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"And the earth was filled with violence." (Genesis 6:11). It's 1,655 years after Eden, and life on earth has already gone to hell. The world of man is a place of wanton cruelty and wickedness. Prehistoric monsters and stone-age marauders roam the land. Murder and destruction are the rule of the day. This is life before the Flood. The story of man on the verge of his first "And the earth was filled with violence." (Genesis 6:11). It's 1,655 years after Eden, and life on earth has already gone to hell. The world of man is a place of wanton cruelty and wickedness. Prehistoric monsters and stone-age marauders roam the land. Murder and destruction are the rule of the day. This is life before the Flood. The story of man on the verge of his first apocalypse. Welcome to the world of the Goddamned. Collects THE GODDAMNED #1-5


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"And the earth was filled with violence." (Genesis 6:11). It's 1,655 years after Eden, and life on earth has already gone to hell. The world of man is a place of wanton cruelty and wickedness. Prehistoric monsters and stone-age marauders roam the land. Murder and destruction are the rule of the day. This is life before the Flood. The story of man on the verge of his first "And the earth was filled with violence." (Genesis 6:11). It's 1,655 years after Eden, and life on earth has already gone to hell. The world of man is a place of wanton cruelty and wickedness. Prehistoric monsters and stone-age marauders roam the land. Murder and destruction are the rule of the day. This is life before the Flood. The story of man on the verge of his first apocalypse. Welcome to the world of the Goddamned. Collects THE GODDAMNED #1-5

30 review for The Goddamned, Vol. 1: Before the Flood

  1. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    Jason Aaron and RM Guera get Biblical with The Goddamned, their latest collaboration that puts the Thump in Bible-thumper! 1600 years after Eden… Paradise is lost. The world is a wasteland of atavistic, wretched humans and among them all walks Cain. Cain: Adam and Eve’s son, the man who invented murder, the man cursed never to die. Suicidal, Cain has tried everything to end his suffering to no avail. But he has one last hope: the giants called the Nephilim, the sons of angels - and these days the Jason Aaron and RM Guera get Biblical with The Goddamned, their latest collaboration that puts the Thump in Bible-thumper! 1600 years after Eden… Paradise is lost. The world is a wasteland of atavistic, wretched humans and among them all walks Cain. Cain: Adam and Eve’s son, the man who invented murder, the man cursed never to die. Suicidal, Cain has tried everything to end his suffering to no avail. But he has one last hope: the giants called the Nephilim, the sons of angels - and these days they hang around with a holy man and warlord called Noah. He’s building a boat or something and bad weather is apparently on its way… Believe me when I say I wanted to love this - Aaron and Guera’s last series, Scalped, is one of my all-time favourite comics so I was nothing but pumped for their reunion… and I was left disappointed with The Goddamned. Like Scalped, this first volume introduces us to our angry shitkicker of a protagonist who’s another bad son - but the characterisation this time around feels tired. Cain comes off as the first emo kid, moping around saying everything is crap and wishing he was dead. I found it really hard to like or care about this dude because there’s nothing to him - he’s just a selfish and immature bitch! That moody sullen tone permeates The Goddamned like an eggy fart in an elevator. Our protagonist is an anti-hero, the usually good and righteous (Noah and the angel offspring) are portrayed as corrupt and sadistic, and God is uncaring, spiteful and petty. Ooo, what an edgelord you are Jason Aaron! I think I’m just jaded of jaded comics. This ain’t your father’s Bible! Whatever. Maybe this dark interpretation of Genesis will have more of an impact on American readers where Christianity is a bigger deal but it’s not like this approach hasn’t been done before. It doesn’t help that I’m not now, or ever been, religious or that interested in Christian mythology. It was fun about ten years ago when every comedian had an anti-Christian bit though it’s been done now and gone back to being dull and trite. I couldn’t care less about stories set in Biblical times. And what’s the point of this series anyway - Aaron’s saying that everything sucks? The whole book reads like a gloomy teen’s scribblings, it’s so lame and unengaging. I’m not sure where the series is headed but I hope it isn’t going to continue retelling the Old Testament in “metal” fashion. The story is very one-dimensional: Cain wants to die and sets out to do just that. Whichever enemy he encounters, he defeats because he’s the uber killer and he can’t die anyway which makes the action predictable and boring and there’s a lot of it. He goes through a clichéd change to make him heroic and then it’s over. It really isn’t that special and reads like Aaron phoning it in which is weird because I thought, given the quality of Southern Bastards, that he saved his A-material for his creator-owned stuff. I loved RM Guera’s art - it’s epic, detailed, terrifying, otherworldly, apocalyptic, and hellish. He draws some really awesome grotesques and sells the violent, fast-moving action superbly; there’s real passion and energy in these pages. And the landscapes were eye-catching in their brutal starkness. The artistic vision is powerful. Besides Guera’s art, I suppose Aaron’s misery-drenched story is compelling in just how unrelentingly nihilistic it is and the story is coherent, if somewhat archetypical and flat. To be fair, it took me until Volume 3 to really fall for Scalped, and when I went back and re-read Vols 1 and 2 I didn’t recognise the criticisms I made about them in the first place, so maybe in another book or two I’ll have completely changed my tune. But right now for me The Goddamned, Volume 1: Before the Flood was a decent but flawed and unexpectedly unimpressive beginning from a creative team that I expected much better from.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Donovan

    Christians, hold onto your hats! I liked this. Not quite love. But it exceeded my expectations. I mean, it's Jason Aaron after all. This follows Cain 1600 years after Adam and Eve have been kicked out of Eden. Just imagine the world created by the bad vibes and darkness of original sin and the invention of murder, and you get an idea what The Goddamned is all about. Sure, it's kind of a downer. But the Old Testament is very doom and gloom. And yet Aaron is bringing this mythical world to life, Christians, hold onto your hats! I liked this. Not quite love. But it exceeded my expectations. I mean, it's Jason Aaron after all. This follows Cain 1600 years after Adam and Eve have been kicked out of Eden. Just imagine the world created by the bad vibes and darkness of original sin and the invention of murder, and you get an idea what The Goddamned is all about. Sure, it's kind of a downer. But the Old Testament is very doom and gloom. And yet Aaron is bringing this mythical world to life, creating a linear story to unite these characters and events which lead to god destroying the blasphemers in The Flood. I mean, flooding the Earth doesn't really make sense if everyone is good, right? Hence the blasphemers. Full disclosure, I don't see The Goddamned as a total downer. Sure, it's crazy dark. The artwork definitely contributes to that. But I see hope in Cain's quest for death and his resilience. His quest is almost Nordic, like the desire for Valhalla and a better place that transcends the hell that Earth has become. Spoilers aside, Cain undergoes a drastic change near the end of the volume which perhaps suggests a future optimism and search for redemption. Which, if you think about, sounds like a slow burn allegory for Christianity itself. The Goddamned seems one dimensional, but it isn't, if you allow yourself to read more deeply into it. R.M. Guéra's artwork is great and a perfect complement to the dark tone. It's dark, gritty, semi-obscure, yet boldly outlined, which is nice. The action does get a little muddy sometimes, but not terribly. Where Guéra shines is facial expressions and landscapes. These are somber, terrified people in a desolate landscape, and yet, much like poverty or war photographed, there's beauty to it. And Giulia Brusco's colors are awesome. Rich and deep and sometimes bright, especially with the one brief view of Paradise. Overall, not totally mind-blowing, but Jason Aaron and R.M. Guéra have created a dynamic post-apocalyptic tale with great potential. It's dramatic, violent, and undependant upon your interest in Christianity or Christian "mythology." While The Goddamned is based upon Biblical events and characters, this is in no way, shape or form, an illustrated Bible.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sud666

    The Goddamned is an interesting concept. It tells the story of Cain (the first murderer) and the Earth after his act. Pretty much everything has gone to shit. This world is dark, grimy, violent and foul. Cain has walked this land for millennia surrounded by the other Goddamned. Throw into this mess a very different version of Noah. This Noah is a brutal conqueror who seeks slaves to build his ark. Apparently the Flood is coming. So far this sounds awesome right? To a certain point it is. Then why The Goddamned is an interesting concept. It tells the story of Cain (the first murderer) and the Earth after his act. Pretty much everything has gone to shit. This world is dark, grimy, violent and foul. Cain has walked this land for millennia surrounded by the other Goddamned. Throw into this mess a very different version of Noah. This Noah is a brutal conqueror who seeks slaves to build his ark. Apparently the Flood is coming. So far this sounds awesome right? To a certain point it is. Then why the two stars? The artwork isn't all that great and I have never liked the use of modern colloquialisms in ancient settings. The word "fuck" is tossed around so much-I wonder why it didn't appear in the Bible. It's an attempt to be edgy but ends up falling flat. Something is off when you see Stone-Age peoples cussing up a storm as if they were Marine Drill Instructors. This makes a weird setting where everything is old and ancient but everyone talks like something from our time. I may look into vol 2 just to see where this is headed. I think the idea was cool. The plot isn't bad, per se, but I am not a fan of a killer like Cain giving two shits about that woman or her son. The fact of him seeking a way to die was well done. I am not sure about what vision Aaron has of God. His God is more to what the real one is likely to be like (if he were real). His followers are often foul and misshapen (check out the Giant). That's cool. This has potential, as long as it isn't bogged down by poor dialogue loaded with modern speech. The artwork isn't terrible, but not good either, choosing to wallow in a semi-decent mediocrity. That's a shame- I think with better artwork and less modern terminology would have helped with the ambiance of the story. Instead it's jarring. Like watching something about Ancient Rome and Julius Caesar walks up to Brutus and says "What's up fucker?" and Brutus says "I goddamn fucking hate you! I'm going to fucking end your shitty life..I'm gonna stab you bitch!" Um yeah..exactly. Then to be even more irritated let me have the art be high-end mediocrity to back up my prose annnddd you're understanding why this ends up with 2 stars. I had hoped this would be better.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Set in the days when Noah was building the ark, Cain has wandered the world for 1,600 looking for a way to die. He can only be killed by Nephilim (the child of a angel and human). Any other damage he regenerates from. Now he walks the earth kung-fu style over a pre?-apocalyptic landscape. The world is full of nothing but depraved and degenerate humans living little better than animals. Noah is no better than the rest, he just acts similarly in God's name. If this sounds depressing, that's becaus Set in the days when Noah was building the ark, Cain has wandered the world for 1,600 looking for a way to die. He can only be killed by Nephilim (the child of a angel and human). Any other damage he regenerates from. Now he walks the earth kung-fu style over a pre?-apocalyptic landscape. The world is full of nothing but depraved and degenerate humans living little better than animals. Noah is no better than the rest, he just acts similarly in God's name. If this sounds depressing, that's because it is. Every other word in the book is "fuck". Characters sound like depraved smurfs. R.M. Guera provided powerful art when he and Aaron teamed up for Scalped. Here I found the art and coloring muddy and ill-defined. for me, Jason Aaron has delivered his first dud of a comic with this nihilistic look at the Old Testament.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Artemy

    Jason Aaron and R. M. Guéra, the creators of Scalped — one of the best comics ever — are back in business, and it took them a whole year to release just five issues of The Goddamned. Man, I wish Jason Aaron could focus more on his creator-owned projects instead of simultaneously writing fifty ongoing titles for Marvel. It's been over 1600 years since Eden, and Cain, the man who invented murder and is himself cursed with immortality, is roaming the world, looking for someone — or something — that Jason Aaron and R. M. Guéra, the creators of Scalped — one of the best comics ever — are back in business, and it took them a whole year to release just five issues of The Goddamned. Man, I wish Jason Aaron could focus more on his creator-owned projects instead of simultaneously writing fifty ongoing titles for Marvel. It's been over 1600 years since Eden, and Cain, the man who invented murder and is himself cursed with immortality, is roaming the world, looking for someone — or something — that can break his curse and finally kill him. He stumbles upon Noah, who is building his arc, and, by the way, is a total piece of shit. The book is a bit thin on plot, and the characters are kinda flat, but the series makes up for that with an absolutely wild atmosphere. This violent world feels depressingly real. It's all dirty, dark and scary, the people are worse than animals, and there is no hope for this world — the flood will kill everyone, and the inhabitants of the planet definitely did everything to deserve that. Man, this is a violent book, even by Jason Aaron's creator-owned standards. This almost felt like reading Crossed. Granted, R. M. Guéra is incredibly talented, so he is drawing all the blood and guts, as well as gorgeous panoramas, wild creatures, crippled and disfigured people, ponds of shit and the Garden of Eden in an absolutely superb way. Overall, it was a good start to a potentially great series, although I think it could go either way after this first book. It all depends on the characters and how they will develop. And I certainly hope that Aaron and Guéra won't take another year to create the second volume, although knowing Aaron, yeah, they probably will.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jesse A

    I'm a fan of Aaron's and I enjoyed the art but this book fucking stunk. The fucking writing was fucking bad, which is fucking surprising from this fucking bitch. I don't mind fucking bad language or fucking violence but this fucking shit was just hard to fucking read. A fucking miss from a fucking good writer. Goddamn Shit! 1.5 stars. I'm a fan of Aaron's and I enjoyed the art but this book fucking stunk. The fucking writing was fucking bad, which is fucking surprising from this fucking bitch. I don't mind fucking bad language or fucking violence but this fucking shit was just hard to fucking read. A fucking miss from a fucking good writer. Goddamn Shit! 1.5 stars.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Starr Light

    Bullet Review: This is BRUTAL AF, but GODDAMN if I didn't like it. Goddamn is so full of goddamn blood, violence, gore, and male nudity - it's probably called "Goddamn" because every page has you saying, "GODDAMN!" (Is that joke old yet? I wanna insert it into this review a few goddamn more times just for a laugh, but goddamn, if that isn't a hard thing to make sound natural.) This is a twist off the Cain/Able, Biblical Creation story, and the Noah and the Ark stories. People with a Judeo-Christian Bullet Review: This is BRUTAL AF, but GODDAMN if I didn't like it. Goddamn is so full of goddamn blood, violence, gore, and male nudity - it's probably called "Goddamn" because every page has you saying, "GODDAMN!" (Is that joke old yet? I wanna insert it into this review a few goddamn more times just for a laugh, but goddamn, if that isn't a hard thing to make sound natural.) This is a twist off the Cain/Able, Biblical Creation story, and the Noah and the Ark stories. People with a Judeo-Christian background will probably enjoy most - but GODDAMN, be careful because like I mentioned above, it's goddamn gory and violent AF. So if you get a bit light-headed at the word "damn" and need to have the statue David wear clothes, DO NOT READ THIS. Where's volume 2?

  8. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    A bleak and vulgar storyline, problematic characters and dialogue, messy and grotesque artwork and misery in spades. I can't think of a good reason why The Goddamned even exists, never mind a reason to read it. Avoid this pointless book at all costs. A bleak and vulgar storyline, problematic characters and dialogue, messy and grotesque artwork and misery in spades. I can't think of a good reason why The Goddamned even exists, never mind a reason to read it. Avoid this pointless book at all costs.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cheese

    I didn’t know what to expect from this, but it seems Aaron really has a problem with Christianity. It’s big fuck you to Christianity from Aaron, not for the faint of heart. Loved it.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Frédéric

    1600 years afters the fall from Eden Cain wanders on a ravaged Earth, trying to get killed. He goes on a collision course with Noah, a brutal tribe leader building a boat in the middle of the desert. First thing, if religion is a sensible matter for you just stay away from this book or you'll feel heavily offended by large. Aaron describes an Earth that makes Mad Max's look like Disneyland. Bleak and depressing,  no hope in sight. It's a land of murder, torture, cannibalism, rape, you name it. Cai 1600 years afters the fall from Eden Cain wanders on a ravaged Earth, trying to get killed. He goes on a collision course with Noah, a brutal tribe leader building a boat in the middle of the desert. First thing, if religion is a sensible matter for you just stay away from this book or you'll feel heavily offended by large. Aaron describes an Earth that makes Mad Max's look like Disneyland. Bleak and depressing,  no hope in sight. It's a land of murder, torture, cannibalism, rape, you name it. Cain hopes to be killed but can't which makes every battle terribly brutal but predictable and his blasé attitude doesn't make for a very engaging character. Noah is violent and sadistic. Nobody is worth saving. Aaron presents a very negative view of the Bible. I'm not offended or anything but where does it go from here? We're the goddamned, nothing to do about it, God is an asshole, abandon all hope? A bit short if you ask me. So it's 2* for the plot. Despicable characters, no real tension, no clear point. 4* for the art on the other hand. R.M. Guéra depicts an incredible world. The landscapes are incredible, the characters are as grotesquely vile as they're supposed to be. Dark and gritty with incredibly violent fighting scenes. Giulia Brusco superbly enhances Guéra's somber art.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Alexander Peterhans

    It's biblical times (literally). The first sons of Adam and Eve are Cain and Abel. Cain becomes the first person to murder another human, his brother Abel to be specific. This is the story of Cain, who is immortal and of course has a death wish, wandering around the cursed earth, which has been inherited and is being defiled by troups of murdering pillagers and rapists. Cain meets Noah, who is busy subjugating large groups of people to slave labour the ark into existence. Cain is helping a mother It's biblical times (literally). The first sons of Adam and Eve are Cain and Abel. Cain becomes the first person to murder another human, his brother Abel to be specific. This is the story of Cain, who is immortal and of course has a death wish, wandering around the cursed earth, which has been inherited and is being defiled by troups of murdering pillagers and rapists. Cain meets Noah, who is busy subjugating large groups of people to slave labour the ark into existence. Cain is helping a mother rescue her Noah-enslaved son. It's all very Old Testament On Steroids, with plenty of ultra-violence and heaps more swearing. I kind of expected this to turn me off, but I rather enjoyed it. It is an unforgiving world ignored by an unforgiving god, which combined with the expressive and splodgy artwork really worked. 3.5 stars (Received a not-that-much-ARC through Edelweiss)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Rod Brown

    Well, this is certainly the grungiest take on the Bible I've read. It's kind of fun in its over-the-top, ultra-violent way, especially its spin on Noah. Well, this is certainly the grungiest take on the Bible I've read. It's kind of fun in its over-the-top, ultra-violent way, especially its spin on Noah.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brian Dickerson

    Brutal, violent, crude, dark, but a storyline that is accessible to all. There is no guessing as to the plot. There are not branches to what this book may be about... Cain is the ultimate anti-hero set in the evil world that the Bible describes prior to "The Flood". It's a very bad place. The artwork is amazing and reflects the chaos of the setting well. This book is not for the easily offended or faint of heart, but it is an enjoyable quick read that reminds me of an action movie. You won't pon Brutal, violent, crude, dark, but a storyline that is accessible to all. There is no guessing as to the plot. There are not branches to what this book may be about... Cain is the ultimate anti-hero set in the evil world that the Bible describes prior to "The Flood". It's a very bad place. The artwork is amazing and reflects the chaos of the setting well. This book is not for the easily offended or faint of heart, but it is an enjoyable quick read that reminds me of an action movie. You won't ponder it's meaning for days but might enjoy the ride.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Liz Janet

    A bit like the bible, but shorter... and somehow more disturbing.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Craig

    This is basically the same story Darren Aronofsky told in his movie Noah, though flipped around so that the bad guys (sons of Cain and, this time, Cain himself) are the viewpoint characters. 1600 years after Adam and Eve were exiled from the Garden of Eden, the Earth is a desolate wasteland, defiled by the descendants of Cain, man-beasts, etc. Cain himself is wandering around, trying to find some way to finally die, when he stumbles on a group with superior technology--iron weapons, animals in w This is basically the same story Darren Aronofsky told in his movie Noah, though flipped around so that the bad guys (sons of Cain and, this time, Cain himself) are the viewpoint characters. 1600 years after Adam and Eve were exiled from the Garden of Eden, the Earth is a desolate wasteland, defiled by the descendants of Cain, man-beasts, etc. Cain himself is wandering around, trying to find some way to finally die, when he stumbles on a group with superior technology--iron weapons, animals in wheeled cages, nephilim, etc. Turns out this is Noah, busily collecting his animals, but also surrounding himself with a slave army to build his ark, including a young boy named Lodo, whose mother pleads with Cain for his help in rescuing the boy. The world is a pretty dismal place, well-illustrated by R. M. Guera, with brief flashbacks to the way it looked just after the exile from Eden--not paradise, but still pretty nice. In fact, Guera's art is really the series' saving grace, since the story, such as it is, is really rather slight. Though I enjoyed it, this really isn't on par with some of Jason Aaron's better efforts, such as Scalped or Thor.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alex Sarll

    Wherein the Scalped team engage in the often entertaining pastime of taking the Bible literally, without presuming it to be a good thing. So all that wickedness which ensued between the Fall and the Flood? Here it is in loving, gory, sordid detail. Our protagonist is Cain, which sets the tone: "The first two children born into the world, and we couldn't fucking stand each other. That alone ought to tell you how fucked we are." Given some of the treatment of faith in Aaron's previous work, in par Wherein the Scalped team engage in the often entertaining pastime of taking the Bible literally, without presuming it to be a good thing. So all that wickedness which ensued between the Fall and the Flood? Here it is in loving, gory, sordid detail. Our protagonist is Cain, which sets the tone: "The first two children born into the world, and we couldn't fucking stand each other. That alone ought to tell you how fucked we are." Given some of the treatment of faith in Aaron's previous work, in particular his Wolverine run where it felt very awkwardly wedged in, I fear this could all end in some form of tiresome redemption narrative. But in the meantime: "We're all His flawed creations. We're all destined to kill ourselves, to kill each other, to defile the world around us. We're all His doomed little monsters."

  17. 4 out of 5

    Jacob

    It's interesting. A dark and brutal take on Genesis and Noah. Not one I'd really recommend highly, but I'd consider reading the next volume. The creators seem to have a very dim view on humanity. It's interesting. A dark and brutal take on Genesis and Noah. Not one I'd really recommend highly, but I'd consider reading the next volume. The creators seem to have a very dim view on humanity.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Ashley

    Synopsis Even if you’re not religious, you might be familiar with the story of Cain and Able. The first children of the world, two brothers, who were content, until Cain wasn’t and became overcome by jealousy for his brother Able. In cold blood Cain killed his brother creating, for the first time, into existence the concept of murder. He has been cursed ever since, cursed by God to wander the wasteland the world has become unable to die. Filled to the brim with mythical beasts, action, and cold-b Synopsis Even if you’re not religious, you might be familiar with the story of Cain and Able. The first children of the world, two brothers, who were content, until Cain wasn’t and became overcome by jealousy for his brother Able. In cold blood Cain killed his brother creating, for the first time, into existence the concept of murder. He has been cursed ever since, cursed by God to wander the wasteland the world has become unable to die. Filled to the brim with mythical beasts, action, and cold-blooded murder, this story is an adventure, to say the least. Collects issues #1-5 The Goddamned, Vol. 1: Before the Flood by Jason Aaron and R.M. Guerra ★★★★★ Genre: Horror/Fantasy Release Date: January 2017 Source: Review Copy Provided by Publisher On My Shelf: YES WOW! I knew I was going to LOVE this as soon as I saw Jason Aaron’s name on it, and I was not disappointed in any way: in fact, I was left awed and needing so much more. You may be familiar with the new Marvel Star Wars comic series (Volume 1: Skywalker Strikes) in which case I can assure you that you are also familiar with Aaron’s work. Also, if you’re an X-Men fan, you may have encountered him in one of those issues. Do you like Thor, specifically the new female run? Congratulations, you know who Aaron is. And, even if you haven’t seen his name before, chances are that if you read comics you’ve read something by him, as he’s worked on so much. But, I’m digressing, so let’s get back to the issue at hand. Image comics is one of my favorite comics publishers, so when I found this finished product in the mail (I’m not going to lie to you) I audibly squealed. The combination of both Image and Aaron caused excitement beyond belief. I was so stoked that I dove in the very next night and read this all in one sitting barely even without pause for breath. I read this comic volume in under an hour! I just devoured it. I will start by saying that this story is not for the feint of heart or those that are easily offended. WARNING: bounteous nudity, gore, and profanity. Basically, this comic was murder and dropping the f bomb as frequently as possible, yet somehow I still enjoyed the plot an incredible amount. It was so interesting how Aaron chose to look at a time in biblical history and gave us a story that focusses on how much of a wasteland the world was before the great flood. I mentioned in the synopsis that this book mainly focusses on Cain but it’s all in relation to the bigger event that’s playing out: Noah. But, I don’t want to ruin anything, so I’ll move on. On top of this being horror, it also felt a bit like fantasy. (I’m not religious, so, to me personally I may have been affected in a different way than others.) Aaron and Guerra created an entirely new world, one with the vengeful God of the old testament that has no sympathy for the mortals he created. One of my favorite things that this comic does is explore the idea that God made us in his image, so what kind of God is that? I just really enjoyed the concepts this story explored and found them all so intensely thought-provoking. I was constantly thrown for loops wondering what mythical creature was going to appear next or what passage would make my jaw drop even further than the previous. To me, this plot had zero flaws, and I’m so invested in the story. I need more like tomorrow K THANKS. And THE ART. o.m.g. the art. Guerra’s work was morbid and horrifying and sad and absolutely beautiful. I couldn’t stop looking at the panels. They were so grotesque and yet I wanted to admire them forever. Does this say more about me than the style? No, I don’t think so. In fact, I’m quite positive it’s the opposite. I can’t get over how much I liked the atmosphere Guerra was able to create. It complements Aaron’s storytelling like a chocolate complements a croissant. I want to say so much more about this, but I also want to wrap this up so you can go forth and experience this comic for yourself. If you’re not squeamish and wouldn’t be offended by the obscenities/dark religious undertones, than I HIGHLY recommend snatching up a copy of this as soon as you can I adored this, and I will be on the edge of my seat waiting for more! Review originally published on my Wordpress blog Dreaming Through Literature.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Shannon Appelcline

    This was a hard comic to like. It was so unpleasant, so bleak. It's a post-apocalyptic pre-historic Earth, and everyone's horrible, and our protagonist is Cain. Except the mythology is intriguing, with a fallen world lying before this one, doomed by Cain. And the character of Cain is intriguing too, particularly as we wonder if he might have the capacity to change. And by the end, and the ending, I was won over. But it's such a perfect little story, that I have no idea where you'd go next, and how y This was a hard comic to like. It was so unpleasant, so bleak. It's a post-apocalyptic pre-historic Earth, and everyone's horrible, and our protagonist is Cain. Except the mythology is intriguing, with a fallen world lying before this one, doomed by Cain. And the character of Cain is intriguing too, particularly as we wonder if he might have the capacity to change. And by the end, and the ending, I was won over. But it's such a perfect little story, that I have no idea where you'd go next, and how you'd do it without being repetitive (and I'd say the creators are asking the same question, but it looks like five years later, the comic is finally headed back).

  20. 4 out of 5

    andrew y

    Okay. Okay. An ugly story and ugly depiction of an ugly but forgotten era (no matter your creation myth, Noah sort of runs across em all). I appreciate the boldness it took from Aaron to get this made. Southern Bastards this is not but you could and will often do worse.

  21. 5 out of 5

    A. David Lewis

    One of the ugliest stories I've read in my life. I hate its brilliance. One of the ugliest stories I've read in my life. I hate its brilliance.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Kenny

    From the creators of Scalped comes a no holds barred biblical bandes dessine. Perfect.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Lesley

    Brutal, bloody, profane and downright sacrilegious. I'd hate to think that is why I loved it so much, but it's probably true. Brutal, bloody, profane and downright sacrilegious. I'd hate to think that is why I loved it so much, but it's probably true.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Kyle Berk

    Jason Aaron is one of the best writers working right now. Anything he’s working on I’m interested. And I had heard virtually nothing about this one. The Goddamned is the story of Cain, over 1600 years after he invented murder. He’s immortal and is looking for death but something else finds its way to him. The story also concerns Noah and his building of he arc but a much more twisted Noah then any other media. The Goddamned was quite good. It’s really not for everyone but it’s got a solid little ar Jason Aaron is one of the best writers working right now. Anything he’s working on I’m interested. And I had heard virtually nothing about this one. The Goddamned is the story of Cain, over 1600 years after he invented murder. He’s immortal and is looking for death but something else finds its way to him. The story also concerns Noah and his building of he arc but a much more twisted Noah then any other media. The Goddamned was quite good. It’s really not for everyone but it’s got a solid little arc, art that I like, and every cuss you would ever need in a book. It’s not Jason Aaron’s best but it might be one of my favorites cause I loved this thing cover to cover. It get a bit silly at times with the level of violence, cursing, and nudity but that doesn’t mean there isn’t good stuff in here cause there is. I like Cain and his ever so slight redemption arc. Lodo and his tragic one. The biggest flaw might be how much this comic loves its squalor, in cursing god and bucking faith. I think it fits the characters but Noah has a bit of a problem in being a stereotype of a religion driven villain. But there is good in this and I’d be remiss to say I didn’t love it. So 4 stars

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    When it comes to Jason Aaron, he seems to have to the best of both worlds, in terms of writing creator-owned works and writing for publishers predominately known for superhero comics. From writing the God of Thunder for Marvel (with his Thor run concluding last year) to a modern crime epic featuring native Americans with Scalped for Vertigo, Aaron has an uncompromising vision that is wildly addictive, no matter how brutal his writing might be, as is the case of The Goddamned. Began publication fr When it comes to Jason Aaron, he seems to have to the best of both worlds, in terms of writing creator-owned works and writing for publishers predominately known for superhero comics. From writing the God of Thunder for Marvel (with his Thor run concluding last year) to a modern crime epic featuring native Americans with Scalped for Vertigo, Aaron has an uncompromising vision that is wildly addictive, no matter how brutal his writing might be, as is the case of The Goddamned. Began publication from November 2015, Aaron, along with Scalped artist R. M. Guéra, tells the story of man on the verge of his first apocalypse. 1600 years after Eden, Cain – son of Adam and Eve – travels through the hellish Earth where prehistoric monsters and stone-age marauders roam the land. With a desire to die as he continuously curses to God, the immortal Cain finds himself suddenly a desperate mother looking for her son, whilst Noah leads an army that will enslave other so that an Ark will be built, preparing for an impending flood. Although he renounced religion after being raised Southern Baptist, Aaron maintains a fascination towards religion and faith, as evident through his work. With The Goddamned, I was reminded of the radical interpretations of religious archetypes in Noah and Mother!, both films directed by Darren Aronofsky. There is no glamour to the world of man in this comic, as the two creators present a wasteland that opens with our anti-hero waking up in a pond full of shit. Through the lens of Cain – inventor of murder, cursed by God – he was born in paradise, only for mankind to evolve into less beings as ravaging as the animals they hunt. He has no desire to help man, only wishing to die as he seeks the Nephilim, in the form of giant men, to end his life. However, when he encounters the mother of a lost son, he is reminded of the family he had long ago and becomes the closest thing this doomed world has to a saviour. Although this is Aaron’s own spin on some of the stories from the Book of Genesis – including quotes from said book that begins each of the five issues – you can see how working on this comic would lead him to write Conan the Barbarian for Marvel. This isn’t a deep intellectual discussion on religion, as much as of the dialogue is of foul language that is said by everyone, including underage children. However, there is much of an emotional engagement as Cain travels through the wasteland and battle the many threats, which is simply humanity as violent as God had created. From the very beginning that chucks you in the deep end, this is definitely not for a younger readership. Despite Aaron’s prose, a lot of the comic relies on the visual storytelling, something that R. M. Guéra is a master of. On a side note, this review is based on the oversized hardcover, which allows Guera’s grotesque, but stunning art to look amazing in a larger format. With an emphasis on browns and yellows through Giuilia Brusco’s colouring, the panels are huge and there are splash pages, all of which show the incredible detail of the apocalyptic environments and the characters. More like a grim fantasy featuring monsters and cleaving, The Goddamned is a masterful and ultraviolent spin on the biblical tales that makes me excited to see what Jason Aaron and R. M. Guéra has in store when they return to the series later this year.

  26. 5 out of 5

    C. Varn

    This starts with depictions of that period of depravity in Genesis before the flood as more fully and totally depraved than I imagined: cannibalism run rampant, defiling the land, brutal idiocy. Cain is father of murder, but he is also the most civilized being in this pre-flood Earth. Noah brings civilization, iron, and religion, but with it slavery and other forms of savagery. Jason Aaron's use of profanity is anachronistic but similar to Deadwood's attempt to use modern profanity to get across This starts with depictions of that period of depravity in Genesis before the flood as more fully and totally depraved than I imagined: cannibalism run rampant, defiling the land, brutal idiocy. Cain is father of murder, but he is also the most civilized being in this pre-flood Earth. Noah brings civilization, iron, and religion, but with it slavery and other forms of savagery. Jason Aaron's use of profanity is anachronistic but similar to Deadwood's attempt to use modern profanity to get across more arcane profanity. I suppose the major problem is that outside of Cain, the characters are so depraved or broken that it is hard to like anyone. Making Noah highly unsympathetic does help, but even that is limited in its creativity. Still, the world building here using fairly solid biblical background for a post-acolyptic landscape that is really pre-deluge is brilliant.

  27. 4 out of 5

    maddie

    I've been on a graphic novel binge lately, and I'm so glad I read this. I LOVED the art and colours, it's stunning despite being heavy subject matter. I've been on a graphic novel binge lately, and I'm so glad I read this. I LOVED the art and colours, it's stunning despite being heavy subject matter.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Travis Duke

    Crude is a good word for this book, in writing and art. The one strength the book has is perhaps the story is itself, its interesting. Goddamned is the story of Cain, yup the biblical one, and his life after eden. He says he has been alive for 1600 years and the world is now a wasteland of death and crazy cavemen like raiders. Cain cannot die and yet that is all he seeks. He meets a woman named Aga and she has a quest for Cain and so they go off on their journey. The writing language is pretty v Crude is a good word for this book, in writing and art. The one strength the book has is perhaps the story is itself, its interesting. Goddamned is the story of Cain, yup the biblical one, and his life after eden. He says he has been alive for 1600 years and the world is now a wasteland of death and crazy cavemen like raiders. Cain cannot die and yet that is all he seeks. He meets a woman named Aga and she has a quest for Cain and so they go off on their journey. The writing language is pretty vulgar, every other word is an F bomb and it's overkill. The art is crap, I am sorry it is. The art is scratchy and cluttered and really a waste. not sure I will read more or not.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Tom Ewing

    Aaron and Guera's "biblical noir" is a pre-apocalyptic comic that reads as a post-apocalyptic one: a portrait of mankind at its lowest possible point. By turns corny, funny, and horribly bleak, The Goddamned's one constant is violence, with Guera's grungy art giving the blood and filth a grossly sensual aspect. If there's a criticism to be made it's that the story is already a bit repetitive - once you've wallowed in one scene of degradation and slaughter you've wallowed in them all. A change of Aaron and Guera's "biblical noir" is a pre-apocalyptic comic that reads as a post-apocalyptic one: a portrait of mankind at its lowest possible point. By turns corny, funny, and horribly bleak, The Goddamned's one constant is violence, with Guera's grungy art giving the blood and filth a grossly sensual aspect. If there's a criticism to be made it's that the story is already a bit repetitive - once you've wallowed in one scene of degradation and slaughter you've wallowed in them all. A change of scene is promised for Book Two though, even if you suspect the tone isn't going to lighten up much.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Relstuart

    I really liked Aaron's Punisher Maxx, the male centered Thor run (female acting as Thor is just ok so far as I've read), and didn't mind Original Sin.. I've lent my copies out of these out and recommended the stories to others to add to their libraries. I've been looking forward to the OHC of Aaron's Dr. Strange. This, on the other hand, is very bad. :( I really liked Aaron's Punisher Maxx, the male centered Thor run (female acting as Thor is just ok so far as I've read), and didn't mind Original Sin.. I've lent my copies out of these out and recommended the stories to others to add to their libraries. I've been looking forward to the OHC of Aaron's Dr. Strange. This, on the other hand, is very bad. :(

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