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Dragondrums is the coming of age story of Piemur, a small, quick, clever apprentice at Harper Hall. When Piemur's clear treble voice changes at puberty, his place among the Harpers is no longer certain. Dragondrums is the coming of age story of Piemur, a small, quick, clever apprentice at Harper Hall. When Piemur's clear treble voice changes at puberty, his place among the Harpers is no longer certain.


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Dragondrums is the coming of age story of Piemur, a small, quick, clever apprentice at Harper Hall. When Piemur's clear treble voice changes at puberty, his place among the Harpers is no longer certain. Dragondrums is the coming of age story of Piemur, a small, quick, clever apprentice at Harper Hall. When Piemur's clear treble voice changes at puberty, his place among the Harpers is no longer certain.

30 review for Dragondrums

  1. 5 out of 5

    Niki Hawkes - The Obsessive Bookseller

    [2.5 stars] In it's defense, I'm also reading Oathbringer, so everything else seems more lackluster than usual. It was, however, my least favorite of the trilogy. [2.5 stars] In it's defense, I'm also reading Oathbringer, so everything else seems more lackluster than usual. It was, however, my least favorite of the trilogy.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rebecca

    Dear Mrs. McCaffrey, What were you thinking? You had done a brilliant job with the first two books in this "trilogy", so please do explain why you felt compelled to switch your focus from our beloved heroine Menolly to her rambunctious sidekick, Piemur? This is no trilogy. Do you think you can just skip ahead three years and make Menolly a peripheral player? Do you think that you can write a slow-moving, rather repetitive adventure story that lacks the resonance of the first two books in this tri Dear Mrs. McCaffrey, What were you thinking? You had done a brilliant job with the first two books in this "trilogy", so please do explain why you felt compelled to switch your focus from our beloved heroine Menolly to her rambunctious sidekick, Piemur? This is no trilogy. Do you think you can just skip ahead three years and make Menolly a peripheral player? Do you think that you can write a slow-moving, rather repetitive adventure story that lacks the resonance of the first two books in this trilogy, and we won't notice? We notice; and we are not happy. This story would be fine as a stand alone story. It still would not be a great story. Despite jumping across the map of your mythical Pern, this story goes virtually nowhere. Anticlimactic is an understatement. Piemur is not even close to being fleshed out as a character and, due to this, does not have enough weight as a driving force for this story. Why this final book jumps gears so completely is beyond me. Obviously, it left me rather frustrated. The story of Menolly was good, layered and exciting. As of book two, it was also nowhere near complete. In Dragondrums she is viewed from afar. She is understood only to the degree that Piemur understands her. This is at odds with the idea of a trilogy whose arc seemed to be the coming of age of a young girl. I would really like to know if Mrs. McCaffrey views these three books as a trilogy or if the publisher decided to lump them together and advertise them as one. I'm more inclined to believe the latter. Not just because I want to (though I do indeed want to), but because the sense of story in the first two books flowed with a confidence utterly lacking in this final one.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Sebastien Castell

    I'd been thinking lately of the core "rules" of cozy mysteries (if it sounds like I'm going way off-genre here, I promise, I'll get back to fantasy momentarily): no sex, no swearing, no gory violence. These are the sorts of books targeted at adult audiences but which have cartoony illustrations on the covers and tend to be about cats, bakeries, flower shops, and other such natural subject areas for whodunnits (seriously, there are untold numbers of cozy mysteries in those sub-categories). Cozy m I'd been thinking lately of the core "rules" of cozy mysteries (if it sounds like I'm going way off-genre here, I promise, I'll get back to fantasy momentarily): no sex, no swearing, no gory violence. These are the sorts of books targeted at adult audiences but which have cartoony illustrations on the covers and tend to be about cats, bakeries, flower shops, and other such natural subject areas for whodunnits (seriously, there are untold numbers of cozy mysteries in those sub-categories). Cozy mysteries focus on fun, well-told stories that aim to entertain without troubling the reader, and they have legions of fans. Fantasy's never been an explicitly "fun" genre, despite how its viewed externally sometimes under the umbrella of escapism. There have always been troubling, explicit, questioning stories and there's no special shelf for "fun fantasy". If there was, all three of the Harper Hall books by Anne McCaffrey, starting with Dragonsong, then Dragonsinger, and finally ending with Dragondrums, would have a prominent place on that shelf. There's no moment in any of these books where you'd feel uncomfortable reading them at night for fear of troubling dreams. The stories are well-written, exciting in places, thoughtful in others, and always in that safe zone free of sex, graphic violence, or swearing. They're not particularly "YA" (which doesn't shy away from difficult subjects or scenes), nor "Middle Grade" (in that they aren't all about how dumb adults are and how kids need to save the world). They're just . . . safe. Having witnessed the way my own YA series, Spellslinger, has had to navigate certain issues of censorship in places like Russia (but also, for very different reasons, the UK), I've become more and more aware of a push towards "safe" stories in some corners of publishing. Until recently I thought I was dead-set against such a drive for non-troubling stories (especially since "troubling" often grows far past "sex, swearing, or graphic violence" to encompass stories that just happen to feature issues of marginalized people in society). But now I think I've come to the conclusion that the mystery fiction world has it right. Go ahead and have a "clean fantasy" subgenre that's devoid of swearing, sex, or graphic violence. Just make sure it's defined clearly that way so that those readers looking for that experience can find it *without* opening up the rest of fantasy fiction to a kind of puritanical scrutiny. Dragondrums, a story of a young singer who loses his voice and ends up on a survival adventure on another continent while discover his own path in life, is—to me, at any rate—clean fantasy done well. It's not as compelling for me as Dragonsong (perhaps my favourite "clean" fantasy of all time), but it delivers what it promises without furthering any kind of puritanical agenda; it's "safe" and "fun" without suggesting that all fantasy books should be that way. In fact, given that there were some troubling aspects to how McCaffrey dealt with topics of sexuality in her first Dragonriders of Pern trilogy, I kind of think this series staying away from the subject worked in everyone's favour. I realize this is something of a meandering review, and apologies to anyone who sees this book – or the entire genre – differently from me, but in re-reading the book I found myself fascinated as much with what explicitly _wasn't_ in the story as what was. Most of all, re-reading Dragondrums made me wish McCaffrey had written more Harper Hall books, and I fear I may have to pick up Dragonsong again one day soon.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Susan Kennedy

    This book follows Piemur. You first meet him in the first two Harper Hall books with Menolly. He is Menolly's first friend in the Harper Hall. This picks up after the first two books. Piemur has a beautiful Soprano voice as a young man, but his voice begins to crack as he begins to go through the change to becoming a man. This makes everything change for him at the Harper Hall. He is so unsure of what will happen to him in the Harper Hall once he loses his voice. The Masterharper takes him and ha This book follows Piemur. You first meet him in the first two Harper Hall books with Menolly. He is Menolly's first friend in the Harper Hall. This picks up after the first two books. Piemur has a beautiful Soprano voice as a young man, but his voice begins to crack as he begins to go through the change to becoming a man. This makes everything change for him at the Harper Hall. He is so unsure of what will happen to him in the Harper Hall once he loses his voice. The Masterharper takes him and has him become one of his apprentices, but in secret. Piemur is a good boy, but he does get into trouble. He also is bright and clever. This makes him a great asset to the Harper Hall, but in ways that others can not know. He becomes a drum apprentice, but while there he is treated really poorly and ends up pretty badly hurt after a fall caused by others. He ends up in the Southern Continent with a fire lizard queen that he impresses. He has gotten himself into a bit of trouble, but he is smart and he survives. This is a good story and I can't help but like Piemur who has a big heart. This Harper Hall trilogy is such a marvelous addition to the Dragonriders of Pern series. They were and still are my favorites.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deborah Ideiosepius

    The Dragon books were part of the network of books that introduced me in my teen years to fantasy and sci-fi and on re-reading them years later it is encouraging to find them still as well written as I remember them. The plots still as riveting, the world-building still as thrilling and the characters still as good - well, maybe just a tiny bit more teen angst than I look for these days, but otherwise just as good! Dragondrums is the third of the "Harper" books and though it also works fine as a The Dragon books were part of the network of books that introduced me in my teen years to fantasy and sci-fi and on re-reading them years later it is encouraging to find them still as well written as I remember them. The plots still as riveting, the world-building still as thrilling and the characters still as good - well, maybe just a tiny bit more teen angst than I look for these days, but otherwise just as good! Dragondrums is the third of the "Harper" books and though it also works fine as a standalone, the previous two books did initially establish Piemur, the main character in the book. It seems to me that you would not have had to read them though, this is the first told from Piemur's point of view and as all of us seem different from the inside of our heads to how people see us on the outside, so Piemur is very different to himself than to others. His adventures start when his voice breaks and the Harper hold must find other work for him. This work accidentally brings him to the Southern continent and his adventures there are significantly different to any others as McCaffrey uses this story to explore a continent that is entirely different to the world of the North, so well established from previous books. At first I was a little miffed - I really wanted more of Menolly, to be honest. Piemur won me over however and I thoroughly enjoyed this book.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Icarus

    Why couldn't she have stopped at two? Why does every fantasy series have to be a trilogy or longer? This mediocre book drags the whole Harper Hall trilogy down with it. Why couldn't she have stopped at two? Why does every fantasy series have to be a trilogy or longer? This mediocre book drags the whole Harper Hall trilogy down with it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Dan Debono

    This was one of my first "adult" fantasy books and I LOVED it! My mom bought it for me one summer and I devoured it (and began my love of Pern). I just started writing little bits for a mid sized daily in our area (or at least trying - I got a couple little mini features in - but I was only in 9th grade!). Being so moved by this strange (to me) book, I decided to write Anne, never expecting to hear back, but sure enough, a great little handwritten letter found it's way into my parent's mailbox a This was one of my first "adult" fantasy books and I LOVED it! My mom bought it for me one summer and I devoured it (and began my love of Pern). I just started writing little bits for a mid sized daily in our area (or at least trying - I got a couple little mini features in - but I was only in 9th grade!). Being so moved by this strange (to me) book, I decided to write Anne, never expecting to hear back, but sure enough, a great little handwritten letter found it's way into my parent's mailbox a month or so later. I had sent a small sample of writing and she encouraged me (and it wasn't too good, but maybe she thought it a bit ... imaginative). I wrote her a couple more times and each time she responded. What a quality lady! I bet most "modern" authors are "far too busy" to do what she did - even those with 1/10 of her volume of work!

  8. 4 out of 5

    Beth

    Now this - this is interesting, because it's so clearly a book meant to be read with information from other books in the series, information that the first two Harper Hall books don't have. There are a lot of political machinations that are only referenced - so much of what's going on in the southern weyr is confusing to me! - and the choice to switch protagonists is an interesting one, too. The resolution is less satisfying. I have no idea why Piemur wants to stay, nor do I think his motivations Now this - this is interesting, because it's so clearly a book meant to be read with information from other books in the series, information that the first two Harper Hall books don't have. There are a lot of political machinations that are only referenced - so much of what's going on in the southern weyr is confusing to me! - and the choice to switch protagonists is an interesting one, too. The resolution is less satisfying. I have no idea why Piemur wants to stay, nor do I think his motivations are adequately addressed. But that's a problem I have with this entire series: there's no standard conflict and resolution. Instead, McCaffrey ends on a triumphant note, whether that note acts as resolution or not. (Mostly it's not.)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Sotiris Karaiskos

    Like many who read this book, I felt disappointed when I started it. I was expecting to read a continuation of the story of our dear Menolly but curiously the author chose to leave it aside and tell us the story of a less interesting character. The only good thing I can find is the fact that, through the story of the central character, we are following some interesting developments like the further maturation of Menolly, beyond that could not find anything interesting. The median rating comes wi Like many who read this book, I felt disappointed when I started it. I was expecting to read a continuation of the story of our dear Menolly but curiously the author chose to leave it aside and tell us the story of a less interesting character. The only good thing I can find is the fact that, through the story of the central character, we are following some interesting developments like the further maturation of Menolly, beyond that could not find anything interesting. The median rating comes with the utmost leniency.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Izzie

    I just wasn't that interested in Piemur's character or storylines. I've enjoyed the Pern books I've read for the most part but I think this will be my last. I just wasn't that interested in Piemur's character or storylines. I've enjoyed the Pern books I've read for the most part but I think this will be my last.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Caro

    Each Pern novel can be read as a stand alone, but Dragondrums is the third book in the Harper Hall trilogy so if you want to read the books in the order, head over to Dragonsong (book 1) and Dragonsinger (book 2). The story starts at the end of Dragonsinger where Menolly is made a Journeyman. Piemur prepares himself for a big event where he will be the lead singer until his voice breaks and he realises that his one and only ability which made him special has now disappeared. But Piemur is very far Each Pern novel can be read as a stand alone, but Dragondrums is the third book in the Harper Hall trilogy so if you want to read the books in the order, head over to Dragonsong (book 1) and Dragonsinger (book 2). The story starts at the end of Dragonsinger where Menolly is made a Journeyman. Piemur prepares himself for a big event where he will be the lead singer until his voice breaks and he realises that his one and only ability which made him special has now disappeared. But Piemur is very far from having just this one ability and Master Robinton knows how precious Piemur is. That is why Piemur is seemingly hired as a drums apprentice when in fact he is asked to becoming the Master Harper's ears and eyes wherever he goes. I was at first quite disappointed to see that I wouldn't be in Menolly's head anymore. I really loved Piemur but I was so used to see things through Menolly's eyes that I thought I wouldn't be able to like the book. But then Piemur started being Piemur and I couldn't remember why I could have been worried in the first place. Piemur has always been very cunning and at times manipulative to get what he wants and seeing his reasoning behind his cunning schemes was fantastic. He is a sweetheart and you can't stop laughing at his wild schemes! I think he is one of my favourite characters ever! It is so heart-breaking when his voice transforms, I could really feel for him, especially with the weight of everyone else's reaction, but thankfully - and quite frankly, in a typical Piemur fashion - he springs out of it and finds something else to do. He has such a great spirit that he sees the positive aspect of things. I really don't want to spoil the story by telling you what sorts of mischief he conjures up in this book, but I can promise that you won't be disappointed. I thought that my favourite books would be the first ones because they are told by Menolly and because they focus on those gorgeous little things named fire lizards but Dragondrums is such a special story of someone trying to find himself. It is such a wonderful story that I cried at the end because it made me so happy. (I am not even kidding and I understand I am losing all my street cred by confessing this.) I know these books were published years ago and no one particularly cares to discover Anne McCaffrey's books today when they can read modern stories and such but those stories really hold something others don't and I really can't wait to read all of Anne Mccaffrey's other books (thank God there are so many!). So you need to read those books too! This trilogy is one of the best fantasy novels I have ever read. It transports me to a beautifully vivid world and makes me travel alongside amazing characters. Plus now I know that I want a fire lizard as a pet so that's that.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Robin Reynolds

    When I picked this book up to read, I was a little disappointed that it wasn't a continuation of Menolly's story. I wanted more about her. I wanted to watch Menolly and Sebell develop their relationship! Once again, I had to remind myself that these are not romance novels. But I quickly got over my disappointment as I was taken into Piemur's world. He is all set to start practicing the part of Lessa in a new song to be performed, when his voice cracks. Piemur has never been thrilled with singing When I picked this book up to read, I was a little disappointed that it wasn't a continuation of Menolly's story. I wanted more about her. I wanted to watch Menolly and Sebell develop their relationship! Once again, I had to remind myself that these are not romance novels. But I quickly got over my disappointment as I was taken into Piemur's world. He is all set to start practicing the part of Lessa in a new song to be performed, when his voice cracks. Piemur has never been thrilled with singing female parts, but he'd hoped this one would bring him to the real Lessa's attention. Suddenly, he can no longer sing, and has to be reassigned within the Harper Hall. Piemur's story is fun and adventuresome. When we met him in the previous Harper Hall books, he was a young scamp, always getting into scrapes and causing mischief. He's older now, and not changed a whole lot, but he has grown into a more mature young man, loyal to his craft and his friends. And still desperately wanting a fire lizard of his very own. And that is what sets him out on his biggest adventure yet. A very enjoyable story. I wish there were a fourth book as I'm not quite ready to leave Piemur behind.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    The focus shifts from Menolly to a young imp who is at the Harper Hall but doesn't take his skill as seriously as Menolly: Piemur. This is another delightful adventure. I think this book proved so popular that McCaffrey almost had no choice but to include him in further stories about Pern. Again, as in the first two books of this series, these are suitable for kids unlike the regular Pern series. I've reread this series over and over and must remember to do so again in the near future! Addendum: The focus shifts from Menolly to a young imp who is at the Harper Hall but doesn't take his skill as seriously as Menolly: Piemur. This is another delightful adventure. I think this book proved so popular that McCaffrey almost had no choice but to include him in further stories about Pern. Again, as in the first two books of this series, these are suitable for kids unlike the regular Pern series. I've reread this series over and over and must remember to do so again in the near future! Addendum: Actually, this one shows one of the main objection of "feminists" to the Pern books is invalid: that women are routinely raped by men while their dragons mate. In this one, the woman has male fire lizards and the man, the female. It is quite clear that both sexes are involuntarily participating when their fire lizards or dragons mate and that rape of women, specifically, was not at all one of McCaffrey's plans for Pern. Actually, because of that one scene with no graphic description, I suppose some would consider this book unsuitable for kids which is silly since it is clearly a coming of age story. Definitely recommended as a delightful look at a charming kid in the Harpercraft hold.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Clarice

    I remember distinctly not liking this book as much as the other two of this series when I read it back as a child (oh, yes I was doing a reread bit for a couple days), but it turns out that it's actually a fun book! I think it was just that Ms McCaffrey changed the focus of the story from my beloved friend Menolly and moved over to a newer face with Piemur. Piemur isn't a bad sort, just a rather impetuous boy who gets in a lot of trouble. There is some fun with the politics of Pern in the backgr I remember distinctly not liking this book as much as the other two of this series when I read it back as a child (oh, yes I was doing a reread bit for a couple days), but it turns out that it's actually a fun book! I think it was just that Ms McCaffrey changed the focus of the story from my beloved friend Menolly and moved over to a newer face with Piemur. Piemur isn't a bad sort, just a rather impetuous boy who gets in a lot of trouble. There is some fun with the politics of Pern in the background and I found it to be as always a sweet and short read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Surprisingly captivating and exciting read. Really makes you feel for Piemur as he tries to find his place as his whole world collapses around his ears, and the journey with him is particularly rewarding when he finds his own purpose. It's a shame that his personality seemed to take a 180 degree turn towards the end, once he met Sharra. What is it about that girl that changes so many endearing boys to snobs? That said, Piemur's snark is still there, and having "accompanied" him on his adventures Surprisingly captivating and exciting read. Really makes you feel for Piemur as he tries to find his place as his whole world collapses around his ears, and the journey with him is particularly rewarding when he finds his own purpose. It's a shame that his personality seemed to take a 180 degree turn towards the end, once he met Sharra. What is it about that girl that changes so many endearing boys to snobs? That said, Piemur's snark is still there, and having "accompanied" him on his adventures for that long in the book, a little character inconsistency can easily be ignored.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Kathy

    I enjoyed this conclusion to the Harper Hall Trilogy despite the fact that Menolly isn't the main character. I like Piemur and enjoyed reading as his story unfolded. There was enough of Menolly & other characters I enjoy to keep me happy. I enjoyed this conclusion to the Harper Hall Trilogy despite the fact that Menolly isn't the main character. I like Piemur and enjoyed reading as his story unfolded. There was enough of Menolly & other characters I enjoy to keep me happy.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Megan

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. I just finished another comfort reread, the final book in Anne McCaffrey’s Harper Hall Trilogy. Dragondrums focuses on Piemer, the mischievous younger friend of Menolly, the protagonist of the first two books. Reading this book for the first time as a child, I was initially disappointed Menolly wasn’t center stage, but she’s still there as an older friend and Piemer is a likable scamp, so I adjusted. I probably enjoyed this even more as an adult, because I was prepared for the protagonist switch I just finished another comfort reread, the final book in Anne McCaffrey’s Harper Hall Trilogy. Dragondrums focuses on Piemer, the mischievous younger friend of Menolly, the protagonist of the first two books. Reading this book for the first time as a child, I was initially disappointed Menolly wasn’t center stage, but she’s still there as an older friend and Piemer is a likable scamp, so I adjusted. I probably enjoyed this even more as an adult, because I was prepared for the protagonist switch. Piemer is the star soprano in the boys choir at Harper Hall, but his voice starts to change, so he’s moved to the drum heights where his facility learning message codes makes enemies with the older apprentices. There are nasty pranks and dangerous hazing. Piemer tries so hard to prove he’s responsible and discreet that he doesn’t really tell anyone about his troubles until a prank goes very wrong. After recovering from a serious fall, Piemer gets to accompany Journeyman Sebell on a reconnaissance mission to Naboll to investigate the political unrest and the surprisingly large number of fire lizards everyone has. Piemer ends up inadvertently transported to the Southern Continent, where he puts all of Menolly’s stories about living holdless to good use. He Impresses a fire lizard, survives Threadfall and explores the intriguing wilderness. Having figured out where Piemer must be, Menolly and Sebell sail to Southern to find him, happily finally acting on all that romantic tension they have during the voyage. This is another great coming of age story, as Piemer uses his wits and natural acting ability to meet all sorts of challenges, learning he has valuable skills aside from his voice. CW: hazing and dangerous pranks, prejudice, gossip, head injury, politics, disease, classism, telepathy, smuggling, dangerous situations: flying dragons, sailing, being attacked by buzzard-like creatures, Thread; some kissing and sexual situations.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gillian Murrell

    Despite the change in focus from Menially to Piemur I still really enjoyed this book. When Piemur's voice broke rather than destroy his career it opened up a multitude of opportunities for him. Piemur soon finds himself using his skills to gather information for the Master Harper. Its entertaining reading about the situations he manages to get himself into and out of. Despite the change in focus from Menially to Piemur I still really enjoyed this book. When Piemur's voice broke rather than destroy his career it opened up a multitude of opportunities for him. Piemur soon finds himself using his skills to gather information for the Master Harper. Its entertaining reading about the situations he manages to get himself into and out of.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Caro

    The story starts at the end of Dragonsinger where Menolly is made a Journeyman. Piemur prepares himself for a big event where he will be the lead singer until his voice breaks and he realises that his one and only ability which made him special has now disappeared. But Piemur is very far from having just this one ability and Master Robinton knows how precious Piemur is. That is why Piemur is seemingly hired as a drums apprentice when in fact he is asked to becoming the Master Harper's ears and ey The story starts at the end of Dragonsinger where Menolly is made a Journeyman. Piemur prepares himself for a big event where he will be the lead singer until his voice breaks and he realises that his one and only ability which made him special has now disappeared. But Piemur is very far from having just this one ability and Master Robinton knows how precious Piemur is. That is why Piemur is seemingly hired as a drums apprentice when in fact he is asked to becoming the Master Harper's ears and eyes wherever he goes. I was at first quite disappointed to see that I wouldn't be in Menolly's head anymore. I really loved Piemur but I was so used to see things through Menolly's eyes that I thought I wouldn't be able to like the book. But then Piemur started being Piemur and I couldn't remember why I could have been worried in the first place. Piemur has always been very cunning and at times manipulative to get what he wants and seeing his reasoning behind his cunning schemes was fantastic. He is a sweetheart and you can't stop laughing at his wild schemes! I think he is one of my favourite characters ever! It is so heart-breaking when his voice transforms, I could really feel for him, especially with the weight of everyone else's reaction, but thankfully - and quite frankly, in a typical Piemur fashion - he springs out of it and finds something else to do. He has such a great spirit that he sees the positive aspect of things. I really don't want to spoil the story by telling you what sorts of mischief he conjures up in this book, but I can promise that you won't be disappointed. I thought that my favourite books would be the first ones because they are told by Menolly and because they focus on those gorgeous little things named fire lizards but Dragondrums is such a special story of someone trying to find himself. It is such a wonderful story that I cried at the end because it made me so happy. (I am not even kidding and I understand I am losing all my street cred by confessing this.) I know these books were published years ago and no one particularly cares to discover Anne McCaffrey's books today when they can read modern stories and such but those stories really hold something others don't and I really can't wait to read all of Anne Mccaffrey's other books (thank God there are so many!). So you need to read those books too! This trilogy is one of the best fantasy novels I have ever read. It transports me to a beautifully vivid world and makes me travel alongside amazing characters. Plus now I know that I want a fire lizard as a pet so that's that.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Teri-K

    I understand why this book disappoints a lot of readers. Sold as the third in a trilogy where the first two books are all about Menolly, and written from her POV, this one relegates her to minor character status and follows Piemur instead. Fortunately I like Piemur and enjoy reading about his adventures, but he's very different from Menolly. Also I think this book works better if you've read enough of the Dragonrider books to understand what's happening on the Southern continent and what the pro I understand why this book disappoints a lot of readers. Sold as the third in a trilogy where the first two books are all about Menolly, and written from her POV, this one relegates her to minor character status and follows Piemur instead. Fortunately I like Piemur and enjoy reading about his adventures, but he's very different from Menolly. Also I think this book works better if you've read enough of the Dragonrider books to understand what's happening on the Southern continent and what the problems are between the Oldtimers and the rest of Pern. Otherwise the nuances of the story will be lost on you. So save this one until you've read the other early Pern books and be prepared for a different kind for story than the first two in the series and you'll be OK. NB - You can get the rest of Menolly's story in The White Dragon, which I think can be read before this one if you're feeling impatient.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    After devoting two novels to Menolly's struggles at the Harper Hall, McCaffrey changed her focus to Piemur, who played a substantial role in the first novel and the second novel as a foil to Menolly's excellence on instruments. He was a scamp and a rascal and befriended her. At the beginning of this novel, his voice broke, and his role as a singer was dashed. McCaffrey who wrote the White Dragon barely a year before this book, then can put Piemur on the Southern Continent and describe what happen After devoting two novels to Menolly's struggles at the Harper Hall, McCaffrey changed her focus to Piemur, who played a substantial role in the first novel and the second novel as a foil to Menolly's excellence on instruments. He was a scamp and a rascal and befriended her. At the beginning of this novel, his voice broke, and his role as a singer was dashed. McCaffrey who wrote the White Dragon barely a year before this book, then can put Piemur on the Southern Continent and describe what happens to him after his voice broke, and also can focus more attention on the Oldtimers, Mirrim, and the fire lizards I thought this novel, without the keen focus on Menolly's signing and music career, was not as good as the first two volumes in this trilogy, but it had its moments, and afterall what exactly were we going to learn about Menolly.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Grace

    Don't go into this book expecting much Menolly; this is Piemur's book. He's a pretty entertaining character usually so you'd think that's a good thing, but in this installment he manages to take a personal journey similar to Menolly's in Dragonsong, and frankly he gets a little boring. We do get some updates on Menolly, but she's older and established within the Hall hierarchy, and McCaffrey's decided to explore other bits of the Pern landscape using Piemur instead. Again, this is good for gettin Don't go into this book expecting much Menolly; this is Piemur's book. He's a pretty entertaining character usually so you'd think that's a good thing, but in this installment he manages to take a personal journey similar to Menolly's in Dragonsong, and frankly he gets a little boring. We do get some updates on Menolly, but she's older and established within the Hall hierarchy, and McCaffrey's decided to explore other bits of the Pern landscape using Piemur instead. Again, this is good for getting a lay of the land if you're going to read the other Pern novels, but when I pick up the Harper Hall books for a reread, I frequently find myself leaving this one on the shelf. It's just not as engaging, and the plot's contained to this book, so you might not even notice the omission if you do read the rest of Pern without this one.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Cass

    The finale of the trilogy focuses is set three turns (years) after the events in the previous two books. This time the book centres around the young Piemur as his life changes due to his voice breaking. The opening chapters of this book are a little clumsy as McCaffrey tries to weave in the essential parts of the previous two books. However it still remains an absolute favourite.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Tara

    And Piemur gets the spotlight he deserves. I love Piemur, but in this book I have a few more issues regarding reactions to something huge Piemur does and the relationship between two characters. Still an old favorite though and I appreciate being able to come to it with a new light.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jessie Potts

    This is an amazing series and I'm so glad I discovered them again on Audible! This is an amazing series and I'm so glad I discovered them again on Audible!

  26. 4 out of 5

    Abigail

    Re-Read 2020

  27. 4 out of 5

    prcardi

    Storyline: 3/5 Characters: 3/5 Writing Style: 3/5 World: 2/5 This final volume of the children's/young adult Harper Hall trilogy shows a McCaffrey more in control of the writing than she was when she started the Pern books but struggling to do new things with the saga. This story follows one of the supporting characters from Dragonsinger through his coming of age. Much like the last two books, McCaffrey's main strength is the ability to create a completely virtuous, likeable protagonist. The story h Storyline: 3/5 Characters: 3/5 Writing Style: 3/5 World: 2/5 This final volume of the children's/young adult Harper Hall trilogy shows a McCaffrey more in control of the writing than she was when she started the Pern books but struggling to do new things with the saga. This story follows one of the supporting characters from Dragonsinger through his coming of age. Much like the last two books, McCaffrey's main strength is the ability to create a completely virtuous, likeable protagonist. The story has difficulty, however, giving us interesting or nuanced characters beyond the main one. Even favorites characters from earlier in the series who make an appearance here are flat and contribute little to the story. Villains continue to be wholly villainous, and the narrative again is one of the completely honorable and good people versus the utterly despicable and beastly ones. McCaffrey does manage to situate this story in the larger plot - something she failed to do in the last story - but this seems to come at the expense of the worldbuilding. Dragonsong had added something new to the world by letting us see the life in a sea hold, and Dragonsinger built up the lifestyle of the craftsholders, but Dragondrums only gives the briefest introduction to a new place, opting to tantalize the reader by foreshadowing future books rather than satisfying us in this one. With the initial two adult Pern books, McCaffrey's done something with the standard trope of women as objects. She's taken the fact that historically women haven't had a choice of their sexual partners or control over how their bodies are used. Instead of freeing women from this predicament - as might be the expected feminist direction - or confronting us with it and showing us the dark ramifications of this - as might be Ursula K. Le Guin tactic - the rules of her world give a reason for this happening. The feminist turn, if it can be called that, is to make men equally subject to these rules. It is odd, and I don't know yet what I think about it, but it is reintroduced here. The sexual encounter is not explicit - far from it in fact - but it is both clear and obvious. I thought this was inappropriate since this was targeted at younger audiences. McCaffrey could easily have alluded to these events in such a way that children would have been oblivious to what was going on while adult readers got the full implications. This moves it out from a children's book to a young adult one in my estimation. It was particularly unfortunate because McCaffrey doesn't explore the social or personal ramifications any further than she had already, thus it was a missed opportunity for the author to give us some more insight into what this meant for culture and relationships.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Tad Callin

    Once again, I find myself inadvertently jumping into the third book of an established series, but this time, it's a story that seems to depend more heavily on understanding the rules of the universe. To McCaffrey's credit, it is possible to follow the arc of this story without having read other books set in her Pern universe. But if, like me, you have only vague recollections of how this world works, a lot of the mechanics of this world may confuse you. It is assumed that you will know that the h Once again, I find myself inadvertently jumping into the third book of an established series, but this time, it's a story that seems to depend more heavily on understanding the rules of the universe. To McCaffrey's credit, it is possible to follow the arc of this story without having read other books set in her Pern universe. But if, like me, you have only vague recollections of how this world works, a lot of the mechanics of this world may confuse you. It is assumed that you will know that the humans and dragons have some kind of telepathic link, for example, and that dragons can "teleport" over vast distances. There is some exposition meant to remind a reader of these facts, but if you're not looking for them, they might be missed. Even knowing about these rules, there are two points in this book where the main character is teleported under circumstances that ought to have either confused him or evoked a surprised reaction in him. Because he didn't react in a way that fit my expectations, these transitions felt abrupt and disorienting to me as the reader; and the reactions of the other characters as they figured out what was going on later reinforced my confusion. The world of Pern is an interesting one, and this story covered a lot of territory, allowing us to see glimpses of cultures and creatures that made the world feel more real. That said, the story itself meandered without feeling like there was a great deal at stake. Tensions among rival apprentices drove plot points, but the situations either didn't lead to consequences, or were resolved "off camera." Perhaps its greatest sin was in placing the main character just out of the center of the political events that were unfolding, making his part feel like that of a popular side-character from a previous story. I suspect if one were to read the series in order, that would address some of these flaws, but I also suspect that would not make this novel feel any more "necessary" than it does as a standalone.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Linda C

    When young Piemur's voice changes and he can no longer apprentice as a singer, he is apprenticed to the Drummaster with ties retained by the Master Harper for special projects. Piemur has problems fitting in with his new fellow apprentices because of his quick study and being pulled away for those projects. The projects generally involve being sent some place incognito to listen to conversations and bring back information. One of these projects doesn't go as planned and causes a major change to When young Piemur's voice changes and he can no longer apprentice as a singer, he is apprenticed to the Drummaster with ties retained by the Master Harper for special projects. Piemur has problems fitting in with his new fellow apprentices because of his quick study and being pulled away for those projects. The projects generally involve being sent some place incognito to listen to conversations and bring back information. One of these projects doesn't go as planned and causes a major change to his life. A great story of coming of age and a great fantasy world.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Meels

    I loved it. I’ve seen people say they didn’t like it as much as the first two due to the change in MC. But, I was already familiar enough with Piemur from the later (in time) books that I really enjoyed his story. However, the editing was dreadful. No idea why. I didn’t have any problems with the first two. Oh, and I’ve heard this series called YA. While the characters are young in the beginning, there is also shagging in this book. Shagging = not YA, IMO.

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