web site hit counter Horror 201: The Silver Scream - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Horror 201: The Silver Scream

Availability: Ready to download

Finally available in a 440 page paperback: HORROR 201: THE FINAL SCREAM - The definitive guide to filmmaking and filmmakers by the best in the field. Horror 201: The Silver Scream, the follow-up to the Bram Stoker Award nominated Horror 101: The Way Forward, delves into the minds of filmmakers to see what it takes to produce great horror films, from the writing and funding Finally available in a 440 page paperback: HORROR 201: THE FINAL SCREAM - The definitive guide to filmmaking and filmmakers by the best in the field. Horror 201: The Silver Scream, the follow-up to the Bram Stoker Award nominated Horror 101: The Way Forward, delves into the minds of filmmakers to see what it takes to produce great horror films, from the writing and funding process, to directing, producing, and writing tie-ins. It’s a tome of interviews and essays by some of our favorite artists. Film legends and authors such as John Carpenter, Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Ray Bradbury, Ed Naha, Patrick Lussier, Stephen Volk, Nancy Holder, Ramsey Campbell, Tom Holland, John Shirley, Jeffrey Reddick, William Stout, and John Russo want to share their expertise with you through informative, practical, career-building advice. These are the folks behind movies and novelizations such as A Nightmare on Elm Street, Scream, Dark Shadows, Sleepy Hollow, Supernatural, Buffy, Resident Evil, The Stand, Sleepwalkers, Masters of Horror, The Fly, Critters, Tales from the Crypt, Child’s Play, Fright Night, Thinner, The Langoliers, Ted Bundy, Final Destination, Re-animator Unbound, Halloween, Apollo 18, The Eye, Night of the Living Dead, The Crow, The Mist, Pan’s Labyrinth, and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Horror 201 also entertains. You’ll see a side of your favorite authors, producers, and directors never seen before – combining fun and entertainment with informative career-building advice. Horror 201 is aimed at arming generations of authors, screenwriters, producers, directors, and anyone else interested in the film industry, from big budget movies to the independent film circuit, as well as the stage. Whether you’re an accomplished author or screenwriter, writing as a hobby, or have dreams of writing screenplays or making movies, Horror 201 will take you on a behind the scenes tour of the Horror movie industry from Hollywood to the UK and Australia. Horror 201 covers: • Horror as culture • Scare tactics • The evolution of the horror film • Viewer desensitization • Watching your story come to life • Screenwriting advice • Dissecting screenplays • A production company case study • Tricks of the trade • Writing tips • Advice on Producing • Advice on Directing • Information about funding and distributing a film • Entertaining tidbits and anecdotes And so much more! Horror 201: The Silver Scream is perfect for people who: • are looking to delve into screenplay writing • want to write their first screenplay • are fans of the horror movie industry • like to follow the careers of their favorite directors • are planning on infiltrating a different field in horror writing • are looking to pay more bills with their art • are trying to establish a name brand • are looking for motivation and/or inspiration • are seeking contacts in the film industry Edited by Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley. The full line-up includes: John Carpenter, Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Ray Bradbury, Ramsey Campbell, Ed Naha, Edward Lee, Patrick Lussier, Tim Lebbon, Jonathan Maberry, Stephen Volk, William Stout, Michael McCarty, Dan Curtis, Graham Masterton, Harry Shannon, Jason V. Brock, L.L. Soares, Mick Garris, William F. Nolan, Lee Karr, Jeffrey Reddick, Taylor Grant, Stephen Johnston, Aaron Sterns, Michael Laimo, Jonathan Winn, David. C. Hayes, Brian Pinkerton, David Henson Greathouse, Aaron Dries, Armand Rosamilia, Billy Hanson, Jack Thomas Smith, John Russo, Keith Arem, Denise Gossett, Mark Steensland, John Shirley, Tom Holland, Adrian Roe, Dave Jeffery, James Hart, James Cullen Bressack, Jeff Strand, Nancy Holder, E.C. McMullen Jr, Richard Gray, Richard Chizmar, William C. Cope (interior artist), Tim Waggoner, Tom Monteleone, Nick Cato, Kevin Wetmore, Eric Miller, and Lynne Hansen. Don’t let this opportunity slip through your creative fingers.


Compare

Finally available in a 440 page paperback: HORROR 201: THE FINAL SCREAM - The definitive guide to filmmaking and filmmakers by the best in the field. Horror 201: The Silver Scream, the follow-up to the Bram Stoker Award nominated Horror 101: The Way Forward, delves into the minds of filmmakers to see what it takes to produce great horror films, from the writing and funding Finally available in a 440 page paperback: HORROR 201: THE FINAL SCREAM - The definitive guide to filmmaking and filmmakers by the best in the field. Horror 201: The Silver Scream, the follow-up to the Bram Stoker Award nominated Horror 101: The Way Forward, delves into the minds of filmmakers to see what it takes to produce great horror films, from the writing and funding process, to directing, producing, and writing tie-ins. It’s a tome of interviews and essays by some of our favorite artists. Film legends and authors such as John Carpenter, Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Ray Bradbury, Ed Naha, Patrick Lussier, Stephen Volk, Nancy Holder, Ramsey Campbell, Tom Holland, John Shirley, Jeffrey Reddick, William Stout, and John Russo want to share their expertise with you through informative, practical, career-building advice. These are the folks behind movies and novelizations such as A Nightmare on Elm Street, Scream, Dark Shadows, Sleepy Hollow, Supernatural, Buffy, Resident Evil, The Stand, Sleepwalkers, Masters of Horror, The Fly, Critters, Tales from the Crypt, Child’s Play, Fright Night, Thinner, The Langoliers, Ted Bundy, Final Destination, Re-animator Unbound, Halloween, Apollo 18, The Eye, Night of the Living Dead, The Crow, The Mist, Pan’s Labyrinth, and Raiders of the Lost Ark. Horror 201 also entertains. You’ll see a side of your favorite authors, producers, and directors never seen before – combining fun and entertainment with informative career-building advice. Horror 201 is aimed at arming generations of authors, screenwriters, producers, directors, and anyone else interested in the film industry, from big budget movies to the independent film circuit, as well as the stage. Whether you’re an accomplished author or screenwriter, writing as a hobby, or have dreams of writing screenplays or making movies, Horror 201 will take you on a behind the scenes tour of the Horror movie industry from Hollywood to the UK and Australia. Horror 201 covers: • Horror as culture • Scare tactics • The evolution of the horror film • Viewer desensitization • Watching your story come to life • Screenwriting advice • Dissecting screenplays • A production company case study • Tricks of the trade • Writing tips • Advice on Producing • Advice on Directing • Information about funding and distributing a film • Entertaining tidbits and anecdotes And so much more! Horror 201: The Silver Scream is perfect for people who: • are looking to delve into screenplay writing • want to write their first screenplay • are fans of the horror movie industry • like to follow the careers of their favorite directors • are planning on infiltrating a different field in horror writing • are looking to pay more bills with their art • are trying to establish a name brand • are looking for motivation and/or inspiration • are seeking contacts in the film industry Edited by Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley. The full line-up includes: John Carpenter, Wes Craven, George A. Romero, Ray Bradbury, Ramsey Campbell, Ed Naha, Edward Lee, Patrick Lussier, Tim Lebbon, Jonathan Maberry, Stephen Volk, William Stout, Michael McCarty, Dan Curtis, Graham Masterton, Harry Shannon, Jason V. Brock, L.L. Soares, Mick Garris, William F. Nolan, Lee Karr, Jeffrey Reddick, Taylor Grant, Stephen Johnston, Aaron Sterns, Michael Laimo, Jonathan Winn, David. C. Hayes, Brian Pinkerton, David Henson Greathouse, Aaron Dries, Armand Rosamilia, Billy Hanson, Jack Thomas Smith, John Russo, Keith Arem, Denise Gossett, Mark Steensland, John Shirley, Tom Holland, Adrian Roe, Dave Jeffery, James Hart, James Cullen Bressack, Jeff Strand, Nancy Holder, E.C. McMullen Jr, Richard Gray, Richard Chizmar, William C. Cope (interior artist), Tim Waggoner, Tom Monteleone, Nick Cato, Kevin Wetmore, Eric Miller, and Lynne Hansen. Don’t let this opportunity slip through your creative fingers.

46 review for Horror 201: The Silver Scream

  1. 5 out of 5

    Jim Dooley

    This book is definitely a mixed bag. Edited by Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley, it is an overview of the modern horror movie genre from the people who make the films. Some of it is incredibly insightful, some of it is helpful (I especially liked the inclusion of the short film script), and a great deal of it is opinion. In fact, I soon learned that the opinion of a maker of horror films isn’t necessarily any more “on target” than the opinion of people who watch and talk about horror films. No one This book is definitely a mixed bag. Edited by Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley, it is an overview of the modern horror movie genre from the people who make the films. Some of it is incredibly insightful, some of it is helpful (I especially liked the inclusion of the short film script), and a great deal of it is opinion. In fact, I soon learned that the opinion of a maker of horror films isn’t necessarily any more “on target” than the opinion of people who watch and talk about horror films. No one has the recipe for the “secret sauce.” When it comes to analyzing films, there were astute observations that caused me to pause and consider. There was also a reference to NIGHT OF THE LIVING DEAD being (in part) a commentary on the Viet Nam conflict. I buy that one as much as I buy that the original KING KONG was a commentary on race relations. Some of those interviewed expound on what they were trying to accomplish, and those tend to be some of the best parts of the book. Others give very general answers, as if they were responding to e-mailed questions. (Perhaps that was the case!) Still others, such as John Russo, could be easily summed up by, “Buy my book. Everything you want to know is in there.” And as for the interviewer of George Romero, why would he think that readers would have an interest in Romero’s AND the interviewers political views? There were screenwriters and filmmakers interviewed who I hadn’t heard of before, and I’ll admit that the more erudite ones have me wanting to see their finished film products. There were also throw-away sections of brief “Fun Facts” that drop little tidbits that you can use at dinner table discussions, although none of those particularly drew my attention. Two other books in the series are out there: a second one on horror filmmaking, and another one on horror writing. Based on what I read in this one, I don’t think that I want to read the continuation of horror filmmaking. It isn’t uninteresting, yet I have the distinct feeling that it will be an extension of more opinions over insight. After all, when John Carpenter is asked what scares him and he responds that it’s the same things that scare everybody else … well, what am I supposed to do with that information?

  2. 5 out of 5

    Carla

    Reviewed by Carla Trueheart for Readers' Favorite Horror 201: The Silver Scream has something for just about anyone who is interested in horror films. Included in the novel is an introduction about the history of horror films, which explains the universal relevance of horror films and why certain films do well in a certain time period. Also included is a handy breakdown of writing structure: establishment, animation, intensification, and resolution, advice for screenwriters (page count, editing, Reviewed by Carla Trueheart for Readers' Favorite Horror 201: The Silver Scream has something for just about anyone who is interested in horror films. Included in the novel is an introduction about the history of horror films, which explains the universal relevance of horror films and why certain films do well in a certain time period. Also included is a handy breakdown of writing structure: establishment, animation, intensification, and resolution, advice for screenwriters (page count, editing, format, etc.), and even passages about music scores. The bulk of the novel is a broad Q&A with notable screenwriters and producers where they give further advice about horror movies and explain what works in film and what does not. Mentioned are the Halloween movies, Child’s Play, Stephen King movies, A Nightmare on Elm Street, and many, many others. Horror 201 is an invaluable resource for horror fans, screenwriters, and even fiction writers. In addition to the history of horror films and the Q&A sessions with writers and producers, editors Joe Mynhardt and Emma Audsley have included a scary screenplay which should please horror fans (and sufficiently freak out the curious). While I enjoyed the Q&A and the writing information, the history of horror films was the most intriguing, as it broke down America’s obsession with films that reflect issues in society. All of this was highly informative and written quite well. I also can’t forget to mention the query to horror writers and producers: Which horror scene haunts you the most? I highly recommend Horror 201: The Silver Scream to fans of horror movies, those interested in the mystery of making a movie, screenwriters, fiction writers, and anyone who just wants a good history lesson on horror films.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Paula

    “At the end of the day, screenwriting is an instrumental part of making a movie, but make no mistake, it’s still very much a discipline of writing.”-Stephen Johnson Have you ever wanted to make a movie, ever wonder how it’s done? Perhaps, you already have a film or two under your belt. Whatever your situation may be this is a book worth looking into! What about you writers? Ever dream of seeing your work on the big screen? You too can find invaluable tips on what works and what doesn’t when it co “At the end of the day, screenwriting is an instrumental part of making a movie, but make no mistake, it’s still very much a discipline of writing.”-Stephen Johnson Have you ever wanted to make a movie, ever wonder how it’s done? Perhaps, you already have a film or two under your belt. Whatever your situation may be this is a book worth looking into! What about you writers? Ever dream of seeing your work on the big screen? You too can find invaluable tips on what works and what doesn’t when it comes to adapting a story to a screenplay. As a person who has no aspirations for filmmaking (only film watching, LOL), I still found this a fascinating read. Interwoven between how-tos and what-not-to-dos, you will find amusing anecdotes, insider info, and WOW moments of “I didn’t know that’s how it’s done.” When you have the likes of Wes Craven, Ed Naha, George Romero, Patrick Lussier, and all the rest of these greats giving advice, how could you not want to read what they have to say? Thoroughly entertaining and oh so informative, this is a book that anyone interested movies will surely want to read! Whether you like Horror or not, the tips found here can be adapted to any genre. Buy it, you’ll like it!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Stuart West

    Horror 201: The Silver Scream Vol. 1 is a mixed bag, depending on what the reader's looking for. If the reader has a keen interest in horror films and/or is looking to try his hand at horror film screenwriting is indispensable, a must-have tome full of tips, insider anecdotes, and advice for the struggling film writer. While I could've done without the two opening, academically dull essays (honestly, it's a bunch of common sense gussied up in boring professorial talk)--and frankly, they don't se Horror 201: The Silver Scream Vol. 1 is a mixed bag, depending on what the reader's looking for. If the reader has a keen interest in horror films and/or is looking to try his hand at horror film screenwriting is indispensable, a must-have tome full of tips, insider anecdotes, and advice for the struggling film writer. While I could've done without the two opening, academically dull essays (honestly, it's a bunch of common sense gussied up in boring professorial talk)--and frankly, they don't seem to fit with the rest of the book's content--there's some very interesting and helpful tidbits by a slew of professionals. For me the absolute highlight was Aaron Dries' interview, plus the full screenplay for his short film, Placebo. Not only did this successfully entertain, it was an excellent example of teaching via illustration. Now, if you're a casual horror fan, looking for a fun read, this probably isn't the book for you. But if you're hardcore into horror films and are pursuing a screenwriting career, this must be on your bookshelf.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Kelly Rickard

    Review copy The Definitive guide to filmmaking and film makers by the best in the field. An insightful and interesting book full of fun facts and stories that only people in the business would know about. Some of the people in this book I knew of, others I don't know but all I had interesting tips about screenwriting, their favourite films, favourite books and other parts of the horror film industry. Review copy The Definitive guide to filmmaking and film makers by the best in the field. An insightful and interesting book full of fun facts and stories that only people in the business would know about. Some of the people in this book I knew of, others I don't know but all I had interesting tips about screenwriting, their favourite films, favourite books and other parts of the horror film industry.

  6. 4 out of 5

    David Murphy

    This was a very interesting read. As someone with no interest in getting into the film making business and so with no knowledge it was very insightful. It also has entertainment value for the various stories told around the making of several movies. Overall I enjoyed it.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Jonathan

    Great material and advice from the pros as well as a touching tribute to the late and great Wes Craven.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Stewart Horn

    I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It's a series of pieces about making horror movies, including interviews, essays and mini-features on every aspect: writing, pre-production, directing, producing, money-raising, editing, promotion and distribution. Some of it is useful and informative, like the sections that specifically advise would-be filmmakers on how to go about it; some less useful but equally entertaining - the long interviews with George Romero, Wes Craven and John Carpenter make it a worthw I thoroughly enjoyed this book. It's a series of pieces about making horror movies, including interviews, essays and mini-features on every aspect: writing, pre-production, directing, producing, money-raising, editing, promotion and distribution. Some of it is useful and informative, like the sections that specifically advise would-be filmmakers on how to go about it; some less useful but equally entertaining - the long interviews with George Romero, Wes Craven and John Carpenter make it a worthwhile purchase for any horror movie fan. Mostly, I found it inspirational. It includes so many stories of how films came to be made despite difficult circumstances, or how people got themselves involved in the industry. While all the interviewees and contributors are based in horror, all of the information is equally valid regardless of genre. It's an ideal gift for anyone who dreams of making movies.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Midnight Blue

  10. 4 out of 5

    Charlene Du Toit

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chuck Buda

  12. 5 out of 5

    Jenn

  13. 5 out of 5

    Susan Morton

  14. 5 out of 5

    OTIS

  15. 5 out of 5

    Cage Dunn

  16. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Lake Publishing

  17. 5 out of 5

    Nodar Khvichia

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michael Wright

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jeremy Thompson

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tamara

  21. 4 out of 5

    Johann

  22. 4 out of 5

    Denise Agnew

  23. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

  24. 4 out of 5

    Michael

  25. 5 out of 5

    Vicki Liebowitz

  26. 5 out of 5

    FabulousRaye

  27. 5 out of 5

    Mark McLemore

  28. 5 out of 5

    Andrey

  29. 5 out of 5

    Candida Norwood

  30. 5 out of 5

    Amber

  31. 4 out of 5

    Crystal Lake Publishing

  32. 5 out of 5

    John Winston

  33. 4 out of 5

    PNJ

  34. 4 out of 5

    Roxy

  35. 5 out of 5

    Dixie

  36. 4 out of 5

    H.G. Gravy

  37. 5 out of 5

    Amy Riccadonna

  38. 4 out of 5

    Ömer Ezer

  39. 4 out of 5

    Liz

  40. 5 out of 5

    Yolanda Sfetsos

  41. 4 out of 5

    Charlene Du Toit

  42. 4 out of 5

    Ken

  43. 4 out of 5

    Richard Scott

  44. 4 out of 5

    Abby

  45. 4 out of 5

    Byron Thompson

  46. 5 out of 5

    Antonia

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.