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Dinosaurs are one of the most spectacular groups of animals that have ever existed. Many were fantastic, bizarre creatures that still capture our imagination: the super-predator Tyrannosaurus, the plate-backed Stegosaurus, and the long-necked, long-tailed Diplodocus. Dinosaurs: The Ultimate Guide to How They Lived taps into our enduring interest in dinosaurs, shedding new Dinosaurs are one of the most spectacular groups of animals that have ever existed. Many were fantastic, bizarre creatures that still capture our imagination: the super-predator Tyrannosaurus, the plate-backed Stegosaurus, and the long-necked, long-tailed Diplodocus. Dinosaurs: The Ultimate Guide to How They Lived taps into our enduring interest in dinosaurs, shedding new light on different dinosaur groups. Leading paleontology experts Darren Naish and Paul Barrett trace the evolution, anatomy, biology, ecology, behavior, and lifestyle of a variety of dinosaurs. They also remind us that dinosaurs are far from extinct: they present evidence supporting the evolution of dinosaurs to birds that exist today as approximately ten thousand different species. Throughout their narrative Naish and Barrett reveal state-of-the-art new findings shaping our understanding of dinosaurs. Readers will discover, for example, how the use of CT-scanning enables scientists to look inside dinosaur skulls, thus gaining new insight into their brains and sense organs. Dinosaurs is a must-have for all those wanting to keep up to date about these dynamic, complicated creatures.


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Dinosaurs are one of the most spectacular groups of animals that have ever existed. Many were fantastic, bizarre creatures that still capture our imagination: the super-predator Tyrannosaurus, the plate-backed Stegosaurus, and the long-necked, long-tailed Diplodocus. Dinosaurs: The Ultimate Guide to How They Lived taps into our enduring interest in dinosaurs, shedding new Dinosaurs are one of the most spectacular groups of animals that have ever existed. Many were fantastic, bizarre creatures that still capture our imagination: the super-predator Tyrannosaurus, the plate-backed Stegosaurus, and the long-necked, long-tailed Diplodocus. Dinosaurs: The Ultimate Guide to How They Lived taps into our enduring interest in dinosaurs, shedding new light on different dinosaur groups. Leading paleontology experts Darren Naish and Paul Barrett trace the evolution, anatomy, biology, ecology, behavior, and lifestyle of a variety of dinosaurs. They also remind us that dinosaurs are far from extinct: they present evidence supporting the evolution of dinosaurs to birds that exist today as approximately ten thousand different species. Throughout their narrative Naish and Barrett reveal state-of-the-art new findings shaping our understanding of dinosaurs. Readers will discover, for example, how the use of CT-scanning enables scientists to look inside dinosaur skulls, thus gaining new insight into their brains and sense organs. Dinosaurs is a must-have for all those wanting to keep up to date about these dynamic, complicated creatures.

30 review for Dinosaurs: The Ultimate Guide to How They Lived

  1. 4 out of 5

    Hai Quan

    Greeting! I would like to ask readers this puzzing question , actuallly to answer this question that has been puzzling me : How can em dinosaurs fit into the story of the Noah ark? How can all of 'em colossal sizes, composed of many species, each species one boy and one girl, fit into the Noah's Ark ??? Greeting! I would like to ask readers this puzzing question , actuallly to answer this question that has been puzzling me : How can em dinosaurs fit into the story of the Noah ark? How can all of 'em colossal sizes, composed of many species, each species one boy and one girl, fit into the Noah's Ark ???

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kam Yung Soh

    An interesting general book about dinosaurs. It includes the latest research on dinosaurs to give a comprehensive and up-to-date view of them. The book starts with a general overview of the dinosaur family starting from their beginnings. It then covers the dinosaur family tree, showing where the various known dinosaurs sit in it. The book then covers the anatomy of dinosaurs, showing how the various bones fit together. Depending on your current knowledge of dinosaur anatomy, you may learn some thi An interesting general book about dinosaurs. It includes the latest research on dinosaurs to give a comprehensive and up-to-date view of them. The book starts with a general overview of the dinosaur family starting from their beginnings. It then covers the dinosaur family tree, showing where the various known dinosaurs sit in it. The book then covers the anatomy of dinosaurs, showing how the various bones fit together. Depending on your current knowledge of dinosaur anatomy, you may learn some things. For me, it was that the posture of sauropods as usually depicted in various museums may not be anatomically correct. And, of course, the hands of the tyrannosaur and various theropods. The book then goes into what the fossils, and other information taken from them, can tell us about how dinosaurs may have lived, their possible behaviours and about the environment around them at the time. The book then looks at the one surviving branch of the dinosaurs: the birds. It also looks the event that caused the extinction of the rest of the dinosaurs and how the world looked in its aftermath. Depending on how much you already know about dinosaurs, you may or may not learn something new from this book. But it will help to let you know what is our current knowledge about dinosaurs and what remains to be discovered.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Hank

    NOTE: This review also appears at www.scienceforthefuture.com. Those of us who love dinosaurs know that there is something poetic about these animals – the spectacular size of some, their amazing variety, the mysteries of their long life on this planet . We still feel a thrill when we envision the fantastic beasts and we sometimes find ourselves drifting into a reverie in which we imagine the world under their 140 million-year domination. We can almost see, in our mind’s eye, the graceful long-ne NOTE: This review also appears at www.scienceforthefuture.com. Those of us who love dinosaurs know that there is something poetic about these animals – the spectacular size of some, their amazing variety, the mysteries of their long life on this planet . We still feel a thrill when we envision the fantastic beasts and we sometimes find ourselves drifting into a reverie in which we imagine the world under their 140 million-year domination. We can almost see, in our mind’s eye, the graceful long-necked sauropods nibbling the trees and shrubs, the stalking bipedal, sharp-toothed theropods tall and small, and the horned, crested, and armored herbivores wandering the landscape. Our endless willingness to imagine the great beasts, and our persistent desire to learn more about them, is catered to by a growing variety of mass market books that aim to help us understand their biology and the ecosystems in which they lived. One of the best recent additions to this library, by the British paleontologists Darren Naish (author of the popular Tetrapod Zoology blog) and Paul Barrett (of London’s Natural History Museum), stands out for its depth and its wide-ranging look at dinosaurs’ anatomy, behavior, diversity, and evolution. The book, Dinosaurs: How They Lived and Evolved, starts with a look at some basic biological principles and the history of dinosaur discoveries. Readers are provided a cogent overview of Earth’s geology and climate during the Mesozoic era, the value of cladistics as a tool to make sense of dinosaur variety, and the place of dinosaurs in the larger group of animals known as archosaurs. Naish and Barrett then move on to a helpful explanation of the relationships among dinosaur species and a detailed look at dinosaur skeletal systems. This discussion shines for its skillful and picturesque descriptions of the major dinosaur groups. The authors focus not just on the famous Saurischians and Ornithiscians; they take the reader into a just-deep-enough examination of the clades into which these groups are divided. In the third section of the book Naish and Barrett shift to an examination of scientists’ current understanding of the deeper aspects of dinosaur biology: their diets, their mating habits, the intricacies of their movement, and their social behaviors. This part of the book is a smorgasbord of insights into how fossils, both trace and body, teach us about the structure of an animal’s life. Next we are presented with a thorough discussion of modern dinosaurs. Here Naish and Barrett not only delve into the ways in which avian anatomy resembles that of their coelurosaur cousins, but also explain the current understanding of feather origins and the genesis of flight. In the book’s final section Naish and Barrett, after a review of the impact by an asteroid or comet and its consequences for dinosaurs and their world, highlight another possible contributor to the Mesozoic terminus: active volcanoes around the planet. The authors explain that, notwithstanding the ecological catastrophe that essentially ended their long reign over the planet’s biosphere (an incident known as the K-Pg event), dinosaurs may have been experiencing both climate change and a loss of diversity at the time it occurred. They take pains to emphasize that, contrary to popular myth, some dinosaurs did survive the end of the Cretaceous period. We know them, of course, as the birds. Gracing the text are numerous photographs, graphs, and computer-generated reconstructions. Naish and Barrett did not, though, include citations to scientific papers or a bibliography.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Yasmin Foster

    All you need to know about the latest dinosaur discoveries and more that you never knew you wanted to know! It’s amazing how far palaeontology has come in the recent decades and what has been unearthed. Never thought that we could ever tell what gender a dinosaur was? Boom! There you go, fossil evidence! Never thought we could tell what colour a dinosaur may have been: ta-dah! Preserved melanosomes! From the inside out dinosaurs are fleshed into more than just monsters to be whored and deformed f All you need to know about the latest dinosaur discoveries and more that you never knew you wanted to know! It’s amazing how far palaeontology has come in the recent decades and what has been unearthed. Never thought that we could ever tell what gender a dinosaur was? Boom! There you go, fossil evidence! Never thought we could tell what colour a dinosaur may have been: ta-dah! Preserved melanosomes! From the inside out dinosaurs are fleshed into more than just monsters to be whored and deformed for movies, but into animals that could be imagined going about, getting on with their day-to-day lives with Attenborough’s narration slavered over. Naish / Barrett write clearly so that anyone should be able to grasp the science of what they are talking about. And this is a science-based book. It is not a catalogue of dinosaur profiles, peppered here and there with basic facts, marketed with a young audience in mind. Although the illustrations of actual dinosaurs within are of great quality, and up to current scientific standards, there are not as many as some people might want. I would say most pictures are photographs of fossils or diagrams to support the science/discoveries that are being discussed. I suppose it depends what you prefer in your dinosaur books. But for those who want to go deeper, who want to find out more about one of the most successful groups of animals ever to walk this earth, then I cannot recommend a better book.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Peter Tillman

    Definitely belong on your dinosaur-geek gift list (or for yourself!). Up-to-date dino-science plus spectacular illos. About the only flaw so far is that illustration credits are scanty and obscure. Which is actually annoying (even more so to the artists!), since much of the appeal of the book is the paleoart. Perhaps they will make amends on the website? https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/... OK, "How awesome is this book exactly?" (the authors ask). Pretty friggin awesome, I'd say. "Even if you Definitely belong on your dinosaur-geek gift list (or for yourself!). Up-to-date dino-science plus spectacular illos. About the only flaw so far is that illustration credits are scanty and obscure. Which is actually annoying (even more so to the artists!), since much of the appeal of the book is the paleoart. Perhaps they will make amends on the website? https://blogs.scientificamerican.com/... OK, "How awesome is this book exactly?" (the authors ask). Pretty friggin awesome, I'd say. "Even if you don’t want to read the text you might buy the book for its pictures alone!" OK! And they do credit some of their faves, such as the awesome dino-art duo of Emily Willoughby and Julius Csotonyi, to name my faves.... Set aside a $20 bill for this one, guys. Lot of book for not much $$. Cheers -- Pete Tillman Professional geologist, amateur dinologist

  6. 4 out of 5

    Elly

    This book exists in that weird limbo area between wanting to appease 'the nerds' while also being appealing to newcomers. So some people will be bored by some of the paragraphs, some will have trouble understanding things. If you fall in the latter category I recommend looking up technical terms you didn't understand and looking at skeleton diagrams for the anatomy section. For visual learners there are definitely a ton of pictures in here, but there was definitely a lack in the anatomy section. This book exists in that weird limbo area between wanting to appease 'the nerds' while also being appealing to newcomers. So some people will be bored by some of the paragraphs, some will have trouble understanding things. If you fall in the latter category I recommend looking up technical terms you didn't understand and looking at skeleton diagrams for the anatomy section. For visual learners there are definitely a ton of pictures in here, but there was definitely a lack in the anatomy section. At least one completely described skeleton would've made a huge difference in my opinion. There's also not much to go on if you want to go deeper into a subject because there are no publications cited in here. So you're on your own to find more info. I'd say this book would be perfect for someone getting into more of the biological side of this. Most dinosaur books tend to be dictionaries with dinosaur names and then a profile detailing some things like weight, region, diet and so on. This tries to give an introduction into the actual living aspect of dinosaurs while also giving some examples. Would be a perfect gift for someone who is into the topic. I also recommend getting the hardcover edition because my paperback is already falling apart after this one read-through. That never happened to me before so just be aware of that.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elaine

    I was fangirling like a tween at a One Direction concert when I won a copy of Dinosaurs: The Ultimate Guide to How They Lived from a Goodreads Giveaway. This is a must-have for any dinosaur aficionado, of which I have been since before I was a tween. An easy to read guide to dinosaur history complete with great photographs and illustrations, the latest scoop on recent fossil discoveries and the latest cutting edge technology being used today that shows us there is so much more to learn about d I was fangirling like a tween at a One Direction concert when I won a copy of Dinosaurs: The Ultimate Guide to How They Lived from a Goodreads Giveaway. This is a must-have for any dinosaur aficionado, of which I have been since before I was a tween. An easy to read guide to dinosaur history complete with great photographs and illustrations, the latest scoop on recent fossil discoveries and the latest cutting edge technology being used today that shows us there is so much more to learn about dinosaurs. The book even talks about dino hookups and reproduction, not something I had ever thought about but found fascinating. Even if you think you know everything there is to know about dinosaurs, I had a good feeling Dinosaurs: The Ultimate Guide to How They Lived will surprise you with a nugget or two of information you may not have known.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kendra

    Loved this book. Enjoyable read, interesting and a lot of updated information with gorgeous artwork and images. A real pleasure to go through.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Herman Diaz

    My NEW favorite serious dino book ( https://www.amazon.com/review/R3VQ7TM... ): 5/5 As you may remember, Gardom/Milner's "The Natural History Museum Book of Dinosaurs" WAS my favorite serious dino book ( https://www.amazon.com/review/R2URWS9... ). However, Naish/Barrett's "Dinosaurs: How They Lived and Evolved" (henceforth DH) is my NEW favorite. Thus, DH is now my go-to natural history of dinos. There are 2 main reasons for why that is: 1) DH is very comprehensive; This is especially apparent in My NEW favorite serious dino book ( https://www.amazon.com/review/R3VQ7TM... ): 5/5 As you may remember, Gardom/Milner's "The Natural History Museum Book of Dinosaurs" WAS my favorite serious dino book ( https://www.amazon.com/review/R2URWS9... ). However, Naish/Barrett's "Dinosaurs: How They Lived and Evolved" (henceforth DH) is my NEW favorite. Thus, DH is now my go-to natural history of dinos. There are 2 main reasons for why that is: 1) DH is very comprehensive; This is especially apparent in Chapters 5-6 (which not only cover "the origin of birds" like Chapter 10 of Gardom/Milner's book, but also birds "beyond the Cretaceous"); 2) DH is very well-illustrated; In addition to Sibbick (who illustrated Gardom/Milner's book), DH is illustrated by Bonadonna, Conway, Csotonyi, Knüppe, Nicholls, Willoughby, & Witton. My only nit-picks are the cover art (which, while not the worst, neither reflects the interior art nor compares to the cover art of Gardom/Milner's book) & the lack of emphasis on the museum website (although the museum logo should be enough to show readers where to go for more info). Otherwise, these 2 books are very similar (E.g. Compare the quotes at the end of this review). 1 more thing of note: Contra what Publishers Weekly says, the "chapter on dinosaur cladistics" is 1 of the highlights of DH; Each section reads like a mini-story of how that sub-group evolved. "For 160 million years, dinosaurs were the most successful and diverse creatures to dominate the Earth. This book is based on the world-famous fossil collections and permanent “Dinosaurs” exhibition at London’s Natural History Museum. Written by two experts from one of the world’s leading Paleontology departments, this book features hundreds of color photos and illustrations that reveal the astonishing variety of life that proliferated in the Mesozoic Era—the Age of Dinosaurs. Tim Gardom has researched several major exhibitions, including The Natural History Museum’s acclaimed “Dinosaurs.” Angela Milner is Head of Fossil Vertebrates at The Natural History Museum" ( https://www.amazon.com/Natural-Histor... ). "From the Victorian golden age of dinosaur discovery to the cutting edge of twenty-first century fossil forensics 'Dinosaurs' unravels the mysteries of the most spectacular group of animals our planet has ever seen. Despite facing drastic climatic conditions including violent volcanic activity, searing temperatures and rising and plunging sea levels, the dinosaurs formed an evolutionary dynasty that ruled the Earth for more than 150 million years. Darren Naish and Paul Barrett reveal the latest scientific findings about dinosaur anatomy, behaviour, and evolution. They also demonstrate how dinosaurs survived the great extinction at the end of the Cretaceous Period and continued to evolve and thrive alongside us, existing today as an incredibly diverse array of birds that are the direct descendants of theropods. 'Dinosaurs' is lavishly illustrated with specimens from the Natural History Museum's own collections, along with explanatory diagrams and charts and full-colour artistic reconstructions of dinosaur behaviour" ( https://www.amazon.co.uk/Dinosaurs-Th... ).

  10. 5 out of 5

    Bill Leach

    Much has been learned about the dinosaurs, starting with the "Dinosaur Renaissance" lead by John Ostrum and Robert Bakker, and through the application of new study techniques since the 1990's. This book provides an excellent review of the current knowledge of these fascinating animals. The known genera has expanded from a few in the late 1800's to around 700 species in 300 genera today, with the expectation of an ultimate number of over 1500 genera. An initial chapter reviews the geological time Much has been learned about the dinosaurs, starting with the "Dinosaur Renaissance" lead by John Ostrum and Robert Bakker, and through the application of new study techniques since the 1990's. This book provides an excellent review of the current knowledge of these fascinating animals. The known genera has expanded from a few in the late 1800's to around 700 species in 300 genera today, with the expectation of an ultimate number of over 1500 genera. An initial chapter reviews the geological time scale, the concept of clades and how the family tree is constructed for the dinosaurs. This is followed by a tour of the various clades making up the Dinosauria. Much attention is paid to anatomy which is key to a detailed understanding of relationships. A more detailed look at the anatomy reveals much about stance, movement, feeding and chewing mechanisms, respiration, digestion and even a surprising amount of insight into their appearance. A separate chapter on ecology and behaviour delves more deeply into feeding and diet, locomotion, physiology (to what degree they were warm blooded), sex and reproduction. Examination of bones shows that most dinosaurs, such as Tyrannosaurus, matured by 20 years and died soon afterward. Smaller dinosaurs matured more quickly - Maiasaura in 8 years. The appearance of some dinosaurs changed significantly as they grew, suggesting that some specimens now considered different species, may be the same species at different ages. Throughout the book, the authors consider the birds to be dinosaurs. While most of the book considers the non-bird dinosaurs, one chapter examines the origin of the birds from the therapods. Recent finds have added much to the knowledge of early birds. The extinction that essentially ended the dinosaurs occurred at the end of the Cretaceous. The Chicxulub asteroid and the Deccan Trap volcanism are both described. In North America, dinosaur diversity declined with the closure of the Western Interior Seaway over a period of nine million years before the extinction. While many of the bird lines survived the extinction, many did not. The book is richly illustrated with artwork depicting the dinosaurs, photos and illustrations of their anatomy and many photos of various fossils.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Lee Broderick

    Don't be put off by the cover! I was relieved when listening to Darren Naish's podcast sometime after reading this book that I wasn't the only person to find it anachronistic and ridiculous. Inside, many of the illustrations are far more naturalistic and, indeed, in keeping with what we currently know about dinosaurs' behaviour and appearance. Including feathers. Having a professional interest in archeoornithology, in addition to the common small-boy-at-heart interest in dinosaurs, I was relieved Don't be put off by the cover! I was relieved when listening to Darren Naish's podcast sometime after reading this book that I wasn't the only person to find it anachronistic and ridiculous. Inside, many of the illustrations are far more naturalistic and, indeed, in keeping with what we currently know about dinosaurs' behaviour and appearance. Including feathers. Having a professional interest in archeoornithology, in addition to the common small-boy-at-heart interest in dinosaurs, I was relieved to see that this book includes modern dinosaurs. Birds, in other words. That was a principal reason for me picking it up and I'm very glad I did. The phrase 'popular textbook' sounds somewhat oxymoronic to me. I guess it must be a relatively common style of book but it's certainly not one I'm that familiar with. This succeeds by that measure though - the book manages to convey a broad overview of current evolutionary and palaeontological understanding of the animals in a manner that's engaging and not patronising. It's easy to recommend to anyone with a casual interest in these beasts who wants to learn a little more about them and how our knowledge (and theory) has changed dramatically in the last twenty years.

  12. 4 out of 5

    R.J. Southworth

    Even though I've read plenty of other dinosaur books, I still learned a great deal from this one. The information is up to date, and it examines the subject of dinosaurs from fresh angles compared to older books: devoting a entire chapter to dinosaur anatomy, going into detail about current theories on dinosaur behaviour, and paying a lot of attention to birds, the surviving dinosaur lineage. A must-read for dinosaur lovers. Even though I've read plenty of other dinosaur books, I still learned a great deal from this one. The information is up to date, and it examines the subject of dinosaurs from fresh angles compared to older books: devoting a entire chapter to dinosaur anatomy, going into detail about current theories on dinosaur behaviour, and paying a lot of attention to birds, the surviving dinosaur lineage. A must-read for dinosaur lovers.

  13. 4 out of 5

    António Matos

    Incredibly informative (and yet still very accessible, without any dumbing down) book on mostly every subject relating to dinosaurs. I thought I was reasonably well informed on the subject, and I ended up learning *a lot* reading it, which is very good. Great production values and design, as well. Very much recommended.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Rachel Holtzclaw

    rip the dinosaurs, gone too soon

  15. 4 out of 5

    Mark Walker

    Not a coffee table book, despite the lurid front cover and glossy pages, this is that rare thing, a book about dinosaurs for anyone (young or old) who wants to know the hard science behind the headlines and pretty (often rather fanciful) paintings. This is a thorough and careful review of the current state of research on many key aspects of dinosaur morphology, behaviour and habitat. Although the tone can be rather dry at times, the authors don't assume any prior knowledge; the opening chapters Not a coffee table book, despite the lurid front cover and glossy pages, this is that rare thing, a book about dinosaurs for anyone (young or old) who wants to know the hard science behind the headlines and pretty (often rather fanciful) paintings. This is a thorough and careful review of the current state of research on many key aspects of dinosaur morphology, behaviour and habitat. Although the tone can be rather dry at times, the authors don't assume any prior knowledge; the opening chapters on cladistics are especially illuminating, since (so it seems) thanks to this powerful new technique of classification (by "clades" rather than the old Linnaean notions of families and species) a quiet revolution is occurring in our understanding of how groups of dinosaurs are related to each other as well as to survivors of their line, notably the birds.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Mike Manzer

    I'm a bit torn about how many starts to give this. I think it is a 5-star book, in that it has really good, in-depth information in it. I also loved the illustrations. For my purposes, it was a bit too in-depth, though. I wasn't prepared at how nitty-gritty it got on specific details of topics like anatomy, so it probably wasn't the book for me. I did enjoy it, but I ended up skimming past a lot in here. I do feel like I learned a TON, though. The last time I read more than a random one-off news I'm a bit torn about how many starts to give this. I think it is a 5-star book, in that it has really good, in-depth information in it. I also loved the illustrations. For my purposes, it was a bit too in-depth, though. I wasn't prepared at how nitty-gritty it got on specific details of topics like anatomy, so it probably wasn't the book for me. I did enjoy it, but I ended up skimming past a lot in here. I do feel like I learned a TON, though. The last time I read more than a random one-off news article or watched more than a one-hour PBS documentary about dinosaurs was probably when I was about seven, so it was cool to see so much has changed and been updated in terms of how we see these magnificent creatures and to be exposed to the real wealth of information we've gotten about dinosaurs recently.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Mark Jeffs

    Great informative Dinosaur book. It introduces some of the key information and recent discoveries in Dinosaur Palaeobiology. It cements these ideas with gorgeous illustrations and informative photographs and infographics. This book is bang up to date and is really good at simplifying complex ideas for ease of access. Simply a must for any Dinosaur enthusiast. The team at the Natural History Museum produce some good stuff!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Preston Postle

    A fascinating book that provides relatively current views on dinosaur theory. The writing does a pretty good job of explaining the science, but it's not a breezy read. The illustrations were fascinating, but many were printed at a size that makes the minute details being described impossible to make out. A fascinating book that provides relatively current views on dinosaur theory. The writing does a pretty good job of explaining the science, but it's not a breezy read. The illustrations were fascinating, but many were printed at a size that makes the minute details being described impossible to make out.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Lara

    This is the best dinosaur book I've ever read. I like the way the material is organized and explained, and I like the discussion of multiple points of view. I especially like how the authors emphasize that birds are dinosaurs and provide an entire chapter on the origin of birds. It includes great photographs of fossils and fabulous art work. This is the best dinosaur book I've ever read. I like the way the material is organized and explained, and I like the discussion of multiple points of view. I especially like how the authors emphasize that birds are dinosaurs and provide an entire chapter on the origin of birds. It includes great photographs of fossils and fabulous art work.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Bob Small

    Comprehensive and very factual. More than a popular science read, but not a text book. Good illistrations. There is a newr edition, and I might even buy that to see how the science has changed. Worth the money.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chloe

    Great book! There is a huge variety of illustrations and photographs in this book as well as many interesting facts.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Santi Rello Varona

    A wonderfully presented book comprising all the new knowledge about the life and relations of the birds ancestors.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Pat

    Great reference book

  24. 4 out of 5

    Carolyn Harris

    Great information, easy to read, and beautiful illustrations. Glad to have this book on my shelf.

  25. 4 out of 5

    hisuin

    4.5 stars.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Laura McLain

    Good update on dinosaur anatomy, evolution, cladistics, and physiology.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Rama

    A grand tour of the Jurassic park and the prehistoric creatures Dinosaurs are one of the most interesting group of creatures that appeared in Triassic period around 230 million years ago. They dominated the planet during the Jurassic (201 to 145 million years ago) and Cretaceous periods (145 to 66 million years ago). These creatures occupied every landmass during this vast period and evolved into thousands of species. During the last decade at least one new species has been identified and named A grand tour of the Jurassic park and the prehistoric creatures Dinosaurs are one of the most interesting group of creatures that appeared in Triassic period around 230 million years ago. They dominated the planet during the Jurassic (201 to 145 million years ago) and Cretaceous periods (145 to 66 million years ago). These creatures occupied every landmass during this vast period and evolved into thousands of species. During the last decade at least one new species has been identified and named every year, greatly improving our knowledge about these species. Even the existing theories that explain the demise of these ferocious creatures have been questioned based on recent geological and archeological studies, and alternative ideas are on the table. A brief discussion about demise of dinosaurs is found in chapter 6, entitled “The great extinction and beyond.” In this book, the authors trace the history, origins, and family-tree using anatomy, biology, ecology and behavior of dinosaurs. Many creatures of this period are not completely extinct but exist in the form of certain reptilian species like alligators, crocodiles, turtles and tortoises. Many of these creatures grew smaller due to the environmental and survival challenges posed by the geological splitting of the continents from one supercontinent. When dinosaurs first appeared 230 million years ago there was one supercontinent called Pangaea, which stretched from north to south and surrounded by one gigantic ocean. About 150 million years ago, the continents started to split. At around 90 million years ago, South America, India and Australasia were separated from Antarctica. These geological movements brought forth new shorelines and impacted the climate. These planetary changes offered new environmental and ecological challenges to living species which changed the direction of the adaptation, survival and evolution. There is also a very good discussion in the fifth chapter entitled “The origin of birds,” that discusses how the “flying” dinosaurs evolved into birds. I found this chapter extremely interesting and illuminating. This book is easy to read and no significant knowledge in biology is required. All illustrations and fossil photographs are in black and white. Readers interested in current developments in the field of dinosaurs may find this useful, since the book has a good deal of information from recent excavations and discovery of new dinosaur sites. I recommend this book to readers interested in the ancient history of dinosaurs, paleontology and fossil studies. It is an effortless reading.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Meredith Miles

    I zipped through this text, marveling at its ability to be both accessible and advanced at the same time. Seriously, on a single page I realized I wanted to recommend the book to a professor, and also a two year-old! Excellent production value, design, writing and editing. And (of course!) the information is up-to-date, accurate, and compelling.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Ste

    Absolutely loved this book. Shows evidence for the lifestyles of various dinosaurs. It is also beautifully illustrated throughout but retains a scientific tone not dumbing down the information for a lay audience. It also doesn't shy from the fact that dinosaurs did not actually go extinct, but that modern birds ARE dinosaurs in a very literal sense. Absolutely loved this book. Shows evidence for the lifestyles of various dinosaurs. It is also beautifully illustrated throughout but retains a scientific tone not dumbing down the information for a lay audience. It also doesn't shy from the fact that dinosaurs did not actually go extinct, but that modern birds ARE dinosaurs in a very literal sense.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Brandon Nguyen

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