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Book of Jasher: Titan Classics (Illustrated)

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The Book of Jasher covers biblical history from the creation of Adam and Eve until a summary of the initial Israelite conquest of Canaan in the beginning of the book of Judges.


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The Book of Jasher covers biblical history from the creation of Adam and Eve until a summary of the initial Israelite conquest of Canaan in the beginning of the book of Judges.

30 review for Book of Jasher: Titan Classics (Illustrated)

  1. 5 out of 5

    Kayt

    This is one of the best books I have read lately. If you enjoy the reading the Bible you will love this book. It gives a more detailed account of the happenings in the bible. This book was written by Jasher who is mentioned in the Bible twice. I enjoy the details about the 12 sons of Israel ( Jacob ) and Israel himself. I feel like I know these people better after reading this book. This book is more historical rather than a spiritual account. However it does still talk about the relationship be This is one of the best books I have read lately. If you enjoy the reading the Bible you will love this book. It gives a more detailed account of the happenings in the bible. This book was written by Jasher who is mentioned in the Bible twice. I enjoy the details about the 12 sons of Israel ( Jacob ) and Israel himself. I feel like I know these people better after reading this book. This book is more historical rather than a spiritual account. However it does still talk about the relationship between God and the people of this time but it is a little different. Every time I don't have a good book to read or I feel like I am forgetting some of the details I pick it up and read it again. I never get tired of it. Highly Recommended!!!!!!!!! Kayt

  2. 5 out of 5

    Brent McGregor

    Aside from the disputed nature of the book and questioned authenticity, when taken with a little salt and viewed with a wary eye, this book is very interesting. Mostly, retelling stories we are all familiar with, the book of Jasher adds some interesting insights into many of these old stories. Three that were imagination inspiring: How Pharaoh came to be and a listing of all the post Tower of Babel migrations (wonder how many ended up in South America), and more details of Abraham's story. Terah w Aside from the disputed nature of the book and questioned authenticity, when taken with a little salt and viewed with a wary eye, this book is very interesting. Mostly, retelling stories we are all familiar with, the book of Jasher adds some interesting insights into many of these old stories. Three that were imagination inspiring: How Pharaoh came to be and a listing of all the post Tower of Babel migrations (wonder how many ended up in South America), and more details of Abraham's story. Terah was not a nice guy. I've just read it again, 2013, and it just gets more fun to read. Still, this is a grain of salt kind of read.

  3. 5 out of 5

    John Martindale

    Joshua 10:13 and 2 Samuel 1:18 both mention the book of Jasher. It's been years now, but I just remembered reading Jasher around 10 years ago online and it was like Paul Harvey's "the rest of the story." It fills in many of the details concerning biblical protagonist and their stories. I recall it being a very interesting read and it is indeed note-worthy that two biblical writer's mentioned it as a reference; a source of authority in that day. Joshua 10:13 and 2 Samuel 1:18 both mention the book of Jasher. It's been years now, but I just remembered reading Jasher around 10 years ago online and it was like Paul Harvey's "the rest of the story." It fills in many of the details concerning biblical protagonist and their stories. I recall it being a very interesting read and it is indeed note-worthy that two biblical writer's mentioned it as a reference; a source of authority in that day.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sheralyn

    One of my favorite apocryphal books. Like reading a more mythical/readable version of the first Old Testament stories. Also, I have it on good authority that, dramatized or not, the book is completely accurate with all dates and historical timelines, so it was likely written at the time or by an informed scholar, shortly thereafter.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jaclynn

    Delve further into the biblical history from Adam to until the Israelites reach the promised land with details and stories you’ve never read before. This isn’t a new story book though but rather a great addition to what is in the Bible. I “ate up” this book and found a lot more insight into the familiar bible stories from the Old Testament.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Carolyn Burton

    Jasher The history of Israel with more details concerning their beginning to obtaining the inheritance. I liked learning what happened behind the scenes. Highly recommend this book for bible scholars with inquiring minds that want to know.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Dawn

    A must read for serious students of antediluvian and end times research. This extra biblical text helps to flesh out some of the more skeletal accounts in Scriptures.

  8. 4 out of 5

    India Lavoyce

    This book was mentioned in Joshua and in 2nd Samuel in the Bible. I had never heard of it. I saw it in a bookstore a few years ago. The Book of Jasher answered some questions that I had after reading the Bible. It went in more detail and even had some events that weren’t mentioned in the Bible. I love Historical & Biblical writing, so I was bound to love this.

  9. 4 out of 5

    melvin justice

    Good history of the Israelites This book would be good for anyone wishing to know more about how the Lord dealt with the Israelites and fulfilling his covenant to Abraham and his descendants.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    Interesting to read and compare with Genesis and Exodus Some interesting insights and also fantastic events presented.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Young Soo Jeon

    We need this Book as a good reference. We need this Book as a good reference. More specific contents help us understand the BIBLE more deeply and more widely.

  12. 4 out of 5

    r j joe

    Loved it! Where has this book been all of my life! I've learned so much about the patriarchs and their exploits. The sons of Jacob? Wow! Moses, King of Cush for 40 years? Wow! Loved it! Where has this book been all of my life! I've learned so much about the patriarchs and their exploits. The sons of Jacob? Wow! Moses, King of Cush for 40 years? Wow!

  13. 4 out of 5

    Christy

    Sort of parallels the first five books of the Old Testament, with some of Joshua. There’s a lot less doctrine than we find in our standard scriptures, but a lot more detail. For example, in the story of Pharaoh’s dream of the seven fat cows and the seven lean cows, and then the ears of corn, Genesis tells us that Pharaoh called the magicians and wise men together, “but there was none that could interpret them.” The Book of Jasher tells us all the wild and crazy interpretations of the wise men an Sort of parallels the first five books of the Old Testament, with some of Joshua. There’s a lot less doctrine than we find in our standard scriptures, but a lot more detail. For example, in the story of Pharaoh’s dream of the seven fat cows and the seven lean cows, and then the ears of corn, Genesis tells us that Pharaoh called the magicians and wise men together, “but there was none that could interpret them.” The Book of Jasher tells us all the wild and crazy interpretations of the wise men and magicians, and how Pharaoh didn’t believe any of them, and had them all killed. Maybe that really happened, and maybe it didn’t, but it sure makes interesting reading. I could say the same for the whole book. Maybe it all happened, and maybe it didn’t, but it’s sure hard to put down.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Raquel

    Great medieval midrash on the Hebrew Bible stories. Some things might raise eyebrows on the anachronisms (King Latinus? Lumbardi?), but what ancient stories have not been interpolated by anachronisms?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Scott

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. This has been a favorite book of mine since a seminary teacher introduced me to it in 9th grade. I read it first in high school, again in my early 20's, and now a 3rd time in my late 30's. It definitely helps that I'm reading Genesis now at the same time. It has helped me appreciate how much more the Book of Jasher offers. As always, there is plenty of the fantastical here that defies credulity--like Judah throwing an enormous stone in the air, catching it with one hand, and then sitting on it h This has been a favorite book of mine since a seminary teacher introduced me to it in 9th grade. I read it first in high school, again in my early 20's, and now a 3rd time in my late 30's. It definitely helps that I'm reading Genesis now at the same time. It has helped me appreciate how much more the Book of Jasher offers. As always, there is plenty of the fantastical here that defies credulity--like Judah throwing an enormous stone in the air, catching it with one hand, and then sitting on it hard until it crumbled to dust--all to try to intimidate Joseph (who hadn't yet revealed himself) into not taking Benjamin captive. Some things like that are laughable, and when they put outlandish things like that into my favorite stories, it gets annoying. But aside from that tomfoolery, the book has much to commend it, and I believe it contains truths that are missing from the Genesis account. My most memorable part: Abraham smashing his father's idols, and putting the hammer in the hands of his dad's favorite statue. When his father accused him of destroying them, he straightface told him that the favorite idol had done it, because he was jealous of the other ones taking a burnt offering that was intended for himself. When Abraham's father denied this was possible, because they are only made of stone and wood, Abraham had caught him--I paraphrase: "Then why do you worship idols of stone and wood that can neither speak nor act?"

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ger

    The text provides some great insights to many stories in the old testiment. I would recommend reading it but it is likely that some of it isn't pure gospel truth. The text provides some great insights to many stories in the old testiment. I would recommend reading it but it is likely that some of it isn't pure gospel truth.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ernie Dawson

    This is a very nice read. Adds a lot to Biblical stories. The copy that I have was published in 1967 and is a reprint of a book by J. H. Parry & Company in 1887.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Aharon

    bible belivers need to read this book fills in many holes in the stories of the bible.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rev. Catherine Cassell

    Awesome story line with details not found in the Old Testament.

  20. 5 out of 5

    James H Robertson

    Yashar Very compelling book. Translation very well done. I have read many of the translations this one is the best I have read I have read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Anthony Woodruff

    A most read for all believers in The Most High Enjoyed this tremendously. A great addition to the bible as mentioned in the book of Joshua 10:13 and 2 Samuel 1:18.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adrienne James

    Excellent How fortunate we are to have this book to flesh out the Bible. We have the opportunity to know the tribes of Israel better.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Deborah Lee

    The Book Of Masher or the Upright or Correct Record by Jasher It is good to go back and read this book from time to time because the Lord always reveals new revelation every time. Thank you and God bless you.

  24. 4 out of 5

    JOANN REED

    The Book of Jasher I enjoyed the details of this book. I want to go back to the beginning to read again the chapter on Adam and Eve in the garden.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Jonny Ayers

    Lots of information I have read the book of Enoch and now this. It provides a more human perspective and fleshed out the books of Genesis and Exodus. I recommend it.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Orville Jenkins

    This book is a reprint of an anonymous 1840 translation of the Hebrew manuscript purported to be the ancient Book of Jasher, referred to in Joshua and 2 Samuel as a source. Sections of this read like they could have been the real Book of Jasher, but parts of it read like a later recounting of some stories in the canonical texts. But these were interesting and may cast light upon the Scriptures. There are some tipoffs in terminology and naming that indicate at least sections of it were written qui This book is a reprint of an anonymous 1840 translation of the Hebrew manuscript purported to be the ancient Book of Jasher, referred to in Joshua and 2 Samuel as a source. Sections of this read like they could have been the real Book of Jasher, but parts of it read like a later recounting of some stories in the canonical texts. But these were interesting and may cast light upon the Scriptures. There are some tipoffs in terminology and naming that indicate at least sections of it were written quite late in Hebrew/Jewish history. The reference Ur of the Chaldeans, for instance, is a late historical reference. Canonical Clues In the time of Abraham, the city of Ur and surrounding area of Mesopotamia did not belong to the Chaldeans. This could actually be a confirmation of compilation or editing process of the canonical texts, confirming clues already found in the biblical texts form the Exile. The Chaldeans were a people farther down river toward the mouth of the Tigris and Euphrates, who took over the Assyrian Empire in the 600-500s BC. The famous Nebuchadnezzar was a Chaldean. It was these Chaldeans who conquered Jerusalem and took groups of Judeans into exile in their domains of Babylon. Return from Exile The phrase “Ur of the Chaldees” (Ur of the Chaldeans) comes from that era of the Babylonian Exile. This also gives us an important insight on the preservation and transmission of the canonical biblical text. If this phrase and similar later terms or forms were in an older source such as Jasher, this does tells us that the process of compilation to the form we now know was in process until during or after the Babylonian Exile. This confirms factors already apparent in the canonical texts. New Hebrew Script We definitely know otherwise that the "Hebrew" script we know was developed late from an Aramaic script, and no biblical texts have been found in the older Hebrew script, a version of Old Phoenician/Canaanite script similar to Sold South Arabian script. (Two scrolls of non-biblical texts in the Old Hebrew script were found among the hundreds of scrolls and fragments at Qumran.) We note also in the biblical text the later name "Ur of the Chaldeans" occurs only two times in later retellings of the story of Abraham. The original story in Genesis 12 does not say anything about Ur belonging to the Chaldeans. So it would be odd if the source text, which this is claimed to be, would have the term. This designation was not applicable till in the 600s BC.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Josephine

    This was a fascinating Apocryphal book that starts with the creation (so beginning of Genesis) and goes to Moses bringing the children of Israel out of Egypt. I only made it about halfway through before I needed to return it, but I may finish it some day. This kind of fleshes out some of the well known stories in the Old Testament. Like giving more details about Cain and Abel, and the city of Sodom. There is a lot in here about Abraham. Then it goes into a lot of details about the sons of Jacob a This was a fascinating Apocryphal book that starts with the creation (so beginning of Genesis) and goes to Moses bringing the children of Israel out of Egypt. I only made it about halfway through before I needed to return it, but I may finish it some day. This kind of fleshes out some of the well known stories in the Old Testament. Like giving more details about Cain and Abel, and the city of Sodom. There is a lot in here about Abraham. Then it goes into a lot of details about the sons of Jacob and that's where it got kind of crazy. According to this book they were warriors who went around wiping people out right and left. That's about where I lost interest in the book, but like I said I may pick it up again some day.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Shad

    This is part of the Apocrypha (not the body of mainstream apocryphal works that used to be included in the Bible, but another apocryphal work that is cited in Samuel in the Bible). Anyway, it is super interesting and has some intriguing explanations for numerous circumstances discussed in less detail in the Bible (like why Moses was slow of speech, why Esau was willing to give up his birthright for food, what happened to Cain, why Lamech - Cain's descendent, not Noah's father - took Cain's role, This is part of the Apocrypha (not the body of mainstream apocryphal works that used to be included in the Bible, but another apocryphal work that is cited in Samuel in the Bible). Anyway, it is super interesting and has some intriguing explanations for numerous circumstances discussed in less detail in the Bible (like why Moses was slow of speech, why Esau was willing to give up his birthright for food, what happened to Cain, why Lamech - Cain's descendent, not Noah's father - took Cain's role, and many other wild stories, especially about Israel's sons).

  29. 5 out of 5

    Wayne C Anderson

    The Book of Jasher is mentioned twice by name in the old testament and referred to in both old and new testaments of the Bible. Jasher answers questions and fills in the blanks that are left open to wonder. If you like to study creation and the lives of Genesis characters, you would want to read this book. I got this particular copy of Jasher on my Nook for travel reading.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Pradheep

    Interesting to read... Has answered some of the questions I have had when reading Genesis and some of the other books of the bible. Should be read as a book that expands on certain aspects of the Biblical story & the reader should remember that this book has NO SPIRITUAL SIGNIFICANCE unlike the Bible.

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