of striving to do the right thing (even when it's dangerous or difficult). Really excited to read the other volumes in this trilogy and to see where Hicks takes her talents in the future.

  10. 4 out of 5

    David

    Lots of unexpected turns and deep thoughts to ponder. I can't wait for Book 3! Lots of unexpected turns and deep thoughts to ponder. I can't wait for Book 3!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Agnė

    3.5 out of 5 The Stone Heart, the second graphic novel in The Nameless City trilogy, is an engaging continuation of the story with the same lovable characters and an expressive and dynamic artwork: While the previous volume, The Nameless City, could have easily passed for a standalone, The Stone Heart feels more like a preparation for the next volume as it ends in a huge cliffhanger and its plot is a little bit thinner than the series opener's. However, the somewhat slower pace in the second book 3.5 out of 5 The Stone Heart, the second graphic novel in The Nameless City trilogy, is an engaging continuation of the story with the same lovable characters and an expressive and dynamic artwork: While the previous volume, The Nameless City, could have easily passed for a standalone, The Stone Heart feels more like a preparation for the next volume as it ends in a huge cliffhanger and its plot is a little bit thinner than the series opener's. However, the somewhat slower pace in the second book allows for some interesting characters' backstories that add depth to the whole series.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jared Pechacek

    Man. Where to begin? On most levels, The Stone Heart works. Faith Erin Hicks is a thoughtful, dynamic cartoonist telling a good story. I would love to recommend it to anyone and everyone. But. Any discussion of The Stone Heart has to take into account that Hicks, a white Canadian woman, has chosen to tell her story in a quasi-Chinese setting. That isn't an automatic strike against the book. The problem is that, as many Asian creators have called her on, much the setting is really just aesthetic. N Man. Where to begin? On most levels, The Stone Heart works. Faith Erin Hicks is a thoughtful, dynamic cartoonist telling a good story. I would love to recommend it to anyone and everyone. But. Any discussion of The Stone Heart has to take into account that Hicks, a white Canadian woman, has chosen to tell her story in a quasi-Chinese setting. That isn't an automatic strike against the book. The problem is that, as many Asian creators have called her on, much the setting is really just aesthetic. Nothing in the story requires it to take place in a fantasy version of medieval China; the themes and characters would work just as well in a more European setting—Hicks herself has said this was the original plan. But she liked the look of a particular era in Chinese history, and put her story there. Based on her many statements regarding this decision, I wonder if she mistook research for respect. I like Hicks. She's a prodigious talent, and I've met her in person twice, and both times were lovely. (The edition of The Stone Heart I have is even signed by her.) This isn't about her, exactly, and I'm not saying she's a bad person. I think she's made a single thoughtless decision…a decision now inextricable from the story she's telling. And she's committed to it. When you reduce a culture to its aesthetics, as this trilogy does, you are doing it a disservice. And when you do it a culture that's already misunderstood and kinda fetishized by Western audiences, that makes it worse. And when creators from that culture call you out on it, you might need to reconsider what you're doing. (It's significant to me that Hicks' own defense of her choice seems to boil down to "my Chinese friend thinks it's okay".) The Stone Heart is one more story snatching a narrative away from the people who truly own it. There are troubling overtones to a Western woman taking Chinese visuals and using them for decorative purposes; this has been happening in so many fields for centuries, usually with some degree of violence. Again, I absolutely don't ascribe any sort of nefarious intent to Hicks, but with her fame and position in the industry, she is essentially speaking more loudly than the people whose voice she's borrowing. Wouldn't it have been better to tell the story in a different setting closer to home and spend that research energy on finding and promoting Asian creators? (Which, actually, she often does anyway, and acknowledges her own artistic debt to manga artists.) So having begun, where do I end? I enjoyed The Stone Heart, when I could forget the anger of artists I admire who feel that Hicks should not have done what she did. It really is a good story about understanding, respect, and peace—but it's undercut by Hicks herself. And that makes it so, so hard to read.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Tasha

    The second book in The Nameless City, this book continues the story of Kaidu and Rat as the political situation grows even tenser in the city. The Dao nation is exploring new paths to solidify peace, but factions within are seeing their personal plans for power evaporating. Soon violence becomes the solution within the Dao factions and someone new is in power. Meanwhile, Kaidu and Rat are discovering that the monks that raised Rat may have the key to the power that the original founders of the C The second book in The Nameless City, this book continues the story of Kaidu and Rat as the political situation grows even tenser in the city. The Dao nation is exploring new paths to solidify peace, but factions within are seeing their personal plans for power evaporating. Soon violence becomes the solution within the Dao factions and someone new is in power. Meanwhile, Kaidu and Rat are discovering that the monks that raised Rat may have the key to the power that the original founders of the City used to create it. But that power could be used as a weapon by the Dao nation, so there is danger in even trying to find it. Hicks has taken on an incredible challenge in this graphic novel series. The story is complicated and fascinating. Hicks creates real danger and drama in the tale, never taking it too far but allowing the political pieces to push the story forward. Kaidu and Rat are marvelous characters, their friendship growing stronger. They offer a critical humorous interlude amongst the politics even as they play an important role in the heart of the story. As this is a graphic novel, the art is just as important as the writing. Hicks has created a truly diverse city filled with various races and religions. She fills the pages with small details, allowing readers to feel the press of the city, the danger it poses and the security it offers. This second novel hints at the adventures to come. Readers will look forward to the third and final book even more after finishing this one. Appropriate for ages 10-13.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Whitney

    Popsugar Reading Prompt: A book with a three word title

  15. 5 out of 5

    Matthew

    School, School, School is the current playlist in my life and the fact that it has taken me over a month to finish this graphic novel showcase my enthusiasm for the second volume. I do not hate it but for sure the first half of the graphic novel I found it to be a bit boring and slow but it pays off towards the end as the sh%t hits the fans. This is a phenomenal middle grade graphic novel series as it really digs into themes of democracy, imperialism, and colonialism in this fictional Asian fant School, School, School is the current playlist in my life and the fact that it has taken me over a month to finish this graphic novel showcase my enthusiasm for the second volume. I do not hate it but for sure the first half of the graphic novel I found it to be a bit boring and slow but it pays off towards the end as the sh%t hits the fans. This is a phenomenal middle grade graphic novel series as it really digs into themes of democracy, imperialism, and colonialism in this fictional Asian fantasy world called The Nameless City. The graphic novel picks up where the previous one ends as Kaidu and Rat saved the General of All-Blades and his son from an assassination attempt. Now that Kaidu was able to save the Emperor's life, it made him realize that this idea of a council of tribes is vital when it comes to avoiding war and preserving the nameless city. Even though its a marvelous idea, executing it on the other hand is rather difficult particularly the Emperor's son who believes it is his divine right to rule as the Emperor of the Nameless City. If you cannot see where I am going with this then you have not seen enough of GoT, Shakespeare, or any historical moment when a son bears hatred for his father and takes what he deems as his birth right. So of course patricide happens and now everything that Kaidu and Rat have worked long and hard for goes to garbage and now they must escape from the Nameless City and yet stop Erzi from destroying the city. Another element that I did not realize was completely obvious yet went over my head is how the First Builders still play a massive role in this drama and how they come into play is predictive yet it was not. It goes to show how the illustrations, the characters, and the world-building of the Nameless City draws me in and lets me enjoy the narrative which I highly recommend everyone to pick up especially those who loved Avatar: the Last Airbender and are into a cute, mesmerizing, simple and yet complex story about hope, change, and the effects of colonialism. I cannot get enough and I am not ready how this series will end!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Gemma

    It’s a kids book they said! It’s not dark at all they said! It definitely won’t include sons brutally beheading their fathers, military coups, social politics, and class divide at all they said!!!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Einas Alhamali

    Can't wait for the finale Can't wait for the finale

  18. 5 out of 5

    Joe Santoro

    When the only complaint one can think of is being annoyed that it's going to be too long until the next installment, one knows one has read a good book :). This sequel is just as interesting and compelling as the first... I only regret that it is only a trilogy.. there is so much that could be written here! When the only complaint one can think of is being annoyed that it's going to be too long until the next installment, one knows one has read a good book :). This sequel is just as interesting and compelling as the first... I only regret that it is only a trilogy.. there is so much that could be written here!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Maggie Gordon

    I adore Faith Erin Hicks' work, and the Nameless City volumes are her strongest releases so far. Having followed her progress for quite a long time, it's wonderful to see just how strong her artistry has gotten. The Stone Heart is a gorgeous book with intricately illustrated backgrounds and characters with delightful sense of movement. Story-wise, it continues directly from the first volume. Rat and Kaidu are no longer secret friends, and the General of All-Blades and Kaidu's father are hard at I adore Faith Erin Hicks' work, and the Nameless City volumes are her strongest releases so far. Having followed her progress for quite a long time, it's wonderful to see just how strong her artistry has gotten. The Stone Heart is a gorgeous book with intricately illustrated backgrounds and characters with delightful sense of movement. Story-wise, it continues directly from the first volume. Rat and Kaidu are no longer secret friends, and the General of All-Blades and Kaidu's father are hard at work trying to organise an all-people's committee to lead the city. The General's son, however, is not happy about this development, and his actions gravely threaten the peace that the city is tenuously holding to. The power of this series is in the deep themes it struggles with while also keeping it understandable for a younger audience. The Nameless City is about conquest, colonialism, and the difficult journeys it takes to try and correct past injustices in order to create a better, more equitable future. The Stone Heart forces characters like Kaidu to come to grips with his position as a coloniser. He feels bad for the actions of his people, and, instead of dwelling and stopping there, takes actions to try and change his behaviour and challenge that of others. It's a beautiful example of how to react to injustice that I think young readers will understand. Some might suggest that The Stone Heart is a slow book, but that is part of its strength. There is some action, but much of the struggle in this book is quieter. However, I was never bored nor did I think the narrative dragged. All in all, this is a fantastic graphic novel for kids and adults alike. Looking forward to the final volume next year!

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ellie

    I liked it until I got to the gay character. That was NOT necessary, and it added NOTHING to the book!

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    The Stone Heart is the second in The Nameless City series by Faith Erin Hicks. I like this story a lot! Set in the 13th Century the city has been conquered over and over again, so many times, in fact, that it doesn't have a true name. Kaidu is new to the city, staying with his father at the Dao palace, and is quickly learning that not everything is as it seems. The Dao believe everything in the city is peaceful and fine but they have little regard for the people they've conquered. Soon Kaidu exp The Stone Heart is the second in The Nameless City series by Faith Erin Hicks. I like this story a lot! Set in the 13th Century the city has been conquered over and over again, so many times, in fact, that it doesn't have a true name. Kaidu is new to the city, staying with his father at the Dao palace, and is quickly learning that not everything is as it seems. The Dao believe everything in the city is peaceful and fine but they have little regard for the people they've conquered. Soon Kaidu explores the city and becomes friends with a street orphan named Rat who has lived a very different experience under the Dao. This is a great exploration of class, politics, and power done in a way that allows younger readers to question on their own. Even if they miss all that it's also just a fun adventure. In this second book the stakes are raised even higher to set up a, hopefully, fantastic ending in the yet to be released third book. Title: B+ Cover: A Grades: 3-8

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dakota Morgan

    The Stone Heart is a rock solid entry in The Nameless City series, although it does suffer somewhat as the middle book in a trilogy - it begins directly after the climax of the first book and expends most of its energy setting things up for the dramatic concluding volume. If you didn't read The Nameless City directly before reading this volume, you might feel a little lost. Lost or not, Kai and Rat are still great characters, exhibiting growth and companionship that feels quite real despite the c The Stone Heart is a rock solid entry in The Nameless City series, although it does suffer somewhat as the middle book in a trilogy - it begins directly after the climax of the first book and expends most of its energy setting things up for the dramatic concluding volume. If you didn't read The Nameless City directly before reading this volume, you might feel a little lost. Lost or not, Kai and Rat are still great characters, exhibiting growth and companionship that feels quite real despite the crazy circumstances of the story. We learn a bit more about other characters, particularly the monks who might be hiding great secrets. We also expand the story beyond the city, exploring one of the other cultures in this world. I could have used a little bit more exploration (what differentiates these tribes?), but that's a minor quibble. The art is still stellar, the action still propulsive. I'm definitely eager to see how the conclusion plays out.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Heidi

    Having really liked the first book in The Nameless City trilogy, I was eager to read this second book. And I was not disappointed. Kai and Rat are coming to terms with their changed circumstances and the changes that seem to be in store for the city. But unfortunately, the politics involved in the running of an empire can change quickly, and when things take a turn for the worse, Kai, his father, and Rat are forced to flee. As the fate of the city rests on a knife's edge, Kai and Rat wonder if t Having really liked the first book in The Nameless City trilogy, I was eager to read this second book. And I was not disappointed. Kai and Rat are coming to terms with their changed circumstances and the changes that seem to be in store for the city. But unfortunately, the politics involved in the running of an empire can change quickly, and when things take a turn for the worse, Kai, his father, and Rat are forced to flee. As the fate of the city rests on a knife's edge, Kai and Rat wonder if the formula created by the cities' founders is the answer. But keeping it out of the hands of the new found enemy may be more than they can handle. Like second books in most trilogies, the book ends on a cliffhanger, with many questions still to be answered. I'm truly anxious to get my hands on the third book. My favorite part of this series are the gorgeous illustrations, depicting Kai and Rat, young people from different cultures who found the courage to look beyond appearances. Now it's up to them to try to prevent all out war and save the city they both love.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Bookish

    Guys, I’m so obsessed with this middle grade series. It focuses on the friendship between Rat, a native of the Nameless city, and Kaidu, a member of the Dao, the people who conquered the city. They respect each other and openly discuss the ingrained prejudices of their societies, while helping to fight against an oppressive government regime. It’s smart, complex, and never underestimates its target audience. I’m already itching for the next one. —Kelly (https://www.bookish.com/articles/book...) Guys, I’m so obsessed with this middle grade series. It focuses on the friendship between Rat, a native of the Nameless city, and Kaidu, a member of the Dao, the people who conquered the city. They respect each other and openly discuss the ingrained prejudices of their societies, while helping to fight against an oppressive government regime. It’s smart, complex, and never underestimates its target audience. I’m already itching for the next one. —Kelly (https://www.bookish.com/articles/book...)

  25. 4 out of 5

    John

    Hopes for peace go a-glimmering as regime change comes to the Nameless City's latest conquerors the Dao just as a new invading army approaches, and a book about a powerful ancient weapon comes to light. Once again Rat and Kaidu are at the center of events, and also the only ones who can stave off widespread disaster--maybe. Hicks ends this episode in mid-gallop, so I hope the closer isn't all that far off...otherwise she does her usual spectacular job of capturing nuances of character in the art Hopes for peace go a-glimmering as regime change comes to the Nameless City's latest conquerors the Dao just as a new invading army approaches, and a book about a powerful ancient weapon comes to light. Once again Rat and Kaidu are at the center of events, and also the only ones who can stave off widespread disaster--maybe. Hicks ends this episode in mid-gallop, so I hope the closer isn't all that far off...otherwise she does her usual spectacular job of capturing nuances of character in the art and keeping the tale moving right along.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Karissa

    This was an amazing continuation of The Nameless City series. Things get pretty tense in this book. I love the detail that went into building this world and the beautifully colored and detailed illustrations. The characters are amazing as well. The Nameless City ends up on the brink of war again...despite the best efforts of those who live there and want to engender peace once and for all. Kadu unravels more history behind his father’s past and Rat reveals some secrets behind the monastery she gre This was an amazing continuation of The Nameless City series. Things get pretty tense in this book. I love the detail that went into building this world and the beautifully colored and detailed illustrations. The characters are amazing as well. The Nameless City ends up on the brink of war again...despite the best efforts of those who live there and want to engender peace once and for all. Kadu unravels more history behind his father’s past and Rat reveals some secrets behind the monastery she grew up in. Both are struggling not only to save the City but their own lives. The illustration throughout is fantastic and easy to follow. The story is getting increasingly complex and things get pretty intense. I would recommend to middle grade and older readers as a result. This should be a graphic novel adults will enjoy too; it’s complex enough and deals with some interesting issues around war. Overall I really loved this 2nd volume in the Nameless City series. I would recommend to those who enjoy fantasy graphic novels about war and politics. This is an incredibly well done series with excellent illustration and an amazing world.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    I'm really liking this series a lot--I love Kai and Rat's friendship, and how they're gradually learning more about each other. I like that nobody's wholeheartedly, straight-up a villain just for the sake of being a villain--there are reasons. And man...the story in this volume definitely went in some directions I did not expect it to go! I'm excited about the finale--write and draw like the wind, Faith Erin Hicks! Like the wind! I'm really liking this series a lot--I love Kai and Rat's friendship, and how they're gradually learning more about each other. I like that nobody's wholeheartedly, straight-up a villain just for the sake of being a villain--there are reasons. And man...the story in this volume definitely went in some directions I did not expect it to go! I'm excited about the finale--write and draw like the wind, Faith Erin Hicks! Like the wind!

  28. 5 out of 5

    Literary Strawberry

    Same fantastic characters, beautiful world-building, wonderful plot development, and there was a twist near the middle that made me literally stare at the page and whisper "what" to myself about a dozen times (actually, more like "what. what. did you just-- no way. what. no, you did not just-- WHAT") so yeah I REALLY ENJOYED THIS AND I AM UPSET THAT I HAVE TO WAIT FOR THE NEXT ONE TO BE PUBLISHED Same fantastic characters, beautiful world-building, wonderful plot development, and there was a twist near the middle that made me literally stare at the page and whisper "what" to myself about a dozen times (actually, more like "what. what. did you just-- no way. what. no, you did not just-- WHAT") so yeah I REALLY ENJOYED THIS AND I AM UPSET THAT I HAVE TO WAIT FOR THE NEXT ONE TO BE PUBLISHED

  29. 5 out of 5

    K

    Sort of a saggy middle book, Hicks' art is excellent as always but the tension isn't drawn out quite as smoothly as it could be. I'm deeply curious where the story is going to go from here, but if I didn't have the momentum of the first book and the promise of another, The Stone Heart would leave me a little disappointed. Sort of a saggy middle book, Hicks' art is excellent as always but the tension isn't drawn out quite as smoothly as it could be. I'm deeply curious where the story is going to go from here, but if I didn't have the momentum of the first book and the promise of another, The Stone Heart would leave me a little disappointed.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Nina

    This got a bit darker than I was expecting! But it's so good. The characters are all interesting and have so much depth even though it's a JGN. There are so many good themes you could talk about if you read this with your kid or a class, etc. Can't wait for #3!! This got a bit darker than I was expecting! But it's so good. The characters are all interesting and have so much depth even though it's a JGN. There are so many good themes you could talk about if you read this with your kid or a class, etc. Can't wait for #3!!

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