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Batman & Robin: Eternal, Volume 2

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The Dynamic Duo thought they defeated her for good, but Mother is back—and she’s ready to enact her grand plan! And, when the truth behind Batman’s greatest failure is revealed, one of his allies may walk away from the fight forever. And as the world burns, it’s up to Dick Grayson to save a generation from unspeakable tragedy! Collecting: Batman & Robin: Eternal 13-26


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The Dynamic Duo thought they defeated her for good, but Mother is back—and she’s ready to enact her grand plan! And, when the truth behind Batman’s greatest failure is revealed, one of his allies may walk away from the fight forever. And as the world burns, it’s up to Dick Grayson to save a generation from unspeakable tragedy! Collecting: Batman & Robin: Eternal 13-26

30 review for Batman & Robin: Eternal, Volume 2

  1. 5 out of 5

    Anne

    I thought this was waaay better than the first volume, mainly because the whole ridiculous did Bruce actually get Mother to create a new sidekick for him?! thing wasn't being pushed (as a plausible explanation, at least) as much in this. Because...puh-lease. Nobody's falling for that. And, yeah, this was probably a tad too long (though not as long as Batman Eternal), but this was more fun in that you got to see all of the Batkids interacting with each other. Even if I had some problems with I thought this was waaay better than the first volume, mainly because the whole ridiculous did Bruce actually get Mother to create a new sidekick for him?! thing wasn't being pushed (as a plausible explanation, at least) as much in this. Because...puh-lease. Nobody's falling for that. And, yeah, this was probably a tad too long (though not as long as Batman Eternal), but this was more fun in that you got to see all of the Batkids interacting with each other. Even if I had some problems with the plot, I still enjoyed seeing everyone together. As for the main villain? Looks like Mother might be one of those Ra's al Ghulish characters that you can never quite kill, so I'm betting she shows up again in the future. I also liked the inclusion of Midnighter & Azrael in the storyline. I think they added a little extra oomph to the overall plot. Oh, and Jason's flashback with Mother's toxin? Yeah, I really thought that was kinda brilliant. In the end, when I compared it to my feelings on the Batman Eternal stuff, I thought this was a superior closing volume. Then again, that could just be Bat-burnout talking...

  2. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    Better than volume 1. All of the Bat sidekicks are trying to stop the one person that Batman couldn't defeat, Mother. She's a master at brainwashing children and has this plot to brainwash all the children in the world to make them stronger. Well written with a rotating group of great artists. Better than volume 1. All of the Bat sidekicks are trying to stop the one person that Batman couldn't defeat, Mother. She's a master at brainwashing children and has this plot to brainwash all the children in the world to make them stronger. Well written with a rotating group of great artists.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Chelsea 🏳️‍🌈

    3.5 stars. I just get the feeling that either Snyder and Tynion hate Cassandra or they just don't know what to do with her because I've hated her characterization since the first volume of this series. Cassandra Cain is one of my top 5 favorite comic book characters. I say that to preface that I'm probably more inclined to be pissed about this book's butchering/ret-con of her origin than the average reader. Cassandra Cain is the child of David Cain and Shiva. She was raised in silence, learned to 3.5 stars. I just get the feeling that either Snyder and Tynion hate Cassandra or they just don't know what to do with her because I've hated her characterization since the first volume of this series. Cassandra Cain is one of my top 5 favorite comic book characters. I say that to preface that I'm probably more inclined to be pissed about this book's butchering/ret-con of her origin than the average reader. Cassandra Cain is the child of David Cain and Shiva. She was raised in silence, learned to understand others through body language alone and was made to kill at a very young age. The very first time her father made her assassinate someone, she realized what she was made to do, was horrified and she ran away. She then ran into Oracle during the No Man's Land business and subsequently took over being Batgirl under Bruce Wayne's tutelage. She was given a "gift" to understand others and think the same way you or I do and it threw off her fighting style for a while but eventually, she adjusted and even defeated Shiva, then thought to be the best fighter in the DC universe. She learned to communicate verbally and she learned to read. She developed all of this in her own solo series. Now, let's talk about Orphan. Orphan is the child of David Cain and... I'm not sure if Shiva is her mother. David Cain was traumatized and turned into a servant for Mother. David gave Cassandra to Mother to be turned into a weapon. Cassandra doesn't speak much. Cassandra grew up in assassin school. Cassandra was never adopted by Bruce Wayne. Cassandra was never taken under Barbara Gordon's wing and never learned to stick up for herself. Cassandra didn't get an apartment in Bludhaven and take over protecting a city. Cassandra never defied Bruce Wayne's orders and befriended Stephanie Brown anyway. Cassandra never learned to grieve. Orphan's story is all about her relationship to David Cain and what the Mother made her do. For some reason, Tynion and Snyder thought it would be more interesting to essentially turn my daughter Cass into The Winter Soldier 2.0 complete with a storyline straight out of the recent Captain America: Civil War film. I'm pretty sure this book came out first but my point is - Cassandra Cain is not Bucky. Cassandra Cain was not the result of her father joining a cult. Cain turned her into a weapon because of his own selfishness. There is a much more complicated, nuanced relationship in the pre 52 and Snyder and Tynion ignored that for this story. I don't understand why. In addition to that, she's barely gotten any development in Detective Comics either. She just fights with tiny, minuscule character moments thrown in. I miss my daughter! I miss her relationship with Bruce and Stephanie. Tynion basically stole her family and now she's about as close to Bruce and Stephanie as Clayface is and that's a travesty. Anyway, on to the rest of this book: I read the first volume a little while ago so I have no clue why I had so much trouble following what was going on in this one. The stuff with Tim, Jason and Azrael threw me off so much and eventually my eyes just glazed over. I don't love any of the art in this book. So, I didn't enjoy looking at it and when I was confused about the events, I didn't care enough to examine them closer. It's a shame because I quite enjoy Tim and Jason's chemistry. The bits with Bruce's past were pretty interesting. The parts with Dick and Helena were confusing to me because I'm pretty sure they pertain to the last dregs of Grayson and I haven't finished that series yet. Oddly enough, I'm not a huge fan of that version of Helena because, while she is very pretty, she's basically just completely untrustworthy. Her interactions with Dick basically consist of: Dick: Why did you lie to me? Helena: I have my reasons Dick: That's very, very not cool. Helena: We have a job to do! I'll explain later. Dick: *grumpy face* Well, okay then. That's their entire relationship here and in Grayson. *Yawns*. The parts with Harper were very, very good. While I am mad that they pulled a Winter Soldier and the big crux of this was (view spoiler)[ Cass being made to kill Harper's mother (hide spoiler)] I quite like Harper as a character. I love her relationship with Cass and would gladly read a solo book about Harper. I would gladly read a book about her and Cass with my daughter's characterization and origin story restored. Damian showed up which was neat. He gave a rousing, inspirational speech which was unexpected. The whole purpose being to rally the troops because Bruce let them be their own windkeepers. It was fine, if cliche. I expected Dick to be the one to do that. I really loved Midnighter. Like really, really loved Midnighter. More than anything, I just wanted to read more about that character. I like his banter with Dick. Ultimately, the reason this gets 3.5 stars is because I really ended up liking the plot of this book. The Mother is an interesting villain and her origin story was really well done. I feel like I understand why she did everything that she did. There's something so terrifying to me about a world full of murderous children. I liked that the Batfam came together without Bruce to save the day. I enjoy the concept of this book. I just hate that Cass' character was regressed in this storyline and that her screwed up, ret-conned origin story is carrying over into Rebirth. I want my daughter back. If you enjoyed the first volume, you'll probably enjoy this one.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Roxanne

    This directly picks up from volume 1 so you can't just dive into this without reading that otherwise you're gonna be hella lost. The batfam are still dealing with Mother who is brainwashing kids into killing their parents so they can be the best damn killers there is. Mother is such a messed up character even scarecrow is scared of her so she's a really good villain to pit against the batfam as Mother adopts and trains orphans so does Batman so the robins are kind of having a bit of an identity This directly picks up from volume 1 so you can't just dive into this without reading that otherwise you're gonna be hella lost. The batfam are still dealing with Mother who is brainwashing kids into killing their parents so they can be the best damn killers there is. Mother is such a messed up character even scarecrow is scared of her so she's a really good villain to pit against the batfam as Mother adopts and trains orphans so does Batman so the robins are kind of having a bit of an identity crisis at the same time. This is such an amazing read i really loved it, i love the Batfam and how they all work together especially Todd and Drake it's just sweet. Midnighter is pretty awesome in this, he's actually written better than Midnighter's own series, and it's probably the only time where Jean-Paul didn't annoy the shit out of me, so that's an achievement all on its own. Definitely worth picking up, such an interesting story, of how Mother and Batman aren't a million miles away from each other and how things could have turned out differently, but it's a beaut of a read, especially for Batfam fans.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Kay

    3.5 MUCH better than Vol. 1. Still way too long, but thankfully a lot more enjoyable than Batman & Robin: Eternal, Volume 1. I LOVE Cass, and this was a lot about her. <3 The Sculptor to Cassandra: "It's called a hug, Cassandra. It's how people show affection to one another... It's how they show they care." Batman to Cassandra: "But you are not what they made you to be. You are something more. You are what you choose to be. And you fought your way across the world so I would know what she's about 3.5 MUCH better than Vol. 1. Still way too long, but thankfully a lot more enjoyable than Batman & Robin: Eternal, Volume 1. I LOVE Cass, and this was a lot about her. <3 The Sculptor to Cassandra: "It's called a hug, Cassandra. It's how people show affection to one another... It's how they show they care." Batman to Cassandra: "But you are not what they made you to be. You are something more. You are what you choose to be. And you fought your way across the world so I would know what she's about to do. So I can stop Mother once and for all. You aren't a monster, that's what they tried to make you. But it didn't work. You are a hero. Because that's the path you took yourself." If we cut out all the bullshit with Azrael, and banter between Jason and Tim (making Jason relive being beaten to death by the Joker & letting it all happen again in his mind to overcome Ichthys, and then Jason telling Tim that he's finally ready to try at being "good"- was real shitty), and annoying time wasted at Spyral, this would be a really good book about Batman, his relationship with Dick, Mother, and her "children" Cass and Harper Row. Dick: "They think...that they understand why we fight. They think it's some kind of blind devotion to Batman. That they can shatter what he meant to us by showing us that he wasn't perfect. But he wasn't. He was human. Same as the rest of us. That was his strength and his weakness." As I said in my review of Batman & Robin: Eternal Vol. 1 The idea that Batman could and would kill a child's parents to manufacture another Batman/Robin Origins is ridiculous, and obviously, we don't believe it. We're proven right (and Batman is proven innocent) in Vol. 2... I do love the "psychological trauma" of Mother as a Batman baddie... instilling doubt in Batman regarding his motives with Robin, and Batman, in turn, instilling doubt in Robin regarding him being an adequate partner... I squeed everytime Batman said he was proud of Dick as his partner, or when he said he never lost faith in Robin. <3 Also, as an added bonus, we have Damian pop in at the end to rally the troops. I always love me some good New 52 Damian. One tiny question Re: Damian though. If Tim and Harper (and Cass?) were young enough to be taken over by Mother's broadcasting, how come Damian isn't affected? He's much younger than them... I also liked the Batman flashbacks a lot. They added to the story, especially the issue "A Mother's Story", where we get Mother's origin story. The Batman/Harper stuff was also super interesting. I wish this had been the main focus of Batman & Robin Eternal, and not all the other stuff... And though I thought the addition of Spyral was yet another add-on to the mess and length of this book, I did like Helena in here kicking ass and creating a super secret satellite for Dick to get his life back in time for DC REBIRTH (nice of her), and Dr. Netz being a weirdo with Tim, "Mr. Robin". She's funny. To sum up, this is what I liked about this story:

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ivy

    5 stars Nice to see that the Robins were able to defeat Mother. Also glad to see that the Bat family and their allies were able to stop the children of the world from turning into Mother's children. Hope Cassandra Cain will be able to help Bruce in Gotham. RIP Orphan. Can't wait to read more Batman and Bat family books!!! Are you looking forward to the Batman movie that is coming out in 2017/2018? 5 stars Nice to see that the Robins were able to defeat Mother. Also glad to see that the Bat family and their allies were able to stop the children of the world from turning into Mother's children. Hope Cassandra Cain will be able to help Bruce in Gotham. RIP Orphan. Can't wait to read more Batman and Bat family books!!! Are you looking forward to the Batman movie that is coming out in 2017/2018?

  7. 5 out of 5

    Mizuki

    2.5 stars. *sighs* The artwork is amazing, the action scenes are asskicking, I'm glad female characters (both good and bad) get a lot of attention in this volume, but the plot itself is just.............I can't get into this story line at all. AT ALL. Now I think I can handle Batman stories only when they were penned by the few of my favorite comic-authors. *sighs* 2.5 stars. *sighs* The artwork is amazing, the action scenes are asskicking, I'm glad female characters (both good and bad) get a lot of attention in this volume, but the plot itself is just.............I can't get into this story line at all. AT ALL. Now I think I can handle Batman stories only when they were penned by the few of my favorite comic-authors. *sighs*

  8. 5 out of 5

    Gary Butler

    75th book read in 2018. Number 152 out of 735 on my all time book list. Very satisfying complex story here.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    While the action in this amps up considerably from the first volume (and they get rid of the dumb nonsense about Batman potentially being bad), this still doesn't ever quite become a necessary event. It's still extremely slow-moving. This entire story could've been 12 issues long, but instead it's 26. The central idea of the various Robins coming together to stop a threat that Batman couldn't handle alone is a solid starting point, but it just never explores that idea well enough. It's another i While the action in this amps up considerably from the first volume (and they get rid of the dumb nonsense about Batman potentially being bad), this still doesn't ever quite become a necessary event. It's still extremely slow-moving. This entire story could've been 12 issues long, but instead it's 26. The central idea of the various Robins coming together to stop a threat that Batman couldn't handle alone is a solid starting point, but it just never explores that idea well enough. It's another instance of having too many writers working on a single story. Another problem is how much this story relies on Harper Row, potentially my least favorite new character in all of the New 52. Not only is it extremely unbelievable that an annoying teenage tech wizard would somehow be an incredible fighter despite never having thrown a punch in her life, but this book retcons her into being directly connected to Batman. When she was introduced, she was just a random kid who used her tech ability to follow Batman around Gotham. It's just too much of a coincidence that she's also hugely important to him. Also, SPOILER ALERT for the rest of this, but I just gotta complain about something that requires specifics. Something that is truly insane in this story, and that I see a lot in comics, is how quickly superheroes forgive murderers who are now on their side. It's revealed in this book that Cassandra Cain, while still working on behalf of the villain Mother, murdered Harper Row's mom. She wasn't under hypnosis or mind control or anything. She was brainwashed in a way, I guess, but still perfectly aware of her actions. She fully murdered Harper's beloved mother. And yet, Harper forgives her for it, like, pronto. Because they're on the same team now, and Harper's like "I know you're not that person anymore." WHAT. SHE KILLED YOUR MOM. YOU'VE KNOWN HER FOR A WEEK. Even if I found out my best friend killed my mom years ago, I'm pretty sure I'd at least be like "Sorry, man, I don't think I can hang out with you for a few years. Gotta, y'know, PROCESS THE FACT THAT YOU KILLED MY MOM." Everyone in this story is a psychopath. So there, that's it. This is yet another skippable late-stage New 52 entry from Scott Snyder and company. Oh well.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Logan

    Okay. So this is the second volume of this series, and continues the whole Mother Story arc. I quite liked the first volume, but this one was okay. The ending I think was quite satisfying(is it the end? it send end on the last page?), my main gripe however is that this could have been cut down in issues and it would have been more cohesive. We also get to learn more about Mother, her intentions and back story; it made her interesting, but in the end if they had a classic batman villain, it would Okay. So this is the second volume of this series, and continues the whole Mother Story arc. I quite liked the first volume, but this one was okay. The ending I think was quite satisfying(is it the end? it send end on the last page?), my main gripe however is that this could have been cut down in issues and it would have been more cohesive. We also get to learn more about Mother, her intentions and back story; it made her interesting, but in the end if they had a classic batman villain, it would have been more exciting. In the end, it had a satisfying finish, but the overall story could have been better.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Quentin Wallace

    I just couldn't quite get into this. I don't know if it just didn't seem plausible or I just couldn't get over what felt like retconning, but this never did click with me. It wasn't really a bad read if you can put aside everything you know about Batman history and take things at face value (which is probably how this was meant to be read.) I also felt like I was step behind with what was going on and never could quite catch up. Overall not really bad, just not so much for me. I just couldn't quite get into this. I don't know if it just didn't seem plausible or I just couldn't get over what felt like retconning, but this never did click with me. It wasn't really a bad read if you can put aside everything you know about Batman history and take things at face value (which is probably how this was meant to be read.) I also felt like I was step behind with what was going on and never could quite catch up. Overall not really bad, just not so much for me.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Very mixed feelings on this. In the beginning, I had a very hard time continuing to read it. Here was yet another story where Bruce is just this terrible mentor that has all these secrets, one of which just seems even too far over the line for him. Things come into light though and the book brings in some new themes. It really isn't about Bruce, it's about all of the Robin's and exactly why Batman chose to raise and train them. It's also about the "next generation" of the Bat team, namely Spoiler Very mixed feelings on this. In the beginning, I had a very hard time continuing to read it. Here was yet another story where Bruce is just this terrible mentor that has all these secrets, one of which just seems even too far over the line for him. Things come into light though and the book brings in some new themes. It really isn't about Bruce, it's about all of the Robin's and exactly why Batman chose to raise and train them. It's also about the "next generation" of the Bat team, namely Spoiler, Blue Bird, Azrael and Cassandra Cain, redefining their origins and relationships to each other. In addition, the serious themes include: just what exactly does trauma do to young children and choosing your own path to be who you are, despite your past. All of this stuff I found interesting, adding another layer to the idea of sidekicks/partners, but all of it is wrapped in very cliche trappings. All the steps they have to take to stop the villains grand plan, the tough motivational orders about doing whatever it takes, and the last uplifting speech on just why they are heroes, all serve to complete the formulaic story but also dull the serious points the writers were trying to make. Mixed feelings.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Beckiezra

    Maybe only a 3 but I was feeling generous because of all the bat characters I got in one place even if maybe it wasn’t the greatest quality. On the one hand I appreciate that the two volumes told a single complete story, but on the other hand I’m sure that it had no impact on the rest of the DC world which makes it a little pointless. Still, it was a decent enough story told in 26 issues and compiled in two volumes that didn’t require any outside reading beyond having a basic understanding of al Maybe only a 3 but I was feeling generous because of all the bat characters I got in one place even if maybe it wasn’t the greatest quality. On the one hand I appreciate that the two volumes told a single complete story, but on the other hand I’m sure that it had no impact on the rest of the DC world which makes it a little pointless. Still, it was a decent enough story told in 26 issues and compiled in two volumes that didn’t require any outside reading beyond having a basic understanding of all the characters and their current situations in the main comics. The DC world has a real problem with people murdering parents and also with training kids to be assassins. An unrealistically big problem based on how many parents were gunned down to make all these children for Mother, plus there are all the girls at British assassin school and there are the batkids and, not really mentioned here, the whole court of owls thing with wanting Dick Grayson to be their talon. He was one incredibly popular orphan, though I guess Mother didn’t actually have any interest in training him, just replacing him. It was nice having all the Robins together, or at least in communication, and I’m never unhappy to see Dick being a leader. I’m still not a fan of Harper, mostly because I found her unnecessary in the main comics and held that against her here, but her story wasn’t terrible to read even if I think she’s a bad mix of Jason and Tim.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Trish Isiderio

    What can I say about this mess? I can't...I just cannot. This was bad. Really bad. Not Cassandra Cain, or Damian's tender moment with Bruce, or the girl hug between Steph, Harper and Cass, or even the awesome bat allies cameos could save this. This was just a disaster and a poor entry to the batfamily lore. What can I say about this mess? I can't...I just cannot. This was bad. Really bad. Not Cassandra Cain, or Damian's tender moment with Bruce, or the girl hug between Steph, Harper and Cass, or even the awesome bat allies cameos could save this. This was just a disaster and a poor entry to the batfamily lore.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Cree

    Nightwing is still ultimate, in my opinion. Although I enjoyed the story and the parallel between Batman and Mother, I thought the story went on just a tad bit too long. Ultimately, the ending scenes were definitely on point.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Peter Krol

    Very well done. This felt more like watching a movie than any other comic I've read. Very well done. This felt more like watching a movie than any other comic I've read.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Get X Serious

    You know what's confusing? How Bruce Wayne and EVERY. SINGLE. ROBIN. look exactly the fucking same. Like younger and slimmer versions of themselves. Seriously, what the fuck? Can we retcon some appearances? Please?! For the love of god, it's so hard to tell them apart. Yeah, Tim Drake is a little skinnier than the others, big fucking deal. His hair and face still screams mini-Bruce Wayne to me. So, I know some people might not be into it, but I love these 14 issue paperbacks. It's nice to know th You know what's confusing? How Bruce Wayne and EVERY. SINGLE. ROBIN. look exactly the fucking same. Like younger and slimmer versions of themselves. Seriously, what the fuck? Can we retcon some appearances? Please?! For the love of god, it's so hard to tell them apart. Yeah, Tim Drake is a little skinnier than the others, big fucking deal. His hair and face still screams mini-Bruce Wayne to me. So, I know some people might not be into it, but I love these 14 issue paperbacks. It's nice to know that I'll get at least a solid couple hours of reading in, rather than burning through a 5 issue TBP in 40 minutes. The Batman Eternal (and B&R Eternal) books have about the same amount of story as a movie. It's like reading a new Christopher Nolan movie every time, albeit with a more compelling story thanks to Tim Seeley and Scott Snyder. Also similar to Batman Eternal was the dramatic, high-as-fuck stakes conclusion. With literally the entire world under attack and the Batfam (including Damian, knew he would show up, disappointed with how little role he plays) plus a few extras like Midnighter (whom Cullen Row refers to as a gay Batman, ha) sweeping in to save the day. With your powers combined, we are... BATFAM. The deeper theme of this series is one of choice. Did Batman use tragedy to shape the Robins in the same fashion that trauma shaped him? Or did they choose this path of their own free will? Oppression is literally the absence of choice, and our villain, Mother, is guilty of this in the extreme. She's gone to extreme measures to induce trauma in children and manipulate them into becoming soldiers of a "higher order". Batman sees the similarities in how he, himself, and the Robins have also been shaped by trauma, and it bothers him more than a little bit, even choosing to distance himself lest he unconsciously influence them... but even doing that is making a choice without their consent. In this story, Batman is entirely absent, and our protagonists have to make hard decisions about how to deal with new revelations about themselves and the people they're fighting alongside. Will they let violence and revenge dictate their actions, or will they rise above the tragedy in their own lives to become something better? Something that they can't be made to be, but rather, have to choose for themselves... A HERO. Was that sufficiently melodramatic? /end corny review

  18. 4 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    [Read as single issues - this review covers both volumes] Batman and Robin Eternal comes hot on the heels of the hugely successful (and very enjoyable) Batman Eternal. At half the size (only 26 issues compared to Eternal's 52), this one is a lot tighter and focuses a lot more on the characters involved. The idea of this story is to look at the legacy of Robin, and how each of the different Robins has affected Batman. In a time where Batman himself is out of action (currently 'dead' at the hands o [Read as single issues - this review covers both volumes] Batman and Robin Eternal comes hot on the heels of the hugely successful (and very enjoyable) Batman Eternal. At half the size (only 26 issues compared to Eternal's 52), this one is a lot tighter and focuses a lot more on the characters involved. The idea of this story is to look at the legacy of Robin, and how each of the different Robins has affected Batman. In a time where Batman himself is out of action (currently 'dead' at the hands of the Joker), Dick Grayson, Jason Todd, Tim Drake, and Damian Wayne have to step up to defeat Mother, a human trafficker who specializes in brainwashed children. Also in on the action are Stephanie Brown and, making their New 52 first appearances, Cassandra Cain and Azrael. With only half as many issues, the pacing of this book is quite quick. We still get the smaller mini-arcs as in Eternal, but there are fewer of these and the action bounces around quite quickly. There aren't any lull issues or 'picking up the pieces before something else happens' issues like Eternal, and the character work is a lot more focused. The artwork, despite having a lot of different artists involved, is fairly consistent overall, as is the writing. Some writers stick out more than others, such as series leader James Tynion IV, whilst Genevieve Valentine and Tim Seeley also turn in some of the better issues. Batman and Robin Eternal is a worthy follow-up to Batman Eternal, and a story that could only be told at this point in time. With no Batman around, all the Robins have to prove just why they were given their title in the first place, and unravel the mystery of Mother at the same time. [Also for fans of the Grayson series, there are quite a few big developments involving Spyral that are worth checking out here]

  19. 5 out of 5

    Hailee

    My biggest criticism for both Batman Eternal arcs is that they are dragged out for so long. This one could have been reduced by ten comics, and it would have tightened the storyline into something much more cohesive. That doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the story; I just got a little bored in some subplots (the Dumas stuff, some of the angsty backstory, and the whole "who works for Mother?" debate). I LOVED seeing my Batfam together again, especially the ladies. One of my big complaints of the Batma My biggest criticism for both Batman Eternal arcs is that they are dragged out for so long. This one could have been reduced by ten comics, and it would have tightened the storyline into something much more cohesive. That doesn't mean I didn't enjoy the story; I just got a little bored in some subplots (the Dumas stuff, some of the angsty backstory, and the whole "who works for Mother?" debate). I LOVED seeing my Batfam together again, especially the ladies. One of my big complaints of the Batman titles post New 52 is the lack of the female bat-characters (Stephanie and Cassandra mostly). I loved how they had a major role in this. Harper is teased out more, and her friendship with Cassandra is everything I wanted. I hope they continue this in other titles and don't let it disappear. Having all the Robins together again was also a huge highlight. I love having all the boys in a comic together. They play off each other so well here. One of my favorite scenes is towards the end when Damian explains what the role of Robin means to Batman and how he envisioned each Robin filling that role. SO SPOT ON. There's this huge misconception of how Batman brings sidekicks under his wing and doesn't give a damn about them, and I really appreciated how Snyder took the time to refute that again. Mother is a creepy addition to the cast of villains. She becomes a little washed out the longer the story drags on. However, she was an engaging antagonist, and I wouldn't be against seeing her cross paths with Batman again. The big twist was a little predictable, and the last two issues could have been cut down and combined into one. I still enjoyed the story, if not purely because all of my favorite characters were heavily featured and so well done.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adam Fisher

    Not 1000% sure on how I feel about this title. The art is sometimes good, sometimes 'eh. Batman is almost non-existent in this Volume, but the Robins and Bat-ladies shine bright here. Harper (Bluebird) and Cassandra Cain have much of the storyline, but it was kind of predictable. The banter between the boys can be quite hilarious at times, and the fights are obviously epic in nature. Mother is set as an excellent villain, but feels underdeveloped. I really missed having a standard Bat-villain, an Not 1000% sure on how I feel about this title. The art is sometimes good, sometimes 'eh. Batman is almost non-existent in this Volume, but the Robins and Bat-ladies shine bright here. Harper (Bluebird) and Cassandra Cain have much of the storyline, but it was kind of predictable. The banter between the boys can be quite hilarious at times, and the fights are obviously epic in nature. Mother is set as an excellent villain, but feels underdeveloped. I really missed having a standard Bat-villain, and think that would have added much to the tale. Overall, this wasn't a horrible title, as it added to the depth of the Bat-family and their interactions, but could have been tighter story. Recommend. (When don't I recommend something Batman related? LOL)

  21. 5 out of 5

    Richard Rosenthal

    The title should be Bat Family Eternal as this volume has a lot more Harper, Stephanie and Cassandra than Dick, Tim, Jason and Damian. Also Bunny Ears Batman aka Jim Gordon is absent. I enjoyed this series. The whole first volume set up the mystery that was solved in this volume. There is a lot of action and a lot of Bat Family cameos. After this one could easily start a new comic that would be a teen titan birds of pray so to speak with Blue Bird, The Spolier, and Cassandra Cain doing the dirty The title should be Bat Family Eternal as this volume has a lot more Harper, Stephanie and Cassandra than Dick, Tim, Jason and Damian. Also Bunny Ears Batman aka Jim Gordon is absent. I enjoyed this series. The whole first volume set up the mystery that was solved in this volume. There is a lot of action and a lot of Bat Family cameos. After this one could easily start a new comic that would be a teen titan birds of pray so to speak with Blue Bird, The Spolier, and Cassandra Cain doing the dirty work while Cullen is there oracle back at the base.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Robert

    Too drawn-out and stupid to finish. I skimmed the last half. It seemed to just keep spinning its wheels, killing time to pad out the volume. Instead of using the length they were provided to engage in some good character development or to have a well-paced long story, it's just a series of dumb, action-packed issues that go nowhere. Mother is a terrible villain. Orphan is even worse. Too drawn-out and stupid to finish. I skimmed the last half. It seemed to just keep spinning its wheels, killing time to pad out the volume. Instead of using the length they were provided to engage in some good character development or to have a well-paced long story, it's just a series of dumb, action-packed issues that go nowhere. Mother is a terrible villain. Orphan is even worse.

  23. 4 out of 5

    connie

    4/5 stars Pfft Jason just made a MAHOOSIVE mistake. I am really enjoying this series so far, especially considering it's the first time I've read a DC series that isn't Joker/Harley Quinn related. 4/5 stars Pfft Jason just made a MAHOOSIVE mistake. I am really enjoying this series so far, especially considering it's the first time I've read a DC series that isn't Joker/Harley Quinn related.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tomas

    I stopped reading this on issue #20 because I started to read Blackest Night epic. I returned to issue #21 to continue and I found out that I do not care about this story anymore. It is just unnecessarily long and boring

  25. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Meh. Not as bad as the first one but not my favorite. Why is it called Batman & Robin when it's all Robins....and what's with the Eternal name never understood that..... and why us Red Robin named after a burger joint??? These questions will never be addressed, I hate comics!! Meh. Not as bad as the first one but not my favorite. Why is it called Batman & Robin when it's all Robins....and what's with the Eternal name never understood that..... and why us Red Robin named after a burger joint??? These questions will never be addressed, I hate comics!!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    A great end to a fantastically complex story. The art has several instances where it fails spectacularly (the faces on some characters are at times the stuff of nightmares), but it mostly works with the frenzied pace of the story.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Kelsey Kimbler

    I almost gave it 2 stars, but the ending redeemed a star. Steph was perfect. Bruce actually had a soul. Jay was wonderful. The Mother business I honestly didn't care about, but it was an okay comic. I almost gave it 2 stars, but the ending redeemed a star. Steph was perfect. Bruce actually had a soul. Jay was wonderful. The Mother business I honestly didn't care about, but it was an okay comic.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    Overlong plodding conclusion. Attempts to make it a broad story by mentioning in passing a dozen side-stories just made it feel even more abbreviated and under-planned.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Bethany

    Three and a half stars. I actually liked this better than the first volume. This was partially because the whole "Did Batman do a horrible thing that's totally against everything he stands for?" plot point wasn't dragged out much longer. (Spoilers: No, of course, he didn't.) But the other element I appreciated was the character interactions. Vol. 1 had a lot of fun character moments, but sometimes the characters felt less like themselves than the reductive fandom versions of themselves (*cough* T Three and a half stars. I actually liked this better than the first volume. This was partially because the whole "Did Batman do a horrible thing that's totally against everything he stands for?" plot point wasn't dragged out much longer. (Spoilers: No, of course, he didn't.) But the other element I appreciated was the character interactions. Vol. 1 had a lot of fun character moments, but sometimes the characters felt less like themselves than the reductive fandom versions of themselves (*cough* Tim *cough*). Not all the characterizations feel quite right here, but they feel a bit more natural. Perhaps because more of this book is spent in action, so the characters get to play off each other while making use of their skill sets. The art is a mixed-bag for me. Nothing I hate, but the changes between character designs from issue to issue is a jarring. (And several times I was thinking, "Why does Damian have so much forehead? That is not a natural amount of forehead. For anyone.") Also, one of the cardinal (but extremely common) sins of action comics is for the action to be unclear. At one point, Dick throws something at Azrael. I think it might have been the handle bar of a destroyed snowmobile, but I couldn't swear by that. Azrael catches it. Jump ahead to several scenes later: Azrael throws this now forgotten something at Dick, and Dick catches it. Then Azrael takes a swipe at Dick with his giant flaming sword, which slices through the something and sets the broken ends smoldering. Dick then uses these smoldering ends to break Azrael's sword? How does that even work? Why does that work? Do the the writers/artists know that's not what "fighting fire with fire" means? (Wait, I retract that. Does the writer know that's exactly the sort of dumb pun Dick would have said in this kind of situation?) Is that even what actually happened or am I reading those panels wrong? This is very much a Bat-fam book. How much you like this volume may depend on how much you love the idea of a sprawling extended Bat-family vs. the grim, loner Batman. I feel like that ship has already sailed--way back in 1940--so I tend to take new Bat-apprentices with a shrug. I'm only concerned if it seems like DC is going to kill of one of my favorites in order to make room for the new kid. My thoughts on the Bat-fam can be summarized as A) Batman's story is as much about family as it is about justice/revenge, and without that his arc is incomplete and B) if you buy into the "Batman is an idea, not a man" theory then some version of the Bat-fam is a necessity. Everything Else I Liked/Disliked: The Mother storyline is okay. I don't think Mother is quite as interesting a villain as she could be (and I have a soft spot for evil maternal figures), but the contrasts between her philosophy and Batman's added another layer of tension. And the way their seeming similarities played on Bruce's fears helped explain at least of some of the "Why don't you just talk to your kids, Bruce?" issues from the first volume. (Pet peeve: A major plot conflict that could have been resolved if characters had *one* honest 15-minute conversation.) I thought it worked particularly well for Damian to be the one to point out the flaws in the other Bat-kids' thinking about Bruce. (And it played into the ways that Damian, as the youngest child, may be dealing with more a practiced parental Bruce--who is a little better at coming out and saying what he means.) I am just so happy to have Stephanie Brown again. And I love Dr. Crane trying to get inside her head and Stephanie saying, "You thought you'd. . .what? Creep on my insecurities until I did what you wanted? You think that makes you a genius and not just half the guys in town?" (Checking the script credits, and yep, there's a female writer. You rock, Genevieve Valentine, and not just for that line.) I didn't keep up with all of Cassandra Cain's pre-New52 backstory, but I'm not sure I like this as well. I'm glad have her back. But it doesn't seem like Cassandra's abilities to read other people's body language are as clear/awesome as they were originally. Also, David Cain working for Mother makes him feel like a smaller player. And I really don't get Cassandra taking on the name Orphan at the end. ("My horrible father used this name to kills hundreds, if not thousands of innocents, and wanted me to do the same, so as a symbol of my rejection of that life. . .I'm going to use the name he fought under?" What?) I know not everyone loves Harper Row (mostly because she draws attention away from characters who have only just been reintroduced), but I've really enjoyed her. I don't know if I'm content with her ending, but I suspect we might see her again later.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ben Truong

    Batman & Robin: Eternal, Volume 2 picks up where the previous trade paperback left off, collecting the last fourteen issues (13–26) of the 2015 on-going maxi-series. Mother is revealed not to be only a human trafficker that specializes in children, but she deals in custom-created humans, taking children who've lived through unspeakable tragedies and turning them into weapons or worse. Batman couldn't stop her, what happened instead became his greatest shame and secret. While in Prague, Cassandra C Batman & Robin: Eternal, Volume 2 picks up where the previous trade paperback left off, collecting the last fourteen issues (13–26) of the 2015 on-going maxi-series. Mother is revealed not to be only a human trafficker that specializes in children, but she deals in custom-created humans, taking children who've lived through unspeakable tragedies and turning them into weapons or worse. Batman couldn't stop her, what happened instead became his greatest shame and secret. While in Prague, Cassandra Cain had a panic attack and flees from Dick Grayson as Agent 37 and Harper Row as Bluebird. They head off to find her and to save her from her assassin father, David Cain as the Orphan. While on their mission they discover that the person Mother chosen to become Batman's perfect Robin was Harper Row. It was determined for Cassandra Cain to kill Harper Row's parents and brother, so Mother could train her to be the perfect Robin for Batman. However, Cassandra Cain only got the job half done, because she only managed to kill off Harper Row's mother – Miranda Row. Meanwhile, Jason Todd as Red Hood and Tim Drake as Red Robin are in Santa Prisca in order to extract the secret of Mother's newest weapon from the Order of St. Dumas and its avenger – Azrael, who happens to be one of Mother's children that she loaned out the Order. They discovered that Mother plans to use Spyral-like technology to control children to kill their parents and then join a New Order that Mother lead and brainwash these children to become soldiers as dedicated as Batman. Together the Robins formulate a plan to outwit Mother with the help of Dick Grayson's Spyral colleagues and Midnighter. Apparently, Mother plans to use twelve of the tallest buildings and radio towers on the planet to send out the signals to brainwash these children. Dick Grayson plans to send an emissary to each station, have them destroy the transmitters, and then used Scarecrow's Trauma Toxin – the one he made for Mother when Dick Grayson was Robin, to break their revere. Using Midnighter technology Dick Grayson sent his operatives into the following field: Bologna (Helena Bertinelli), Dubai (Katherine Kane), Gotham City (James Gordon (Batman) and Duke Thomas (Robin)), Kuala Lumpur (Katana), London (Damian Wayne), Mexico City (Dinah Lance), Moscow (Tim Drake), Paris (Barbara Gordon), Shanghai (Talon), Sydney (Selina Kyle), Toronto (Jason Todd), and Tokyo (Stephanie Brown), while he heads straight to the beast – Mother's headquarters in the Arctic Circle to save Harper Row and Cassandra Cain. The epilogue has Batman with his memories back and visits Harper Row who is given up the vigilante life for the moment to continue her education, but she promises to be back. Meanwhile, Cassandra Cain takes up the mantle of Orphan – her father's mantle and to use it for good. As for the rest of the Robins they with Batman go off into the sunset going on patrol together. It is difficult to rate this trade paperback, particular there are many writers and pencilers to keep them straight. However for the most part, I really enjoyed the overall story, it shows the importance of being a Robin and that Mother had gotten things backward – Batman doesn't create other Batmen, which seemingly failed – he makes Robins so they could get over the pain and not be defined by them – to be better than him. Artistically, it flowed rather well, one could say that the editors choose wisely by making sure that the pencilers used has similar penciling styles so visually it flowed rather well. Of course, there are some pencilers that I favored over others, but for the most part I like most of the penciling styles that this volume has to offer. All in all, Batman and Robin: Eternal, Volume 2 was wonderfully constructed and illustrated conclusion to a maxi-series.

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