web site hit counter Riding for the Lone Star: Frontier Cavalry and the Texas Way of War, 1822-1865 - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Riding for the Lone Star: Frontier Cavalry and the Texas Way of War, 1822-1865

Availability: Ready to download

The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innov The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innovation in Spanish Tejas and culminating with massive mobilization for the Civil War, Texas society developed a distinctive way of war defined by armed horsemanship, volunteer militancy, and short-term mobilization as it grappled with both tribal and international opponents. Drawing upon military reports, participants’ memoirs, and government documents, cavalry officer Nathan A. Jennings analyzes the evolution of Texan militarism from tribal clashes of colonial Tejas, territorial wars of the Texas Republic, the Mexican-American War, border conflicts of antebellum Texas, and the cataclysmic Civil War. In each conflict Texan volunteers answered the call to arms with marked enthusiasm for mounted combat. Riding for the Lone Star explores this societal passion—with emphasis on the historic rise of the Texas Rangers—through unflinching examination of territorial competition with Comanches, Mexicans, and Unionists. Even as statesmen Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston emerged as influential strategic leaders, captains like Edward Burleson, John Coffee Hays, and John Salmon Ford attained fame for tactical success.


Compare

The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innov The idea of Texas was forged in the crucible of frontier warfare between 1822 and 1865, when Anglo-Americans adapted to mounted combat north of the Rio Grande. This cavalry-centric arena, which had long been the domain of Plains Indians and the Spanish Empire, compelled an adaptive martial tradition that shaped early Lone Star society. Beginning with initial tactical innovation in Spanish Tejas and culminating with massive mobilization for the Civil War, Texas society developed a distinctive way of war defined by armed horsemanship, volunteer militancy, and short-term mobilization as it grappled with both tribal and international opponents. Drawing upon military reports, participants’ memoirs, and government documents, cavalry officer Nathan A. Jennings analyzes the evolution of Texan militarism from tribal clashes of colonial Tejas, territorial wars of the Texas Republic, the Mexican-American War, border conflicts of antebellum Texas, and the cataclysmic Civil War. In each conflict Texan volunteers answered the call to arms with marked enthusiasm for mounted combat. Riding for the Lone Star explores this societal passion—with emphasis on the historic rise of the Texas Rangers—through unflinching examination of territorial competition with Comanches, Mexicans, and Unionists. Even as statesmen Stephen F. Austin and Sam Houston emerged as influential strategic leaders, captains like Edward Burleson, John Coffee Hays, and John Salmon Ford attained fame for tactical success.

36 review for Riding for the Lone Star: Frontier Cavalry and the Texas Way of War, 1822-1865

  1. 4 out of 5

    Adam L

    A must have book for any respectable cavalry or Texas military history collection. Jennings military expertise and superb writing style is evident as he weaves a great narrative that connects the unique military style of Texas cavalry to a larger way of fighting and war. Jennings’ book is clear, well organized, and very readable. Too often in history, I have to choose between reading a well-researched, heavily detailed, but boring book or read a great story that lacks any information. That is no A must have book for any respectable cavalry or Texas military history collection. Jennings military expertise and superb writing style is evident as he weaves a great narrative that connects the unique military style of Texas cavalry to a larger way of fighting and war. Jennings’ book is clear, well organized, and very readable. Too often in history, I have to choose between reading a well-researched, heavily detailed, but boring book or read a great story that lacks any information. That is not the case with Nathan Jennings, I read the book cover to cover. Not only did I expand my knowledge of Texas cavalry, but also the military, cultural, and social dynamics at play during the birth of Texas. War and politics are not isolated events, but uniquely intertwined, Jennings captured this dynamic remarkably. I strongly recommend this book for military historians and armchair strategists alike. Arguably, this is the definitive work on the origins of Texas frontier military history.

  2. 5 out of 5

    David M

    boring, sometimes polemical historical account of Texas rangers and mounted troops from earliest Anglo colonies through the Confederacy. Interesting detail of actions against and alliances with indians and Tejanos

  3. 5 out of 5

    Luis Alberto

  4. 4 out of 5

    Brian Drohan

  5. 5 out of 5

    Darren Ivey

  6. 4 out of 5

    Cecilia Dunbar Hernandez

  7. 4 out of 5

    Micielle

  8. 4 out of 5

    Frederick Rotzien

  9. 5 out of 5

    Trica Johnson

  10. 5 out of 5

    Terry Pearson

  11. 4 out of 5

    Stacia Chappell

  12. 4 out of 5

    Joy Adams

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ann Ellis

  14. 5 out of 5

    Cheryl Bradley

  15. 4 out of 5

    Melinda M

  16. 5 out of 5

    Cathie Ward

  17. 5 out of 5

    Tony Schmidt

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gordon Bingham

  19. 5 out of 5

    Donna Smith

  20. 5 out of 5

    Tammy Hornbeck

  21. 5 out of 5

    Emiley Allen Bowes

  22. 5 out of 5

    Bill

  23. 4 out of 5

    Sonia

  24. 5 out of 5

    Susan Johnson

  25. 4 out of 5

    MIPat

  26. 4 out of 5

    Charlie

  27. 5 out of 5

    LLL Reads

  28. 4 out of 5

    Toni Mcintire

  29. 4 out of 5

    Pam

  30. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Heare Watts

  31. 5 out of 5

    Danielle Hayes

  32. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

  33. 4 out of 5

    Carla

  34. 5 out of 5

    Evelyn Murray

  35. 4 out of 5

    Kristin

  36. 5 out of 5

    Prince Rupert

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.