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In the dark days immediately after 9/11, the CIA turned to Dr. James Mitchell to help craft an interrogation program designed to elicit intelligence from just-captured top al-Qa'ida leaders and terror suspects. A civilian contractor who had spent years training U.S. military members to resist interrogation should they be captured, Mitchell, aware of the urgent need to prev In the dark days immediately after 9/11, the CIA turned to Dr. James Mitchell to help craft an interrogation program designed to elicit intelligence from just-captured top al-Qa'ida leaders and terror suspects. A civilian contractor who had spent years training U.S. military members to resist interrogation should they be captured, Mitchell, aware of the urgent need to prevent impending catastrophic attacks, worked with the CIA to implement "enhanced interrogation techniques"--which included waterboarding. In Enhanced Interrogation, Mitchell now offers a first-person account of the EIT program, providing a contribution to our historical understanding of one of the most controversial elements of America's ongoing war on terror. Readers will follow him inside the secretive "black sites" and cells of terrorists and terror suspects where he personally applied enhanced interrogation techniques. Mitchell personally questioned thirteen of the most senior high-value detainees in U.S. custody, including Abu Zubaydah; Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the amir or "commander" of the USS Cole bombing; and Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the mastermind behind the September 11, 2001, terror attacks--obtaining information that he maintains remains essential to winning the war against al-Qa'ida and informing our strategy to defeat ISIS and all of radical Islam. From the interrogation program's earliest moments to its darkest hours, Mitchell also lifts the curtain on its immediate effects, the controversy surrounding its methods, and its downfall. He shares his view that EIT, when applied correctly, were useful in drawing detainees to cooperate, and that, when applied incorrectly, they were counter-productive. He also chronicles what it is like to undertake a several-years-long critical mission at the request of the government only to be hounded for nearly a decade afterward by congressional investigations and Justice Department prosecutors. Gripping in its detail and deeply illuminating, Enhanced Interrogation argues that it is necessary for America to take strong measures to defend itself from its enemies and that the country is less safe now without them than it was before 9/11.


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In the dark days immediately after 9/11, the CIA turned to Dr. James Mitchell to help craft an interrogation program designed to elicit intelligence from just-captured top al-Qa'ida leaders and terror suspects. A civilian contractor who had spent years training U.S. military members to resist interrogation should they be captured, Mitchell, aware of the urgent need to prev In the dark days immediately after 9/11, the CIA turned to Dr. James Mitchell to help craft an interrogation program designed to elicit intelligence from just-captured top al-Qa'ida leaders and terror suspects. A civilian contractor who had spent years training U.S. military members to resist interrogation should they be captured, Mitchell, aware of the urgent need to prevent impending catastrophic attacks, worked with the CIA to implement "enhanced interrogation techniques"--which included waterboarding. In Enhanced Interrogation, Mitchell now offers a first-person account of the EIT program, providing a contribution to our historical understanding of one of the most controversial elements of America's ongoing war on terror. Readers will follow him inside the secretive "black sites" and cells of terrorists and terror suspects where he personally applied enhanced interrogation techniques. Mitchell personally questioned thirteen of the most senior high-value detainees in U.S. custody, including Abu Zubaydah; Abd al-Rahim al-Nashiri, the amir or "commander" of the USS Cole bombing; and Khalid Sheikh Mohammed, the mastermind behind the September 11, 2001, terror attacks--obtaining information that he maintains remains essential to winning the war against al-Qa'ida and informing our strategy to defeat ISIS and all of radical Islam. From the interrogation program's earliest moments to its darkest hours, Mitchell also lifts the curtain on its immediate effects, the controversy surrounding its methods, and its downfall. He shares his view that EIT, when applied correctly, were useful in drawing detainees to cooperate, and that, when applied incorrectly, they were counter-productive. He also chronicles what it is like to undertake a several-years-long critical mission at the request of the government only to be hounded for nearly a decade afterward by congressional investigations and Justice Department prosecutors. Gripping in its detail and deeply illuminating, Enhanced Interrogation argues that it is necessary for America to take strong measures to defend itself from its enemies and that the country is less safe now without them than it was before 9/11.

30 review for Enhanced Interrogation: Inside the Minds and Motives of the Islamic Terrorists Trying to Destroy America

  1. 4 out of 5

    James

    An interesting look into what was going on the the interrogations and also a look into the minds of the terrorists. Once again Senator dianne feinstein comes across as the village idiot, I don't search out books that point out she has the intelligence of a turnip, but I do remember reading a library book about Richard Ramirez - The Night Stalker 6-8 years ago, and once again the village idiot couldn't keep a secret the SF police had casts of his shoe prints, they told mayor Feinstein about that she An interesting look into what was going on the the interrogations and also a look into the minds of the terrorists. Once again Senator dianne feinstein comes across as the village idiot, I don't search out books that point out she has the intelligence of a turnip, but I do remember reading a library book about Richard Ramirez - The Night Stalker 6-8 years ago, and once again the village idiot couldn't keep a secret the SF police had casts of his shoe prints, they told mayor Feinstein about that she went straight to the media and blabbed. Ramirez happened to be watching the tv news & couldn't believe that but he bought a new pair of shoes, walked out the golden gate bridge and tossed away the shoes that could link him to a rape/murder. The police were livid. How many other times has dianne blabbed when she should have kept her mouth shut? Why do Cal voters keep electing such an incompetent? stay tuned for more misdeeds by the idiot

  2. 4 out of 5

    Hans

    As any Politician regularly demonstrates, the Intelligence Community makes the ideal Victim since they can't talk back or defend themselves. One can use and abuse them and then blame them for what you originally asked them to do. The professionalism of the community means they have to take the abuse while the confusion that the Politicians create are never clarified to the public which unfortunately leaves an impression of guilt. This is an extremely dangerous game to attack your own Intelligenc As any Politician regularly demonstrates, the Intelligence Community makes the ideal Victim since they can't talk back or defend themselves. One can use and abuse them and then blame them for what you originally asked them to do. The professionalism of the community means they have to take the abuse while the confusion that the Politicians create are never clarified to the public which unfortunately leaves an impression of guilt. This is an extremely dangerous game to attack your own Intelligence Community and makes it a regular aspect of Politics. I like having my assumptions challenged and clarity added to an easily obscured topic due to the strong emotional reactions it automatically invokes. Truth is always more nuanced than anyone likes to admit so its always easier to paint it with broad brush strokes and only emphasize those points that rile people while downplaying the parts that make sense. Enhanced Interrogation, at least as the author explains it here (and he helped develop the techniques) is nothing like it has be portrayed to the public. Despite how widely vetted it was for both its safety and effectiveness it has been construed as a gross violation of Western Values and even savage. The reality is actually much more interesting. Waterboarding was a technique developed and used first on American Soldiers in a Training environment to see if they could build a resistance to it but it proved to be so effective that they discontinued using it. When 9/11 happened many of those within Al-Qaeda were already familiar with the Counter-Interrogation techniques because they had successfully stolen the manual from the US Military and knew how to resist American Interrogation Techniques. This put the US in a precarious situation because the information they needed was from individuals who knew how to resist providing it. That is how water-boarding was re-introduced, because it was the only technique that even highly trained American Soldiers could not learn to resist. There were other techniques utilized but this was the one that the media and Congress seems fixated on exaggerating disproportionately. The reality is that it was effective, caused no permanent damage and saved potentially thousands of more innocent lives. And once the narrative has been high-jacked with the label of "Torture" no amount of evidence or facts can undo that initial impression that has stuck deep in the public consciousness. As one of the terrorists within the book admitted that "Terrorism doesn't have to destroy the US, it just has to amplify the discord within the US until Americans destroy themselves". A chilling revelation that many would feel is already occurring.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Ebonique Ellis

    I agree with other reviewers, he's racist, but it's the only first hand account of enhanced interrogation available to the public, so it's incredibly important book in a historical perspective. I enjoyed it. I agree with other reviewers, he's racist, but it's the only first hand account of enhanced interrogation available to the public, so it's incredibly important book in a historical perspective. I enjoyed it.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ailith Twinning

    Before we suspend reality for the sake of argument, one word needs to be said, no, screamed, as loud as freaking possible: TORTURE. TORTURE. TORTURE. IT'S CALLED TORTURE YOU COWARDLY PIECE OF SHIT. Even if you grant the narrative of the author, his actions are still both evil and criminal -- just because you come up with 100 euphemisms for Torture (right after you admit all your methods are reverse engineered from training to withstand torture) , that doesn't fix a damn thing. It's also worth re Before we suspend reality for the sake of argument, one word needs to be said, no, screamed, as loud as freaking possible: TORTURE. TORTURE. TORTURE. IT'S CALLED TORTURE YOU COWARDLY PIECE OF SHIT. Even if you grant the narrative of the author, his actions are still both evil and criminal -- just because you come up with 100 euphemisms for Torture (right after you admit all your methods are reverse engineered from training to withstand torture) , that doesn't fix a damn thing. It's also worth reading up on that, ever so critical "legality" that cowards like this man cling to -- Not only is it bullshit on the face of it, it violates international law -- and if you reject the basic human rights of international law -- by what goddamned right do you justify anything you do? Fuck this guy, fuck the CIA, fuck Cheney with a giant spiked dildo, and for the love of God would someone put Kissinger on trial for war crimes before he dies already? And, for the record, revoke Mitchell's PHD, if he can't convince me he doesn't deserve to go on trial for war crimes, how the fuck does he expect anyone to believe he talked a terrorist into anything with anything other than horrific torture? Just, fuck you, you're as evil as the men you tortured are alleged to have been.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sangria

    Really enjoyed reading it in paperback. Been awhile. Whether you agree or disagree with how he writes this one thing is for sure, those interviews are frightening. With what's going on in Europe right now with all the rapes this part struck close to home. Radical Islamic terrorist Khalid Sheikh Mohammede (I think that's right, the 9/11 mastermind) said "the terror attacks were good, but the practical way to defeat America was through immigration and by outbreeding non-Muslims. He said jihadi-min Really enjoyed reading it in paperback. Been awhile. Whether you agree or disagree with how he writes this one thing is for sure, those interviews are frightening. With what's going on in Europe right now with all the rapes this part struck close to home. Radical Islamic terrorist Khalid Sheikh Mohammede (I think that's right, the 9/11 mastermind) said "the terror attacks were good, but the practical way to defeat America was through immigration and by outbreeding non-Muslims. He said jihadi-minded brothers would immigrate into the United States, taking advantage of the welfare system to support themselves while they spread their jihadi message. They will wrap themselves in America’s rights and laws for protection, ratchet up acceptance of Sharia law, and then, only when they were strong enough, rise up and violently impose Sharia from within.” Hate to say it, but that sounds an awful lot like what Europe going thru. On the other hand there was some stuff he said I hoped wasn't true. Go into with an open mind it's good to read it all. Well written.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Nick Hernandez

    Great to get the other side of the story which we never heard from the media and the SSCI congressional report. Interesting that in compiling the congressional report, NO interrogator, security personnel, nor medical personnel who were on site at the black sites were ever interviewed!! Nor were any of them asked for a written comment for the report!!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Asim Qureshi

    Ugh! Not much else to say. Read the SSCI report instead - much better use of your time.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Al Boraig

    Save your time and money. The title is misleading. I bought this book because I want to know "the minds and motives of the Islamic terrorists" as the author claimed to provide, but I ended up knowing the mind and motives of the writer and his colleagues! The only chapter you can find a very brief and shallow analysis of the terrorists' "minds and motives" is chapter number nine. Other than that is a weak copy of almost the exact script of the Tv series "24" or "Homeland". Absolutely nothing smart Save your time and money. The title is misleading. I bought this book because I want to know "the minds and motives of the Islamic terrorists" as the author claimed to provide, but I ended up knowing the mind and motives of the writer and his colleagues! The only chapter you can find a very brief and shallow analysis of the terrorists' "minds and motives" is chapter number nine. Other than that is a weak copy of almost the exact script of the Tv series "24" or "Homeland". Absolutely nothing smart or creative.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ben

    Waterboarder makes his case that comes down to 3 arguements: 1. waterboarding his way isn't that bad, and it's worth it for the information received 2. stuff that was really bad was done by other bad actors in CIA or other programs 3. he's the fall guy who's been scapegoated by softhearted liberal politicians Interesting for a couple reasons, but mostly for seeing how one would have to organize one's mind and thinking in order to justify and perform this kind of job. Waterboarder makes his case that comes down to 3 arguements: 1. waterboarding his way isn't that bad, and it's worth it for the information received 2. stuff that was really bad was done by other bad actors in CIA or other programs 3. he's the fall guy who's been scapegoated by softhearted liberal politicians Interesting for a couple reasons, but mostly for seeing how one would have to organize one's mind and thinking in order to justify and perform this kind of job.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Frank Ch. Eigler

    Straight talk What a shame that the author had to spend even 20% of the book defending his program from MSM/(D) misrepresentation. The truth is enthralling and frightening, and a call to clear-eyed view of the radical islamist threat.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    I read this book back to back with Sushaku Endo's book, Silence, which was a provocative combination since the main character in each wrestles (one more, one less) with what one may do on behalf of others, in the case of one, whether one may deny Christ to spare others torture and suffering, and in the case of the other, whether one may use techniques of "enhanced interrogation" on a few to protect the many. There is much else to say about Silence in terms of what it has to say about suffering, I read this book back to back with Sushaku Endo's book, Silence, which was a provocative combination since the main character in each wrestles (one more, one less) with what one may do on behalf of others, in the case of one, whether one may deny Christ to spare others torture and suffering, and in the case of the other, whether one may use techniques of "enhanced interrogation" on a few to protect the many. There is much else to say about Silence in terms of what it has to say about suffering, about faith, about what it means to have a savior, and what solidarity with others requires, but that is a subject for another review. In his account of the work he did for the CIA, Mitchell is at odds in significant ways with Feinstein's Senate report and offers his version of the story, and it is a portrayal far more restrained than the account which has been described in the media. In his description, the use of "enhanced interrogation" was far less frequent, less severe, and more productive than the public has been led to believe. Of course, tugging at the back of one's mind is the fact that Mitchell spent many years teaching our own people how to resist revealing important information if captured and interrogated. Is any of that ability in play in his telling of this story? Even granting his version of things, one is still left with the question whether one should use these techniques at all. Does one not assault the dignity of a human person because they have contractual standing (Geneva Conventions) or does one not because they are human beings?

  12. 4 out of 5

    Lyndsy

    Eh There are always at least three sides to any story: Side 1, Side 2, and the truth. This book does a great job of providing detail on EITs. But, it is also largely a book that lets the author puff his chest and defend himself. It ignores the larger reality at the time the latter investigations happened. Did Feinstein go overboard with her rhetoric? Probably. She's a politician. Did it address larger issues besides the author? Yes. This would have been a much better book without all the justific Eh There are always at least three sides to any story: Side 1, Side 2, and the truth. This book does a great job of providing detail on EITs. But, it is also largely a book that lets the author puff his chest and defend himself. It ignores the larger reality at the time the latter investigations happened. Did Feinstein go overboard with her rhetoric? Probably. She's a politician. Did it address larger issues besides the author? Yes. This would have been a much better book without all the justification and political ranting at the end.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rpm5099

    This is a fantastic book, and every single word of it rings true. Mitchell clearly has integrity and has been finally given the chance to tell his side of the story and vindicate himself from the smear campaign he has been subjected to but unable to comment on due to his nondisclosure agreement. Ironically it was Feinstein's libelous and factually untrue report that finally paved the way for him to get permission to publish, something which rarely happens with regard to classified programs. This is a fantastic book, and every single word of it rings true. Mitchell clearly has integrity and has been finally given the chance to tell his side of the story and vindicate himself from the smear campaign he has been subjected to but unable to comment on due to his nondisclosure agreement. Ironically it was Feinstein's libelous and factually untrue report that finally paved the way for him to get permission to publish, something which rarely happens with regard to classified programs.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Steve

    A well written book. Very concise and unfortunately prophetic if we don’t start being more assertive in our quest to capture and interrogate those that are planning more attacks on our country. To the author: thanks for your efforts and sacrifice in making this country safer for our children and hopefully our grandchildren.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Chainsaw

    Dr. Mitchell does a superb job of laying out in laymen's terms specifically how enhanced interrogation techniques were legally reviewed, used, on whom, and to what end. Excellent read, by an author who has first-hand knowledge of these events. The sections on how terrorists think were particularly enlightening. Recommended reading! Dr. Mitchell does a superb job of laying out in laymen's terms specifically how enhanced interrogation techniques were legally reviewed, used, on whom, and to what end. Excellent read, by an author who has first-hand knowledge of these events. The sections on how terrorists think were particularly enlightening. Recommended reading!

  16. 4 out of 5

    Claudia

    Highly recommend this book. Mitchell was there. He was a part of the enhanced interrogations. This is not a news story from someone who has just heard or guessed about it, but it is instead a genuine view of what really happened in enhanced interrogation. Definitely gives a viewpoint that is not found in the media.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kevin

    There has been so much mis-information in the news about what did and did not happen to captured terrorists. It's nice to read a first hand account from someone who was actually there and has no political ax to grind. There has been so much mis-information in the news about what did and did not happen to captured terrorists. It's nice to read a first hand account from someone who was actually there and has no political ax to grind.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Alan

    I loved this book. For anyone interested in the treatment of high security terrorist prisoners during the Bush years, this is the book to read.

  19. 4 out of 5

    E.P.

    In this interesting if highly disturbing read, James E. Mitchell, one of the chief architects of the CIA's "enhanced interrogation" program and introducer of waterboarding to the program, gives his side of the story and describes the techniques used, the interrogations conducted, and the intelligence gathered as a result. Mitchell brings up a number of issues that warrant serious consideration. It is true that there are bad people out there in the world actively planning to do bad things, and the In this interesting if highly disturbing read, James E. Mitchell, one of the chief architects of the CIA's "enhanced interrogation" program and introducer of waterboarding to the program, gives his side of the story and describes the techniques used, the interrogations conducted, and the intelligence gathered as a result. Mitchell brings up a number of issues that warrant serious consideration. It is true that there are bad people out there in the world actively planning to do bad things, and they're not going to stop or reveal their plans just because their enemies ask them nicely. It is true that torture, like terrorism, does sometime achieve its aims, especially in the short term. And it may very well be true that a carefully organized and controlled program of coercion is better than a bunch of haphazard violence--certainly Eric Fair's account of how a bunch of untrained interrogators, under intense pressure from above, totally went off the rails at Abu Ghraib and other sites in Iraq and committed a number of unacceptable atrocities, not because they were intentionally evil, but because they didn't know what else to do, should be a warning to us all. On the other hand, Mitchell's accounts of the calm deliberations that he and others went through over exactly what techniques were and were not legal are perhaps even more chilling, and certainly provoked my gag reflex more than stories of almost any amount of casual beatings. Furthermore, Mitchell's account has only strengthened my own personal belief that waterboarding is unacceptable, although I frankly confess that I can't 100% promise that I myself wouldn't do that or something equally bad under the right circumstances. Still, waterboarding is unequivocally, undeniably torture, as Christopher Hitchens recounted after experiencing it first-hand. Mitchell argues that America must take decisive steps to protect itself against the terrorists who seek to destroy it, and even includes as further justification some conversations he had with his interrogation subjects, who (he says) did not hold the waterboarding and other techniques (e.g., "walling"--throwing the detainee repeatedly against a special flexible wall) he used on them against him, but instead told him that it enabled them to confess without sinning against Allah, since Allah sees into each person's heart and knows just how much they can bear. In fact, there are a number of ironic or even creepy parallels in the book between Mitchell and the people he interrogates, although Mitchell himself seems to be largely unaware of them. Indeed, it must be said that while the book is competently written, it is probably not a great work of nonfiction--Mitchell seems to lack the kind of introspection that elevates the simple memoir or autobiography into art. But going back to the parallels, Mitchell admits that the interrogators and their subjects often developed a strange kind of rapport, and they would often spend a fair amount of time hanging out with them and keeping their spirits up, as well as defending them against what they considered predatory or abusive behavior from higher-ups. Mitchell himself, he claims in the book, eventually refused to carry out more waterboarding and spoke up against other behaviors he considered inappropriate or abusive, which led--oh irony!--to accusations that he was a "bleeding-heart liberal *****". And then, once the hearings and accusations began, Mitchell found himself--oh double irony!--afraid that his words would be used against him or that he might make an innocent mistake of memory and be accused of deliberately lying, as he was subjected to "interrogation" after "interrogation" by the media and Senate Democrats. The book ends with his account of the Senate hearings on the subject and his statement that KSM (one of the detainees he subjected to "EITs") was right, thus, bizarrely, putting Mitchell on the same team, in a weird way, with some of the Al-Qaeda masterminds of 9/11 against Senate Democrats and the Obama administration. I can't support what Mitchell and the CIA did, or agree with everything he says, but I do think that this is nonetheless an important book and an important perspective to keep in mind, both because it is true that the world is not just rainbows and unicorns and sometimes dirty work has to be done, and because Mitchell is hardly the only one who believed and continues to believe that the CIA acted rightly and waterboarding and other EITs were justified and necessary. This is something that must be grappled with, even if it is unpleasant.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Thomas

    This is a good and shocking book about Radical Islamist terrorists, told by one of the few men who was authorized to waterboard them for information. The techniques employed in this book were purportedly used to find Osama Bin Laden, as well as other top tier terrorists. I do think it is a book that should be read by all Americans, if for no other reason than to understand the "WHY" part Islamism. Why do they hate us, and can we change their minds? That's the important part of this book. The oth This is a good and shocking book about Radical Islamist terrorists, told by one of the few men who was authorized to waterboard them for information. The techniques employed in this book were purportedly used to find Osama Bin Laden, as well as other top tier terrorists. I do think it is a book that should be read by all Americans, if for no other reason than to understand the "WHY" part Islamism. Why do they hate us, and can we change their minds? That's the important part of this book. The other parts of the book (and why I gave it 3 stars instead of 4) deal with the author's battle over partisan politics. I have no idea what the truth is, and I'm not saying I disbelieve what's written here as it pertains to a "witch hunt", I just thought those parts felt like Mitchell wanted to write this book partly to respond to Democrats who accused him of torture. All I'm saying is those parts of the book were far less interesting than the parts where we're privy to what was said and done in the prison cells of these middle eastern black sites. But I do reiterate that there are important discussions about terrorist ideologies in here that deserve to be heard.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Xin

    An interesting fact that the media has never covered is that both the writer and his “partner in crime” are avid mountaineers & ice climbers. Those sports totally changed a person’s perspective on torture & tolerance of pains. Americans with their frontier traditions & mindset are already way tougher than the sissies of the world. In the book, Endure, a crazy American miner walked days covering over a hundred miles w/o water in the Mojave desert until he reached help & he survived. When the rest An interesting fact that the media has never covered is that both the writer and his “partner in crime” are avid mountaineers & ice climbers. Those sports totally changed a person’s perspective on torture & tolerance of pains. Americans with their frontier traditions & mindset are already way tougher than the sissies of the world. In the book, Endure, a crazy American miner walked days covering over a hundred miles w/o water in the Mojave desert until he reached help & he survived. When the rest of the world look at Americans they fail to see this part of their history and they never truly understand who Americans really are. They are unbelievably tough. They don’t need a God, an ideology or a totalitarian gov to tell them to suffer. Suffering is in their blood & they’re really nonchalant toward it. The enemies of Americans, take notes. You’ve definitely picked the toughest enemies you can to fight. Anyway, these two are probably among the toughest of the Americans. I think the author genuinely believes what they recommended is not real torture (compared to what they willingly subject themselves to year after year in the name of fun).

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dennis Murphy

    Enhanced Interrogation: Inside the Minds and Motives of the Islamic Terrorists Trying to Destroy America by James Mitchell is one gigantic, if informative, axe that is being ground. When Mitchell was under a nondisclosure agreement working as a contractor/interrogator at CIA. He is particularly loathing in criticism of Diane Feinstein, and took a few pot shots at Ali Soufan. Much of the narrative appears to be an over-correction. Painted as a malicious character who gleefully tortured, he spends Enhanced Interrogation: Inside the Minds and Motives of the Islamic Terrorists Trying to Destroy America by James Mitchell is one gigantic, if informative, axe that is being ground. When Mitchell was under a nondisclosure agreement working as a contractor/interrogator at CIA. He is particularly loathing in criticism of Diane Feinstein, and took a few pot shots at Ali Soufan. Much of the narrative appears to be an over-correction. Painted as a malicious character who gleefully tortured, he spends too much time showing how he was disliked for having a bleeding heart and caring for the needs of the high profile detainees he saw. He wants to vindicate himself, but he's an unreliable narrator. If anything its too much to trust him. That said, do I think he's lying? Not really. Its just I don't trust him. The overall narrative and information it provides is useful, and acts as a counterbalance to a lot that I already saw and came to understand. Time will tell if this is just one man screaming in the dark. 80/100

  23. 5 out of 5

    Phil

    Fascinating, first-hand account about the interrogation of key Islamist leaders responsible for 9/11 and other acts of terrorism against the United States and Western democracy. If you want to better understand how intelligence is obtained from these detainees you have to read this book, whatever your views may be on the use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" such as walling and waterboarding to break down a captive's resistance. The author is a psychologist and consequently able to draw upo Fascinating, first-hand account about the interrogation of key Islamist leaders responsible for 9/11 and other acts of terrorism against the United States and Western democracy. If you want to better understand how intelligence is obtained from these detainees you have to read this book, whatever your views may be on the use of "enhanced interrogation techniques" such as walling and waterboarding to break down a captive's resistance. The author is a psychologist and consequently able to draw upon this professional training and experience to offer thoughtful insights into how Islamic militants view their ideological fight against the West, and how the human mind reacts when faced with either a threat or actual act of physical discomfort. Gripping stuff. (And if I'm ever subjected to waterboarding, I know now to open up my sinuses and either drink the water or let it flow out my mouth. Who knew?!)

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

    This is a very interesting book about techniques to get terrorists to talk. The author and his company were involved in the CIA's interrogation program particularly of high profile operatives. He defends the techniques he used including waterboarding and walling as having been approved by the CIA, the President, and Congress. Much of the book defends himself against various claims by the press and Senator Feinstein's report, which makes the book less interesting to me since I had no prior knowle This is a very interesting book about techniques to get terrorists to talk. The author and his company were involved in the CIA's interrogation program particularly of high profile operatives. He defends the techniques he used including waterboarding and walling as having been approved by the CIA, the President, and Congress. Much of the book defends himself against various claims by the press and Senator Feinstein's report, which makes the book less interesting to me since I had no prior knowledge of the author and his legal battles. Nevertheless, I would recommend the book since it provides insight into the threat from Islamic terrorists.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan Rolfe

    The architect of the Enhanced Interrogation program, released from his non-disclosure agreement, is finally allowed to defend himself. He provides insight as to how and why torture works and the debates within the CIA about what was effective, what was legal, and what was moral. I imagine this guy is being hired back on as a CIA contractor. He settles some scores with the FBI, other CIA employees, and Sen Dianne Feinstein. That's not as interesting, though, as the story of breaking KSM. Water boa The architect of the Enhanced Interrogation program, released from his non-disclosure agreement, is finally allowed to defend himself. He provides insight as to how and why torture works and the debates within the CIA about what was effective, what was legal, and what was moral. I imagine this guy is being hired back on as a CIA contractor. He settles some scores with the FBI, other CIA employees, and Sen Dianne Feinstein. That's not as interesting, though, as the story of breaking KSM. Water boarding just doesn't work on some people.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Stuart

    This book will be passed over by lots of folks who should probably read it. If any of the quotes from journalists are remotely true you can see where the truth train left the tracks years ago damaging credibility for generations. If any of the information gleaned from the enhanced interrogations are to be believed I weep form my children. I fear America and its lack of leadership doom my children to Sharia law.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jo Auburne

    This book, though well written, was a tough read and slow going, filled with names, dates, and facts that followed an actual time line. I wanted to read it after I heard the author speaking about it on a radio show, so I ordered it. l had the feeling, at the time that I was only getting a very slanted part of the story from the media and wanted to uncover more information in order to formulate a more accurate opinion on the subject. This book was very helpful in that regard.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    The author, a psychologist helped develop and implement enhanced interrogation program for the CIA after the 9/11 attacks. He does a good job explaining the need for the program, criteria developed and shared some steps required to achieve information from some detainees. The author explains over time how a changing political culture effected their work and brought on subsequent investigational inquiries.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Lisa

    This should be required reading for every citizen of the United States. The lies and disinformation the left wants to feed the public about enhanced interrogation has turned people against the use of it under any circumstances. If people knew (1) that it's not as horrible as it's made to seem and (2) the people it's used on WANT TO KILL us for no other reason other than we are not Islamic, might make them change their minds. This should be required reading for every citizen of the United States. The lies and disinformation the left wants to feed the public about enhanced interrogation has turned people against the use of it under any circumstances. If people knew (1) that it's not as horrible as it's made to seem and (2) the people it's used on WANT TO KILL us for no other reason other than we are not Islamic, might make them change their minds.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Kevin Key

    Author Mitchell takes us behind the scenes in modern torture/enhancement methods. The U.S. policies are woven together mostly by politics and the media’s portrait of poor war prisoners. Our enemies wouldn’t think twice about using our soft methods. This is a good read by someone involved and the obstacles in keeping us truly safe. War is by h hell and soft methods in dealing with enemies is very dangerous.

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