web site hit counter Uncanny Magazine Issue 8: January/February 2016 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Uncanny Magazine Issue 8: January/February 2016

Availability: Ready to download

The January/February 2016 issue of Uncanny Magazine. Featuring new fiction by Maria Dahvana Headley, Nghi Vo, Christopher Barzak, Brit Mandelo, and Rose Lemberg, classic fiction by Sarah Rees Brennan, essays by Chris Kluwe, Max Gladstone, Isabel Schechter, and L.M. Myles, poetry by Kayla Whaley, Leslie J. Anderson, and Bryan Thao Worra, interviews with Maria Dahvana Headley The January/February 2016 issue of Uncanny Magazine. Featuring new fiction by Maria Dahvana Headley, Nghi Vo, Christopher Barzak, Brit Mandelo, and Rose Lemberg, classic fiction by Sarah Rees Brennan, essays by Chris Kluwe, Max Gladstone, Isabel Schechter, and L.M. Myles, poetry by Kayla Whaley, Leslie J. Anderson, and Bryan Thao Worra, interviews with Maria Dahvana Headley and Christopher Barzak by Deborah Stanish, a cover by Priscilla H. Kim, and an editoral by Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas.


Compare

The January/February 2016 issue of Uncanny Magazine. Featuring new fiction by Maria Dahvana Headley, Nghi Vo, Christopher Barzak, Brit Mandelo, and Rose Lemberg, classic fiction by Sarah Rees Brennan, essays by Chris Kluwe, Max Gladstone, Isabel Schechter, and L.M. Myles, poetry by Kayla Whaley, Leslie J. Anderson, and Bryan Thao Worra, interviews with Maria Dahvana Headley The January/February 2016 issue of Uncanny Magazine. Featuring new fiction by Maria Dahvana Headley, Nghi Vo, Christopher Barzak, Brit Mandelo, and Rose Lemberg, classic fiction by Sarah Rees Brennan, essays by Chris Kluwe, Max Gladstone, Isabel Schechter, and L.M. Myles, poetry by Kayla Whaley, Leslie J. Anderson, and Bryan Thao Worra, interviews with Maria Dahvana Headley and Christopher Barzak by Deborah Stanish, a cover by Priscilla H. Kim, and an editoral by Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas.

30 review for Uncanny Magazine Issue 8: January/February 2016

  1. 4 out of 5

    Kaitlin

    So this was my first time diving into Uncanny and I am very happy with the first foray. As always with this sort of thing you get a few you like, a few you don't and some middling stories so i am going to just post all of my currently-reading updates and expand upon them if necessary to show what I thought of each story as I went through this. Fiction 'The Virgin Plated Bass' by Maria Dahvana Headley is a really weird story about a band of lying, cheating mercenaries based off of Jesus and Mary. So this was my first time diving into Uncanny and I am very happy with the first foray. As always with this sort of thing you get a few you like, a few you don't and some middling stories so i am going to just post all of my currently-reading updates and expand upon them if necessary to show what I thought of each story as I went through this. Fiction 'The Virgin Plated Bass' by Maria Dahvana Headley is a really weird story about a band of lying, cheating mercenaries based off of Jesus and Mary. It's a warped version of Christianity, and it's got a cat who swears a lot. Maybe not my favourite story, but a weird one for sure and definitely thought-provoking even though it wasn't to my personal taste. 2* 'Lotus Face and the Fox' by Nghi Vo was beautifully sad and a story which reminded me a little of Kij Johnson's style. It's about a young fox girl who wants her sister back and so she goes to visit Lotus Face and ask her help...I loved the way this was written, the language was beautiful and wondrous but sad too. It had a sense of loneliness about it which I loved. 3.5*s" 'Creeping Woman' by Christopher Barzak and I have to say it was odd. Not really my kind of odd. Seems to be about a young woman falling into madness... Bit of a weird one... also there's horrible yellow wallpaper which sounds like anyone's nightmare. (I since realised this is a retelling of the Yellow Wallpaper which I haven't read so this maybe would have resonated more with me if I had) 2*s 'The Sincerity Gate' by Brit Mandelo was a sexually-charged story of mystical madness. I liked it but it was weird too. 3*s 'The Desert Glassmaker and the Jeweler of Berevyar' by Rose Lemburg was beautiful, poignant, evocative and lovely. I really liked that one and it's probably the most memorable of this issue for me becuase it was just lovely and sad and happy and wonder-filled all at once. Also I totally want one of their gemstones or glass pieces, they sound marvellous! 4*s 'The Spy Who Never Grew Up' by Sarah Rees Brennan is a modern-day retelling of Peter Pan as a spy. He's still not grown up and he's still kidnapping young girls, but the world has moved on and he has to adjust. I loved it! 4*s Non-Fiction 'Gatekeepers: The Nerd /Jock False Division' by Chris Kluwe is a short non fiction piece about how complex people are and how grouping people does each a disservice. Nothing I didn't know already, but all good sentiments. 3*s 'Growing Up In Hyperspace' by Max Gladstone is a non fiction essay about Star Wars and the influence it has had on the culture of the West. I recently wrote my dissertation about the effect of the LoTR films so this was very interesting and relevant, although again not overly surprising. 3*s 'Creating A Welcoming Fannish Community' by Isabel Schechter, I would give it a 4*s. Definitely agree with all her points and think this is something that Conventions and Fandoms need to look at, examine, change and work on. 'Quest for and SF/F Grandmother' by L M Myles. Non fiction piece about older female writers in SFF. It introduced a new author I am for sure going to investigate, can't wait! Also made you think about finding female authors to read in SFF. 5*s Poetry 'Tended, Tangled and Veined' by Kayla Whaley is a poem. I don't read much if any poetry but this felt raw and genuine and I was there with the girl, rosie... really lovely! 4*s 'The Exquisite Banality of Space' by Leslie Anderson is a poem which I didn't really connect with sadly. 1* 'Narrative of the Naga's Heirs' by Bryan Worra was a super short reflection on life. 2* (Also poetry) Miscellaneous Interview with Maria Dahvana Headly - 4*s Interview with Christopher Barzak - 4*s Both the Interviews are hard to rate, but both made me want to read more by the authors as they sound like superb people :) Overall a great mix and it's wonderful to see so many interesting Non-fiction and Poetry pieces as I don't often read too much of either of these genres. I will certainly be continuing my Uncanny subscription and I am really looking forward tot he next March Issue which I already own! 3.5*s overall!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Althea Ann

    *** The Virgin Played Bass - MARIA DAHVANA HEADLEY An odd retelling of "The Musicians of Bremen" with, perhaps, a bit of Puss In Boots thrown in - which all takes place during the Balkan conflict. A group of dispossessed persons wanders around, forming a musical band, singing for their supper and trying to stay alive. It's a good thing a 'cat' has nine lives, because in this war-torn land, they're going through them. As in the fairy tale, they're heading vaguely for Bremen, where things might be *** The Virgin Played Bass - MARIA DAHVANA HEADLEY An odd retelling of "The Musicians of Bremen" with, perhaps, a bit of Puss In Boots thrown in - which all takes place during the Balkan conflict. A group of dispossessed persons wanders around, forming a musical band, singing for their supper and trying to stay alive. It's a good thing a 'cat' has nine lives, because in this war-torn land, they're going through them. As in the fairy tale, they're heading vaguely for Bremen, where things might be better. As in the tale, they never get there. Unfortunately, the story doesn't really get much of anywhere either, although it creates an effective and disturbing mood. I think this novella would very much appeal to those who liked Genevieve Valentine's "Mechanique: A Tale of the Circus Tresaulti."

  3. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    I preferred Maria Dahvana Headley's surreal fable "The Virgin Played Bass" to the other stories here. It is a little too giddy in its absurdity at times, but I could still taste the imagery and wordplay on my tongue well after I had finished it. It overshadows the rest of this otherwise decent issue of Uncanny. Christopher Barzak's "The Creeping Woman" is a nice variation on Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper", and worth reading whether or not you are familiar with that classic sto I preferred Maria Dahvana Headley's surreal fable "The Virgin Played Bass" to the other stories here. It is a little too giddy in its absurdity at times, but I could still taste the imagery and wordplay on my tongue well after I had finished it. It overshadows the rest of this otherwise decent issue of Uncanny. Christopher Barzak's "The Creeping Woman" is a nice variation on Charlotte Perkins Gilman's "The Yellow Wallpaper", and worth reading whether or not you are familiar with that classic story.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    A good collection that examines boundaries in society. Not as strong as previous issues, but I stil enjoyed reading it, and I highly recommend Barzak's "The Creeping Women." Short Stories: "The Virgin Played Bass" by Maria Dahvana Headley: This is one odd novelette! A white cat collects players for his band--an accordion player (the protagonist), Mary Magdalene who plays violin, the Virgin Mary who plays bass, and Lazarus Mary who plays trumpet. The band members all lost their families in the prev A good collection that examines boundaries in society. Not as strong as previous issues, but I stil enjoyed reading it, and I highly recommend Barzak's "The Creeping Women." Short Stories: "The Virgin Played Bass" by Maria Dahvana Headley: This is one odd novelette! A white cat collects players for his band--an accordion player (the protagonist), Mary Magdalene who plays violin, the Virgin Mary who plays bass, and Lazarus Mary who plays trumpet. The band members all lost their families in the previous war, but a new war is marching their way, now they're playing across the world ahead of it, dying as they go, but luckily with the white cat as their leader they have 9 lives. The idea and execution reminded me a lot of something Catherynne M. Valente would come up with, though it's definitely written differently. 4/5 "Lotus Face and the Fox" by Nghi Vo: 3 masked children prowl the streets on festival day, grabbing what they can. But one, the fox-masked girl, is not satisfied with her way of life and misses her sister, who was hung for thieving. So she decides to try and visit the head alchemist of the city, Lotus Face. 3/5 "The Creeping Women" by Christopher Barzak: A retelling of The Yellow Wallpaper and Other Stories! And it's really good! 5/5 "The Sincerity Game" by Brit Mandelo: Sex. And more sex. They can't help it whenever they see one another, but they're both hiding something while posing as 'sincere.' 3/5 (3 for the good writing. Not much of a story here). "The Desert Glassmaker and the Jeweler of Berevyar" by Rose Lemberg: The only way for Maru and Vadrai to communicate is through letters, and those they only receive once a year. In these letters they describe their magic as they realize they love one another (and that love may be driving them a bit mad too). 3/5 "The Spy Who Never Grew Up" by Sarah Rees Brennan: Peter Pan far after Wendy, still a boy, and also a spy for Her Majesty the Queen and demented. 3/5 Poems: "tended, tangled, and veined" by Kayla Whaley: 4/5 "The Exquisite Banality of Space" by Leslie J. Anderson: 3/5 "Narrative of the Naga’s Heirs" by Bryan Thao Worra: 3/5 Nonfiction: "Growing Up in Hyperspace" by Max Gladstone: Good discussion of how Star Wars changed SF fandom. 4/5 "Thank You, Patreon Supporters!" by Lynne M. Thomas and Michael Damian Thomas "Gatekeepers: The Nerd/Jock False Division" by Chris Kluwe: A football player that's also a sci-fi fan discusses labeling and how we shouldn't be doing it. 3.5/5 "Creating a Welcoming Fannish Community" by Isabel Schechter: I don't participate in cons, but seems like some good advice for those who do. 4/5 "Quest for an SF/F Grandmother" by L.M. Myles: Let me just add Naomi Mitchison to my TBR list... 4/5 Interviews: "Interview: Maria Dahvana Headley" by Deborah Stanish: Good interview. I am actually not aware of the fairy tale her novelette is based on, so I'll have to go check that out. "Interview: Christopher Barzak" by Deborah Stanish: Another good interview.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jess

    3.5 - Rated just for the lovely story Lotus Face and the Fox by Nghi Vo "When one found food, they all were fed, and they were all hungry alike. Death was nearly the first thing they found that they could not share." 3.5 - Rated just for the lovely story Lotus Face and the Fox by Nghi Vo "When one found food, they all were fed, and they were all hungry alike. Death was nearly the first thing they found that they could not share."

  6. 4 out of 5

    Laura

    "The Virgin Played Bass" by Maria Dahvana Headley - Very loosely based on "The Musicians of Bremen" folktale. Dream-like and mythical. One of my favorites this issue. "Lotus Face and the Fox" by Nghi Vo - A young, orphan girl (the Fox) desperately turns to a mysterious, powerful woman (Lotus Face) for help. I really liked the setting for this one, but the ending was too abrupt and left me with too many questions. "The Creeping Women" by Christopher Barzak - Well-done retelling of "The Yellow Wallp "The Virgin Played Bass" by Maria Dahvana Headley - Very loosely based on "The Musicians of Bremen" folktale. Dream-like and mythical. One of my favorites this issue. "Lotus Face and the Fox" by Nghi Vo - A young, orphan girl (the Fox) desperately turns to a mysterious, powerful woman (Lotus Face) for help. I really liked the setting for this one, but the ending was too abrupt and left me with too many questions. "The Creeping Women" by Christopher Barzak - Well-done retelling of "The Yellow Wallpaper" from another POV. But it takes the story completely out of the fringe of speculative fiction that the original occupied. "The Desert Glassmaker and the Jeweler of Berevyar" by Rose Lemberg - Letters between two artists overcome long distance, infrequent communication, and cultural difference. Set in the author's Birdverse. This was another favorite. "The Sincerity Game" by Brit Mandelo - This story does an excellent job of conveying the excitement and uncertainty of a new relationship. But it is a complete stretch to consider it speculative fiction.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Elle Maruska

    Such a beautiful, fascinating, achingly sad story. I enjoyed every word of it

  8. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca Crunden

    'tended, tangled, and veined' by Kayla Whaley was beautifully intense and raw. It's a story in a poem and I love the imagery Whaley uses! she practiced her girlhood with heat–stricken hair, sheared nails, scrubbed skin. she baptized herself with fat wrung from beans and battered into butter. she oiled her joints with poise, scented her flesh with propriety, and clothed herself in performance. she practiced girlhood, but she never quite perfected it. I thoroughly recommend this poem and I can't wait 'tended, tangled, and veined' by Kayla Whaley was beautifully intense and raw. It's a story in a poem and I love the imagery Whaley uses! she practiced her girlhood with heat–stricken hair, sheared nails, scrubbed skin. she baptized herself with fat wrung from beans and battered into butter. she oiled her joints with poise, scented her flesh with propriety, and clothed herself in performance. she practiced girlhood, but she never quite perfected it. I thoroughly recommend this poem and I can't wait to read the rest of this issue. Some seriously good writing here. Read it for yourself here.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Erin

    ***The Virgin Played Bass by Maria Dahvana Headley ****The Spy Who Never Grew Up by Sarah Rees Brennan ****Lotus Face and the Fox by Nghi Vo ****The Creeping Women by Christopher Barzak ****The Desert Glassmaker and the Jeweler of Berevyar by Rose Lemberg ***The Sincerity Game by Brit Mandelo

  10. 4 out of 5

    Krista McCracken

    'Creeping Woman' by Christopher Barzak was by far my favourite short fiction story in this issue. I loved this darker more honest and blatant retelling of 'Yellow Wallpaper'. Incredibly creepy and beautiful written. 'Creeping Woman' by Christopher Barzak was by far my favourite short fiction story in this issue. I loved this darker more honest and blatant retelling of 'Yellow Wallpaper'. Incredibly creepy and beautiful written.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Rachel (Kalanadi)

    Most of the stories in this issue were a little too far out there for me, or darker/weirder than I prefer. However, Christopher Barzak's "The Creeping Women" was excellent - a very effective retelling of "The Yellow Wallpaper". Most of the stories in this issue were a little too far out there for me, or darker/weirder than I prefer. However, Christopher Barzak's "The Creeping Women" was excellent - a very effective retelling of "The Yellow Wallpaper".

  12. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    The Sincerity Game by Brit Mandelo

  13. 4 out of 5

    Kenny V

    The Virgin Played Bass - Maria Dahvana Headley The Sincerity Game - Brit Mandelo

  14. 4 out of 5

    Elanor Matton-Johnson

    It was the non fiction that called out to me in this issue, particularly LM Myles' search for her SF/F grandmother & Chris Kluwe's argument that sports fans & SFF fans are the same kind of people. It was the non fiction that called out to me in this issue, particularly LM Myles' search for her SF/F grandmother & Chris Kluwe's argument that sports fans & SFF fans are the same kind of people.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Kim

    I liked the Creeping Woman best this issue.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Nelson

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ekaterina Trayt

  18. 5 out of 5

    William Eckman

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Meerkat

  20. 5 out of 5

    Michael Lloyd-Billington

  21. 4 out of 5

    Sidsel Pedersen

    I don't know what to think. I don't know anything about the story, after listening to it, other than it is about the meeting of brains and flesh in the rush of a new red hot relationship. Merged review: An interesting fable like story about a grieving street girl wishing for a better life or perhaps just for the pain to go away. More beautiful than touching to me, but I have to admit I might not have been listing as closely as I should. I don't know what to think. I don't know anything about the story, after listening to it, other than it is about the meeting of brains and flesh in the rush of a new red hot relationship. Merged review: An interesting fable like story about a grieving street girl wishing for a better life or perhaps just for the pain to go away. More beautiful than touching to me, but I have to admit I might not have been listing as closely as I should.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  23. 5 out of 5

    Joe

  24. 4 out of 5

    John

  25. 5 out of 5

    Bryan Worra

  26. 5 out of 5

    Panda Panda

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mathew

  28. 4 out of 5

    Elaysee

  29. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  30. 5 out of 5

    Tracey

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.