web site hit counter The Goat in the Rug - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

The Goat in the Rug

Availability: Ready to download

Geraldine is a goat, and Glenmae, a Navajo weaver. One day, Glenmae decides to weave Geraldine into a rug. First Geraldine is clipped. Then her wool is spun into fine, strong yarn. Finally, Glenmae weaves the wool on her loom. They reader learns, along with Geraldine, about the care and pride involved in the weaving of a Navajo rug -- and about cooperation between friends.


Compare

Geraldine is a goat, and Glenmae, a Navajo weaver. One day, Glenmae decides to weave Geraldine into a rug. First Geraldine is clipped. Then her wool is spun into fine, strong yarn. Finally, Glenmae weaves the wool on her loom. They reader learns, along with Geraldine, about the care and pride involved in the weaving of a Navajo rug -- and about cooperation between friends.

30 review for The Goat in the Rug

  1. 4 out of 5

    Mir

    This book follows the Navajo rug-making process through the eyes of Geraldine the goat. It starts with her shearing, and with detail describes every step in the process. By the end of the book Geraldine has grown back all of her coat. Very informative and adorably illustrated.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Marcie

    I am weeding a collection of books that my mother bought for me when I was child, thus instilling my lifelong love of reading. My mother's love of reading and her passing on that love to me is truly a gift. So, as I reread these books from long ago, I will keep the ones that are most dear to me and the others I will place in my local library donation box, hopeful that another child will experience the many worlds of reading that I did while growing up in my parents' home. The Goat in the Rug is a I am weeding a collection of books that my mother bought for me when I was child, thus instilling my lifelong love of reading. My mother's love of reading and her passing on that love to me is truly a gift. So, as I reread these books from long ago, I will keep the ones that are most dear to me and the others I will place in my local library donation box, hopeful that another child will experience the many worlds of reading that I did while growing up in my parents' home. The Goat in the Rug is an engaging tale told from the goat's perspective. The illustrations, especially those of the goat closely watching Glenmae's preparations and weaving, are enchanting. My husband and I visited the Desert SW Region of the United States this past summer, and I will include this book in the travel trunk that I created for my classroom when we study this period in world history.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Kara

    A charming story narrated by a goat about the painstaking steps that take place between a shaggy goat to a beautiful rug. The goat is a humorous narrator, not quite getting what’s going on, but still impressed by the beautiful work of art the weaver produces. Also, the story punches you in the heart at the end with a little side note that oh by the way, this ability is going to die out soon, kaythnkbye! Ugh. OK, duly noted. At least the cultural history is being preserved in books like these, but A charming story narrated by a goat about the painstaking steps that take place between a shaggy goat to a beautiful rug. The goat is a humorous narrator, not quite getting what’s going on, but still impressed by the beautiful work of art the weaver produces. Also, the story punches you in the heart at the end with a little side note that oh by the way, this ability is going to die out soon, kaythnkbye! Ugh. OK, duly noted. At least the cultural history is being preserved in books like these, but still, depressing end to this charming tale.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Colin

    A wonderful children's book based on a real account of a traditional Navajo weaver at Window Rock (in the Navajo Nation in Arizona), but told from the perspective of Geraldine, her goat. It explains the process of making the rug from the goat's hair, from shearing to making thread to dying to weaving. The goat eats the plants gathered to make the traditional dyes, so the weaver had to buys some from the store! It was fun to read with my kids (ages 6 and 7 right now, living in Phoenix, AZ). A wonderful children's book based on a real account of a traditional Navajo weaver at Window Rock (in the Navajo Nation in Arizona), but told from the perspective of Geraldine, her goat. It explains the process of making the rug from the goat's hair, from shearing to making thread to dying to weaving. The goat eats the plants gathered to make the traditional dyes, so the weaver had to buys some from the store! It was fun to read with my kids (ages 6 and 7 right now, living in Phoenix, AZ).

  5. 5 out of 5

    Jami

    My daughter learned to read with this wonderful book. Her grandmother found it at a yard sale and of all the books that came into our lives, this one was her obsession. She was reading it at age four. It's a marvelous story, from a goat's perspective, of what goes into the making of a Navajo rug. It's a book that will delight children and adults. My daughter learned to read with this wonderful book. Her grandmother found it at a yard sale and of all the books that came into our lives, this one was her obsession. She was reading it at age four. It's a marvelous story, from a goat's perspective, of what goes into the making of a Navajo rug. It's a book that will delight children and adults.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Leo

    This is one of my all-time favorite childhood stories, it brings memories forth of sheep herding, shearing and late-shinálí asdzą́ą́n. I recommend!

  7. 4 out of 5

    Blue

    A goat narrates how a Navajo weaver makes a rug from her wool. Very cute, cheeky goat, charming illustrations and informative about weaving.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Checkthebook

    I bring a woven rug from Mexico into my classroom as a hands-on supplement to this wonderful book. I love when the goat gets in trouble for eating everything (as goats do).

  9. 5 out of 5

    Angela Germany

    So cute. I love that the story is told through the goat's point of view. So cute. I love that the story is told through the goat's point of view.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Sabrina Parsons

    The Goat in the Rug is a true story about the process of making a Navajo rug. The story is told from a goat's point of view named Geraldine. He tells about Glenmae who is his friend and an amazing rug weaver. The story is about Glenmae weaving a pick, black, and brown rug and how Geraldine plays a major role in the process. Glenmae uses Geraldine for wool and transforms it into yarn. The both of them then go out to pick berries so that Glenmae can die the yarn into beautiful colors, but Geraldin The Goat in the Rug is a true story about the process of making a Navajo rug. The story is told from a goat's point of view named Geraldine. He tells about Glenmae who is his friend and an amazing rug weaver. The story is about Glenmae weaving a pick, black, and brown rug and how Geraldine plays a major role in the process. Glenmae uses Geraldine for wool and transforms it into yarn. The both of them then go out to pick berries so that Glenmae can die the yarn into beautiful colors, but Geraldine eats them all and she must take a trip to the store and leave him behind. Glenmae and Geraldine get closer to creating the actual rug, but Glenmae must set everything up so that she can have a perfect rug. She then begins to weave and creates a one of a kind pattern. This story gives a clear picture of the day in the life of a Navajo female weaver. The book describes that the Navajo culture has changed and that Glenmae is one of few weavers left. The book uses real Navajo words, but shortens them so that the reader can easily understand the story. The book describes the weaving process step by step but uses an engaging method. This method is using the goat to tell the story. It makes the story more engaging because the goat is given human characteristics and really seems to be apart of the rug making process. By using the goat as the narrator it creates a better connection for the reader, because he is a less intimidating character compared to the adult Glenmae, because of his child like characteristics. This story completely relies on the text. The text is what tells the story and really shows the way of a Navajo reader. The text incorporates both English and Navajo words which allows for easy understanding. It does this by stating the Navajo word and describing it in English, which allows the story to flow. Incorporating both languages shows the reader both their own culture and the Navajo culture which allows the reader to make connections and compare what they know to what the story is about.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Madison

    Personal Reaction: I thought this story was interesting and a fun read. This, again, is another story I read to my 3rd graders at work. It follows the journey of a sheep and how his wool gets woven into a blanket. The pictures that accompany the weaving story are really helpful in understanding the complex process. I really liked this book. Purposes: This story shares the process of creating something slowly and carefully. Perhaps this could be read before an art project that is intensive and wil Personal Reaction: I thought this story was interesting and a fun read. This, again, is another story I read to my 3rd graders at work. It follows the journey of a sheep and how his wool gets woven into a blanket. The pictures that accompany the weaving story are really helpful in understanding the complex process. I really liked this book. Purposes: This story shares the process of creating something slowly and carefully. Perhaps this could be read before an art project that is intensive and will take time. It will show the students that certain projects take time. It also shows the importance of this particular are in the native american culture and gives insight into how this art in valued in the native american culture. Curriculum: As Glenmae, the weaver, and Geraldine, the goat, go through the process of growing out the wool and then weaving it into a blanket, it shares information about the Navajo culture. This would be useful in a social studies setting during a native american unit. I think it would also be interesting to use in a unit about resources and creating things with natures resources.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Ina

    This is a charming book, narrated by Geraldine the goat. She tells the reader all about the process of weaving a Navajo rug. Her friend Glenmae decides to weave a rug using Geraldine's mohair...so Geraldine gets shorn, her wool carded, spun, dyed, and woven. It is really fun to see Geraldine's coat grow back as the rug progresses and many other wonderful details abound - as she watches her wool being died, Geraldine imagines what she would look like if her wool grew on her in those colors. While This is a charming book, narrated by Geraldine the goat. She tells the reader all about the process of weaving a Navajo rug. Her friend Glenmae decides to weave a rug using Geraldine's mohair...so Geraldine gets shorn, her wool carded, spun, dyed, and woven. It is really fun to see Geraldine's coat grow back as the rug progresses and many other wonderful details abound - as she watches her wool being died, Geraldine imagines what she would look like if her wool grew on her in those colors. While Glenmae weaves the rug, Geraldine sits leaning against her and the friendship between the two of these characters only makes the story more charming. There are beautiful illustrations.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Mistiemae1 Downs

    The Goat in the Rug details the weaving of a traditional Navajo rug, from the shearing of the goat all the way to the finished product. The twist is, the story is all told from the perspective of the goat! Engaging and humorous, this book had my children eager to participate in the weaving process... and begging for a pet goat. I did find it curious that the author chose to have the Navajo weaver use store-bought dye after Geraldine the goat eats all of the dyeing plants, but overall the story wa The Goat in the Rug details the weaving of a traditional Navajo rug, from the shearing of the goat all the way to the finished product. The twist is, the story is all told from the perspective of the goat! Engaging and humorous, this book had my children eager to participate in the weaving process... and begging for a pet goat. I did find it curious that the author chose to have the Navajo weaver use store-bought dye after Geraldine the goat eats all of the dyeing plants, but overall the story was grand.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    This is a true story of a weaver and her goat who lived in the Navajo Nation at Window Rock, Arizona. The story is a how-to book, telling the tale of shearing the mohair from a goat, who tells the tale, to taking the rug off the loom. It uses the proper terms for preparing the wool for weaving like cleaning, carding, spinning and dyeing. Amazingly, it is not silly, but although we know goats cannot talk, the illustrations and the story show the close relationship between natural objects and thei This is a true story of a weaver and her goat who lived in the Navajo Nation at Window Rock, Arizona. The story is a how-to book, telling the tale of shearing the mohair from a goat, who tells the tale, to taking the rug off the loom. It uses the proper terms for preparing the wool for weaving like cleaning, carding, spinning and dyeing. Amazingly, it is not silly, but although we know goats cannot talk, the illustrations and the story show the close relationship between natural objects and their use by Native Americans.

  15. 4 out of 5

    alana

    The Goat in the Rug is Geraldine the Goat's retelling of how her hair became a Navajo weaver's rug. The book breaks down the basic steps of creating a hand woven rug in terms that are appropriate for preK - middle elementary (older students would need more in-depth information and vocuabulary). The cheekiness of the goat will also appeal to younger readers. The book also acknowledges that the Navajo weaving tradition is a dying art and could fit well into a unit studying Navajo culture and craft The Goat in the Rug is Geraldine the Goat's retelling of how her hair became a Navajo weaver's rug. The book breaks down the basic steps of creating a hand woven rug in terms that are appropriate for preK - middle elementary (older students would need more in-depth information and vocuabulary). The cheekiness of the goat will also appeal to younger readers. The book also acknowledges that the Navajo weaving tradition is a dying art and could fit well into a unit studying Navajo culture and craft.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Gregory Rothbard

    One of the best children's books of all time is The Goat in the Rug by Geraldine. Geraldine, the goat, tells of his favorite Navajo weaver Glenmae. The story told from the point of view of the Goat, gives the reader a unique perspective. At times the story is funny, and other times seriously woven. One of the best children's books of all time is The Goat in the Rug by Geraldine. Geraldine, the goat, tells of his favorite Navajo weaver Glenmae. The story told from the point of view of the Goat, gives the reader a unique perspective. At times the story is funny, and other times seriously woven.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa Holzknecht

    This book is essentially about weaving a Navajo rug and is told from the perspective of a goat. I found that it was from the perspective of the goat very interesting. I also liked how there were funny little parts the goats would say. This book would be good for kids to understand how rugs were traditionally made and also so that they can learn about an understand this culture better.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Janet

    This title is more nonfiction than an actual picture book story. Told from the viewpoint of Geraldine, the goat, one learns how a traditional Navajo woman, Glenmae weaves a rug. The story begins with Geraldine being shorn and ends with Geraldine about to be shorn for the second time. All of the steps of traditional weaving are here.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Dale

    [children’s] a true story of a weaver and her goat who lived in the Navajo Nation at Window Rock, AZ. Received when I won the bidding on a Navajo made teddy bear at the ’15 Friends of Madison County Public Library Little Quilt Show; 1990 paperback; no numbered pages. 5 out of 5 stars; finished Jan. 01, 2016/#1

  20. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    It was a cute story about Geraldine the goat. She tells the story about how her friend and owner a Navajo Weaver called Glen-Mae, whose Native American name is Glee 'Nasbah, will shorn her and turn her wool into thread to weave into a beautiful Navajo rug. Recommended for ages 4-7. It was a cute story about Geraldine the goat. She tells the story about how her friend and owner a Navajo Weaver called Glen-Mae, whose Native American name is Glee 'Nasbah, will shorn her and turn her wool into thread to weave into a beautiful Navajo rug. Recommended for ages 4-7.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Judy

    What's not to like about this story? It focuses on one specific aspect of Navajo life, rug making; it's told from the point of view of a goat; the author has a sense of humor; and the art is perfect. What's not to like about this story? It focuses on one specific aspect of Navajo life, rug making; it's told from the point of view of a goat; the author has a sense of humor; and the art is perfect.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alfajirikali

    I liked how detailed (yet engaging for young readers) the book was about the processes involved in Navaho rug making.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Robert W.

    A picture book about a weaver who lived at Window Rock and how she makes a rug.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Rian Graves

    This story is told by the goat, Geraldine, who is the companion of Glenmae, the navajo weaver, both living in window Rock, Arizona.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Lara

    Window Rock, navajo, start to finish how to make yarn from a goat's perspective, kids love it Window Rock, navajo, start to finish how to make yarn from a goat's perspective, kids love it

  26. 5 out of 5

    Leonard

    A children's story about a Navajo weaver and her goat who gives up her coat to make an artistic authenic Navajo rug. Nice and educational. A children's story about a Navajo weaver and her goat who gives up her coat to make an artistic authenic Navajo rug. Nice and educational.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    A favorite from my childhood. Story about a Dine (navajo) weaver making a rug told from the goat's perspective. So sweet. It used to make me giggle as a kid. A favorite from my childhood. Story about a Dine (navajo) weaver making a rug told from the goat's perspective. So sweet. It used to make me giggle as a kid.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    Great info on the rug making process and so cute. That picture of the goat falling asleep while she's weaving is just so precious! Great info on the rug making process and so cute. That picture of the goat falling asleep while she's weaving is just so precious!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Alysha DeShaé

    This was a cute book about Navajo weaving from the perspective of a goat. My niece picked this up and loved it!

  30. 5 out of 5

    Patricia Andrade

    It is a great story that teaches about traditions that we can not let dissapear.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.