web site hit counter A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel: My Journey in Photographs - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel: My Journey in Photographs

Availability: Ready to download

In a unique publishing event that’s perfectly timed for Mother’s Day, National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths Belt discloses the secrets of a peripatetic life...revealing in often hilarious detail how she managed to juggle two children, bulky cases of camera equipment and everything needed for a nurturing family life as she traveled to far-flung destinations aroun In a unique publishing event that’s perfectly timed for Mother’s Day, National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths Belt discloses the secrets of a peripatetic life...revealing in often hilarious detail how she managed to juggle two children, bulky cases of camera equipment and everything needed for a nurturing family life as she traveled to far-flung destinations around the world. Belt was one of the first female photographers hired at the National Geographic Society. When her children were born, she kept right on going—and this book is a loving compendium of the wisdom she gained. It chronicles three decades of international travel, a moveable family, and the art she created along the way. Belt shares intimate moments, lessons learned from other women and men she met, and all the fun and heartache of the experience. Her quirky sense of humor and many touching stories will delight and excite readers who are making and maintaining career decisions for themselves and their families. In addition to its value as a collection of emotionally rich photographs, A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel will find wide appeal as a unique and meaningful gift for Mother’s Day, birthdays, and many other occasions.


Compare

In a unique publishing event that’s perfectly timed for Mother’s Day, National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths Belt discloses the secrets of a peripatetic life...revealing in often hilarious detail how she managed to juggle two children, bulky cases of camera equipment and everything needed for a nurturing family life as she traveled to far-flung destinations aroun In a unique publishing event that’s perfectly timed for Mother’s Day, National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths Belt discloses the secrets of a peripatetic life...revealing in often hilarious detail how she managed to juggle two children, bulky cases of camera equipment and everything needed for a nurturing family life as she traveled to far-flung destinations around the world. Belt was one of the first female photographers hired at the National Geographic Society. When her children were born, she kept right on going—and this book is a loving compendium of the wisdom she gained. It chronicles three decades of international travel, a moveable family, and the art she created along the way. Belt shares intimate moments, lessons learned from other women and men she met, and all the fun and heartache of the experience. Her quirky sense of humor and many touching stories will delight and excite readers who are making and maintaining career decisions for themselves and their families. In addition to its value as a collection of emotionally rich photographs, A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel will find wide appeal as a unique and meaningful gift for Mother’s Day, birthdays, and many other occasions.

30 review for A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel: My Journey in Photographs

  1. 5 out of 5

    JoAnna

    I picked up A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel completely randomly during a long afternoon spent browsing the shelves at the local library. My intention was to take it home and flip through the pages at the breakfast table, but I was greatly mistaken at how involved I would get with this book. A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel is written by Annie Griffiths Belt, who was the youngest photographer at the National Geographic Society when she arrived to work there in 1978. A photographer by trade, Annie has I picked up A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel completely randomly during a long afternoon spent browsing the shelves at the local library. My intention was to take it home and flip through the pages at the breakfast table, but I was greatly mistaken at how involved I would get with this book. A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel is written by Annie Griffiths Belt, who was the youngest photographer at the National Geographic Society when she arrived to work there in 1978. A photographer by trade, Annie has compiled A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel as an autobiography / coffee table book, and it works. Early in the book, she writes about her journey of becoming a photographer (it all started with a college newspaper assignment) for one of the most-renowned associations known for its vivid and authentic photography, the National Geographic Society. She talks about meeting her husband (Don, a writer for the magazine), and then having two children. For many people, this would result in the end of their world travels, but having children simply fueled Annie and Don’s desire to share the world with their family, so for many years, the four of them have traipsed from the Galapagos Islands to Jersalem to Wyoming and beyond. (The kids, now in their early 20s, still travel frequently with their parents.) Annie writes a lot about what it’s like to travel with kids, thus providing valuable information to people who would like to do the same. After introducing herself, her work as a photographer, her family and their experiences as a traveling family, Annie introduces readers to a wide variety of her photography. Large, colorful spreads of Appalachia with the fog rising, a Jewish cemetery at the Mount of Olives, members of the Calder Valley Mouse Club, the veins of the Sea of Cortez and dozens of others spill across the pages, drawing people into the world as seen through Annie’s eyes. Interspersed with these photographs are sections of text describing specific experiences living, working and giving back to local communities in certain parts of the world. I particularly enjoyed the part of the book focused on the Middle East, when Annie traveled throughout Jordan, Israel, Syria and Egypt. I loved reading about her experiences of trying to photograph places, holidays and people that weren’t meant to be captured on film for any number of reasons. In many cases, Annie was the first (and is still the only) person to take pictures of certain sites and traditions in the Middle East, and it is as fascinating to read about how she did this as well as look at the photos she shot. I absolutely loved A Camera, Two Kids and a Camel because of its unique blend of being a travel guide, travel narrative and collection of stellar photography. If you pick it up, take the time to read it as well as enjoy the photos. Text and images together tell this story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brian Page

    A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel: My Journey in Photographs is all about the importance of establishing relationships for great documentary photography; and Annie Griffiths Belt is the master of this. The photos in this book are spectacular, of course (could there be a more striking portrait than that of Violet Wise on page 185?), but the essays are even more captivating. Annie’s work for National Geographic dates from the days of big budgets, loose deadlines, and long assignments: “Assignments i A Camera, Two Kids, and a Camel: My Journey in Photographs is all about the importance of establishing relationships for great documentary photography; and Annie Griffiths Belt is the master of this. The photos in this book are spectacular, of course (could there be a more striking portrait than that of Violet Wise on page 185?), but the essays are even more captivating. Annie’s work for National Geographic dates from the days of big budgets, loose deadlines, and long assignments: “Assignments in those days averaged three to six months. No assistants. No shot list. No excuses.” (p. 36) I particularly loved her little essay on Calder Valley Mouse Club (and the photo too). Annie cut her teeth at a newspaper, noting, “Among the most important things I learned at the Globe was that if you can befriend a shy Norwegian farmer and make it to his kitchen table, you can probably navigate any culture on Earth.” (p. 20) So how to do that? “And as long as I keep my head down and my heart open, I get to places few people are lucky enough to see.” (p. 129) Fortunately, there is this book for those many of us who are unlucky.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Cyndi Maupin

    I loved this book. As someone that enjoys photography it was very inspirational to see the different types of photos along with the written narratives behind the images. The fact that Annie Griffiths Belt was able to balance her career, marriage and family was very impressive. More importantly she spoke of the struggles and logistics in trying to have it all but in the end the good outweighed any difficulties her and her family experienced. She also gave her children something that will stay wit I loved this book. As someone that enjoys photography it was very inspirational to see the different types of photos along with the written narratives behind the images. The fact that Annie Griffiths Belt was able to balance her career, marriage and family was very impressive. More importantly she spoke of the struggles and logistics in trying to have it all but in the end the good outweighed any difficulties her and her family experienced. She also gave her children something that will stay with them for life, the gift of world culture and exploration.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Drick

    Annie Griffiths Belt is a high school friend who wrote this pictorial memoir of travelling around the world with her husband, 2 children and a nanny doing her work as a photographer for National Geographic. While the title would suggest that the entire book would focus on family adventures, that story loosely told and not held together to the end of the book, is really a pretext for Annie to share some of her incredible photographs of people and place around the globe. As Annie herself writes sh Annie Griffiths Belt is a high school friend who wrote this pictorial memoir of travelling around the world with her husband, 2 children and a nanny doing her work as a photographer for National Geographic. While the title would suggest that the entire book would focus on family adventures, that story loosely told and not held together to the end of the book, is really a pretext for Annie to share some of her incredible photographs of people and place around the globe. As Annie herself writes she is not an author but a photographer, and her pictures tell a story of hope and the human spirit. Even in places of suffering and dire poverty she is able to capture the caring and joy of being alive. In many cases she tells the story behind pictures which brings it to life even more. As a friend of Annie's I found this a great way to follow a part of her life that I had only heard about. For others it is a rich experience of seeing the world through lens of someone who has an eye for beauty and hope

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lori

    I expected the photos to do all the talking, and they do carry the heaviest load but the author's commentary provided an unexpected delight. Tales of world travels, of common humanity, of the universality of women and of children drew me in and held me. Much more than a book of photos, this visual and intellectual treat took me on a journey- through foreign customs around the world and right next door. Her writing conveys, with nearly as much punch as her photos, how cultural immersion can feel. I expected the photos to do all the talking, and they do carry the heaviest load but the author's commentary provided an unexpected delight. Tales of world travels, of common humanity, of the universality of women and of children drew me in and held me. Much more than a book of photos, this visual and intellectual treat took me on a journey- through foreign customs around the world and right next door. Her writing conveys, with nearly as much punch as her photos, how cultural immersion can feel. She invites the reader along for the experience, and I felt invigorted and enlarged by the shared travel. I also felt grateful for a renewed sense of wonder at this world and the people in it that we get to glimpse through her lens.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mary

    The photography was beautiful with a great deal of variety in terms of subject (personally, I think these could have been organized in a way that would have flowed a little better: by region, maybe?). The writing was promising, and I enjoyed reading the little blurbs here and there about different assignments, but I felt like the book would have been a better read if there had been more writing and more detail about her life and her assignments. From reading the dust jacket, I thought there woul The photography was beautiful with a great deal of variety in terms of subject (personally, I think these could have been organized in a way that would have flowed a little better: by region, maybe?). The writing was promising, and I enjoyed reading the little blurbs here and there about different assignments, but I felt like the book would have been a better read if there had been more writing and more detail about her life and her assignments. From reading the dust jacket, I thought there would be more about her experiences balancing her career and her role as a mother. She talks about it here and there, but only briefly, and I never got a sense for the other people in her life.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Theresa Powers

    This was so interesting. Annie and her husband both work for National Geographic. She sort of fell into the profession of photography at a very early age and her husband has always been a writer. They decided to have children with one stipulation; the children would travel with them around the world. The children recieved a lot more than a formal education; they were able to explore different cultures, religions, and ethnicities. This was a fascinating pictoral about their lives. The children gr This was so interesting. Annie and her husband both work for National Geographic. She sort of fell into the profession of photography at a very early age and her husband has always been a writer. They decided to have children with one stipulation; the children would travel with them around the world. The children recieved a lot more than a formal education; they were able to explore different cultures, religions, and ethnicities. This was a fascinating pictoral about their lives. The children grew up gypsies and continue to travel to this day. The way the story is potrayed and knowing it is true made me not want to put the book down. I read it all in one sitting.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Julie Ivens

    This is a very well done book. Annie Griffiths Belt has my dream job of travelling all over the place and taking pictures every step of the way. Every fascinating photograph is accompanied by her story about the lives of the people involved, what she had to do to get the shot, etc. The book has a down to earth presentation style. It's eye candy that makes you think and gives glimpses into hidden lives. This is a very well done book. Annie Griffiths Belt has my dream job of travelling all over the place and taking pictures every step of the way. Every fascinating photograph is accompanied by her story about the lives of the people involved, what she had to do to get the shot, etc. The book has a down to earth presentation style. It's eye candy that makes you think and gives glimpses into hidden lives.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    3.5 stars. (Why don't they have 1/2 stars on GR?) Inspiring, heart-warming photo memoir about work and travel with her two kids, who she brought all over the world while on assignments for National Geographic. The book made me almost teary-eyed a few times (but I easily get teary), especially in the first half. Not sure what happened, but the book's emotional effect wasn't nearly as potent in the second half =/ 3.5 stars. (Why don't they have 1/2 stars on GR?) Inspiring, heart-warming photo memoir about work and travel with her two kids, who she brought all over the world while on assignments for National Geographic. The book made me almost teary-eyed a few times (but I easily get teary), especially in the first half. Not sure what happened, but the book's emotional effect wasn't nearly as potent in the second half =/

  10. 4 out of 5

    Julie

    I saw the author present a lot of these photos at a National Geographic lecture here in Seattle. It was awesome. To hear the stories related to each photo made me appreciate her work even more. Especially since I don't have a photographic eye. What an exciting life she has had traveling around with her kids and husband doing what she loves! I saw the author present a lot of these photos at a National Geographic lecture here in Seattle. It was awesome. To hear the stories related to each photo made me appreciate her work even more. Especially since I don't have a photographic eye. What an exciting life she has had traveling around with her kids and husband doing what she loves!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Allison Jones

    gorgeous pics--this was more interesting from a human interest standpoint rather than from a photographic one. I would like to hear more about her actually photographing the things she did and the problems she solved etc. This is a gorgeous coffee table book about a talented woman who created family life on her own terms. Worth having.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caro

    I heard her speak last night, and in a conversational, lively style she told some of the stories from this book as well as from her subsequent travels. She spoke (and write here) very little about technicalities, more about how forming relationships with people and being patient can result in just the photo you want. Inspiring.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Cynthia

    This book is gorgeous. The aerial photo of the Dome of the Rock is one of the most beautiful I have ever seen. This book is much more about the photos than the text, but the author's anectdotes about her life and work are interesting , as well. This book is gorgeous. The aerial photo of the Dome of the Rock is one of the most beautiful I have ever seen. This book is much more about the photos than the text, but the author's anectdotes about her life and work are interesting , as well.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Paulette

    Great book. Wonderful pictures. Author works for National Geographic and traveled with her children. Met the author at BN book event! Enthusiastic, energetic talented speaker, photographer and author!

  15. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    Saw Annie Griffiths speak -- so inspiring, not only as a voyaging woman who was able to make her career and family balance work really well, but also as a change-maker who is using her art to change the world.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Aimee

    Great book for the coffee table! I never tire of looking through this book and each time I gain a different perspective. The stories enhance the spectacular photos. I enjoy Annie’s fresh, pure and loving perspective reflected in her stories. Thank you for sharing the world through your eyes!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marianne Cohen

    Interesting story of a womans challenges to becoming a serious photographer with a husband and two children. Many of her photographs are included. She has achieved great success working for National Geographic and raising a family.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kat McKay

    I loved this book! A valuable tool for anyone going into the photojournalism industry, especially if you're a woman. It teaches you that you can have it all, a family and career! Plus, Annie's photos are spectacular. I loved this book! A valuable tool for anyone going into the photojournalism industry, especially if you're a woman. It teaches you that you can have it all, a family and career! Plus, Annie's photos are spectacular.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Angie

    I love this book!!! As an aspiring photographer I was so excited to get it. I have gone through all the beautiful photos and am going back to read her story.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    Annie's pictures are amazing, and this book is a wonderful photo essay (it dealt with her travels with her children only superficially). Gorgeous pictures though. Annie's pictures are amazing, and this book is a wonderful photo essay (it dealt with her travels with her children only superficially). Gorgeous pictures though.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Cindy

    Beautiful photos. Great stories about traveling with kids.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Melissa

    An interesting look at the life of National Geographic photographer Annie Griffiths Belt. Great photographs and great photo essays. A must read for fans of photography and National Geographic.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Clara

    I want to be Annie Griffiths Belt when I grow up. It probably wasn't too smart to buy this book when I have been consumed by wanderlust for weeks. Wonderful stuff, wonderful stories I want to be Annie Griffiths Belt when I grow up. It probably wasn't too smart to buy this book when I have been consumed by wanderlust for weeks. Wonderful stuff, wonderful stories

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    Beautiful images and words from a world traveler. Also inspiring - you can have a family and still travel!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Stacy

    Interesting biography of Annie Belts' career. I would love to have had her job. She has traveled to and photographed some amazing places around the world. There are some beautiful photos in her book. Interesting biography of Annie Belts' career. I would love to have had her job. She has traveled to and photographed some amazing places around the world. There are some beautiful photos in her book.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Really enjoyed this beautiful book, and the short stories within. Makes you want to hop on a plane!

  27. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Flannery

    I really enjoyed this one. A story of her family along with the story of her photos. I recommend picking this one up, good coffee table book as well.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    Beautiful photography and wonderful essays. Nice.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    I enjoyed this book. It was an easy/light read and also inspiring. :) Annie's photography takes up a good portion of the book, so I read it in 2-3 sittings. I enjoyed this book. It was an easy/light read and also inspiring. :) Annie's photography takes up a good portion of the book, so I read it in 2-3 sittings.

  30. 5 out of 5

    April

    Fascinating read. The short text made for a quick read, but the remarkable photographs are burned into my memory.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.