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His Share of Glory: The Complete Short Science Fiction of C. M. Kornbluth

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His Share of Glory contains all the short science fiction written solely by C. M. Kornbluth. Many of the stories are SF "classics", such as "The Marching Morons," "The Little Black Bag," "Two Dooms," "The Mindworm," "Thirteen O'Clock," and, of course, "That Share of Glory". His Share of Glory includes all of Kornbluth's solo short science fiction, fifty-six works of short His Share of Glory contains all the short science fiction written solely by C. M. Kornbluth. Many of the stories are SF "classics", such as "The Marching Morons," "The Little Black Bag," "Two Dooms," "The Mindworm," "Thirteen O'Clock," and, of course, "That Share of Glory". His Share of Glory includes all of Kornbluth's solo short science fiction, fifty-six works of short SF in all, with the original bibliographic details including pseudonymous by-line. The introduction is by noted SF writer and life-long friend and collaborator of C. M. Kornbluth-Frederik Pohl. Hardbound with cover art by Richard Powers.


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His Share of Glory contains all the short science fiction written solely by C. M. Kornbluth. Many of the stories are SF "classics", such as "The Marching Morons," "The Little Black Bag," "Two Dooms," "The Mindworm," "Thirteen O'Clock," and, of course, "That Share of Glory". His Share of Glory includes all of Kornbluth's solo short science fiction, fifty-six works of short His Share of Glory contains all the short science fiction written solely by C. M. Kornbluth. Many of the stories are SF "classics", such as "The Marching Morons," "The Little Black Bag," "Two Dooms," "The Mindworm," "Thirteen O'Clock," and, of course, "That Share of Glory". His Share of Glory includes all of Kornbluth's solo short science fiction, fifty-six works of short SF in all, with the original bibliographic details including pseudonymous by-line. The introduction is by noted SF writer and life-long friend and collaborator of C. M. Kornbluth-Frederik Pohl. Hardbound with cover art by Richard Powers.

52 review for His Share of Glory: The Complete Short Science Fiction of C. M. Kornbluth

  1. 4 out of 5

    Stephen

    4.5 stars. I have not read all of the stories in the definitive collection of Kornbluth's short fiction so this review is only for the stories listed below (I will update my review as I read additional stories): The Marching Morons (4.5 to 5.0 Stars): Satirical look at a world in which the vast majority of the world's population are idiots who live carefree lives and the few "intelligent" people work endlessly to keep society going. That Share of Glory (4.5 stars): Really good short story about an 4.5 stars. I have not read all of the stories in the definitive collection of Kornbluth's short fiction so this review is only for the stories listed below (I will update my review as I read additional stories): The Marching Morons (4.5 to 5.0 Stars): Satirical look at a world in which the vast majority of the world's population are idiots who live carefree lives and the few "intelligent" people work endlessly to keep society going. That Share of Glory (4.5 stars): Really good short story about an organization of diplomats and translators that assist in galaxy wide trade and commerce, but who may have a hidden agenda. The Adventurer (4.5 stars): Great look at a dystopian American society run by a corrupt regime and the unusual vehicle for change that revolutionaries develop. An example of the maxim "be careful what you wish for." The Little Black Bag (5.0 stars): One of Kornbluth's most famous stories about a medical bag from the future that lands in the hands of a down and out doctor. A superb story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jean-marcel

    I'm so glad I discovered this writer. Everyone talks about the "golden age SF" writers who were a cut above the norm, and most people always site the same ones: notably, those who have gained a bit of mainstream cred in recent years, like Phillip K. Dick. I've got nothing against Dick, really; some of his stories are great, his world-building excellent, his ideas novel and sometimes gloriously outlandish...but his style just isnt so hot much of the time, the prose often seeming to have been forc I'm so glad I discovered this writer. Everyone talks about the "golden age SF" writers who were a cut above the norm, and most people always site the same ones: notably, those who have gained a bit of mainstream cred in recent years, like Phillip K. Dick. I've got nothing against Dick, really; some of his stories are great, his world-building excellent, his ideas novel and sometimes gloriously outlandish...but his style just isnt so hot much of the time, the prose often seeming to have been forced out of him with great difficulty and hitting the ground with a clunk. Not so with C. M. Kornbluth. While the quality of stories in this anthology is necessarily variable (more on this later), the man had a really snappy, distinctive and sharp style that you'd recognise within a few sentences, and which brings to life even the most standard of stories. Not many of these tales are very standard if you ask me; while he got his start within pulp strictures and even wrote stories based on guidelines in the 30s, Kornbluth was clearly a visionary with plenty to say and a huge amount of talent and ability. Maybe, in the end, too cynical to keep plugging on; probably very disillusioned and almost certainly clinically depressed. Many of these stories are startling in their depictions of reality and their observations about humankind. No exuberant one-sided boyish wonder here; for Kornbluth there may well be plenty of great advancements to come, but the future looks kind of grimy and crooked. There are also some fine tales of the present, sometimes with just a hint of the otherworldly lurking beneath the surface. At times I was reminded of Harlan Ellison, but Kornbluth seems a bit less cocky and, to me at least, a bit more enjoyable to read. Most of the strongest tales in the anthology come from Kornbluth's post-war period, specifically, the 1950s. This makes it all the sadder that Kornbluth died so young as he was obviously climbing to a real pinnacle of artistic craftsmanship. There are still plenty of early gems though, and I found it interesting to notice how under various pseudonyms Kornbluth would tell a different sort of tale with a different sort of voice, depending on what kind of audience he thought he was writing for. There are two or three "occult" stories, written in the 40s, that I found very interesting. The Cecil Corwin stories are very lighthearted and silly, but immensely entertaining. Some of these ideas seem far ahead of their time to me. "The Marching Morons" is classic; I think everyone should read it. Sure, Idiocracy is fun, but this is far cleverer, far more biting, and will really have you thinking by the end on what it implies. "The Mindworm" is an unusual take on vampirism and is a very dark story, especially as it basically puts the destructive eponymous creature in the role of protagonist. "Two Dooms" concerns a physicist taking a very special kind of psychedelic mushrooms because he is agonising over the ethical problem of the atom bomb, and being transported to an alternate world where the Nazis won World War II. "The Silly Season" is the story of a somewhat disreputable newspaperman struggling to be on the scene and report a number of weird events that are happening...nobody listens to him, and the whole thing is kind of funny until the last line, which is so sudden and packs such an unexpected sting that I laughed out loud. "The Events Leading Down to the Tragedy" reminded me of Poe's more sly and humorous stories because of the way it plays with its audience, and turns out to be a brilliant display of misdirection that reveals a lot about Kornbluth's trickster-like nature. There are even a couple of stories in here about struggling young artists that don't really have any normal SF trappings at all, and in which Kornbluth seems to be coming very close to revealing the stark pain of his inner soul. These are not necessarily the best pieces in the anthology, but they're very surprising coming from a writer most would dismiss as a "pulp hack" without even having read a word of him. Kornbluth does his best to portray a wide variety of characters and situations and make you feel for most of them. There's some blusteringly anti-Asiatic sentiments on display in a couple of the stories, but all told it's not too alarmist, and they were written immediately in the aftermath of World War II, so they kind of seem like natural products of their time. A few stories show Kornbluth appearing to struggle with the format he was forced to work in, as reading them I got a bizarre, powerful sense that he really, really wanted to take things in better, more interesting directions but was held back by the strictures of some of the magazines who were supplying his paycheque. No more is this evident than in "The Slave", which starts out remarkably and bursting with interesting ideas. Kornbluth even goes through some trouble to show the alien antagonists as being individuals and possessing their own culture, which he tries to elucidate a bit before turning the whole thing off in a quick ending battle and sending everybody home. It was rather disappointing and almost felt like someone else had stolen Kornbluth's typewriter before he could finish the thing. There are a couple of inconsequential pieces, too; one even hinging upon a bad pun, in the manner of Roger Zelazny's "I woke up this morning and then I made a funny" stories, but these are far outweighed by the level of quality displayed in most of the other tales here. For the most part this shows that Kornbluth's body of work was a huge success. I think several of these stories actually rank among my favourite short pieces, in any genre. Kornbluth could elucidate better than almost anyone the futility of many pursuits and ways of life, and he'd do it with a joke more often than not. The whole of "The Marching Morons" is like a massive, sick joke played on the central character, the world at large, and even the reader, and it's hilarity is all the more effective because the more you think about it the more uncomfortable it makes you feel. Genuinely great stuff, this.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Mark

    Despite his death at a tragically young age, Cyril M. Kornbluth was one of the greats from the "golden age" of science fiction. One of the members of the "Futurians" fan club of the 1930s (a group that counted Frederick Pohl, Isaac Asimov, and Damon Knight among its members), he went on to co-author the classic novel The Space Merchants and write a number of short stories that are among the finest of the genre. These stories have been brought together in this collection, from his earliest work t Despite his death at a tragically young age, Cyril M. Kornbluth was one of the greats from the "golden age" of science fiction. One of the members of the "Futurians" fan club of the 1930s (a group that counted Frederick Pohl, Isaac Asimov, and Damon Knight among its members), he went on to co-author the classic novel The Space Merchants and write a number of short stories that are among the finest of the genre. These stories have been brought together in this collection, from his earliest work to such greats as "The Mindworm" and "The Marching Morons" (a sure influence on Mike Judge's more gentle take on a similar premise in Idiocracy). This is a must-have collection for fans of golden-age science fiction, one that captures the wonder of the works of the era.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Michael Battaglia

    Time and memory being what they are, Kornbluth is unfortunately probably fated to go down amongst most general SF fans as an "and" person, simply a name that got tacked on in collaboration with someone who is more well known today, although given that a lot of the names he collaborated with are probably also fading into the mists of people's memories as glitzier TV shows and flashier book series take more prominence in people's attention that it wouldn't be surprising if pretty much everything h Time and memory being what they are, Kornbluth is unfortunately probably fated to go down amongst most general SF fans as an "and" person, simply a name that got tacked on in collaboration with someone who is more well known today, although given that a lot of the names he collaborated with are probably also fading into the mists of people's memories as glitzier TV shows and flashier book series take more prominence in people's attention that it wouldn't be surprising if pretty much everything he's done is a bit hazy. These days it wouldn't be too surprising if people thought Isaac Asimov was the guy who wrote the adaptation for that Will Smith movie (and were probably very upset when it didn't seem to match what was happening on screen). The most well known Kornbluth involved work is probably his novel with Frederick Pohl, "The Space Merchants", a rather savage satire on advertising and consumerism for the time that was considered a classic then and still is now (I read it years and years ago but I remember it being very good). He did several other works with Pohl (who only died about three or four years ago at the ripe age of ninety plus and did a lot ot keep the memory of his old writing partner alive), among other writers and was widely admired among his peers as being a kind of prodigy. Unfortunately, and this has a lot to do with the reasons he's not well remembered today, his experiences in WWII didn't leave him in the most robust of health and combined with a certain lack in taking care of himself led to his extremely early death by heart attack at the age of thirty-four in 1958. He left a decent amount of work behind but unless you're well versed in SF writers of the early days, chances are you aren't really going to come across him. This collection attempts to go a ways toward fixing that. Between the covers it collects fifty plus short stories that Kornbluth wrote, pretty much all his solo SF (he wrote a couple novels alone but everything else was with collaborators) over the course of his career under a variety of names. Having so much gathered in one place does go a ways toward making a good case for him being far more well known than he is, if only to prove how consistent he was (even when he was really just hacking it out . . . the last handful of stories in the collection are what was known as "spec work", literally banged out for the money and even though they lack bite and focus of his better works, they are still entertaining stories), so consistent in fact that I can't really detect a huge difference in stories that were written earlier in his mature career and ones that were written toward the end of his life (the collection jumbles them up, which some folks wanting to track his development might quibble with but it didn't really bother me). To that end, all the big guns you'd expect are here and they do kind of form the core of the collection. You get finely imagined future scenarios like "That Share of Glory", where negotiation has become a kind of religion as a merchant hires out a herald to assist him on a tough deal, only to encounter a bit of a twist as it winds on. You get the other big classic, the so-true-to-today its scary "The Marching Morons" which postulates a future where a relatively small group of smart people have to concoct ways to save the world from the masses of sheer idiocy that now comprises most of the population (actually given today's climate it might be optimistic as you wonder who the smart people that are going to save us are). Those two stories alone are strong enough to cement Kornbluth's legacy, emerging as fully formed slices of alternate reality that bristle with a brisk intelligence and a sharp eye for satire, taking current trends of the time and extrapolating them into areas of ridiculousness that doesn't feel dated at all today and in fact feel somewhat prescient at times. Surrounding those stories are equally strong tales, notably stuff like "The Little Black Bag" where an alcoholic doctor discovers a medical bag from the future and uses it to get some redemption (this one was made into TV episodes of several SF anthology series, although I can't imagine how the ending would have been shot without scaring the crap out of people). And time and again that's what Kornbluth does, taking scenarios that are interesting on their own and finding unusual angles on them ("The Education of Tigress McCardle", which should be required reading for anyone who wants to be in "Teen Mom", still makes me laugh every time I read it). "The Mindworm" postulates a scenario that Theodore Sturgeon would have taken into realms of both horror and love, while Kornbluth lets it play out with overlapping thoughts until the ending sneaks up on you from nowhere. "Two Dooms" sounds a call for a nuclear free world and basically writes "The Man in the High Castle" in a tenth of the space and with about half of Dick's sometimes off-putting oddness. And when Kornbluth did decide to be weird, the results are generally charming, like "MS Found in a Chinese Fortune Cookie" which is amazingly about exactly what the title says it is, but doesn't overstay its welcome. I also had a fondness for the journalist SF tale "Make Mine Mars", probably because he manages to transplant a detailed feel of how a newspaper runs into the future. What strikes in story after story is how seriously accomplished Kornbluth was, and how much more he could have done if his health had allowed him to stick around a little longer. Would he have found ripe subjects in the culture of the 1960s? Could we even say he had peaked? For all we know he was getting ready to enter his prime, which really speaks to the tragedy of his early death. In the meantime, we have these and so much else, which feels like a lot and a little at the same time. Few of the stories have a note out of place and even decades later its often clear what he's satirizing. He rarely pulls punches and so the stories lack the sometimes sappy sentimentality that even a genius like Sturgeon could let trickle in. But rarely are they cold either, his characters are full of pluck and even if the boy-girl stuff isn't that daring for the time more often than not he manages the dual feat that only the best of SF of that time could pull off: entertaining you with a plausible future (at least as seen from the 1940s) while making you think about the ramifications of that future. With all the old masters gone or nearly gone (are there any big guns from that era left?) and their works gradually beginning the slow fade in the eyes of a general reading population that only likes old stuff when its linked to a amber haze of nostalgia or repurposed for the sake of being new, there's something to be said for reading a story written over fifty years ago and still being able to sense what the author was thinking, to find it just as passionate or poignant as any story written today, to not make apologies or excuses for its embarrassing moments, to enjoy it simply for what is, a well told tale told well, written by a major talent who unfortunately only stuck around long enough to tease us with how talented he was.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Timothy Boyd

    Well I didn't enjoy this one very much. I am not sure if it was the dated writing of the stories or just the writer's style. Either way I struggled to get this one read. If you are looking for a new classic Golden era SiFi writer and you like short stories then give this one a try otherwise it's not recommended Well I didn't enjoy this one very much. I am not sure if it was the dated writing of the stories or just the writer's style. Either way I struggled to get this one read. If you are looking for a new classic Golden era SiFi writer and you like short stories then give this one a try otherwise it's not recommended

  6. 4 out of 5

    Duane

    CM Kornbluth (with or without Pohl) was one of the finest and most prolific of the fifties sf writers. His biting wit (especially later on) and sardonic turn on events reminded me of Twain or Swift, although his subject matter wasn't the same (of course). See "the Little Black Bag", probably his most famous. Or search out the story that ends "here they come with an insulting thick rope.." No, you gotta read it to find out which one. Or "I know a word that will explode this planet like a stick of CM Kornbluth (with or without Pohl) was one of the finest and most prolific of the fifties sf writers. His biting wit (especially later on) and sardonic turn on events reminded me of Twain or Swift, although his subject matter wasn't the same (of course). See "the Little Black Bag", probably his most famous. Or search out the story that ends "here they come with an insulting thick rope.." No, you gotta read it to find out which one. Or "I know a word that will explode this planet like a stick of dynamite in a rotten apple". Great command of language and dovetailing character to subject matter-way ahead of his time.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lawrence

    http://gnomeship.blogspot.com/2014/04... http://gnomeship.blogspot.com/2014/04...

  8. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    Cyril Kornbluth was a very bright child. His brother Lewis shared a family story about Cyril (quoted in C. M. Kornbluth: The Life and Works of a Science Fiction Visionary by Mark Rich): A neighbor lady came up to talk with my mother, and put her hand on the baby carriage, at which Cyril said, "Get your hands off my baby carriage." Mother said, "Don't pay attention. He's just a child." Cyril: "I am not the baby you think I am." He began getting his science fiction and fantasy stories published when h Cyril Kornbluth was a very bright child. His brother Lewis shared a family story about Cyril (quoted in C. M. Kornbluth: The Life and Works of a Science Fiction Visionary by Mark Rich): A neighbor lady came up to talk with my mother, and put her hand on the baby carriage, at which Cyril said, "Get your hands off my baby carriage." Mother said, "Don't pay attention. He's just a child." Cyril: "I am not the baby you think I am." He began getting his science fiction and fantasy stories published when he was very young. Some of the stories in this collection feel like they were written by a gifted teenager because they were written by a gifted teenager. Kornbluth was born in 1923 and 22 of the 56 stories in ths book were published by 1942. Some of these are quite poor; some, notably "The Words of Guru," are good. There are no stories in this book with a copyright date from 1943 to 1949. Part of this was because of Kornbluth's World War II service. Also, Kornbluth was branching into other kinds of writing. When the science fiction stories resume in 1950, they are, for the most part, much better than the earlier ones. There are still some really poor stories: "The Slave" and "Virginia," for example, both from 1958, are pretty bad. But he also published some good to excellent stories. My favorites are "I Never Ast No Favors" and Kornbluth's most acclaimed story,"The Little Black Bag." Other good stories would include "Gomez," "With These Hands," "Two Dooms," "The Altar at Midnight," "The Silly Season," "Theory of Rocketry," and "The Cosmic Charge Account." Kornbluth died of a heart attack in 1958 when he was only 35 years old.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Benjamin Espen

    His Share of Glory: The Complete Short Science Fiction of C. M. Kornbluth NESFA Press 1997 $27.00; 670 pages ISBN 0-915368-60-9 I picked up this volume because I had read the [almost] titular short story "That Share of Glory" in Jerry Pournelle's Imperial Stars: The Stars at War. I was pleasantly surprised at how much I liked just about every story contained within. I suppose I shouldn't be. Jerry Pournelle remains among my all time favorite writers, and I trust his judgment about other interesting a His Share of Glory: The Complete Short Science Fiction of C. M. Kornbluth NESFA Press 1997 $27.00; 670 pages ISBN 0-915368-60-9 I picked up this volume because I had read the [almost] titular short story "That Share of Glory" in Jerry Pournelle's Imperial Stars: The Stars at War. I was pleasantly surprised at how much I liked just about every story contained within. I suppose I shouldn't be. Jerry Pournelle remains among my all time favorite writers, and I trust his judgment about other interesting authors. This book comes in at 670 pages, and it only represents the scfi short fiction of Kornbluth. Not his novels, and not short fiction in any other genre. That is an impressive corpus of writing for a man who only lived to be 34. As Tom Lehrer almost said, by the time Kornbluth was my age he was dead. Some of Kornbluth's short stories are famous. "That Share of Glory", "The Little Black Bag", and "The Marching Morons" are his best, and best known works. Another in this collection that I especially liked was "Gomez", the tale of an unlikely nuclear physicist who finds and then loses great power. The stories I didn't like as much, I still liked a lot. I even liked the stories the in back, set in a smaller font, that came with a warning that they were early works written quickly to fill space in pulp magazines. You have to be damn good to write stories that way that anyone wants to read 75 years later, and Kornbluth was. While most of these stories are scifi, there were a couple that reminded me a bit of Lovecraft and Howard: uncanny and disturbing. Judging by their frequency, this wasn't his specialty, but I enjoyed them nonetheless. His specialty seemed to be journalism. Stories like "The Silly Season" and "Make Mine Mars" show marks of Kornbluth's time as a wire-service reporter in Chicago. This is important, since I'm always interested in what makes a given author's work "hard" scifi. While Kornbluth wrote some space opera featuring technology nigh unto magic, most of the works in this volume focused on reasonable extrapolations from Kornbluth's encyclopedic knowledge. I mean that literally, since Kornbluth acquired his facts by reading an encyclopedia front to back. However, it isn't really the technology that makes this hard scifi. Kornbluth displayed a keen insight into human motivations, combined with a reporter's cynicism for the tawdriness of ordinary life. Sometimes scifi can be rightly castigated for incomplete or wooden characterization. This is not true of Kornbluth; he understood the human condition, and wrote about it with the authority of a jaded confessor. Kornbluth was taken from us too soon; he might have been a yet more remarkable author had he lived longer. What might have been is a fit subject for another story. In the meanwhile, you just need to read Kornbluth. This is what the golden age of science fiction is all about.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Art

    Seventy-four million of us voted for one of the ten candidates other than trump, who received only forty-six percent of the popular vote. His surprising and disappointing victory drove me to search "idiocracy" as we enter this new era. That search lead me to a film of that name released eleven years ago. I watched it, saving you the bother. Positioned as a dystopian social satire set five hundred years in the future, it is a crude and humorless film. Although it receives no credit as inspiration, Seventy-four million of us voted for one of the ten candidates other than trump, who received only forty-six percent of the popular vote. His surprising and disappointing victory drove me to search "idiocracy" as we enter this new era. That search lead me to a film of that name released eleven years ago. I watched it, saving you the bother. Positioned as a dystopian social satire set five hundred years in the future, it is a crude and humorless film. Although it receives no credit as inspiration, the film story parallels a science fiction short story by C.M. Kornbluth, included in this anthology . "The Marching Morons" takes place two thousand years in the future. Geneticists bred intelligence out of the population for generations, abandoning words for deeds, leaving three million smart people on earth ruling five billion stupid people. These are morons, born suckers, writes Kornbluth. Barlow, our antagonist, wallowed in "a world dictatorship with me as dictator. ... A shrewd operator does not need to compromise." "The Marching Morons" published less than a year after another Kornbluth short story. "The Little Black Bag," which appeared in nineteen-fifty, centers on a physician's kit bag that arrived from the future. Kornbluth's editor liked that story and asked him to turn it around, to write a piece about present-day people set in the future, which is how he got to the morons. Of the two related stories, I prefer the earlier one, "The Little Black Bag," which seemed more vivid and intriguing. An aging physician pawned his kit bag. Suddenly, a kit bag appeared, from four hundred years in the future. The instruments seemed vaguely familiar, they caused no pain and left no scars. It was impossible to do harm. Cyril Kornbluth attended the University of Chicago before becoming a wire service reporter, which he quit to become a full-time writer.

  11. 4 out of 5

    John Faubion

    C.M. Kornbluth is my favorite author of all time. How often do you hear that? I first read him when I was around twelve years old. Probably 1956, or 1957. I'll never forget NOT THIS AUGUST. HIS SHARE OF GLORY is a collection of his work, excepting only the novel-length pieces. They're all worth reading. He had a way of sneaking up on you with his humor, I suppose I should call it satire, that I always enjoyed. One of the best short stories in this volume is "The Little Brown Bag." Start with that C.M. Kornbluth is my favorite author of all time. How often do you hear that? I first read him when I was around twelve years old. Probably 1956, or 1957. I'll never forget NOT THIS AUGUST. HIS SHARE OF GLORY is a collection of his work, excepting only the novel-length pieces. They're all worth reading. He had a way of sneaking up on you with his humor, I suppose I should call it satire, that I always enjoyed. One of the best short stories in this volume is "The Little Brown Bag." Start with that one if you want to see him at his best. Then enjoy all the rest, too. Cyril Kornbluth died in 1958 at only 35 years of age. What a shame.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Highly recommended collection of short sci fi pieces. Kornbluth died early and his work is often forgetten in sci fi conversation. But many of the pieces here that have had re-incarnations in the current age (Mike Judge's Idiocracy, for example, is much indebted to stories like The Little Black Bag and The Marching Morons). Definitely worth checking out. Highly recommended collection of short sci fi pieces. Kornbluth died early and his work is often forgetten in sci fi conversation. But many of the pieces here that have had re-incarnations in the current age (Mike Judge's Idiocracy, for example, is much indebted to stories like The Little Black Bag and The Marching Morons). Definitely worth checking out.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Shane

    Picked this up after a discussion about the film Idiocracy, in which someone recommended Kornbluth's tale The Marching Morons. And, from what I have read in this, the man does have quite a way with words. Picked this up after a discussion about the film Idiocracy, in which someone recommended Kornbluth's tale The Marching Morons. And, from what I have read in this, the man does have quite a way with words.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bart Larsen

    This book contains my all-time favorite short story (The Medicine Bag). I discovered C.M. Kornbluth as a teen-ager. I searched for other works by him and found that he died young and wrote very little. What a waste.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nathanielk

    A bitter, bitter man with a sharp tongue for satire. Marching Morons and That Share of Glory are amazing stories, just to start.

  16. 4 out of 5

    bluetyson

    His Share of Glory: The Complete Short Science Fiction of C.M. Kornbluth by C. M. Kornbluth (1997)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Rose Ann

    Wonderful short fiction from a man who died too young.

  18. 5 out of 5

    William Ritch

    What a wonderful writer of short stories. Too bad he only lived to 35. What a wealth of novels and stories are unwritten.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Tom Eldridge

    This set of stories includes "The Marching Morons." For that reason alone it's worth the read. Just watch the Kardasians some time and see if you agree. This set of stories includes "The Marching Morons." For that reason alone it's worth the read. Just watch the Kardasians some time and see if you agree.

  20. 5 out of 5

    William

  21. 5 out of 5

    Andy McFadden

  22. 5 out of 5

    Laruchka

  23. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  24. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  25. 4 out of 5

    Steve

  26. 5 out of 5

    Johann

  27. 4 out of 5

    Dave

  28. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

  29. 5 out of 5

    Jim Lloyd

  30. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

  31. 5 out of 5

    diabolical Dr. Z

  32. 5 out of 5

    Jeremiah Genest

  33. 4 out of 5

    Bryant Durrell

  34. 4 out of 5

    Mister Brodsky

  35. 4 out of 5

    Michel

  36. 4 out of 5

    Mike

  37. 4 out of 5

    Amanda

  38. 4 out of 5

    Linda

  39. 5 out of 5

    Howard

  40. 5 out of 5

    Adam Burton

  41. 4 out of 5

    Jim

  42. 4 out of 5

    Nick

  43. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  44. 5 out of 5

    David

  45. 4 out of 5

    Jed

  46. 4 out of 5

    Joel Johnson

  47. 5 out of 5

    Jimmy Slattery

  48. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  49. 5 out of 5

    Eric Hart

  50. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Szabo

  51. 5 out of 5

    Jerry Hyson

  52. 4 out of 5

    Forrest Norvell

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