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A brand new saga of magic and adventure by #1 New York Times best-selling author Brandon Sanderson. On the planet of Taldain, the legendary Sand Masters harness arcane powers to manipulate sand in spectacular ways. But when they are slaughtered in a sinister conspiracy, the weakest of their number, Kenton, believes himself to be the only survivor. With enemies closing in A brand new saga of magic and adventure by #1 New York Times best-selling author Brandon Sanderson. On the planet of Taldain, the legendary Sand Masters harness arcane powers to manipulate sand in spectacular ways. But when they are slaughtered in a sinister conspiracy, the weakest of their number, Kenton, believes himself to be the only survivor. With enemies closing in on all sides, Kenton forges an unlikely partnership with Khriss -- a mysterious Darksider who hides secrets of her own. White Sand brings to life a crucial, unpublished part of Brandon Sanderson s sprawling Cosmere universe. The story has been adapted by Rik Hoskin (Mercy Thompson), with art by Julius Gopez and colors by Ross Campbell. Employing powerful imagery and Sanderson s celebrated approach to magical systems, White Sand is a spectacular new saga for lovers of fantasy and adventure."


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A brand new saga of magic and adventure by #1 New York Times best-selling author Brandon Sanderson. On the planet of Taldain, the legendary Sand Masters harness arcane powers to manipulate sand in spectacular ways. But when they are slaughtered in a sinister conspiracy, the weakest of their number, Kenton, believes himself to be the only survivor. With enemies closing in A brand new saga of magic and adventure by #1 New York Times best-selling author Brandon Sanderson. On the planet of Taldain, the legendary Sand Masters harness arcane powers to manipulate sand in spectacular ways. But when they are slaughtered in a sinister conspiracy, the weakest of their number, Kenton, believes himself to be the only survivor. With enemies closing in on all sides, Kenton forges an unlikely partnership with Khriss -- a mysterious Darksider who hides secrets of her own. White Sand brings to life a crucial, unpublished part of Brandon Sanderson s sprawling Cosmere universe. The story has been adapted by Rik Hoskin (Mercy Thompson), with art by Julius Gopez and colors by Ross Campbell. Employing powerful imagery and Sanderson s celebrated approach to magical systems, White Sand is a spectacular new saga for lovers of fantasy and adventure."

30 review for White Sand, Volume 1

  1. 4 out of 5

    Petrik

    3.5/5 Stars According to the postscript I read in Arcanum Unbounded and the intro in this comic, White Sand is a graphic novel adaptation of Sanderson’s first novel (unpublished) of the same name which he finished back in 1999. I wouldn’t say I ‘m a fan of graphic novel medium but I am a huge fan of manga so reading a sequential art is not something new to me. However, as enjoyable as this adaptation is, this graphic novel actually killed some of Sanderson’s usual strength. For example, dividing a 3.5/5 Stars According to the postscript I read in Arcanum Unbounded and the intro in this comic, White Sand is a graphic novel adaptation of Sanderson’s first novel (unpublished) of the same name which he finished back in 1999. I wouldn’t say I ‘m a fan of graphic novel medium but I am a huge fan of manga so reading a sequential art is not something new to me. However, as enjoyable as this adaptation is, this graphic novel actually killed some of Sanderson’s usual strength. For example, dividing a full novel into three volumes just won’t work in general. Imagine reading a novel and after 1/3 you have to stop until next year for the next 1/3 and so on, that’s the case for White Sands. This situation caused the story itself to lose its charm, it’s still good, nothing bad, nothing amazing but it could’ve been done so much better if they actually adapted the whole novel straight into one huge volume or at least release all three close to each other so we won’t have to wait that long. The plot of the first volume actually ended where it was getting interesting. However, the worst part of doing a graphic novel adaptation of Sanderson’s book is the lack of prose in everything. Kenton, the main character suffers a lot from this, Sanderson has always been superb at characterization, he knows how to write compelling characters POV eloquently with his prose and evoke the reader’s empathy, that experience is lost here. Other than seeing the character’s facial expression, we never get to be inside their heads. (Speaking of character, it’s really awesome to finally see Khriss's background here, an important figure in the Cosmere universe which I’ll talk about more in my Arcanum Unbounded full review.) Luckily, the artworks are gorgeous. The world of Taldain is beautiful to look at, the characters and action scenes are well drawn but the best aspect of this adaptation is the magic system, Sand Mastery. Although this is a graphic novel, the magic system’s explanation is brief and at the same time intricate, Sanderson himself said that out of all the magic systems he ever wrote, Sand Mastery is best suited for this medium and I can’t say I disagree with that cause it looked amazing and suitable visually. In the end, although I had some problems with this adaptation, I do enjoy this one hour read. It’s a great addition to the Cosmere universe, especially with Khriss’s background and appearance. I will continue with this planned three volume comic in the future, well, I’m planning to read every single thing Sanderson write in his Cosmere universe anyway so this is a nice addition. You can find the rest of my Adult Epic/High Fantasy & Sci-Fi reviews at Booknest

  2. 4 out of 5

    TS Chan

    This is my first time reading graphic novels. Being so used to reading for narratives and details, this medium took a bit of time to get into as a lot of it is graphically represented as opposed to written. It took me a mere hour or so to finish what was supposed to be one-third of the full White Sand (unpublished) novel. I'm sure there were details which I've missed and will need to spend another hour or so to appreciate the visuals. There is one particular sequence of scenes which in my mind w This is my first time reading graphic novels. Being so used to reading for narratives and details, this medium took a bit of time to get into as a lot of it is graphically represented as opposed to written. It took me a mere hour or so to finish what was supposed to be one-third of the full White Sand (unpublished) novel. I'm sure there were details which I've missed and will need to spend another hour or so to appreciate the visuals. There is one particular sequence of scenes which in my mind worked better in this format. (view spoiler)[This was where Khriss failed to get any meetings with 7 of the profession leaders while trying to fix a lock. (hide spoiler)] As for the story itself, I'd say colour me intrigued. The first two chapters of Sanderson's 1999 draft in Arcanum Unbounded already had me hungry for more. After finishing this first volume of three of the graphic novel adaptation, I've promptly written to Brandon requesting for the unpublished draft and hoping for the best. A tidally-locked world with one side permanently Day and the other Dark, the planet in itself is fascinating. The different cultures between the Dayside and Darkside people have yet to fully manifest in whatever exposition there was to be revealed so far - but there clearly is a distinction. The magic system is completely unique (any surprises here?) and true to his laws, there is a limitation and cost to using it. Over-mastery of magic can actually be fatal here. There is also some form of trope subversion where the protagonist did not start out being "the one" with the hidden superpowers/talent. Even in the short introduction so far, I've grown to like Kenton as a main character. Of course, the one that I was waiting to meet was Khriss, whom most of the Cosmere fans know has a greater agenda in mind. And even though they only appeared quite briefly, I'm keen to know more about Aarik (a good friend of Kenton's) and Ais (a female law enforcer). It's too soon to know where the plot is headed - right now there just seemed to be conspiracies within conspiracies occurring. I love Sanderson's writing so I really do wish to read the book as well as continuing with the graphic adaptation.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Sean Barrs

    Brandon Sanderson writes some damn cool novels, and I’ve always felt that his ideas would be great in the realm of comic books, so it’s not surprising that his first delve into the genre shows much promise. I spotted the first issue in Sanderson’s collection of short works Arcanum Unbound and I knew I had to read further. And I’m glad I did because the story moved forward quickly in traditional Sanderson fashion. As ever, the magic system he creates is imaginative and thoroughly explained. This t Brandon Sanderson writes some damn cool novels, and I’ve always felt that his ideas would be great in the realm of comic books, so it’s not surprising that his first delve into the genre shows much promise. I spotted the first issue in Sanderson’s collection of short works Arcanum Unbound and I knew I had to read further. And I’m glad I did because the story moved forward quickly in traditional Sanderson fashion. As ever, the magic system he creates is imaginative and thoroughly explained. This time it centres on Sand. The protagonist is a wielder of it, though he isn’t particularly talented much to the dismay of his teacher. He does have some skill though it isn’t what one would call flashy. He uses what he has to the best of his ability, and he is out to prove that what he does have really is enough to get the job done. The artwork matches superbly with Sanderson’s style of writing and the general feel his plots tend to create: It’s always great to see new material from Sanderson, though when I was reading I couldn’t help but wish that one of his better novels was adapted into comic book form instead. The story is good here, but it does lack a certain sense of awesomeness that the Mistborn and Reckoners series carried with them. I won't be reading any further.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Valliya Rennell

    2 stars This is my first review of a graphic novel so please excuse any faults I may have and please tell me how to improve in the comments section! After finishing this first volume, I have decided to focus on 3 things: story, writing, art. I hope this will make sense. Story : ★★ The story was meh. It moved at a crazy fast pace. When sometimes crazy fast pace can be good, here it wasn't. It didn't let me to immerse myself in this world. A different graphic novel series that addresses pacing ver 2 stars This is my first review of a graphic novel so please excuse any faults I may have and please tell me how to improve in the comments section! After finishing this first volume, I have decided to focus on 3 things: story, writing, art. I hope this will make sense. Story : ★★ The story was meh. It moved at a crazy fast pace. When sometimes crazy fast pace can be good, here it wasn't. It didn't let me to immerse myself in this world. A different graphic novel series that addresses pacing very well is Saga. Please check it out. There was a lot happening and it was either convenient or done for shock value. In chapter two there is an attack that happens out of nowhere and I felt that it was a plot device. In chapter one, after they make it a huge deal about not letting Kenton do the trials, they immediately let him and he does them really fast and exceptionally well within the blink of an eye. This is something that is supposed to be hard and threatening. At no point did I feel it was a challenge. The other stuff going on with Khriss, Cynder, and Baon and the Darksiders is kind of confusing me, but I expect it to get better in the next volume. So far though, I don't really care about anything that is happening. Writing : ★ The writing is bad. It is just bad. The dialogue, for the most part is fine. HOWEVER the actual thoughts/world-building/flash-backs/everything-else is bad. It is all told in info dumps which distract from the story. And it is all very much "wow. Look at me. I'm so great. Now let me monologue while action is taking place." Once again I'll compare this to Saga, especially its earlier volumes, where a lot of character and world building is done. It is done through showing not telling. "But there is art! Isn't that showing not telling?" No. Sure, the whole element of imagining how something looks like is gone, but you can't just make immediately understand the culture, inner-workings, systems, beliefs etc of a world through just looking at it. Saga takes its time to show you Landfall and Wreath; the politics and beliefs are shown right off the bat through actions of characters and good dialogue. NOT THROUGH THE MAIN CHARACTERS THINKING AT YOU IN INFO-DUMPS. At no point does Alana, the female-lead, say "Wow, I'm pretty badass. However everyone thinks I'm useless and weak because I have smol wings. Oh I also have anger issues haha." This is what Kenton does. Like... ok, but no. Art :★★★ When it comes to art, I'm no great expert. What I can say is this: the art matches the tone that is coming across so far. It is sometimes a lot to take in, but you get used to it. I liked it enough and it didn't inhibit my reading experience. The way it shows sand mastery is the most visually appealing in my opinion, especially the contrast between how a sand master looks when they are using their power and when they get dehydrated. In that instance I can say the art made my reading experience better. ----------------------- Books in Cosmere: Mistborn: Era 1 #1 The Final Empire: ★★★.5 #2 The Well of Ascension: ★★★★.25 #3 The Hero of Ages: ★★★★.5 Era 2 #1 The Alloy of Law: ★★★ #2 Shadows of Self: ★★★.25 #3 The Bands of Mourning: ★★★.5 Novellas / Short-Stories: Mistborn: Secret History: ★★★★.25 The Emperor's Soul: ★★★★.25 Standalones: Elantris: ★★★.5 Warbreaker: ★★★.75 The Stormlight Archive: #1 The Way of Kings: ★★★★★ #2 Words of Radiance: ★★★★.75 White Sand: #1 Volume One: ★★ #2 Volume Two: ★★★ #3 Volume Three: ★★★.25

  5. 5 out of 5

    Maria

    Reading this after The Way of Kings was a mistake. The Way of King was so full of epicness that I was expecting the same from this. Unfortunately, White Sand would have to be my least favorite work of Sanderson. White Sand is also set in the Cosmere universe, way before the events of The Way of Kings and Mistborn (two books of his I've read so far). To be honest, I was confused majority of the time while I was reading this. I did appreciate the fact that I could see this world in front of my eyes Reading this after The Way of Kings was a mistake. The Way of King was so full of epicness that I was expecting the same from this. Unfortunately, White Sand would have to be my least favorite work of Sanderson. White Sand is also set in the Cosmere universe, way before the events of The Way of Kings and Mistborn (two books of his I've read so far). To be honest, I was confused majority of the time while I was reading this. I did appreciate the fact that I could see this world in front of my eyes and not just my imagination. It's one of the things I enjoyed about it. Storywise though, I was a bit underwhelmed. I wanted more substance, more history, more everything. The characters were okay. Kenton, the main protagonist I would say, is pretty well developed. I liked how you know his motivations and struggles. It wasn't brushed off, instead it was used to the progression of the story. The side characters were fine, nothing really worth talking futher about. The art, I'm still on the fence about. It looks good, but I'm not sure it worked for the story. Overall, it was okay. I was just expecting more from the story.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Mel Anie

    Rating: 4 stars White Sand is a first graphic novel in the White Sand duology by Brandon Sanderson. This book strongly focuses on magic and adventures from the very beginning till the very last page. This was my very first graphic novel I've ever read. I really liked it, although I had a little bit of a trouble to follow the story. Characters were well crafted and interesting. I was so happy to finally be able to read a book which doesn't portray those characters as annoying or reckless. I a Rating: 4 stars White Sand is a first graphic novel in the White Sand duology by Brandon Sanderson. This book strongly focuses on magic and adventures from the very beginning till the very last page. This was my very first graphic novel I've ever read. I really liked it, although I had a little bit of a trouble to follow the story. Characters were well crafted and interesting. I was so happy to finally be able to read a book which doesn't portray those characters as annoying or reckless. I adore people with strong characters which are brave enough to fight for their beliefs - this book covered that aspect. Graphics in this book are awesome. They made reading this book an interesting experience. I only regret a little bit that it wasn't longer. Final scene left me curious as to know what will happen next. A really good read for anyone who looks for either graphic novel, short story or an easy read which features magic and adventures.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mike

    December 2020 update: This review applies to the White Sand Volumes 1 through 3 If you have browsed through my reviews it becomes pretty apparent how big of a fan I am of the works of Brandon Sanderson. I think he is doing amazing things in the epic fantasy space and I always a day one buyer of his works. So it is with a heavy heart that I am unable to recommend this series to others. The problem isn't the material, per se, but the medium. Sanderson does most of his work through pretty long, but h December 2020 update: This review applies to the White Sand Volumes 1 through 3 If you have browsed through my reviews it becomes pretty apparent how big of a fan I am of the works of Brandon Sanderson. I think he is doing amazing things in the epic fantasy space and I always a day one buyer of his works. So it is with a heavy heart that I am unable to recommend this series to others. The problem isn't the material, per se, but the medium. Sanderson does most of his work through pretty long, but high quality, novels. His Stormlight archive books could be classified as deadly weapons, that is how heavy they are. His books tend to have excellent character work (especially secondary characters), great world building, innovative magic systems, and his calling card, the last 10% Sanderlanche. For whatever reason this series was unable to live up to these lofty expectations and I suspect it was due to the comic medium. On the character work front the comic medium is adequate for a few main characters, but space is at a premium and words compete with images. The result of this is that, in spite of Sanderson's skill, many of the secondary characters we meet just felt a bot flat or underdeveloped. I am certain that, given a novel format, we could have rich experience we have seen in his other novels. We see the surface behavior of the characters but rarely see what makes them tick. Probably the strongest aspect of this series was the Worldbuilding. Sanderson always knows how to come up with unique worlds and setting appropriate cultures to populate them. And while that was the case I couldn't help but feel that the artistry paled in comparison to Sanderson's prose. Sure we saw all the things they wanted us to see, but when such fantastical worlds Sanderson dreams up are solidified in color and picture they seem to lose some of their charm or luster. Additionally, we are limited to brief text snippets to supplement what we are seeing, further reducing the impact of the setting and constraining it to the skill of the artist instead of the wordsmithing of Sanderson. This series did have a pretty neat magic system, but once again the limited space for descriptions and the limitation of the artists' abilities lets this series down. I can see the Sand Mages do lots of neat things, but in a way putting it in a comic format makes this dynamic system feel stilted and static. Instead of Sanderson describing the interactions of the sand with the surroundings or what the Sand Mages are thinking as they utilize their magic we merely see what a bystander might see. And given the alien nature of this magic it is sometimes difficult to translate the image on the page to a cohesive flow of action in the mind. Finally I found the ending a but hum drum, especially compared to Sanderson's other works. The story itself was interesting enough and hinted towards lots of interesting plot lines that were going on in other parts of the world, but there was little in the way of dramatic twists or revelations that completely altered the story or how we perceived past actions. It wasn't a bad or boring story, to be sure, just not up to the typical Sanderson standards, a failing I attribute to the medium constraining what sort of information can be communicated to the reader. I have no doubt that had this story been told on a novel format it would have been many times better. Characters would be sharper, action sequences clearer, it would be much easier to get emotionally invested in characters, and Sanderson would have had more space to explore the themes of the story. But alas we do not live in that world. At best I can say the series was diverting and had its moments. ~~~ Original review: Graphic novels, a brave new world for Brandon Sanderson's Cosmere, and what a world. While Sanderson is known for his vivid world building this medium does present a bit more of a challenge for him. Graphic novels offer much less space for Sanderson's typical expansive prose. Instead it has to be built a bit more slowly with the graphics and the flow of the story. As such we do get some fun facts about this world: it seems to be tidally locked with the sun, with one side being in permanent day while the other is in eternal night, there appears to be a significant technological gap between the two, there are a class of people who can manipulate sand with magic (because Sanderson, no pun intended (OK, maybe a little bit)), and there is a complex society based around professions that regulate life on the dayside.This book was just the first installment of a larger series so there is still plenty of world to be fleshed out, but there is still a ton of wonderful world for a reader to sink their teeth into here. The graphic part of this graphic novel was serviceable. It didn't do a ton to enhance the story (Sanderson is already great at vividly painting a picture in the reader's mind) but also didn't detract from it as well. I think some of the larger pitched battles scenes were a bit confusing as to what was happening, something that a book would not have trouble with. Still, Sanderson is probably still learning the strengths and limits of the medium so I expect this aspect to improve over the course of the run. The characters themselves are also quite interesting: a sandmaster (the aforementioned magic users) on the ropes, a Duchess from the night side of the planet searching for her clues about the fate of her love, and a cop from a force that seems to get no respect and is under siege from the criminal element to name a few. They all have their own agendas, willing to use others to attain their goals in a very complicated world with hidden conspiracies that may reach all the way to the night side of the planet. All in all this was a brisk read, with a good balance to the action and character development. I really liked where the story is heading and am interested to see how the plot unfolds. There are lots of places this could go and I am excited to see how Sanderson decides to direct the story. Knowing him there will be plenty more twists and turns ahead. If you liked Sanderson's other work then you will feel right at home with this graphic novel.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Connor

    My Video Review: https://youtu.be/1NaQnGzulSQ My Video Review: https://youtu.be/1NaQnGzulSQ

  9. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    I picked this up mainly because it's Brandon Sanderson, but after I read the foreword and got a peek at the artwork, I became quite enamored. What author wouldn't be thrilled to see his first story-love get fulfilled in a format BETTER suited to it than the original novel? Or I should say... Damn. This is Sanderson, people. He's a writer KNOWN for great magic systems and fantastic visualizations... and this IS a perfect medium for that. And so I read it and really enjoyed the setup. You know how I picked this up mainly because it's Brandon Sanderson, but after I read the foreword and got a peek at the artwork, I became quite enamored. What author wouldn't be thrilled to see his first story-love get fulfilled in a format BETTER suited to it than the original novel? Or I should say... Damn. This is Sanderson, people. He's a writer KNOWN for great magic systems and fantastic visualizations... and this IS a perfect medium for that. And so I read it and really enjoyed the setup. You know how it is. A kid full of willpower and drive and virtually no support from his society or his father. Stay down. Don't try. You're weak. Only in this case, he can barely control one thread of sand in battle or defensive magic, where others easily handle three or more. He makes up for it with skill and intelligence. It's classic. And then the test happens, intrigue happens, tragedy happens, and even a little budding romance, and all the while, the worldbuilding keeps pouring in. Comparing this to another Sanderson book is all fine and well and I will not comment on how it stacks AGAINST some of his most beloved titles. I can say, however, that as a graphic novel, it's rather good, rather complete, and it's exciting in all the best senses. It is sure as hell has a lot more going on in it than most anything else out there. Compared to the comic field in general, it's an awesome story with great artwork and I'm hooked even without Sanderson's name attached to it. I call that a win. And besides, it's SAND MAGIC! Flashy, yo!

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kogiopsis

    I received this title from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. No external considerations went into this review - like you'd need to pay me to talk about Sanderson anyways, jeez. I've been struggling with writing this review for well over a month now, and I think the main reason is... this is my favorite author's first graphic novel, and it took me a while to admit that I just... don't feel it's that good. First off, the complaint I've seen from a lot of reviewers: the ar I received this title from the publisher via NetGalley in exchange for an honest review. No external considerations went into this review - like you'd need to pay me to talk about Sanderson anyways, jeez. I've been struggling with writing this review for well over a month now, and I think the main reason is... this is my favorite author's first graphic novel, and it took me a while to admit that I just... don't feel it's that good. First off, the complaint I've seen from a lot of reviewers: the art is grainy and pixelated in the galley. This isn't just a quibble about it not looking nice; this makes it genuinely difficult to follow the action scenes and distinguish faces, especially among characters who are all dressed the same. I assume that the final copy will be much, much cleaner than this. Now, the real meaty stuff - I reread this volume today and in doing so was struck by how many of the hallmarks of a Sanderson novel I could see here, just... not at their full potential. It must be very difficult to adapt such a worldbuilding-heavy writing style to a visual medium, and especially an episodic one, but with all due sympathy and respect for those who undertook this momentous task: I'm not sure it entirely paid off. The first chapter of the book is functionally a 'tutorial level' for the reader, familiarizing us with the magic system and the main character, and yet for all the important information that's delivered, it feels completely extraneous to the plot. The events of that first chapter (Kenton running the Mastrell's Path) have so far had no impact; there is perhaps one later event that might have been affected, and even there it could have turned out as it did regardless. Kenton's choices are relevant to establishing his character, but much of the chapter is taken up with worldbuilding and magic-system explaining. This isn't a surprise, coming from Sanderson; however, because this isn't a complete story, the reader finishes the volume without actually understanding things that are significantly plot-relevant. Kenton himself is an interesting character. Mixed-race and multicultural, he's immediately shown to be too stubborn for his own good, someone who has turned to unorthodox methods to get ahead in a strictly orthodox subculture. Sanderson contrasts the sheer power of other Sand Masters with Kenton's refined skill - a sort of Ideal Gas Law sort of equation, where Kenton's technique and precision balance out his lack of raw ability. He winds up as both a scrappy underdog and a pig-headed jerk, which... makes him an interesting protagonist, I suppose. His tenacity is his most heroic trait at this point, even if it gets him into trouble more often than not. However, the character I'm most excited about - to the surprise of virtually no one - is Khriss! So far we know very little about her, but what we do know is interesting. Honestly, Khriss in this volume is most intriguing in light of what Cosmere readers know her future to be: she will become the author of the Ars Arcanums found in other books. We're just not sure how yet For now, she and her entourage provide cultural contrast, political savvy, and a hint at future plot points to be developed later. The one thing that I missed when it came to characters in this book was a good internal look at their perspectives. Sanderson excels at this in the multiple viewpoints of the Stormlight Archive, and it really brings the story to a new level. Here, I found myself really feeling the lack of that view; we don't really get to see how relationships develop or attitudes change. Kenton makes several rude/snarky comments towards Khriss for no apparent reason - attitudes that previously he'd only displayed towards his overbearing father. Why direct it at a woman he's barely met? We just don't know, and I struggled to remain patient with him after that. Perhaps sometime in the future we'll get prose novellas set on Taldain that will illuminate things a bit more. I fully expect this book to be a hit among those who are already fans of the Cosmere. It does have all the traits we've come to expect from Sanderson's work (including some really neat flora/fauna worldbuilding). Personally, I'm intrigued and will keep up with it as Vol 2 and 3 are published, but I feel like it may end up being a better reading experience when all three volumes are out.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Mitticus

    3.5 sandy stars I got this digital copy thanks to Read Now at NetGalley, but sadly the copy is not good quality -blurred and pixelated- so I think that diminesh the experience. Well, this is not a new Sanderson book, actually is a never published old Sanderson book (before Elantris, so is in the Cosmere verse). This time, the magical system take us to a culture of Sand Masters, a divided world -darkside and lighside- , and religious fanatics. Sounds familiar? The story is 145 pages, the rest are s 3.5 sandy stars I got this digital copy thanks to Read Now at NetGalley, but sadly the copy is not good quality -blurred and pixelated- so I think that diminesh the experience. Well, this is not a new Sanderson book, actually is a never published old Sanderson book (before Elantris, so is in the Cosmere verse). This time, the magical system take us to a culture of Sand Masters, a divided world -darkside and lighside- , and religious fanatics. Sounds familiar? The story is 145 pages, the rest are sketches of the characters. This is from my copy: En el prólogo del libro Sanderson menciona haber sido bastante influenciado en un principio por Dune, y que después trató de crear algo más propio. El protagonista, Kenton, es un muchacho decidido a probar a su padre que esta equivocado y puede llegar a ser un maestro de arena (como un Aang a la inversa ;P), a pesar de tener muy pocas capacidades , o casi ninguna de hecho (lo que después de haber leido hace poco El Rithmatista hasta me recuerda a otro personaje). Después hay un ataque y el mundo de él parece a punto de desaparecer. Aparecen nuevos personajes, una duquesa (donde el lado oscuro quiere decir otra cultura y no algo siniestro, er creo) que anda en busca de respuestas, guerreros fanáticos, y probablemente un cambio de gobierno o algo mucho más ominoso tratándose de este autor. Una buena partida a una nueva serie.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review. I couldn't believe my luck when I was browsing NetGalley and saw this was on there, so I excitedly downloaded it and started reading instantly. I was so keen to read this, so eager and I was sadly left completely disappointed. This graphic novel promises magic and adventure, but sadly all I saw was just more battles in the sand. I had expected wonderful things from Brandon Sanderson, and I tried so hard to throw I received this book from the publisher via NetGalley in return for an honest review. I couldn't believe my luck when I was browsing NetGalley and saw this was on there, so I excitedly downloaded it and started reading instantly. I was so keen to read this, so eager and I was sadly left completely disappointed. This graphic novel promises magic and adventure, but sadly all I saw was just more battles in the sand. I had expected wonderful things from Brandon Sanderson, and I tried so hard to throw myself into the world and the magic system, but it just didn't grab my attention. I found the plot dull, and none of the characters called out to me. Other issues I had with this book are just my personal preferences. For example, I'm not sure if the art I saw is the fully finished version, as my copy was an ARC, but I found the art really grainy and not as good a quality as I would have wanted or expected. Maybe that's the look they are going for? If that's the case, I'm not a fan at all. Also for the vast majority of the pages, the writing is just too much per page. I like a good balance between artwork and writing and I get grumpy if I am stuck reading several paragraphs on one page. Sadly I just didn't enjoy this graphic novel and I probably won't continue on with the series, never say never though. You might enjoy this if you have enjoyed Brandon Sanderson's other work or if you enjoy graphic novels with a lot of text bubbles per page that are fantasy based.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    This is an old story which Sanderson wrote as his first ever novel. Currently it's unpublished in novel format, but this is the graphic version which came out very recently, and which I was both eager for and a little worried about. I wasn't sure how well Sanderson's story would translate to graphic medium, but it actually seems like this magic system works quite well. We follow a young sand mage called Kenton as he tries to defy his father's wish for him not to become a Mage. All his life he's This is an old story which Sanderson wrote as his first ever novel. Currently it's unpublished in novel format, but this is the graphic version which came out very recently, and which I was both eager for and a little worried about. I wasn't sure how well Sanderson's story would translate to graphic medium, but it actually seems like this magic system works quite well. We follow a young sand mage called Kenton as he tries to defy his father's wish for him not to become a Mage. All his life he's been weak with the sand magic, but Kenton is determined to prove his doubtful father wrong and show that even with minimal magic he will be a good Sand Mage. When he decides to run through the test, to prove his worth, he does more than impress, he defies, and when another tribe strikes against the Mages, everything is in uproar. The artwork is definitely the downside of this in my opinion. It's not terrible, but it's definitely a lot 'messier' than I would normally like. I think that the style just really isn't doing full justice to the story. I would like it a lot more if we got less repetition and more simple line-work and bold colours. On the whole, I think it's a good start to the story with lots of potential so I'll pick up the next volume when that comes out too. 3.5*s

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I was given an ebook version of this graphic novel by the publisher through NetGalley. Again here we are with Sanderson and of course the talk will go to worldbuilding. Yes, he does it again. This time it's his story and idea, but an adaptation by Rik Hoskin with art by Julius M. Gopez. While not quite as epic or satisfying as Sanderson's novels, this story was very compelling. It was also just getting going when it was time to wrap up this first volume, but I can tell that over time this should I was given an ebook version of this graphic novel by the publisher through NetGalley. Again here we are with Sanderson and of course the talk will go to worldbuilding. Yes, he does it again. This time it's his story and idea, but an adaptation by Rik Hoskin with art by Julius M. Gopez. While not quite as epic or satisfying as Sanderson's novels, this story was very compelling. It was also just getting going when it was time to wrap up this first volume, but I can tell that over time this should be a really good graphic side to Sanderson's Cosmere universe.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Eric Allen

    This story has potential to be very good. Unfortunately, it seems to have lost quite a bit in translation from unpublished manuscript to graphic novel. A lot of the world building is glossed over, so the world and characters seem pretty vague, the artwork, while not bad, could be a little smoother, less rough around the edges, and there's way too much narration explaining things that would be better worked into the story if it was in a medium other than graphic novel. It just seems as though the This story has potential to be very good. Unfortunately, it seems to have lost quite a bit in translation from unpublished manuscript to graphic novel. A lot of the world building is glossed over, so the world and characters seem pretty vague, the artwork, while not bad, could be a little smoother, less rough around the edges, and there's way too much narration explaining things that would be better worked into the story if it was in a medium other than graphic novel. It just seems as though there's a whole lot of the story and worldbuilding that's missing in order to cut things down as much as possible to fit in three graphic novels. I would have really liked to have an actual book of this story, but Brandon Sanderson is rumored to have said that he doesn't plan to ever publish one now that the graphic novel series is coming out. Which is too bad, I can see this book being another great example of why Sanderson is one of my favorite authors. The graphic novel is not bad, it's an interesting story, in an interesting world, with interesting characters, it just seems like it would be a lot MORE interesting in written form. Sanderson fans will likely find it interesting at the very least, but it really seems as though it could be much better than it is. Also... shouldn't the skin colors on the Daysiders and Darksiders be reversed? Shouldn't the people who live in the lands where the sun never sets have darker skin than those who live in the lands where it's always night? I don't know if that was just a choice of the artist, or if it was in the actual Sanderson manuscript, but either way, someone fails at common sense. A pretty decent argument could be made for racism as well, unintentional or otherwise, in "Darksiders" all having dark skin. I mean, if a 30-something white guy from Utah, the whitest place on earth, noticed it, I can only imagine what other people who are, perhaps a little more racially sensitive than myself, must be thinking about it. I suppose it might be an illustration of the concept that white sand when drained of magic turns dark, and the people with dark skin have no magic, but, um... when you put it like that, it seems even MORE racist. Oh, and why would a character who has grown up on a world where the sun is always in the same place in the sky, never moving, even have to narrate about that to himself? He's never known anything different, and he's not explaining it to anyone but the readers sooooo... that's just some really clunky exposition delivery right there. The entire thing is like that too. That's what I meant when I said that there's way too much narration to explain all of the worldbuilding instead of working it into the story in some way. I'll still read the other two graphic novels when they're released. I'm interested enough in what's happening to continue to the end. I just wish this was a book, rather than a graphic novel. Seems like the story really isn't suited to the medium.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Max S

    Read 1 of my Cosmere chronological extravaganza White Sand is a series of graphic novels that are technically one story. It is set on the planet Taldain in the Cosmere, where sand mastery is this particular magic of Investiture--the ability to manipulate white sand at the cost of the manipulator's water supply. Without water, they are left to dehydrate and, therefore, their powers are wasted. After a warring attack against the raging Kerztians, the sand masters on Dayside--the light side of the wo Read 1 of my Cosmere chronological extravaganza White Sand is a series of graphic novels that are technically one story. It is set on the planet Taldain in the Cosmere, where sand mastery is this particular magic of Investiture--the ability to manipulate white sand at the cost of the manipulator's water supply. Without water, they are left to dehydrate and, therefore, their powers are wasted. After a warring attack against the raging Kerztians, the sand masters on Dayside--the light side of the world--are left in disarray, their monarchy completely ruined. So the Lord Mastrell's (their 'ruler-like' figure) son, Kenton (one of these sand masters) ventures across Dayside to attend to the matters, as well as the mystery of the Kerztians. Why did they attack them? For what purpose? And who, among his kin, could be the traitor behind the attack? Who exposed the sand masters to their enemies? Brandon Sanderson did an amazing job of weaving multiple storylines together. I came to the sudden realisation of Khriss's backstory, her beginnings with Gevin. I really liked the way this panned out, as well as how it adds to the completeness of the Cosmere. I loved the differences between the Darksiders and the Lightsiders, the two different locations of the world (and two different races). Their different ways of understanding culture, language, arts, weaponry and the stances on the battlefield was just so intriguing and it brings life to Sanderson's world. "Spoilers. Spoilers everywhere." Down below! (view spoiler)[I loved when Kenton truly embraced his sand mastery. Although he is his father's son, he is not the person he expected to become. He is a strong sand master capable of many things. As he progressed further, as he realised many mysteries and secrets unravelling, I saw them too and how they would play out in the outcome of the story. Also, I don't know why but I loved Kenton's friendship with Aarik and I love Aarik in general. His sarcasm and wit and generosity is just something that was needed in the story and it showed its charm. Another main POV, although it was quite vague (and will hopefully be elaborated on in Volume 2), was Ais. She was an interesting character but, like I said, we didn't get to see much of her. I did feel a lot of sympathy toward her character when her husband and daughter saw her, and when she was speaking to her husband about how one of her comrades died and how she might not come back after a day of her work. It made me sad, but the emotions were so good in that scene. I loved it. Oh, and I really don't like Drile. His complete obsession with himself really irritated me and I honestly hope he dies or at least suffers in the next volume. Feels the wrath of Kenton, dares to threaten him. The correlations with him, Drile and the council was just awesome. I loved seeing how these narcissistic characters saw the truth of what Kenton said. Eventually what he spoke of was brightening for them because they understood. I was super sad when his best friend died in the battle with the Kerztians. It really dug into my feels, guys. Super sad stuff. At the end, when Khriss was like "Oh, Harmony, he was a sand mage all along" I just thought Kenton was the sneakiest little person on the block. I don't know if he thought of doing that all along but I did love it when it happened. When the book ended just at that, I applauded Brandon Sanderson because what an ending! And with Aarik and the revelation of Drile and... ah! Fantastic storytelling! (hide spoiler)] I believe next on the Cosmere chronology (in-world) is Elantris, so I'll be reading that for the first time! I did get some 200 pages in at first but I wasn't concentrating heavily on the text. Hopefully I'll pick up some interesting theories and speculations about its involvement to the Cosmere!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I thought this was pretty awesome. But why is it set in a desert. It always feels so Star Wars when something is set in a desert. Why not use a swamp? I know, they have to conserve their water. I get it. The magic systems is so clever. I like that there was some power escalation in the story and we didn't have to wait to see a jump with our main character. We open with a mysterious clan going through a ritual to raise and student up to a level. We learn that the student is the son of the clan le I thought this was pretty awesome. But why is it set in a desert. It always feels so Star Wars when something is set in a desert. Why not use a swamp? I know, they have to conserve their water. I get it. The magic systems is so clever. I like that there was some power escalation in the story and we didn't have to wait to see a jump with our main character. We open with a mysterious clan going through a ritual to raise and student up to a level. We learn that the student is the son of the clan leader. He is a most powerful leader and he is ashamed of his son because his son is so weak. The ritual is very dangerous and only strong members do well. The son is determined to do the ritual and so he is allowed to do so. They have to find 5 power balls of some kind in a maze. It's a great start to the story. I can't wait for the next issue. This is my first story in the Cosmere universe and I can't wait to start the Mistborn trilogy.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kristalia

    Final rating: 3/5 stars I know this is just a start of it, but for now it's 3 stars.. I am not really into characters, except for Khriss, and she was just cool enough for me to wait for the other two parts. Interesting world and there are many poc characters and it's like a mix of modern and fantasy at the same time. Gooooooooorgeous art and designs though. Really gorgeous. Final rating: 3/5 stars I know this is just a start of it, but for now it's 3 stars.. I am not really into characters, except for Khriss, and she was just cool enough for me to wait for the other two parts. Interesting world and there are many poc characters and it's like a mix of modern and fantasy at the same time. Gooooooooorgeous art and designs though. Really gorgeous.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Fares

    2.75 All I can say is I wish this was a book. It just feels too important of a story to be told in a 3 volume graphic novel.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jenny Baker

    3.5 stars Story: ★★★★☆ This is a unique story concept, although it's slightly confusing at first when you're trying to learn about the world. I wasn't expecting that big attack early on and of course, some of my new favorite characters died. Duchess Khrissalla is a strong character who is quite the fashionista! I also like Senior Trackt Ais. She's starting to grow on me. I'm still not sure what I think of Kenton. I know for sure that Drile is a jerk and probably a traitor. lol Art: ★★★☆☆ I wasn't t 3.5 stars Story: ★★★★☆ This is a unique story concept, although it's slightly confusing at first when you're trying to learn about the world. I wasn't expecting that big attack early on and of course, some of my new favorite characters died. Duchess Khrissalla is a strong character who is quite the fashionista! I also like Senior Trackt Ais. She's starting to grow on me. I'm still not sure what I think of Kenton. I know for sure that Drile is a jerk and probably a traitor. lol Art: ★★★☆☆ I wasn't thrilled with the art. At the beginning, a lot of the sand masters looked alike, especially since they were wearing white, hooded outfits and you couldn't see their faces well enough. Some of the scenic illustrations of the world was pretty cool. Overall, it's an enjoyable graphic novel and I'll definitely read the next volume!

  21. 5 out of 5

    ZeN

    I prefer the original novel by Sanderson, as opposed to this adaptation by Rik Hoskin. Doesn't seem authentic to have Sandersons' name front and center, while the poor narration is derived from someone else. Would hate to have someone read this on the basis that its Sanderson material and then get an erroneous idea of what his actual work is like. Having read the unpublished novel certainly curved my impression since the book has added depth, background characterizations and explains motivations I prefer the original novel by Sanderson, as opposed to this adaptation by Rik Hoskin. Doesn't seem authentic to have Sandersons' name front and center, while the poor narration is derived from someone else. Would hate to have someone read this on the basis that its Sanderson material and then get an erroneous idea of what his actual work is like. Having read the unpublished novel certainly curved my impression since the book has added depth, background characterizations and explains motivations, as opposed to the graphic novel that doesn't explain motive. Like many other reviewers have expressed, I also found the art to be uninspired and lacking visual vitality.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Ivan

    Decent addition to Cosmere universe but I am not impressed.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Nadine

    Brandon Sanderson can do no wrong across all mediums. White Sand is a well constructed world about a group of people who are able to manipulate sand to do as they wish, however it requires the manipulator's own water to fuel the magic. This is where Sanderson shines when it comes to magic systems and world building. He creates such amazing and interesting magic systems, but knows how to limit them in realistic ways thereby making them pragmatic and help move the plot along with an organic way. Wh Brandon Sanderson can do no wrong across all mediums. White Sand is a well constructed world about a group of people who are able to manipulate sand to do as they wish, however it requires the manipulator's own water to fuel the magic. This is where Sanderson shines when it comes to magic systems and world building. He creates such amazing and interesting magic systems, but knows how to limit them in realistic ways thereby making them pragmatic and help move the plot along with an organic way. What I enjoyed most about this graphic novel is that you think you have an idea of where the story is headed, but then something happens that changes the plot entirely. This plot point enhances the world building on top of keep the reader on their feet. I cannot wait for the second volume!

  24. 4 out of 5

    Siona St Mark

    November 2017 Re-read: Still really enjoy this book the second time around! I can't wait for the second time. It's a good introductory to the cosmere, but the lack of Vol 2 (as of me writing this) kind of hinders that statement since this takes all of an hour to read. I don't know, as I type that out I think it sounds dumb but whatever. You don't have to know anything about the cosmere to read this, but it has a lot of interesting connections if you do. Maybe one of my favorite settings. Original November 2017 Re-read: Still really enjoy this book the second time around! I can't wait for the second time. It's a good introductory to the cosmere, but the lack of Vol 2 (as of me writing this) kind of hinders that statement since this takes all of an hour to read. I don't know, as I type that out I think it sounds dumb but whatever. You don't have to know anything about the cosmere to read this, but it has a lot of interesting connections if you do. Maybe one of my favorite settings. Original Review: This has got to be one of my most, if not my most, favorite Cosmere world! Taldain is such an interesting and unique world. All of Sanderson's world are unique, of course, but they all have feeling to them of familiarity, to me at least). For example, Scadrial and Roshar, for the most part, are super-fantastical versions of Earth: the have similar planetary orbits and rotations to Earth, the have similar day/night and time cycles to Earth, and other such things. The only real difference is the flora/fauna, continents/ecosystems, and the fact that magic exists. Taldain, however, is a world tidally locked with it's main star, so that one side is constantly in daylight and the other night. I believe if I read correctly, there is a second sun, but I'm not quite sure. Regardless, the fact that this planet was tidally locked to at least one star in it's solar system makes the world feel really unique to me. The magic was also really interesting. Mastery, the ability to control sand, was made for graphic novels. In Mistborn, the magic series would be cool to see in a visual format, but it's perfectly fine just being based in words. Mastery though is very graceful and artsy, and it could be done in writing just fine, but it lends itself to visual depiction quite well. I hope in the next volumes we get to see the Darkside of Taldin, and I'd be interested to see if they have their own magic, but otherwise, I felt this to be a really great read. I hope the next one comes out soon.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Brandon Sanderson's first novel, never before published, rewritten as a graphic novel. Our main character is Kenton, a sand mage of little power but great control. He's constantly in conflict with his father who considers him a disappointment. Two issues in, the series takes a huge turn and the Darksiders arrive who are much more technologically advanced. This is the first of 3 planned volumes. Sanderson still provides us with a highly detailed, fully realized world, it's just that it is mostly Brandon Sanderson's first novel, never before published, rewritten as a graphic novel. Our main character is Kenton, a sand mage of little power but great control. He's constantly in conflict with his father who considers him a disappointment. Two issues in, the series takes a huge turn and the Darksiders arrive who are much more technologically advanced. This is the first of 3 planned volumes. Sanderson still provides us with a highly detailed, fully realized world, it's just that it is mostly presented to you visually instead of in words. The art is quite good. Most people who are complaining were reading the advance copy from NetGalley which is a really lo-res, blurry version of the final art. Received an advance copy from NetGalley and Dynamite in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Chelsies Reading Escape

    I received this graphic novel from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I thought the story had a unique magic system as many of Brandon Sandersons books do. The plot was interesting but I think I might have enjoyed it more in book format. The characters flaws added depth to them and I found myself rooting for them. I didnt enjoy the art as much and I think that took away from my enjoyment of the story. I felt like the art was mediocre. The white on white made it very bland and the details I received this graphic novel from Netgalley in exchange for an honest review. I thought the story had a unique magic system as many of Brandon Sandersons books do. The plot was interesting but I think I might have enjoyed it more in book format. The characters flaws added depth to them and I found myself rooting for them. I didnt enjoy the art as much and I think that took away from my enjoyment of the story. I felt like the art was mediocre. The white on white made it very bland and the details felt rough but that might be because the illustrations of the e-arc I received were a little blurry.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Bar Reads

    This ARC was given to me in exchange for an honest review. I LOVE BRANDON SANDERSON. He's a brilliant writer. This graphic novel has a good story, but the artwork is terrible. As much as I tried to look at the story, not the artwork, in a graphic novel I need both. DNF 35% This ARC was given to me in exchange for an honest review. I LOVE BRANDON SANDERSON. He's a brilliant writer. This graphic novel has a good story, but the artwork is terrible. As much as I tried to look at the story, not the artwork, in a graphic novel I need both. DNF 35%

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Wilson

    3.5 Stars Not a big fan of the graphic novel format, definitely more of novel novel kind of guy. Only started really getting into the story at the very end. But I love Brandon Sanderson, love the Cosmere and will definitely get the second volume. Can't wait to see how it fits into the universe. 3.5 Stars Not a big fan of the graphic novel format, definitely more of novel novel kind of guy. Only started really getting into the story at the very end. But I love Brandon Sanderson, love the Cosmere and will definitely get the second volume. Can't wait to see how it fits into the universe.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Yzabel Ginsberg

    [I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.] First things first, I've never read anything by Brandon Sanderson (not yet, at least), so I have no idea if this compares to his novels. As a comics, it was OK, but I wasn't awed. Possibly because the PDF version I got was kind of blurry, more certainly because the style was a bit too rough to my liking and because of some things that didn't make a lot of sense (or were missing) in hindsight when it came to world [I received a copy of this book through NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review.] First things first, I've never read anything by Brandon Sanderson (not yet, at least), so I have no idea if this compares to his novels. As a comics, it was OK, but I wasn't awed. Possibly because the PDF version I got was kind of blurry, more certainly because the style was a bit too rough to my liking and because of some things that didn't make a lot of sense (or were missing) in hindsight when it came to world-building. On one hand, some panels contain a lot of text and explanations, which doesn't always work too well in a graphic novel; on the other, in spite of those walls of text, little was actually *explained* when it came to all the questions raised. For instance: - All the Sandmasters we see are men. I don't recall any women. Why? Kenton's mother is mentioned as having come from Darkside, and there's a point where he wonders about whether he has any brothers “or sisters” left, but where are these sisters? I don't recall any women anywhere, either among the Sand Masters themselves or back at their enclave, and this just seems... weird. It's never explained, there isn't any line, not even one, about women living somewhere else, or not developing powers over sand and thus not studying with the men, etc. - Re: Darkside and Dayside, the whole dichotomy doesn't make a lot of sense. The people living under the blazing sun all year long are light-skinned, and the ones living on the presumably “dark side” (no sunlight there, ever? Or are they living in caves?) are dark-skinned. So, sure, I like it when we don't go with the usual clichés, yet biologically-speaking, and in a science fiction story, it's not really believable. I could buy, for instance, “drows have dark skin and white hair” in the Forgotten Realms 'verse Because It's Magic or their dark goddess making them like that or anything; here, I'd need an actual scientific explanation to be satisfied. All this to say that, as is often the case when such a problem arises in a world where a scientific basis is expected, things that don't make sense tend to keep me unfocused on the actual story: as soon as anything new pops up, I always find myself wondering why it is like that, and how it's supposed to be justified. The Darksiders have a sort of “19th century British empire” flavour, with their way of seeing the Daysiders as uncouth and not very civilised, and this is a bit problematic (that theme always is): had they been light-skinned people, it would've been too close to events that happened in history, but turning the tables here didn't work too well for me. What I mean by this is that it felt like the author wanted such a civilisation in his story but didn't want them to be “the civilised white people vs. the dark-skinned savages”, yet at the same time making them dark-skinned clashes with what you'd expect from people living on that “dark side of the planet” all the time. This was weird, and, I don't know, I guess another option would've been more believable? (This said, I liked them graphically-speaking. The Duchess was stylish and quite amiable, and the items they carry hint at mechanical inventions I wouldn't mind seeing more.) Mostly this story was an easy read, with some good fight-and-magic scenes. However, I'm likely to forget about it quickly, to be honest. 2.5 stars.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Cors

    The magic system is great! I am freaking astounded, the reason for the missing one star is because it's a graphic novel and I'm not a huge fan of them, but still amazing. Im currently devouring Issue #2 RTC The magic system is great! I am freaking astounded, the reason for the missing one star is because it's a graphic novel and I'm not a huge fan of them, but still amazing. Im currently devouring Issue #2 RTC

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