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Los chinos en Puerto Rico

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El libro analiza minuciosamente los antecedentes históricos de los braceros escriturados chinos en el Caribe, especialmente en Cuba y su posterior asentamiento en Puerto Rico. El autor describe las razones de la ola emigratora de esta población, los cuales llegaron en tres etapas a Puerto Rico. Unos llegaron por vía de Cuba, tanto en el siglo XIX como en el siglo XX, otros El libro analiza minuciosamente los antecedentes históricos de los braceros escriturados chinos en el Caribe, especialmente en Cuba y su posterior asentamiento en Puerto Rico. El autor describe las razones de la ola emigratora de esta población, los cuales llegaron en tres etapas a Puerto Rico. Unos llegaron por vía de Cuba, tanto en el siglo XIX como en el siglo XX, otros de Estados Unidos; y en el presente, otros directamente de China. Al final, presenta el imaginario social que existía en Puerto Rico sobre los chinos.


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El libro analiza minuciosamente los antecedentes históricos de los braceros escriturados chinos en el Caribe, especialmente en Cuba y su posterior asentamiento en Puerto Rico. El autor describe las razones de la ola emigratora de esta población, los cuales llegaron en tres etapas a Puerto Rico. Unos llegaron por vía de Cuba, tanto en el siglo XIX como en el siglo XX, otros El libro analiza minuciosamente los antecedentes históricos de los braceros escriturados chinos en el Caribe, especialmente en Cuba y su posterior asentamiento en Puerto Rico. El autor describe las razones de la ola emigratora de esta población, los cuales llegaron en tres etapas a Puerto Rico. Unos llegaron por vía de Cuba, tanto en el siglo XIX como en el siglo XX, otros de Estados Unidos; y en el presente, otros directamente de China. Al final, presenta el imaginario social que existía en Puerto Rico sobre los chinos.

31 review for Los chinos en Puerto Rico

  1. 4 out of 5

    latinageek

    I bought this book because I was curious about Chinese immigration to Puerto Rico. It's a very small population and I always wondered why they would choose to settle here instead of the mainland U.S. or elsewhere with larger numbers of their ethnicity. This book needs a second part because it sort of cuts off at the beginning of the 20th century and there isn't much post World War II. It’s very academic and sometimes it is literally one news clipping or judicial procedure after the next, making I bought this book because I was curious about Chinese immigration to Puerto Rico. It's a very small population and I always wondered why they would choose to settle here instead of the mainland U.S. or elsewhere with larger numbers of their ethnicity. This book needs a second part because it sort of cuts off at the beginning of the 20th century and there isn't much post World War II. It’s very academic and sometimes it is literally one news clipping or judicial procedure after the next, making it tedious for the average reader. It took me months to finish. Here's what I learned: 1. In the 1800s when PR was still a Spanish colony and slavery was slowly being abolished in the Americas, British and French vessels transported “excess” impoverished indentured laborers from the weakened Chinese empire to the Americas and created a sub-class of workers laboring under pretty awful conditions. 2. In the Caribbean most Chinese workers ended up in Cuba, another Spanish colony. Puerto Rico, never a huge slave importer, was facing the abolitionist movement, slave rebellions, and cholera so the hacienda owners needed more workers and tried to get the government to import Chinese or any other available group. But no dice. This was not a government operation like African slavery was but a business arrangement. The British didn't see it as profitable as importing to the richer Cuba, and PR business owners didn't have the financial clout of their Cuban counterparts. 3. Indentured laborers were given names in Spanish and in case of repeated names got surnames like First, Second, Third (Primero, Segundo, Tercero). This besides being offensive lacked so much imagination but apparently is good for historical research purposes. 4. Cuban hacienda owners treated their Chinese laborers terribly and some rebelled, got murdery, and were incarcerated. Some were transferred to prisons elsewhere including Puerto Rico starting in 1865. Here they were assigned mayor public works like roads. Of those prisoners that survived most stayed in PR after finishing their sentences. Some eventually established humble guest houses and eating establishments. 5. The Spanish American War of 1898 and the change in sovereignty to the United States expedited prisoner sentences. Also Puerto Rico became an alternative for Chinese immigrant families that could not go to the United States because of the Chinese exclusion laws over there. The federal laws did eventually apply to PR in 1904. In 1943 the exclusion law was abolished and in the 1950s with the industrialization boom in Puerto Rico, many Chinese businesses opened, especially restaurants and ice cream shops. Chinese (along with non-Chinese) fleeing the communist regime in Cuba also came to PR to a place similar to what they left behind. 6. The third immigration wave after 1990 is of young, mostly male workers, some undocumented, via other regions of the Caribbean and Latin America. Some end up owing enormous fees and have to pay off their debt. After the Dominicans they are now the second largest group of workers arriving illegally. Because of the nature of this immigration it is hard to know exactly how many ethnic Chinese are in PR. What this book is lacking, and why I mentioned it needs a second part, are personal stories of current Chinese families living in Puerto Rico. There are a lot of facts and figures and a dry retelling of historical events but not much else.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Jeanette Marie

  3. 5 out of 5

    Keyshla

  4. 4 out of 5

    Alba

  5. 5 out of 5

    Francisco La Puerta

  6. 4 out of 5

    Patricia

  7. 4 out of 5

    Alejandra

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jan

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lili

  10. 4 out of 5

    PurpleFille

  11. 5 out of 5

    Grace Lay

  12. 4 out of 5

    Brian Louie

  13. 5 out of 5

    Christina

  14. 5 out of 5

    Tania

  15. 4 out of 5

    ashley

  16. 5 out of 5

    Alicia Canu

  17. 5 out of 5

    Elliot

  18. 5 out of 5

    José Borges

  19. 4 out of 5

    Kitziliany

  20. 4 out of 5

    Maite

  21. 4 out of 5

    Lizvette

  22. 5 out of 5

    Nilsa Pacheco

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lam Siu

  24. 4 out of 5

    Jessica Ortiz

  25. 4 out of 5

    Victor C.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Yormimi

  27. 5 out of 5

    Maritily

  28. 5 out of 5

    EveJan Gonzalez

  29. 4 out of 5

    Adriana Salas

  30. 4 out of 5

    Sujei

  31. 4 out of 5

    Lore Vélez

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