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As I dug into my memory for those snacks or tiffin, I recalled the many anecdotes and narratives about the people and places associated with these recipes, My replies grew into lengthy stories and my girls loved them. ‘Amma, send us more recipes for tiffin,' they wrote, Those stories were rambling and multifaceted and they are all here in my book. ‘Tiffin', derived from ‘ti As I dug into my memory for those snacks or tiffin, I recalled the many anecdotes and narratives about the people and places associated with these recipes, My replies grew into lengthy stories and my girls loved them. ‘Amma, send us more recipes for tiffin,' they wrote, Those stories were rambling and multifaceted and they are all here in my book. ‘Tiffin', derived from ‘tiffing', a historical British term for small meals or snacks to accompany a drink, is a staple meal in most Indian households. A popular television chef on the local Arlington cable network, Rukmini Srinivas or ‘Rukka', regularly whips up mouth-watering delicious tiffin for her viewers with an ease and prowess befitting a seasoned epicure. In this delightful memoir-cum-cookbook, Rukka shares the memories and recipes of delectable food that she has cooked and eaten over many decades. Having travelled extensively- from Poona, Madras and Delhi to Berkeley, Stanford and Boston- she realized, at a very young age, the indispensability of authentic home-cooked food. She records here her emotional and deeply personal bond with food- from Chitappa's masala vadai and Appa's vegetable cutlet to bondas on Marina Beach, Narayana's bajji and Amma's Mysore pak. Alongside, she shares stories from her childhood in British Poona, of making vegetable cutlets with a Victorian meat grinder, college days in the Madras of a newly independent India, cooking for author R.K. Narayan and her travels around the world with her husband, the renowned social anthropologist, M.N. Srinivas. Like the traditional metal tiffin box, which has found its way into modern food, Rukka's pure-vegetarian recipes are an interesting amalgamation of old-school cooking techniques, with innovative twists. Including charming anecdotes and over a hundred easy-to-follow delicious recipes accompanied by evocative photographs, Tiffin is a richly satisfying feast for all those who believe in food, family and friendship.


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As I dug into my memory for those snacks or tiffin, I recalled the many anecdotes and narratives about the people and places associated with these recipes, My replies grew into lengthy stories and my girls loved them. ‘Amma, send us more recipes for tiffin,' they wrote, Those stories were rambling and multifaceted and they are all here in my book. ‘Tiffin', derived from ‘ti As I dug into my memory for those snacks or tiffin, I recalled the many anecdotes and narratives about the people and places associated with these recipes, My replies grew into lengthy stories and my girls loved them. ‘Amma, send us more recipes for tiffin,' they wrote, Those stories were rambling and multifaceted and they are all here in my book. ‘Tiffin', derived from ‘tiffing', a historical British term for small meals or snacks to accompany a drink, is a staple meal in most Indian households. A popular television chef on the local Arlington cable network, Rukmini Srinivas or ‘Rukka', regularly whips up mouth-watering delicious tiffin for her viewers with an ease and prowess befitting a seasoned epicure. In this delightful memoir-cum-cookbook, Rukka shares the memories and recipes of delectable food that she has cooked and eaten over many decades. Having travelled extensively- from Poona, Madras and Delhi to Berkeley, Stanford and Boston- she realized, at a very young age, the indispensability of authentic home-cooked food. She records here her emotional and deeply personal bond with food- from Chitappa's masala vadai and Appa's vegetable cutlet to bondas on Marina Beach, Narayana's bajji and Amma's Mysore pak. Alongside, she shares stories from her childhood in British Poona, of making vegetable cutlets with a Victorian meat grinder, college days in the Madras of a newly independent India, cooking for author R.K. Narayan and her travels around the world with her husband, the renowned social anthropologist, M.N. Srinivas. Like the traditional metal tiffin box, which has found its way into modern food, Rukka's pure-vegetarian recipes are an interesting amalgamation of old-school cooking techniques, with innovative twists. Including charming anecdotes and over a hundred easy-to-follow delicious recipes accompanied by evocative photographs, Tiffin is a richly satisfying feast for all those who believe in food, family and friendship.

30 review for Tiffin: Memories and Recipes of Indian Vegetarian Food

  1. 5 out of 5

    Em*bedded-in-books*

    Am no great cook, but I love reading about food and stories involving food. So when I came across this title in a friend's bookshelf here in Goodreads, I was piqued. Rukmini Srinivasan (Rukka) is not a familiar persona. But she soon became familiar via her anecdotes and reminiscences involving food and the various circumstances involving specific recipes. Via her I came to know of many people, many customs and habits, and travelled all over India, Britain and USA. I feel like cooking , though I d Am no great cook, but I love reading about food and stories involving food. So when I came across this title in a friend's bookshelf here in Goodreads, I was piqued. Rukmini Srinivasan (Rukka) is not a familiar persona. But she soon became familiar via her anecdotes and reminiscences involving food and the various circumstances involving specific recipes. Via her I came to know of many people, many customs and habits, and travelled all over India, Britain and USA. I feel like cooking , though I don't know how long the feeling will last...but for the time being she has rekindled my interest in traditional vegetarian Indian fare. I would treasure this book and it's recipes, because each recipe feels personal to me. And one thing I forgot to mention is that she gave me quite a good glimpse of parts of the personal life of RK Narayan, her good acquaintance, and one of my favorite authors.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kavita

    Rukmini Srinivas brings together nostalgia, good food, and enchanting anecdotes in this wonderful memoir. Well, it's technically not a memoir but bits and pieces from Rukmini's own life and from the lives of the people around her. Her chosen recipes are also mostly lovely and depict the best of South Indian (mostly, Tamil) cooking. A lot of the stories read like the ones my own patti (maternal grandmother) would tell me. My patti is only a couple of years younger than Rukmini and they belong to Rukmini Srinivas brings together nostalgia, good food, and enchanting anecdotes in this wonderful memoir. Well, it's technically not a memoir but bits and pieces from Rukmini's own life and from the lives of the people around her. Her chosen recipes are also mostly lovely and depict the best of South Indian (mostly, Tamil) cooking. A lot of the stories read like the ones my own patti (maternal grandmother) would tell me. My patti is only a couple of years younger than Rukmini and they belong to the same place, background, class, and caste. Just like Rukmini, my grandmother too had lived in Chennai, Pune, Delhi, and so on. So a lot of the stories brought loads of nostalgia to me, of the times when my patti would chat with me about her younger years. In fact, I think my patti would enjoy this book and I am definitely going to recommend this to her. Rukmini's family appears to be far more progressive than my own in many respects. She was sent off to college and lived alone in hostels, something even my mother was not allowed to do. So yes, there is a lot of difference as well. There were sketches and pictures accompanying some major events and descriptions, which were really interesting. I really love looking through old pictures and wondering about the past, and this was a perfect story already served up with these lovely pics. I enjoyed Rukmini's description of her life in India more than her USA descriptions. I was impressed that she actually knew R.K. Narayan, one of my favourite authors. I actually think she has channelled his method of writing in this book, just letting the story flow where it will. It was interesting to know that Narayan finished writing The Guide in her home in the US. Despite all this, her Indian memories were still more interesting to me. I was mildly annoyed by the fact that this book appeared to be written solely for an American audience. I simply died when she described the delicious arisi upma as rice couscous. Ugh! I mean, couscous is delicious too, but just no! She describes paranthas as tortillas and dosai as lentil crepe. It's irritating because Indian food is a major cuisine and doesn't need to be described in such random terms taken from other cuisines. A second annoyance was that there were no photographs of the food items, which could have given readers an idea how the food looks, rather than mangling its name. But despite these minor niggles, I really enjoyed this book and wish there could be a sequel.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Raksha Bhat

    This book is a literary and culinary delight, the anecdotes and experiences shared in between make the recipes given in the book more personal and interesting. It is rare to find such writings especially in a time where everything that can be cooked and eaten is up on the internet, on the blog or television shows. Master Chefs and what not! This book is beyond all that, it compelled me to go and hug my mother and grandmother for their dosas, idlis, chutney, sambhar, paysam and all the love that This book is a literary and culinary delight, the anecdotes and experiences shared in between make the recipes given in the book more personal and interesting. It is rare to find such writings especially in a time where everything that can be cooked and eaten is up on the internet, on the blog or television shows. Master Chefs and what not! This book is beyond all that, it compelled me to go and hug my mother and grandmother for their dosas, idlis, chutney, sambhar, paysam and all the love that they feed me with ! :-)

  4. 5 out of 5

    Smitha Murthy

    I love food. I go on travel expeditions in search of food - my last trip to Madurai being a case in point. One of the sources of my deepest sadness in life is when health issues intervene and I can't quite eat the way I want to. But I can read about food all I want, can't I? Rukmini Srinivas has written a delightful food memoir - an ode to the joys of South Indian food. Selling at a ridiculously low price on Amazon, I chanced upon 'Tiffin' and I was immediately hooked. Rukmini has led a rich and I love food. I go on travel expeditions in search of food - my last trip to Madurai being a case in point. One of the sources of my deepest sadness in life is when health issues intervene and I can't quite eat the way I want to. But I can read about food all I want, can't I? Rukmini Srinivas has written a delightful food memoir - an ode to the joys of South Indian food. Selling at a ridiculously low price on Amazon, I chanced upon 'Tiffin' and I was immediately hooked. Rukmini has led a rich and varied life, filled with experiences that span the globe, and it shows. I loved learning about her childhood, her stints in Madras (now Chennai), and then stays in Boston and Bangalore. Throughout all these journeys, there is one thing common - food. Her love for food and her passion for cooking. The anecdotes she writes about only form a loose chronological order. Each chapter or anecdote ends with several delectable recipes that are marketed as 'simple' but which seem remarkably complex and time-consuming. I am not sure when I would have the courage to attempt those in my kitchen! The lack of chronological structure means that certain things end up being repeated more often than they ought to. For instance, I learnt quite repeatedly that Rukka's father was transferred to Tanjore, about her college education in Queen Mary's College in Madras again and again. It's almost like I have an old grandmother who forgot that she already told about this, and continues to relate the story again. But I love old grandmothers. I love stories. And did I say I love food? So, I loved reading this book - and if you are a foodie, you might too.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Srujan

    A very warm and honest memoir on life and how food touches small, seemingly unimportant things in our lives but imprints you with last memories and mindsets. I have not tried the recipes and if I would be completely honest, I often skipped over the recipe to continue reading the next chapter ( of her life, of her book! ). ☺ The tone of the book is warm and happy, but doesn't for once sound pompous or extremely didactic. What I loved the most was the fact that though it was a cookbook, she wasn't A very warm and honest memoir on life and how food touches small, seemingly unimportant things in our lives but imprints you with last memories and mindsets. I have not tried the recipes and if I would be completely honest, I often skipped over the recipe to continue reading the next chapter ( of her life, of her book! ). ☺ The tone of the book is warm and happy, but doesn't for once sound pompous or extremely didactic. What I loved the most was the fact that though it was a cookbook, she wasn't talking in her capacity as an instructor. It felt more like talking to an extremely adorable grandmother who grew up in a land far away from what you call home and the stories from "her" land.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Swati

    This is how it's done. This is how precious memories are preserved and passed on because memories are like recipes. They need to be told and retold. Rukmini Srinivas'book takes us through her childhood and adulthood, her family and friends, and the food that surrounded them at all times. We often express pride when we try out our grandmother's recipe but mostly we never know how she got the recipe herself or her memories surrounding it. Rukka, as she is known to everyone, transports us to her wo This is how it's done. This is how precious memories are preserved and passed on because memories are like recipes. They need to be told and retold. Rukmini Srinivas'book takes us through her childhood and adulthood, her family and friends, and the food that surrounded them at all times. We often express pride when we try out our grandmother's recipe but mostly we never know how she got the recipe herself or her memories surrounding it. Rukka, as she is known to everyone, transports us to her world that was a mix of tradition and modernity, something that was unheard of in 1940s India. Her parents, especially her father, were unusually liberal for their times and Rukka was frequently the odd person out amongst her friends with her preference for skirts, English authors, and progressive attitude. I got lost in her recollections about Palani's Welcome Bakery, Ramakrishna Lunch Home, and other hidden places that I would otherwise have not heard of. I am not sure how many of these joints exist today but I do want to look them up and see if I can find them. After a point, I was so drawn by her stories that I skipped past many of the recipes. Most of the recipes are laborious but I am sure they are delicious because of that. But for me "Tiffin" was made more enchanting by the friends and family, and all the travels that surrounded Rukka's life. I just wish it had been edited better to avoid countless repetitions.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Preethi

    In a day and age where cookbooks have photos enough to give you an idea on how each recipe will look like, the book is heavy on prose and less on photos. I liked the fact that the recipes are all traditional ones, but the format of the book fails the content.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sudha Narayanan

    What a book. Nostalgia well captured! It was such a pleasure to read about the food scene in the 40s and 50s in a South Indian household, and the book captures her life experiences in various part of the world in spreading Indian vegetarian cooking. Simply brilliant read.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Promita Bhowmick

    What a delightful read! So many stories and following them are some authentic south Indian and a bit of other regional recipes. I virtually experienced the post Independence era bazaars in Chennai, Jabalpur, New Delhi, how it was to travel by train during those days, how was Tanjore, the kind of ingredients available during those days, how the US was during those times, and above all how people were more harmonious, helpful and ready share things with each other. Each recipe is so unique and aut What a delightful read! So many stories and following them are some authentic south Indian and a bit of other regional recipes. I virtually experienced the post Independence era bazaars in Chennai, Jabalpur, New Delhi, how it was to travel by train during those days, how was Tanjore, the kind of ingredients available during those days, how the US was during those times, and above all how people were more harmonious, helpful and ready share things with each other. Each recipe is so unique and authentic that your mouth would start watering just by looking at the pics, and the stories are equally interesting with travel and other kitchen anecdotes. If you love food, cooking and above all if you love the storyteller's stories, then this book is for you. Along with it you'll get some lovely recipes too. What more can you ask for? So, enjoy the delightful take on Rukmini's kitchen and variety of dishes she tasted/made.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Hamsini

    Rukmini Srinivas with her soulful writing and recipes brings alive the warmth of an Indian kitchen in her book. A septuagenarian who has had rich life experiences with a father in military services and later, having married a sociologist, she writes lovingly of travels and life through India and the world, while never compromising on cooking and sharing vegetarian Indian food. The author, herself, seems a woman way ahead of her times, having been a geography teacher in eminent colleges in India, Rukmini Srinivas with her soulful writing and recipes brings alive the warmth of an Indian kitchen in her book. A septuagenarian who has had rich life experiences with a father in military services and later, having married a sociologist, she writes lovingly of travels and life through India and the world, while never compromising on cooking and sharing vegetarian Indian food. The author, herself, seems a woman way ahead of her times, having been a geography teacher in eminent colleges in India, while never losing sight of her chef/ cooking instructor avatar! At 70 odd, as a resident of Boston, Rukmini continues to teach Indian cooking and has a food show in a local channel. The book felt like I was reading letters from one of my grandparents- personal, warm and charming.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jaanaki

    Every lover of South Indian food should have this gem of a book !😍.Mouthwatering pictures,excellent and clearly explained recipes and heart warming anecdotes.Food is all about memories and this book is testimony to that.Reading this was like listening to a favorite piece of music again and again.I keep reading it once in a while either to try new recipes or just to enjoy bits of it again and satisfy my food cravings.Thank you ,rukmini srinivas for sharing your memories and food ..😍They are both Every lover of South Indian food should have this gem of a book !😍.Mouthwatering pictures,excellent and clearly explained recipes and heart warming anecdotes.Food is all about memories and this book is testimony to that.Reading this was like listening to a favorite piece of music again and again.I keep reading it once in a while either to try new recipes or just to enjoy bits of it again and satisfy my food cravings.Thank you ,rukmini srinivas for sharing your memories and food ..😍They are both priceless.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Amardeep Sodhi

    A must read for food enthusiasts! Tiffin is a memoir / recipe book that brings to life the humble Indian kitchen. The author has captured the very essence of the Indian way of life -how every event / activity is associated with food. Coming back home from school to ma's soulful yet hearty meals, the intensely hot summers made bearable by the amazing buttermilk, the train journeys that were incomplete without snacking.. It was a joy to read the book. Also, the recipes are a bonus. A must read for food enthusiasts! Tiffin is a memoir / recipe book that brings to life the humble Indian kitchen. The author has captured the very essence of the Indian way of life -how every event / activity is associated with food. Coming back home from school to ma's soulful yet hearty meals, the intensely hot summers made bearable by the amazing buttermilk, the train journeys that were incomplete without snacking.. It was a joy to read the book. Also, the recipes are a bonus.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Padmashri

    This is a book I keep going back to and read. Its warm and fuzzy with people we can relate to easily. Annam athai reminds me of own aunt and the ritual purity of her own kitchen and it reminded my mom of hers. This is a book over which me and my mom bonded over, reading out parts of it to her and having a good laugh. The characters make me smile and sometimes frustrated with the similarities in South Indian families. Its definitely more than a cookbook.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Maya Gopalakrishnan

    Nostalgia Galore Filled with recepies for homemade and familiarly mouthwatering comfort food garnished with stories and details which take you back to your grandparents home. Truly delicious!

  15. 5 out of 5

    Uma

    Enjoyed the way this book is written - a combination of recipes and memories... brought back the memories of my grandmother's, my aunts and my mum's cooking... and my summer vacations with my cousins. Enjoyed the way this book is written - a combination of recipes and memories... brought back the memories of my grandmother's, my aunts and my mum's cooking... and my summer vacations with my cousins.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Shrinidhi Venkat

    Wonderfully written. I so loved reading about India those times also the memories :)

  17. 4 out of 5

    Anitha KS

    The book made me want to reach out to the author and thank her for preserving this legacy. I read it cover to cover within a day because.. We'll.. Food and anecdotes tied to familiar recipes and a peek into yesteryear India. Highly recommend it for anyone who loves traditional cooking or cooking of any kind. The book made me want to reach out to the author and thank her for preserving this legacy. I read it cover to cover within a day because.. We'll.. Food and anecdotes tied to familiar recipes and a peek into yesteryear India. Highly recommend it for anyone who loves traditional cooking or cooking of any kind.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Ancita☆

    The author as-of-today is 93 years old. She wrote this book 5 years back. Have you ever sat down with your mother or your grandmother or an elderly and they teach you skills via stories from their or someone else's life? If you know this experience, this book is a voyage down Rukka's (fondly called so) memory lane. She does not bother the reader with stories of pre or post Independence era but keeps the memories sweet and shares endearing snippets around the recipes she brings up at the end of e The author as-of-today is 93 years old. She wrote this book 5 years back. Have you ever sat down with your mother or your grandmother or an elderly and they teach you skills via stories from their or someone else's life? If you know this experience, this book is a voyage down Rukka's (fondly called so) memory lane. She does not bother the reader with stories of pre or post Independence era but keeps the memories sweet and shares endearing snippets around the recipes she brings up at the end of each chapter. There is an authenticity to the book's tone, an honesty that is hard to come by these days. There are recipes which are original to her mother's kitchen, certain that belong to her Chitappa and others to her Athai. Several others are her own creation after having spent most of her married life in the US since the 50's. I am fond of the era gone by, the traditions we've lost, the stories untold and the stuff shoved to the bottom most pits of our lives simply because they are old. I am a firm believer of their should-not-be-understated value and this book rejuvenated me in that aspect. I did not want it to be over and kept stalling completing it. But after a month, it just had to. So, ordered a physical copy now, to be kept as a prized possession on my bookshelf because why not! As a reader. as a homemaker - this book is refreshing. Do not forget to read it!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Shriya Srinivasan

    Tiffin is a cute book by Rukmini Srinivas which feels much like listening to stories from my Paati (grandmother) or Thatha (grandfather). The fact that the author and I share the same village was a point of bonding too. Each chapter is a small anecdote describing in simple words how life felt like in the 1940s or 1980s perhaps. At the epicentre of each story is food, a special dish, which most probably is the protagonist in truest sense. And the recipe for that dish follows the chapter. If you ar Tiffin is a cute book by Rukmini Srinivas which feels much like listening to stories from my Paati (grandmother) or Thatha (grandfather). The fact that the author and I share the same village was a point of bonding too. Each chapter is a small anecdote describing in simple words how life felt like in the 1940s or 1980s perhaps. At the epicentre of each story is food, a special dish, which most probably is the protagonist in truest sense. And the recipe for that dish follows the chapter. If you are a South Indian and more precisely South Indian who has been or still lives in any part of Maharashtra, you might be familiar with many of the given dishes. Yet it is no less of a fun to go through similar stories about food.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Prem Rao

    Loved the book. Please check out my review here. https://premraostoryteller.com/2016/0... Loved the book. Please check out my review here. https://premraostoryteller.com/2016/0...

  21. 4 out of 5

    Mayuri Nidigallu

    Be prepared to salivate as you read through this delicious book. Precious family recipes are shared too! What a treat!

  22. 5 out of 5

    Harshita

    This is one of rare lovely heart warming books, which remind you of your childhood and makes you cherish everyone who was a part of making it. Ironically enough, it made me wonder if my life and those of modern kids will ever be as rich as those of our parents and grandparents. Despite much fewer means spread out among a much larger brood, people seemed to have been putting a lot of more effort into things they did to keep themselves entertained and busy. The rich stories that evolved out this e This is one of rare lovely heart warming books, which remind you of your childhood and makes you cherish everyone who was a part of making it. Ironically enough, it made me wonder if my life and those of modern kids will ever be as rich as those of our parents and grandparents. Despite much fewer means spread out among a much larger brood, people seemed to have been putting a lot of more effort into things they did to keep themselves entertained and busy. The rich stories that evolved out this effort are probably very hard to find today Oh and the food. Well described. Receptors are nicely detailed. But it is the stories which bring them alive though and really makes me want to try some these dishes.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Shruti Srinivasan

    Book 32 of 2020 - Tiffin by Rukmini Srinivas ji - a story feast sprinkled with gastronomic delights! Such a warm read this was. The book elaborates on the author's road to discovering food and the recipes that she dished out to the pleasure of all her friends and acquaintances in India and abroad Oh! And by the way, there is also a mention of a famous Indian writer whose works we all grew up reading. Read to find more and get an insight into the life of that wonderful author too! A wonderful boo Book 32 of 2020 - Tiffin by Rukmini Srinivas ji - a story feast sprinkled with gastronomic delights! Such a warm read this was. The book elaborates on the author's road to discovering food and the recipes that she dished out to the pleasure of all her friends and acquaintances in India and abroad Oh! And by the way, there is also a mention of a famous Indian writer whose works we all grew up reading. Read to find more and get an insight into the life of that wonderful author too! A wonderful book that you must pick up if you love food :) #book32of2020 #tiffin #rukminisrinivas #booksof2020 #bookstagram #readersofinstagram #booksofinstagram #foodlove PS: Best enjoyed with your favourite Indian tiffin (snack)!

  24. 5 out of 5

    Prabha

    What a journey! I started reading the book expecting a lot of recipes, but what I got was lots and lots of stories, memories from a bygone era, that are so touching, funny and heartwarming. The accompanying photos and the impeccable English in which the book is written... Overall, it was a great experience reading this book, although, fair warning, it is quite long 😊

  25. 5 out of 5

    V V

    Best cookery book The book is inspiring. I really liked the book as the book contains mixture of autobiography,cookery,indian culture and tradition. The book was presented nicely. Super !!!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Shruti S

    Wow!!! Just Wow!! Food stories with a lot of anecdotes in between.. The author relives her childhood and early youth while writing this book, hence proving that each and every memory has its own special taste..

  27. 5 out of 5

    Prasanth Prabhu

    A wonderful book It is absolutely a delight to read this book - a rambling but fun autobiographical jottings woven around tiffin interpersed with recepies of mouth watering dishes. Loved the stories and the food.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sailee Dhole

    A warm collection of stories centered around food

  29. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Radhakrishnan

    The book goes in to details of personal exchanges between the author and her child. Far cry from what I thought the topic of the book suggested.

  30. 4 out of 5

    anamika

    Beautifully description of situations. While reading this book I could feel floating along the memories. Simple recipes to follow and very handy. Totally loved it

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