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The New Mutants

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49 npages! Has Psyche gone mad, or is it the Spirit Bear out to get her? Or worse -- is Professor X really a Brood?


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49 npages! Has Psyche gone mad, or is it the Spirit Bear out to get her? Or worse -- is Professor X really a Brood?

30 review for The New Mutants

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sophia

    The first appearance and adventure of the New Mutants! I liked how each new character was introduced, the little glimpses of life before their powers presented themselves. I loved how you really felt these kids were young and inexperienced but were also determined and strong. I wasn’t too keen on reading more (on the New Mutants) but this GN has really made me want to continue reading their stories!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Himanshu Karmacharya

    When the X-Men were supposedly "killed", it was time to introduce the readers to a new X-Men team. Chris Claremont has all the right ingredients at his disposal, a number of new and young characters, with all sorts of new superpowers, but he never manages to make something out of it. The execution is near horrible, and the poor dialogues do not help the book at all. Another thing that troubled me was the art. The characters who are supposed to be in their teens, look like they are in their 30s. When the X-Men were supposedly "killed", it was time to introduce the readers to a new X-Men team. Chris Claremont has all the right ingredients at his disposal, a number of new and young characters, with all sorts of new superpowers, but he never manages to make something out of it. The execution is near horrible, and the poor dialogues do not help the book at all. Another thing that troubled me was the art. The characters who are supposed to be in their teens, look like they are in their 30s. Even the faces of the characters don't match panel to panel. The New Mutants is a book which paves the way for infinite possibilities for the X-Men mythos, but lackluster writing and inconsistent art bring down all the potential it holds.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Engel-Hodgkinson

    2.9/5 I was surprised when I found this in my local pawn shop. I rarely find oldies like this for cheap in my town of all places, but there it was, right alongside an old Marvel Comics graphic novel adaptation of RoboCop 2. It brings a nice feeling. That being said, The New Mutants is sorely lacking in some of the wrong spots. It has the story down, and the ideas, but it's merely barebones; it's a Thanksgiving dinner without the turkey and stuffing. The characters all lack development. They are plo 2.9/5 I was surprised when I found this in my local pawn shop. I rarely find oldies like this for cheap in my town of all places, but there it was, right alongside an old Marvel Comics graphic novel adaptation of RoboCop 2. It brings a nice feeling. That being said, The New Mutants is sorely lacking in some of the wrong spots. It has the story down, and the ideas, but it's merely barebones; it's a Thanksgiving dinner without the turkey and stuffing. The characters all lack development. They are plot devices, tools. Xavier needs replacements for his precious X-Men, whom are missing and possibly dead, and pop, here come the new mutants. Youngsters whose powers all seem to surface at once, catching both Xavier's and our villain-of-the-hour's attention at the same time. Xavier's only task is to recruit them and "mould" them. The villain's name is unimportant; he has an evil plan and he must be stopped by these children, whose only task is to set aside their fears and differences and beat the bad guy. The man the new mutants must defeat is more forgettable than the average villain in the current Marvel Cinematic Universe. McCleod's art is nice enough, but his insistence to draw cheekbones on every single character makes them look much older than they are. Just by glimpsing the cover alone, I thought the new mutants looked like fifteen-year-olds with fifty-year-old faces. It's decent, and a cool piece of comic book history, but it's under-developed, and kind of unsatisfying.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sicily

    Diverse and interesting characters. I love these new mutants. They may be better than the originals, or at least the writing was better in this graphic novel.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Tacitus

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. "It's because we're so young, we're kids -- 'X-babies.' Nobody takes us seriously." Roberto DeCosta, The New Mutants #8 I liked how these stories were told, but so much the stories themselves. Chris Claremont, Sal Buscema, Bob McLeod, and others offer a primer here on good comics storytelling. Each issue is clearly told. If a reader picked up any issue, the characters, a bit of their backstories, and some reference to recent events in prior issues all make these easy to read and jump into at any "It's because we're so young, we're kids -- 'X-babies.' Nobody takes us seriously." Roberto DeCosta, The New Mutants #8 I liked how these stories were told, but so much the stories themselves. Chris Claremont, Sal Buscema, Bob McLeod, and others offer a primer here on good comics storytelling. Each issue is clearly told. If a reader picked up any issue, the characters, a bit of their backstories, and some reference to recent events in prior issues all make these easy to read and jump into at any point. It's easy to take this for granted, but these conventions worked well and seem to be a lost art today. On this level of plain craftsmanship, Claremont and Buscema respected their audience and the medium. Some of the conventions seem staid today, especially the paneling, but there's also artistic merit in straightforward, clear storytelling. Their run here also demonstrates what a consistent partnership of creators can achieve. Still, I never gravitated toward teenage superheroes when I was younger, for problems revealed here. The stories typically involve the teens going out for fun and then getting in trouble. Xavier constantly says that he wants to keep the New Mutants out of trouble, and not repeat the disaster that befell the X-men -- but then he forces them to wear X-men-style uniforms and fight in the Danger Room, among other things. Throughout, Claremont weaves in all kinds of details about each character, giving them a lot of depth and life, even if this is done routinely through the somewhat ham-fisted technique of internal thought bubbles. Most of their adventures start with some innocent-seeming teenage outing. Sometimes the teens go out accompanied by Stevie, a non-powered instructor at the institute and their chaperone; other times, they don't. They go to a mall and are attacked by Sentinels in a storyline that goes nowhere after that. They need Stevie to go see a movie, but in a disconnected annual, Stevie doesn't chaperone them into New York City, and they end up in a fight on 42nd Street and a running pursuit throughout Manhattan. (Apparently, after seeing Cats, they were walking back to Port Authority Bus Terminal to catch a bus home; it seems like Sam may have been old enough to get a driver's license and taken the X-mansion Rolls, or that Charles could have paid an adult driver to do so, but no matter.) There's also a delightfully weird Alien-inspired plot involving a Brood queen, Charles, and his Shiar girlfriend, Lilandra. Despite their propensity to get in trouble on their typically teenage outings, Xavier assents to the New Mutants joining Roberto's mother in the Amazon. That way, he can focus on helping a group of motorcycle stunt performers, Team America, build their mutant powers. Meanwhile, the New Mutants discover a lost civilization -- whose inhabitants apparently learned English somehow -- and the teens manage to survive without much adult help. Despite his earlier concern for the teens, Xavier never appears once that I can recall while they are struggling in the Amazon. All the while, one of the more interesting members of the team, Karma, disappears from the pages. Too, three of the New Mutants are plagued by clothing issues. Cannonball's lower body is a blaze of fire that propels him around. Sunspot's body transforms, smashing armor at one point but not his underclothes. Wolfsbane is a bit of a prude due to her religious upbringing, but she suffers no embarrassment in her wolf form, or weirder still, a transitional form that is both wolf and human. In any case, in one scene she bursts through her robe only to have it magically reappear somehow later when she's back in human form. It's almost like the creators didn't expect that teenage readers would see through these gaffes and gaps. It may be a fault of the medium: creating characters with relatable, real-world backstories, and then, because superpowers, not holding them up to to any sort of real-world, everyday logic. The teens are constantly going on fun outings and vacations; never once do these teenagers struggle with something as mundane as math class. Indeed, what are they getting out of their Xavier schooling exactly? Well, perhaps it can be said that the best school to a teenager is one that you never have to go to. For my part, as a teen I was drawn to fully adult characters. I didn't want to dwell on others' teenage problems, which, after all, weren't real teenage problems. My hope was to get past adolescence and become something better; that's why I gravitated toward comic books featuring adult superheroes and still do. That said, I did treasure every panel of the 4-issue mini-series that features Magik. In a tale that reminded me at times of Alice in Wonderland, it avoids most of the real-world pitfalls by setting it in Limbo, throwing in parallel universe versions of several X-men to boot. It's a shame, in a way, that it's in the back of this collection, because a reader may not get that far. This is one of the best origin stories I've read, and the writing and artwork were consistently good on every page. The contrast between the Magik series and the rest of the stories perhaps underscores the feeling that I've often had that creators do their best work in shorter arcs like that mini-series. The run-of-the-mill work that Claremont and his fellow creators churned out month to month was passably good, but not outstanding. Even so, their prosaic, monthly output rises above what most creators churn out today, and at the very least, this New Mutants collection offers new creators a primer on how to create good, if not always great, comic books.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Tony Calder

    Back in the mid 70s Chris Claremont took over scripting and plotting duties on X-Men, a previously popular title which had been languishing, and was only printing repeats of earlier stories. Gradually the sales built, and by 1982 X-Men was Marvel's best-selling magazine, and (I think) selling more than any DC comic as well. Just as they had done when Spider-Man was selling very well, Marvel decided to release a second X-Men title. However, instead of writing a second comic about the X-Men, Clarem Back in the mid 70s Chris Claremont took over scripting and plotting duties on X-Men, a previously popular title which had been languishing, and was only printing repeats of earlier stories. Gradually the sales built, and by 1982 X-Men was Marvel's best-selling magazine, and (I think) selling more than any DC comic as well. Just as they had done when Spider-Man was selling very well, Marvel decided to release a second X-Men title. However, instead of writing a second comic about the X-Men, Claremont created a new, younger group of mutants, who were just discovering their powers, just as had been the X-Men when the original title launched in 1963. This graphic novel introduced the team and told their origin stories. 50 pages of story isn't a lot to tell 5 origin stories and have a battle with the villains as well, so things do seem a little rushed. The characters, however, are interesting, and sufficiently different from both the original X-Men and the new characters that Claremont had introduced in the main title. The story (not surprisingly considering the lack of space) is also a lot simpler than the long, multi-issue stories being told in the X-Men. The artwork is serviceable without being spectacular. The New Mutants did go on to be another huge success for Marvel, so this is certainly a significant issue.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Marvel Team Up #100 (Spider-man and Fantastic Four) [Dec, 1980]: Great panels and movement by Frank Miller and Bob Wiacek. Features Karma's origin story. Marvel Graphic Novel #4 (1982): Uneven pencil work by Bob McLeod and dull Claremont story. Origin stories of the new mutants. Unusually coloured (color pencils?). New Mutants #1 (March 1983): "[...]then again, her being full grown might have...other compensations." Care to explain this Claremont? Danielle (Dani') Moonstar aka Psyche gets herself Marvel Team Up #100 (Spider-man and Fantastic Four) [Dec, 1980]: Great panels and movement by Frank Miller and Bob Wiacek. Features Karma's origin story. Marvel Graphic Novel #4 (1982): Uneven pencil work by Bob McLeod and dull Claremont story. Origin stories of the new mutants. Unusually coloured (color pencils?). New Mutants #1 (March 1983): "[...]then again, her being full grown might have...other compensations." Care to explain this Claremont? Danielle (Dani') Moonstar aka Psyche gets herself into trouble in the Danger Room. The New Mutants: New Mutants #3 & Uncanny X-men #167: crossover with the brood. p. 171 Sikorsky: "Longshot, is. Choice, there is none. Permission given. Procedure begun has." Brood compare Alien. Uncanny X-Men #167: Solid and refreshing art by Paul Smith and Bob Wiacek. X-men return to deal with Xavier the Brood-mama.

  8. 4 out of 5

    R.C.

    I always find myself very hesitant when starting older comics just because some can be very dated, or very campy, or incredibly bigoted. But not only was this one decently progressive in its cast and themes, but it was a lot of fun. Over the span of about 49 pages, we see a new group of mutants as their powers are awakened, coming under the tutelage of Professor Xavier. Chris Claremont writes the characters with nuance instead of mere stereotypes and caricatures, and gives each of them relevance I always find myself very hesitant when starting older comics just because some can be very dated, or very campy, or incredibly bigoted. But not only was this one decently progressive in its cast and themes, but it was a lot of fun. Over the span of about 49 pages, we see a new group of mutants as their powers are awakened, coming under the tutelage of Professor Xavier. Chris Claremont writes the characters with nuance instead of mere stereotypes and caricatures, and gives each of them relevance and a place in this plot. It’s the perfect introductory to this team and how it formed, while still maintaining entertainment, interesting action sequences, and good character moments. Overall, I really really enjoyed this, and I found this to be a good intro comic for first time comic readers.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Liana

    New Mutants introduces some of the most famous and beloved characters, like Dani Moonstar (Mirage), Cannonball, Karma, Wolfsbane, and Sunspot. It’s a short, yet wonderful introduction to these characters, their abilities, and backgrounds, and how they all came to study at Xavier’s institute. Its strength is not so much its pacing and actual storyline, but the introduction of such powerful characters, characters that are easy to love and root for. My only “complaint” – as a person who doesn’t rea New Mutants introduces some of the most famous and beloved characters, like Dani Moonstar (Mirage), Cannonball, Karma, Wolfsbane, and Sunspot. It’s a short, yet wonderful introduction to these characters, their abilities, and backgrounds, and how they all came to study at Xavier’s institute. Its strength is not so much its pacing and actual storyline, but the introduction of such powerful characters, characters that are easy to love and root for. My only “complaint” – as a person who doesn’t really like Charles – is that I saw him way more than I wanted to. I do, however, understand his importance to the X-Men and how vital he is, so I’m not really complaining.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Rog Harrison

    This was first published in 1982 and I probably bought my copy a few years later as it's a 4th printing. I have read this several times but would not have recorded reading it as I would have considered it a comic. This introduces the New Mutants team who would then feature in a comic which lasted for 100 issues. Apparently this story was originally intended to be the first issue of the comic but was then changed to become this graphic novel. It's not much of a story as it has to explain who the n This was first published in 1982 and I probably bought my copy a few years later as it's a 4th printing. I have read this several times but would not have recorded reading it as I would have considered it a comic. This introduces the New Mutants team who would then feature in a comic which lasted for 100 issues. Apparently this story was originally intended to be the first issue of the comic but was then changed to become this graphic novel. It's not much of a story as it has to explain who the new characters are as well as having a plot.

  11. 4 out of 5

    DOUGLAS J BERRY

    The creation of the new mutant team. All of these teen mutants seem like a writing exercise in how to flesh out a troubled teen. This team will spend more time fighting each other than external enemies. I always thought the New Mutants were a sort of soap opera comic. Still this novel does a good job of presenting them and their powers.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Nuno

    I grew up reading stories with these characters but had not yet sampled this origin story, so this had that added interest from my part. The introductions are short but effective, and there was plenty of tension. The art is typical of the early 80's but I found it good enough. Some of the script seems silly, but if you can let it slide then it's still an entertaining book.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Juan Wences

    Nothing beats a classic This story is so fantastic because it seriously shows the diversity and adversity of the New Mutants. They are a unique bunch so different from the X-men in actions and personality. Chris Claremont does a fantastic job of giving you an insight to these characters and the role they will soon play in this team. Love this book.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Buddy

    Poor, silly, paint-by-numbers, team-origin-story writing. It doesn't hint at all at the more mature writing to come. Claremont seems to have felt like he was writing for pre-teens in this book, but that all changed with the first issue of the regular series.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Durrwachter

    An expansion of the X-Men Good complete artwork by McLeod, but I prefer his inks to his pencils. Good script by Claremont, but these characters' powers are not nearly as interesting as those of previous incarnations of the team.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ryk Stanton

    I was so thrilled when this came out way back in the 80s, and I’m excited about the movie eventually coming out. Decided to read the whole series on Marvel Unlimited. It’s not as good as I remember, but I’m older. Still a lot of fun :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Reyel2107

    what a great genesis for this group !!!

  18. 5 out of 5

    MICHAEL REILLY

    Meh This story was a little boring, but not terrible. I am not a huge fan of psychic powers either so I think in will be avoiding "New Mutants" from now on.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Connor

    A decent introduction to these characters. Not much story.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Williams

    a great example of why people weren't taking comics seriously in the mid 80s. yikes.

  21. 4 out of 5

    paola

    rahne calling mutations "these gifts from satan" is the highlight of this graphic novel

  22. 5 out of 5

    Trevor Dailey

    Probably the best origin for a team,especially in that era.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Judah Radd

    Not my fav. On the plus side, the art was pretty good, the coloring was beautiful (as is typical with the supersized Marvel Graphic Novel series), and it was physically a pleasure to hold in my hand. I also enjoyed the characters. What suffered was the plot. It was all so rushed. Claremont crammed a bunch of origin into the first half, and a half baked villain story into the second half. It’s possible that he just wasn’t used to the format of a self contained, short GN when he wrote this... but thi Not my fav. On the plus side, the art was pretty good, the coloring was beautiful (as is typical with the supersized Marvel Graphic Novel series), and it was physically a pleasure to hold in my hand. I also enjoyed the characters. What suffered was the plot. It was all so rushed. Claremont crammed a bunch of origin into the first half, and a half baked villain story into the second half. It’s possible that he just wasn’t used to the format of a self contained, short GN when he wrote this... but this sloppy rushed feel really detracted from my ability to enjoy it. It’s not awful. It doesn’t suck. It’s just a bit disappointing and unsatisfying. I still love Chris Claremont.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Blake Petit

    An interesting chapter in the history of the X-Men -- with the team missing and presumed dead, Professor Xavier finds himself coming to the aid of a group of young people each developing mutant powers, much like the original X-Men did years before. I was a big fan of the original New Mutants team back in the day, but this is the first time I've ever managed to read the graphic novel that introduced the characters. Very "Claremont in the 80s," but for the most part, I think that's all to the good An interesting chapter in the history of the X-Men -- with the team missing and presumed dead, Professor Xavier finds himself coming to the aid of a group of young people each developing mutant powers, much like the original X-Men did years before. I was a big fan of the original New Mutants team back in the day, but this is the first time I've ever managed to read the graphic novel that introduced the characters. Very "Claremont in the 80s," but for the most part, I think that's all to the good.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Stacey

    This is the beginning few issues about the New Mutants, those who came after the original X-Men. Since I'd never read about them before, I'll admit it didn't offer as much to me as it might have, but it was still worthwhile.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    I loved this series as a whole, but it was too spotty to get a better rating. There were a lot of page-filling arcs, and when you're putting out such a small comic only once a month, it needs to be packed with character development.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jdetrick

    Ah, for the days when reading Chris Claremont was fun! Actually this story is in the middle of the best days of the mutant titles in Marvel and this is an example of why; interesting characters, solid art, naturalistic reactions to the events around them. Good stuff.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    I've always loved this graphic novel because it makes wonderful use of its space to really take the time to introduce a new group of heroes, who are themselves quite interesting. Every bit as good of a new beginning as Giant-Size X-Men itself.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Kerri

    I'm glad I read this after I already starts the New Mutants series. This book sets up the New Mutants with a lot of potential that has only begun to be realized at issue #18. These mutants all have a past they are struggling with both related and non-related to their powers.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Mphill968

    The series that introduced Deadpool Hard to believe that this is beginnings of the series that gave us Deadpool and Cable. I had forgotten how much the characters had changed over the years.

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