web site hit counter A Comedian's Guide to Theology: Featured Comedian on the Best-Selling DVD Thou Shalt Laugh - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

A Comedian's Guide to Theology: Featured Comedian on the Best-Selling DVD Thou Shalt Laugh

Availability: Ready to download

Thor Ramsey (hereafter known as the Jon Stewart of the theological world) defends the essentials of the Christian faith in this volume of comedy for the thinking person. Armed with only a laptop and a rapier wit, he defends the inspiration of the Bible ("all Scripture is inspired by God"—in other words, when you tell someone off, quote the Bible), the doctrine of total d Thor Ramsey (hereafter known as the Jon Stewart of the theological world) defends the essentials of the Christian faith in this volume of comedy for the thinking person. Armed with only a laptop and a rapier wit, he defends the inspiration of the Bible ("all Scripture is inspired by God"—in other words, when you tell someone off, quote the Bible), the doctrine of total depravity (calling someone out for their sins is a tricky business, especially if you don't know how to operate a bullhorn), and the supremacy of Christ (or why Thor's God is bigger than your god), along with a host of other essential doctrines of the Christian faith. Packed with funny stories and hard-hitting truths, this comprehensive collection of biblical insights and personal anecdotes will surprise readers, destroy their misconceptions and leave them wanting more. For readers looking alternatives to the conversation of traditional faith, or those who have a taste for fearless (and hilarious) honesty, A Comedian's Guide to Theology will permanently change how we all look at Christianity—or at least offer a good-hearted shove out of the box (or back in the box, if that's where you need to be). "What a supreme pleasure to read a book that I find powerfully honest, theologically kapow dead-on, and incredibly and ACTUALLY funny funny funny funny! This book is so brilliantly funny and dead-on that if I weren't a very mature Christian I might be jealous." —Eric Metaxas, New York Times best-selling author of Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery, and former editor of The Yale Record.  


Compare

Thor Ramsey (hereafter known as the Jon Stewart of the theological world) defends the essentials of the Christian faith in this volume of comedy for the thinking person. Armed with only a laptop and a rapier wit, he defends the inspiration of the Bible ("all Scripture is inspired by God"—in other words, when you tell someone off, quote the Bible), the doctrine of total d Thor Ramsey (hereafter known as the Jon Stewart of the theological world) defends the essentials of the Christian faith in this volume of comedy for the thinking person. Armed with only a laptop and a rapier wit, he defends the inspiration of the Bible ("all Scripture is inspired by God"—in other words, when you tell someone off, quote the Bible), the doctrine of total depravity (calling someone out for their sins is a tricky business, especially if you don't know how to operate a bullhorn), and the supremacy of Christ (or why Thor's God is bigger than your god), along with a host of other essential doctrines of the Christian faith. Packed with funny stories and hard-hitting truths, this comprehensive collection of biblical insights and personal anecdotes will surprise readers, destroy their misconceptions and leave them wanting more. For readers looking alternatives to the conversation of traditional faith, or those who have a taste for fearless (and hilarious) honesty, A Comedian's Guide to Theology will permanently change how we all look at Christianity—or at least offer a good-hearted shove out of the box (or back in the box, if that's where you need to be). "What a supreme pleasure to read a book that I find powerfully honest, theologically kapow dead-on, and incredibly and ACTUALLY funny funny funny funny! This book is so brilliantly funny and dead-on that if I weren't a very mature Christian I might be jealous." —Eric Metaxas, New York Times best-selling author of Amazing Grace: William Wilberforce and the Heroic Campaign to End Slavery, and former editor of The Yale Record.  

30 review for A Comedian's Guide to Theology: Featured Comedian on the Best-Selling DVD Thou Shalt Laugh

  1. 4 out of 5

    Nathan Albright

    Admittedly, the jokes in this book are more than a little bit corny.  I have never heard of the author as a comedian, although he has apparently worked with some famous people.  That said, this book is funny largely because the author remembers that the first rule of being an appealing comedian is making fun of himself.  And if there is one thing that the author does particularly well it is making fun of himself in such a way that it allows him to make fun of a great deal of the failures of cont Admittedly, the jokes in this book are more than a little bit corny.  I have never heard of the author as a comedian, although he has apparently worked with some famous people.  That said, this book is funny largely because the author remembers that the first rule of being an appealing comedian is making fun of himself.  And if there is one thing that the author does particularly well it is making fun of himself in such a way that it allows him to make fun of a great deal of the failures of contemporary Christianity without coming off as holier than thou.  If the author draws some laughs, at least a few of those laughs are uncomfortable and reflect some self-awareness that the author has about himself.  It is also genuinely funny, especially in the acknowledgments, to read that the author too hated the front cover (it truly is terrible) but that he had no clout as a new author.  Still, he has better sense and taste than the people who designed the cover, and that does suggest that if he continues to write books that in the future he may be able to package these books in a way that reflects his own competence in writing the books. This book is a short one at just a bit more than 200 pages and it contains fourteen chapters.  The book begins with two prefaces, which the author jokes is a matter of giving postmodernists choices about which to read.  After that the author talks about theology and the sexual life of a nun (1) and also mentions his own struggles with fidelity as a traveling comic.  After that the author discusses the importance of knowing the Bible for believers (2) as well as the connection between inspiration and perspiration when it comes to the writing of the Bible (3).  After that the author discusses doubt and how it may or may not help someone (4) as well as a general discussion of what God is like (5). After that comes a discussion of narcissism (6), a discussion of the superiority of Christianity (7), and a look at how one acquires a death threat (8), which demonstrates that the author's humor occasionally strikes at sensitive nerves.  This leads to a discussion of the theology of hell that takes two chapters (9, 10) where the author makes his own positions plain, and a look at the problem of grace in the contemporary context (11) of licentiousness.  The author manages to defend uptight fundamentalist Christians (12) while also discussing Christology (13) and the end times (14), before ending with acknowledgments and some notes about the author and an overall successful first effort as an author. There are some aspects about this book that greatly pleased me.  For one, despite not knowing the comedian, I found him to be a very appealing and relatable writer, which is important when one is dealing with a subject like this one.  The ability to write about theological matters as someone who does not have an obviously recognized expertise in the subject can be a dicey matter sometimes and the author handles it well.  The way that the author talks about the behavior of Christians and about the knowledge level that people tend to have about the ways of God are heavily dosed with a lot of levity, and that makes them go down better.  If the author is not someone who could draw a lot of attention to his work by his nonexistent name recognition, he at least is someone whose work I can appreciate and respect, and if I see any more from him I will definitely take them seriously.  Anyone who can engage in theology and comedy and do it in a self-effacing but competent manner is worthy of respect by my standards, at least.

  2. 5 out of 5

    C

    Funny, unique, but perspective on things explains a lot. Good read. Here are some highlights: Chapter 1: "The Sexual Life of a Nun" Theology is a Presence. You think about God because this Presence is with you.... God as a Presence is very surprising, much like a Living theology.... Theology will not disappoint you. Theology is alive. Our goal as people should be to become truer people; the outside of us getting closer to what's actually on the inside of us; living lives of complete authenticity (u Funny, unique, but perspective on things explains a lot. Good read. Here are some highlights: Chapter 1: "The Sexual Life of a Nun" Theology is a Presence. You think about God because this Presence is with you.... God as a Presence is very surprising, much like a Living theology.... Theology will not disappoint you. Theology is alive. Our goal as people should be to become truer people; the outside of us getting closer to what's actually on the inside of us; living lives of complete authenticity (unless you're dating--then you're just trying to trick someone into thinking you're wonderful). The great theologian H. Richard Nieburh once said, "Laughter is the beginning of prayer."...Sad faces on the road to Emmaus, "They crucified him" (Luke 24:20). "I'm alive again--tah dah!" Jesus IS magic. Chapter 2: "The Bible is more than just a place to stash your drugs" Trying to have a relationship wih Christ apart from the Bible is like dating a shallow fashion model. What's there to know if they don't have a mind? The Bible is a glimpse into the mind of God. And who doesn't want that? Well, besides people who are afraid of what God might think. The Book seemed to say, "You won't be reading me. I'll be reading you." Folks, the pulpit isn't for the preacher. The pulpit is for the Bible, because the Bible stands in authority above us all, even above the preacher. Still, there's only one thing wrong with reading the Bible, and that's if you never do anything it says. This is the physical part of the relationship. Look, I love my wife for her mind, but if she was only a brain in a glass jar, I probably wouldn't have dated her. Relationships are both mental and physical. Translation: If you don't get to touch them eventually, you go nuts. Chapter 3 That's why people believe that the Bible is inspired by God--because sometimes He shows up when you read it. Chapter 4 I believe in God because He has made it easy for idiots to believe in Him. Just because ... someone becomes convinced that He is real doesn't mean they will love Him and demonstrate that love by following Him and obeying Him. God is looking for demonstrative lovers, not believers. The Church is full of believers and that's part of the problem. Even demons believe. So, if you only the faith of a demon--you can get by in church. I am an idiot, but God loves me anyway. Chapter 8: How to acquire a death threat There are no Muslim Promise Keepers. Muslims, the men anyway, look forward to a paradise of wine, women, and song. Their religion is kind of like, "Be good on Earth so you can be bad in heaven." Muhammad never claimed to be God. Chapter 11: So Full of Grace, We're Full of ... [The problem of divorce] and others depict our theological weaknesses when we say we're "saved by grace through faith" but live lives that aren't saved from anything. ...Antinomianism is alive and well in the twenty-first-century Church, that is to say, a view of grace that divorces faith from behavior. It's what Dietrich Bonhoeffer called "cheap grace." Apparently, his book The Cost of Discipleship wasn't a bestseller because his corrective never caught on. Expand My Territory--best seller. Die To Self--not so much. I mean, we think we're Christians, but our thoughts and actions testify against us, as do some of the Internet sites we visit. The fact that the divorce rate among evangelical Christians is higher than the general population's certainly doesn't do anything to glorify the power of God to change lives. Our society has lost the concept of marriage as an institution that is larger than any two individuals, primarily because the Church has lost this view. The stability of our marriages is important to society as a whole, providing structure, support, growth… It affects other marriages. The strength of one marriage will encourage weaker marriages, and the fall of a strong marriage will discourage weaker marriages… Ladies and gentleman, might I remind you that Hosea the prophet married a prostitute for the sake of a sermon illustration. You think maybe we Christians might stay married to illustrate the grace of God? You’re a bonehead and God loves you. Go and do likewise to your spouse. 1 John 2:3-6 NASB That grace is there to help us in our time of need, not excuse us. When you know that you cannot be good, God makes a way for you. And that way is His Spirit inside of you. Following, living, doing. Now that takes grace. I hope you’re full of it. Chapter 12: In Defense of Uptight The thing that I like about these religious fundamentalists is that they sincerely want to get the work of the Kingdom done. They want people to come to know Christ. They believe in the urgency of life. They understand the danger of false beliefs. They don’t care if their views are unfashionable or unpopular. They care about the Truth, about making Jesus known. People who aren’t uptight often fail to see the benefits that uptight people bring to our society. That’s why this country needs obnoxiously religious people. It’s a checks and balances thing. Think about it, folks. That nagging little religious person in your life may be the only reason you haven’t become the raging alcoholic that you truly are. Instead of downing that bottle of Jack, you just had a couple of beers. Way to go, religious people. I owe not only my faith but often my continued growth in grace to people like him—people who challenge and provoke me and who are rejected by the evangelical church at large. People who make Christians feel like sinners—unrighteous, unholy, ungodly, things we don’t feel nearly often enough. We’re not troubled by the sins of society anymore. There is no shame. If it wasn’t for fundamentalist Christians, who would act as the antithesis for the freight train of shamelessness that is speeding through our cities? We need these fundamentalist Christians around, especially since the statistics say that only 7 percent of evangelical Christians share their faith on a regular basis. Somebody has to do it. That leaves the fundamentalists. Chapter 13: Everybody Likes Jesus …anyone who doesn’t need a Savior is self-righteous. Our experience needs to be interpreted by our theology or we end up with Jesus-y feel-good mist that demands nothing and offends no one—not that the emergent church hasn’t influenced evangelicalism in positive ways too. Jesus has always maintained that the majority just won’t get Him (see Matt. 7:14)… Jesus said that some will hate Him without reason (see John 15:25), while others will see miracles and still hate Him (see John 15:24). He promises His followers that they will be hated by all nations (see Matt. 24:9)… Even the Church is full of people who actually hate Jesus (see Matt. 7:23; Titus 1:16). Oh, they say they love Jesus and sing and raise their hands …. But it’s obvious that they hate Jesus by how they treat their neighbor, who is Jesus in disguise… People like the idea of Jesus but not the reality of Jesus. The same way people like the idea of feeding the poor but not really feeding the poor. Chapter 14: Apocalypse Later British evangelist Leonard Ravenhill said that we are too earthbound. We think just as the world thinks. We spend our time and money just the same as everyone else. Put the word “fun” back in funeral.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Brandon H.

    This is was a very enjoyable read for me. I laughed from the beginning to the end. Thor's humor had a way of flavoring up the subject-matter. Theology and apologetics can be a bit dry at times but Thor saved the day here! Perhaps we need more comedians to go to seminary? I don't know but I will say that if he gets taken up to heaven in a flaming chariot, I hope to be there to catch his mantle! Here are a few quotes - "Granted, celibacy is also a gift from God. Let's be honest, it's kind of like g This is was a very enjoyable read for me. I laughed from the beginning to the end. Thor's humor had a way of flavoring up the subject-matter. Theology and apologetics can be a bit dry at times but Thor saved the day here! Perhaps we need more comedians to go to seminary? I don't know but I will say that if he gets taken up to heaven in a flaming chariot, I hope to be there to catch his mantle! Here are a few quotes - "Granted, celibacy is also a gift from God. Let's be honest, it's kind of like getting socks for Christmas." - Pg 172 "Misconceptions about what it means to be a born-again Christian still persist. It's pretty simple really. You just bow your head, say a simple prayer and when you open your eyes - you're a registered Republican with a firearm. The process is made even simpler when churches leave out repentance." -Pg 187 "During our discussion of Jesus at our theology group one night, the subject of praying to Jesus was introduced, not that we would actually consider praying together, but we talked about it just the same. That's what you do at a theology group. You talk about things you should do, but don't. It was rather a depressing chat, I must confess because we all came to the conclusion that in America, we don't really need Jesus. What I mean is that we don't need to pray for our daily bread because our cupboards are full. Even poor people are fat in America. We don't need to cry out for healing because we have great Medical Care. Anyone with enough cash flow can launch a church and see growth just like a good business. We don't desperately need the presence of Christ to help our programs function and get our budgets met. Honestly, we don't really thirst for the presence of Christ. Another round of Amstel Light, please." - Pg 205

  4. 5 out of 5

    Tori

    Humorous and thought provoking, this was an enjoyable book to read. Nothing was off limits, even himself (or maybe especially himself). I really appreciated how he used humor and sarcasm within the context of scripture and many times I had to stop reading to process my own thoughts. I like a book that makes me laugh AND think...This one definitely hit the mark!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Carol Arnold

    More comedy than theology. I enjoyed it although I didn't understand all his humor. He did have a lot of good theological thoughts which were presented in a very satirical, humorous way. More comedy than theology. I enjoyed it although I didn't understand all his humor. He did have a lot of good theological thoughts which were presented in a very satirical, humorous way.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Evan Hobbs

    This is one of those books you need to be strong in your faith and your relationship with God. I shared some of the talking points with my father (who is a baptist minister) and we had some candid and free flowing conversation. My mother however, felt it was a book trying to bring down Christianity. If you can truly look at something with an open mind and heart, and accept that just because something is against YOUR understanding of the bible, and it doesn't mean it's harmful to your faith or Go This is one of those books you need to be strong in your faith and your relationship with God. I shared some of the talking points with my father (who is a baptist minister) and we had some candid and free flowing conversation. My mother however, felt it was a book trying to bring down Christianity. If you can truly look at something with an open mind and heart, and accept that just because something is against YOUR understanding of the bible, and it doesn't mean it's harmful to your faith or God, then you will appreciate this book as much as I did. If you aren't that person, then go find another book that tells you God is a hateful being that will put a brand new Benz in your driveway because you volunteer one day out of the year and only go to church on Easter Sunday.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Stacey

    this book is funny, smart, and thought-provoking. it is a book on christian theology (though it does have a chapter that addresses other religions) that may offend at times. the author acknowledges this though, and he encourages the reader to read critically, not simply to accept anything that he or anyone else says.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Dondra

    This is a book that will only appeal to a rare breed: Christians who can laugh at them selves, have a good grasp of theology to begin with, and understand the use of irony. I'm not sure how many people I know like that. But personally, I enjoyed it. This is a book that will only appeal to a rare breed: Christians who can laugh at them selves, have a good grasp of theology to begin with, and understand the use of irony. I'm not sure how many people I know like that. But personally, I enjoyed it.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Peter

    This book actually covers some serious ground, but with a humorous tone. I found myself laughing out loud from the first page, but also nodding with agreement in several spots. Thor specifically addresses the excesses of liberal and emergent brands of Christianity.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Bradley Barrett

  11. 5 out of 5

    Jim Pickett

  12. 4 out of 5

    Andrew Nichols

  13. 5 out of 5

    Paul B

  14. 5 out of 5

    Kendall Mccullough

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jami

  16. 4 out of 5

    Emmeline

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mwvickers

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steven Dyk

  19. 5 out of 5

    Ruth

  20. 5 out of 5

    Roger Leonhardt

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  22. 5 out of 5

    Damien Knuckey

  23. 4 out of 5

    Big Mike Lewis

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joel

  25. 4 out of 5

    Deborah

  26. 5 out of 5

    Bethany

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alan

  28. 5 out of 5

    Anna Bradley

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

  30. 4 out of 5

    Axsel Cintron

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.