web site hit counter Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion

Availability: Ready to download

The fairy tale may be one of the most important cultural and social influences on children's lives. But until Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion, little attention had been paid to the ways in which the writers and collectors of tales used traditional forms and genres in order to shape children's lives - their behavior, values, and relationship to society. As Jack Zipes The fairy tale may be one of the most important cultural and social influences on children's lives. But until Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion, little attention had been paid to the ways in which the writers and collectors of tales used traditional forms and genres in order to shape children's lives - their behavior, values, and relationship to society. As Jack Zipes convincingly shows, fairy tales have always been a powerful discourse, capable of being used to shape or destabilize attitudes and behavior within culture. For this new edition, the author has revised the work throughout and added a new introduction bringing this classic title up to date.


Compare

The fairy tale may be one of the most important cultural and social influences on children's lives. But until Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion, little attention had been paid to the ways in which the writers and collectors of tales used traditional forms and genres in order to shape children's lives - their behavior, values, and relationship to society. As Jack Zipes The fairy tale may be one of the most important cultural and social influences on children's lives. But until Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion, little attention had been paid to the ways in which the writers and collectors of tales used traditional forms and genres in order to shape children's lives - their behavior, values, and relationship to society. As Jack Zipes convincingly shows, fairy tales have always been a powerful discourse, capable of being used to shape or destabilize attitudes and behavior within culture. For this new edition, the author has revised the work throughout and added a new introduction bringing this classic title up to date.

30 review for Fairy Tales and the Art of Subversion

  1. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Sas

    After reading Bettelheim's Uses of Enchantment, it's fascinating to read Zipes who swings the pendulum as far as he can in the opposite direction. Where Bettelheim focuses entirely on the positive influence of fairy tales on the child's psychology, Zipes questions the socially conservative "civilizing" role of fairy tales, focusing almost entirely on the way they indoctrinate children into traditional (but often oppressive) values of the bourgeois middle class. We've gone from Freudian theory in After reading Bettelheim's Uses of Enchantment, it's fascinating to read Zipes who swings the pendulum as far as he can in the opposite direction. Where Bettelheim focuses entirely on the positive influence of fairy tales on the child's psychology, Zipes questions the socially conservative "civilizing" role of fairy tales, focusing almost entirely on the way they indoctrinate children into traditional (but often oppressive) values of the bourgeois middle class. We've gone from Freudian theory into Marxist and yet I find myself frustrated in the same ways. Just like with Bettelheim, I'm not saying that there isn't a valid and valuable Marxist critique to be made of fairy tales. I like Zipes insistence that fairy tales do have material, social relevance, and that we must not take for granted the stories we tell to our children and their message. However, I would like to counter Zipes' worries with a little bit of Bettelheim and remind him that the appeal of fairy tales is not merely in what they say about the material, social world but what they say about the inner world of the mind, heart, and spirit. The two realities are related, and yet I feel like Zipes (like Bettelheim) sometimes just missed the point of his subject. All that said, this was an enjoyable read and challenged a lot of my assumptions. It was fun in a kind of perverted way to watch him go to town on the Grimms, Perrault, and Hans Christian Anderson, and the chapter where he demonstrates the subversive and innovative qualities of George MacDonald, Oscar Wilde, and L. Frank Baum justifies the book all by itself.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Hannah

    Summary and points learnt: Fairy tales and the art of subversion is an incredibly interesting book which talks about the origins of fairytales and the direct influence they have on our culture. What I really liked about this book is it explained he basic knowledge of the fairytales but also went further to make links and give reasoning to why this is important to stories an life now days. I found the analysis of different fairytales really detailed and when they are directly compared to those of Summary and points learnt: Fairy tales and the art of subversion is an incredibly interesting book which talks about the origins of fairytales and the direct influence they have on our culture. What I really liked about this book is it explained he basic knowledge of the fairytales but also went further to make links and give reasoning to why this is important to stories an life now days. I found the analysis of different fairytales really detailed and when they are directly compared to those of a similar nature it became incredibly interesting and I found it good to see that those fairytales I considered ‘the original’ where actually recorded by many different people showing the importance of the oral tradition. Main focus point: The main focus point is clearly fairy tales. There are some links into general story telling but largely the fairytales are the focus and they move through ages and into the more cinema and movie styles such ad Walt Disney. How it read: The book is very much set up as an essay which at times made it difficult to read. However, as I was interested in the topic it wasn’t too bad. The references where clearly laid out and the uses of different italics made it easy to defer between analysis and when there where quotes or information from his resources. As an essay structure it was really well written and formally done with good language. It was a very nice read in this sense with the language being readable and topic specific dialect which made it well informed. I really liked this as a nonfiction/ essay book! I learnt so much about folklore and fairy tales from this book it was so well done and easily laid out and I really enjoyed reading it... fascinating!

  3. 4 out of 5

    Jean

    I was surprised to find this book . . . a page-turner! Okay, since I love all things fairy tale, maybe I shouldn't have been so surprised. Still, it's been awhile since I read anything remotely academic (I'm ashamed to say), and this was a nice, smooth way to re-enter the realm of real thinking. Zipes did something to me that I always appreciate in an author: made me angry. He got me all riled up about the way literary writers of fairy tales tried to write women into submission. Ah! I just wante I was surprised to find this book . . . a page-turner! Okay, since I love all things fairy tale, maybe I shouldn't have been so surprised. Still, it's been awhile since I read anything remotely academic (I'm ashamed to say), and this was a nice, smooth way to re-enter the realm of real thinking. Zipes did something to me that I always appreciate in an author: made me angry. He got me all riled up about the way literary writers of fairy tales tried to write women into submission. Ah! I just wanted to strangle Charles Perrault by the time I finished the chapter on him. Then Zipes re-introduced me to my warm-fuzzy place. I got all googly-eyed over George MacDonald. Stupendous writer. Wonderful man. The only chapter that kind of left me cold was, sadly, the final one. Here, Zipes addressed the work and character (I'm not sure which he focused on more) of Walt Disney. I felt that some of the criticisms he leveled could be applied to film in general, rather than Disney in particular. Also, even when looking at Disney's earlier work, which was more ideologically subversive and revolutionary than his later, well-know films, Zipes seemed to have a hard time giving the man much credit. I do not by any means idealize Disney, or agree with his picture of the "perfect" woman, but I felt that this chapter maybe took a few cheap shots (that might be too strong). In any case, I thought the finale did not live up to the rest of the book. Still--a thought-provoking and enjoyable read overall.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Bettie

    Fascinating book. While I will always be a fan of The Uses of Enchantment I was never down with the Freudian rationale (I know, I know, the Freud shit practically is the book, but there are also some good summaries and apt observations, and it was the book that got me back into fairy tales after I thought I'd outgrown them). I especially appreciate the way Zipes contrasts various versions of the French fairy tales with their folk tale precursors, and how his analysis is based on the historical, Fascinating book. While I will always be a fan of The Uses of Enchantment I was never down with the Freudian rationale (I know, I know, the Freud shit practically is the book, but there are also some good summaries and apt observations, and it was the book that got me back into fairy tales after I thought I'd outgrown them). I especially appreciate the way Zipes contrasts various versions of the French fairy tales with their folk tale precursors, and how his analysis is based on the historical, cultural and class background of both the tellers and their tales. A fascinating read for anyone interested in the origins and uses of fairy tales.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Madly Jane

    A must for all fairy tale lovers!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Jamie

    Finally made it through this book, after setting it down and picking it up again throughout the semester. While I think the other Zipes book I've read--Fairy Tale as Myth, Myth as Fairy Tale--was a more accessible and quicker read, this is going to prove invaluable to my thesis research. Some of the chapters got a little bogged down--particularly the Hans Christian Andersen chapter about Zipes discourse of the dominated theory (which I felt could have been articulated with far fewer words)--but Finally made it through this book, after setting it down and picking it up again throughout the semester. While I think the other Zipes book I've read--Fairy Tale as Myth, Myth as Fairy Tale--was a more accessible and quicker read, this is going to prove invaluable to my thesis research. Some of the chapters got a little bogged down--particularly the Hans Christian Andersen chapter about Zipes discourse of the dominated theory (which I felt could have been articulated with far fewer words)--but others are wonderfully fascinating and--dare I say it--fun reads! The Disney chapter was illuminating, far more in depth than a similar chapter in FTaM,MaFT, and smartly written. Similarly, I found his look to George Macdonald, Oscar Wilde, and L.Frank Baum and their imaginings/challengings of the fairy tale utopia absolutely brilliant. The Weimar/Nazi chapter was another one that's fascinating from a sociohistorical perspective, but not a particularly easy or page-turning read. On the whole, I'd say this is much more in-depth and theoretical/professional than FTaM, MaFT--and certainly far more useful to me as I continue to work on my thesis. Only really recommended for people doing serious research or seriously interested in fairy tale/lit theory.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Mark Isaak

    The early chapters of this book are particularly good, where Zipes shows how the fairy tales of Perrault, Grimm, and Andersen are not simply folklore, but were adapted to promote the upper-class values of the day. More examples of the tales before and after such transformation would have been nice, but perhaps "Red Riding Hood" was the only good example available. The next two chapters (on George MacDonald, Oscar Wilde, and L. Frank Baum, and on Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany) are interesting The early chapters of this book are particularly good, where Zipes shows how the fairy tales of Perrault, Grimm, and Andersen are not simply folklore, but were adapted to promote the upper-class values of the day. More examples of the tales before and after such transformation would have been nice, but perhaps "Red Riding Hood" was the only good example available. The next two chapters (on George MacDonald, Oscar Wilde, and L. Frank Baum, and on Weimar Republic and Nazi Germany) are interesting history, but arguments concerning significance are weak. The last chapter, concerning modern times, is poor, first because it tries to fit its analysis into a Freudian framework, and second because it focuses only on deliberately subversive literature (none of which I had heard of before), with no mention at all of popular writers such as Dr. Seuss and Sendak and only passing mention of Tolkien and C.S. Lewis; nor is there any mention of other other reality-challenging genres or of games such as Dungeon & Dragons, which might be seen as subverting fairy tales themselves.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kate

    The introduction is a stultifying morass of subject-specific technical jargon; thankfully, Zipes eases up some in the following chapters. The biographical aspects were the most interesting part of the book to me: Zipes describes the lives of many of the writers/transcribers of fairy tales, such as Hans Christian Andersen and the women of the French salons, though by the final chapter on Walt Disney the arguments re: the psychological motivations of the writers and creators gets borderline scurril The introduction is a stultifying morass of subject-specific technical jargon; thankfully, Zipes eases up some in the following chapters. The biographical aspects were the most interesting part of the book to me: Zipes describes the lives of many of the writers/transcribers of fairy tales, such as Hans Christian Andersen and the women of the French salons, though by the final chapter on Walt Disney the arguments re: the psychological motivations of the writers and creators gets borderline scurrilous. His arguments re: the historical and social are not as well-made, I felt, because they hinge on these psychological biographies of the dead--but since I read this for fun, not as a scholar, I can't really refute or support his thesis either way.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Ilana

    I really admire the depth of knowledge Zipes has on fairy tales and their history, but sometimes I feel like he assumes I have an academic background I do not. Despite the fact that some of this book was VERY hard to get through (mostly the first chapter), I really did enjoy it, and feel like I know a lot more about the authors who's stories I grew up reading. Sidenote: Does anyone else feel like Oscar Wilde has a lot in common with Lady Gaga? No, I'm serious. I really admire the depth of knowledge Zipes has on fairy tales and their history, but sometimes I feel like he assumes I have an academic background I do not. Despite the fact that some of this book was VERY hard to get through (mostly the first chapter), I really did enjoy it, and feel like I know a lot more about the authors who's stories I grew up reading. Sidenote: Does anyone else feel like Oscar Wilde has a lot in common with Lady Gaga? No, I'm serious.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Erin

    Relied heavily on this book for my thesis. It's a fascinating read, as are all his books. Relied heavily on this book for my thesis. It's a fascinating read, as are all his books.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jeffrey

    Sometimes Zipes is so damn good and then he misreads things in such a peculiar way that you just marvel in incredulity that he can be so dense - his take on Andersen is mean-spirited and makes me wonder hoiw much of a Marxist he really is and that he takes Hoffman's Struwwelpeter as a serious series of cautionary tales (and then later Fallada's imitations) is very odd indeed - but that said, when he is on - marvellous! Sometimes Zipes is so damn good and then he misreads things in such a peculiar way that you just marvel in incredulity that he can be so dense - his take on Andersen is mean-spirited and makes me wonder hoiw much of a Marxist he really is and that he takes Hoffman's Struwwelpeter as a serious series of cautionary tales (and then later Fallada's imitations) is very odd indeed - but that said, when he is on - marvellous!

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kat

    I found this book really interesting. It speaks extensively about the socializing functions of fairytales in a way that I had never thought of before. It has prompted me to see the socializing fairytales, particularly by way of gender, in a lot of stories where I had not seen them before. That having been said, it is also very long and dry.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl

    In part because it showed up when I did a search for the Italian, Gianni Rodari. According to other reviewers, don't worry if the first chapter(s) is a heavy slog. And even then, don't ever completely give up, but give each section a good chance. In part because it showed up when I did a search for the Italian, Gianni Rodari. According to other reviewers, don't worry if the first chapter(s) is a heavy slog. And even then, don't ever completely give up, but give each section a good chance.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sara

    Another invaluable source for fairy tale analysis. I only read excerpts for a paper I wrote, but I've read other Zipes' works, and I think they are all essential reads if you have a deeper interest in fairy tale studies. Another invaluable source for fairy tale analysis. I only read excerpts for a paper I wrote, but I've read other Zipes' works, and I think they are all essential reads if you have a deeper interest in fairy tale studies.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Danelley

    an interesting read and lots of historical context. You can tell this author did his research, although you may not agree with a lot of his conclusions.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Katerina

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Read 5 out of 9 chapters for my fairy tales class. Very informative.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Jake Nessel

    this book had a lot of good information but had so much analysis that my brain went hsjke32grs

  18. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    Very academic and informative.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Sim

  20. 4 out of 5

    Katrina

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nadia

  22. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

  23. 4 out of 5

    Lucy Caird

  24. 5 out of 5

    L.E. Fidler

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jaimee

  26. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Anjirbag

  27. 4 out of 5

    Lilya Loring

  28. 5 out of 5

    Ivonne Spinoza

  29. 5 out of 5

    Copacul Cititor

  30. 5 out of 5

    Elly

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.