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A hero, a person who displays great courage for the greater good, can also fall. But what happens to a fallen hero? A Thousand Unspoken Words is the unique journey of a hero who falls. The champion of the underdogs, the writer who uses the nom de plume Musafir is famous in Kolkata. His incisive criticism of the injustices around him earn him many enemies but he holds his i A hero, a person who displays great courage for the greater good, can also fall. But what happens to a fallen hero? A Thousand Unspoken Words is the unique journey of a hero who falls. The champion of the underdogs, the writer who uses the nom de plume Musafir is famous in Kolkata. His incisive criticism of the injustices around him earn him many enemies but he holds his ideals above all else. Scathing attacks at his books and a night of hide and seek from political goons leads Musafir unto a path he never liked, faraway from his ideals. He runs away and chooses the comforts of money over the travails of following one’s ideals. The hero falls. But Tilottama, passionate fan’s hopes don’t. When he comes back after many years, emotions, love and lust take charge and an affair brews. Will she bring back her hero? Will he rise again? Or will the thousand untold words, the many stories of the ideal writer be lost forever?


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A hero, a person who displays great courage for the greater good, can also fall. But what happens to a fallen hero? A Thousand Unspoken Words is the unique journey of a hero who falls. The champion of the underdogs, the writer who uses the nom de plume Musafir is famous in Kolkata. His incisive criticism of the injustices around him earn him many enemies but he holds his i A hero, a person who displays great courage for the greater good, can also fall. But what happens to a fallen hero? A Thousand Unspoken Words is the unique journey of a hero who falls. The champion of the underdogs, the writer who uses the nom de plume Musafir is famous in Kolkata. His incisive criticism of the injustices around him earn him many enemies but he holds his ideals above all else. Scathing attacks at his books and a night of hide and seek from political goons leads Musafir unto a path he never liked, faraway from his ideals. He runs away and chooses the comforts of money over the travails of following one’s ideals. The hero falls. But Tilottama, passionate fan’s hopes don’t. When he comes back after many years, emotions, love and lust take charge and an affair brews. Will she bring back her hero? Will he rise again? Or will the thousand untold words, the many stories of the ideal writer be lost forever?

30 review for A Thousand Unspoken Words: Love story of a fallen hero

  1. 4 out of 5

    Namitha Varma

    When a novel is categorised as ‘Romance’, I tend to view it more as a feel-good, chick-lit story with high predictability of storyline. Since that is not the kind of works I like to read, it takes a lot of motivation for me to pick it up. Paulami Dutta Gupta had sent me an e-copy of A Thousand Unspoken Words a few months ago in return for an honest review, and because of my prejudice against romance novels, I kept off the reading for so long.   But once I started reading, I realised that this was When a novel is categorised as ‘Romance’, I tend to view it more as a feel-good, chick-lit story with high predictability of storyline. Since that is not the kind of works I like to read, it takes a lot of motivation for me to pick it up. Paulami Dutta Gupta had sent me an e-copy of A Thousand Unspoken Words a few months ago in return for an honest review, and because of my prejudice against romance novels, I kept off the reading for so long.   But once I started reading, I realised that this was not your average mushy romance. A Thousand Unspoken Words is literary fiction, if I HAD TO label it, but otherwise I’d just leave it at being a very good story, well-told. This story doesn’t have heroes and heroines. Riddhimaan and Tilottama’s love story is not a story of battles with family or society, but it’s a story of battling with one’s own demons. In this story, Riddhimaan is not a prince charming and Tilottama is not a damsel in distress. If anything, this love story is as close to reality as one can get without being melodramatic about romance. Riddhimaan is an idealist who turns into a materialist after a terrifying brush with harsh reality. Tilottama is an idealist who is in love with the idealist/Leftist writer Musafir, the pseudonym taken by Riddhimaan. When Tama and Riddhi meet after Musafir/Riddhi has transformed into the materialist, there are sparks of attraction, but a lack of conviction too. Tama finds it difficult to come to terms with the changed ideologies of Riddhi, and the writer is not able to reconcile the differences in the personalities of Musafir and Riddhimaan. Both have to deal with their demons before they can take their paths forward together.   The writing is simple despite the underlying debate between idealism and realism. A Thousand Unspoken Words is not just a love story but a subtle critique on the social and political systems. Dutta Gupta doesn’t merely tell you a story — there are layers in the story that bring out important points such as the tyrannies of capitalism towards the poor, management of an NGO, coping with mental illnesses, dealing with one’s demons, being non-judgemental….   The victory of A Thousand Unspoken Words is that Riddhimaan is not a hero and Tilottama is not a heroine. They are normal people to whom things happen. The question is whether you can deal with it or not. And in that sense too, neither of them are noble and sacrificing and epitomes of anything. They deal with things, make mistakes, try to correct themselves, and learn with every step. Their story is backed by supportive characters like Riddhi’s mother Krishnakoli, his sister-in-law Mimi and Tama’s father Shoumo Sen.   The characterisation in the novel is really well done — well-rounded. Tilottama is stuck with ideals of younger years, self-righteous, judgmental and doesn’t easily let her hair down. Riddhimaan is fun-loving, stubborn, slightly egocentric, and constantly confused over the rift created within his identity through Musafir. Shoumo Sen is living in the past, crying over the spilt milk of his estate in Darjeeling, but supportive of his daughter and trying hard to move on. Krishnakoli loves her son and wants him to be happy, while being a mother to almost everyone else too. Every little character presented to the reader comes with a personality, and not as two-dimensional pictures.   What could have added a little bit more substance to the book is a stronger reason or trajectory of Musafir/Riddhi’s transformation from the idealist to materialist. I somehow found it difficult to believe that just being attacked and hounded by people who hated his writings could have changed him so drastically.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Rhiti

    As I went through the first few lines of the book I was pulled into a world full of classic romance. The ups and downs, the heartbreaks, the reconciliation, the desire, the passion everything is brimming with Tilottama and Musafir’s turbulent love. Paulami’s writing has a unique cinematic quality; it seems that you are watching a movie in your mind. Her narration is beautiful, though not flawless. But the slight imperfections make the story more real. A custom made plastic romance where everythin As I went through the first few lines of the book I was pulled into a world full of classic romance. The ups and downs, the heartbreaks, the reconciliation, the desire, the passion everything is brimming with Tilottama and Musafir’s turbulent love. Paulami’s writing has a unique cinematic quality; it seems that you are watching a movie in your mind. Her narration is beautiful, though not flawless. But the slight imperfections make the story more real. A custom made plastic romance where everything falls in place seems too good to be true. Whereas here in this saga everything is lifelike, it is real. Paulami like a possessive mother cradles this baby of hers throughout, the entire book has her touch, the presence of her voice is confident and strong, so strong that in certain intense portions I half-expected Paulami to emerge from somewhere to hug me and tell me, all will be well. The story shifts from Kolkata to Shantiniketan to Darjeeling, all the settings are aptly used to give the backdrop of the story a classic feel. The spine of the story is the tumultuous relationship of Tilottama, a fiery beautiful young woman and Musafir, an elusive writer, who is moody, brooding and unhappy with his life. The enigmatic portrayal of their love keeps you guessing, will they ever be together? The characters are really well drawn out; the story line is pretty linear without too many complicated subplots. The inner conflict of Musafir is shown brilliantly. The unlikely bond between two women of two different ages, Tilottama and Krishnakoli, is narrated with earnest affection by the author. This book is like the ocean, calm and deep, yet stormy and rough at parts. It is not your usual chik-lit, you will be disappointed if you are looking for a quick escape through a tailor made romance. This book deserves your time, your thought, it deserves a commitment from your mind to think. The book leaves you with a lingering feeling of a blissful solitude. So many questions remained unanswered, but yet a sense of fulfilment remained in the soul. As a reader I have a gut feeling that this book will surely be in the bestsellers list.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Ruchi Singh

    Don’t we all love to have a ‘hero’ in our life? But isn’t expecting a mere mortal to exhibit exemplary qualities endlessly without any slack a bit too much? The novel beautifully presents this very aspect of humanity - the story of a fallen hero, who is also a human being. ‘A Thousand Unspoken Words’ explores the complex minds of a highly talented writer and his biggest admirer, who also becomes his nemesis. The novel also brings forth the issue which plagues humans the most—inability to accept t Don’t we all love to have a ‘hero’ in our life? But isn’t expecting a mere mortal to exhibit exemplary qualities endlessly without any slack a bit too much? The novel beautifully presents this very aspect of humanity - the story of a fallen hero, who is also a human being. ‘A Thousand Unspoken Words’ explores the complex minds of a highly talented writer and his biggest admirer, who also becomes his nemesis. The novel also brings forth the issue which plagues humans the most—inability to accept the realities of life. For the protagonist Tilottama ‘Musafir’, the anonymous writer is a hero, who is fighting for the rights of the oppressed and innocent people. On a rainy night in Calcutta she meets a man running for his life and provides much needed sanctuary to him. Later she comes to know that he was the one whom she had put on her heart’s pedestal. Musafir had to pay dearly for the crusade he had started with the might of his pen. His printing press is destroyed, he had to flee from his hometown and his father dies. Fearing for his life, he was not even allowed to come for his father’s last rites by his mother. The pressures and practicality of life forces him to become something else, and he falls in Tilottama’s eyes. ‘A Thousand Unspoken Words’ is the story of their struggles, love, expectations, and acceptance. The author has expertly dealt with the imperfections or natural human failings of both the protagonists. The characterization is near perfect and the end is beautiful. The story lingers in the mind and forces one to acknowledge that even heroes are humans and we should make peace with their weaknesses. Highly recommended read.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Anirban Nanda

    Last night, the clock was ticking 3 AM and I was reading the last few lines of this book. I was so emotionally exhausted that no matter how much I wanted to write a review of this right then, I had to go to bed. Yes, it was that emotional. Getting into technicalities, let me introduce the backdrop of this novel. In the year of 2007-08 Communist Party, the then ruling party of Bengal gave out a huge chunk of land in Singur to TATA for NANO car manufacturing. But the farmers were not given a proper Last night, the clock was ticking 3 AM and I was reading the last few lines of this book. I was so emotionally exhausted that no matter how much I wanted to write a review of this right then, I had to go to bed. Yes, it was that emotional. Getting into technicalities, let me introduce the backdrop of this novel. In the year of 2007-08 Communist Party, the then ruling party of Bengal gave out a huge chunk of land in Singur to TATA for NANO car manufacturing. But the farmers were not given a proper compensation and they were asked to leave their fertile lands. Taking this opportunity, Mamata Banerjee, now C.M. of Bengal started voicing against the ruling party. Mind you, Communist Party was in power in Bengal for 35 years, yes they had remained undefeated for 35 years. After Singur, similar land acquisition issue had arisen in Nandigram (very near to my mother's home) and in midst of huge turmoil, one day, 14 villagers were killed due to ruthless shooting and tear gas throwing by Police. The term 'Poriborton' (change in political power) was trending in Bengal and the then government tried every way possible to stay in power. This was reflected in a sentence that otherwise may seem simply literary (but it's not). Angry flags reddened the sky. Communist party's flag is pure red in color. In this novel, the principal character Musafir had written poems against the ruling party and faced dire consequences. As one may expect, this is not a social drama but absolutely a romance. The characterization, the dialogues are natural and contextual. I agree, Vishwakarma Puja is round the corner but couldn't they wait for the rains to stop? And these security guards are of little use. Just about anyone comes in these days. And of course what better target than the first floor flat. The author has used these scenes and dialogues to describe her flat, her situation etc. Like in above, the fact of her living in first floor has come out naturally, without seeming the author is trying too hard to describe everything. These are reasons why I like this book and the way it keeps its grip through out the novel. Saying all this, I want to point to a teeny-weeny thing that I wish the writer had written. As I have not read any novel written with an important background such as this, I wish the author had written more about those times (the times when Musafir was away from home). That wouldn't make this any less a romance novel. This is essentially a love story between a writer and a reader which presents itself with fresh viewpoints about relationships. I absolutely love the ending. Overall, this is a must read book for any romance lover who wants to read something based on serious Indian backdrop and a very very unique situation that torments lovely relations.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Ophelia West

    A Thousand Unspoken Words Paulami Duttagupta This marvel of a book came to me on the recommendation of a colleague whose opinion I esteem highly, hence, I began my journey with marked anticipation. The writer's storytelling aptitude and the progressive development of the characters hooked me in with a voracious hold and I completed the book in one sitting. The adventure is composed of an excellent mix of the primary genres, romance and suspense, with an unmistakeable subset in wit. As the story em A Thousand Unspoken Words Paulami Duttagupta This marvel of a book came to me on the recommendation of a colleague whose opinion I esteem highly, hence, I began my journey with marked anticipation. The writer's storytelling aptitude and the progressive development of the characters hooked me in with a voracious hold and I completed the book in one sitting. The adventure is composed of an excellent mix of the primary genres, romance and suspense, with an unmistakeable subset in wit. As the story embarks, we meet a enrapturing young couple, Tilottama and Musafir, incandescently thrown together in a series of unexpected and intriguing circumstances. Musafir is mysterious and complex as well as cynical and emotionally unavailable. His world is spiraling and whether he knows it or not he needs a centrifugal force. Tilottama has the exponential capacity to embody that needed force and fulfill the desires that her romantic longings evoke when she is in the presence of this elusive man. This is the premise upon which this whirlwind story begins and it sustains its ability to compel the reader quickly to the next chapter with all of its twists and turns and as the characters begin to develop, the readers attachment forms. This book left me with a desire to immediately search out other works by this celebrated, noteworthy author. Her success on this effort is well deserved and the commendation she has received is most definitely earned. Ms. Duttagupta distinguishes herself amongst her contemporaies with this empathetic and skillfully guided novel. She will undoubtedly continue to amass praise and this novel will continue to become acclaimed. Ophelia E. West President, The Jones West Group, Inc.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Rahul Ahuja

    The first thing that came to my mind after finishing the book is the quote by Tyler Knott Gregson - “I would imagine there are days when Superman wakes up, glances at his cape, and wonders when someone will come save him.” A Thousand Unspoken Words by Paulami Dutta Gupta is a story or more precisely a journey of a fallen hero. The novel begins with the description of a popular Hindi classic song “Wahan kaun hai tera, Musafir jaayega kaha” and which according to me is so apt for the plot of the no The first thing that came to my mind after finishing the book is the quote by Tyler Knott Gregson - “I would imagine there are days when Superman wakes up, glances at his cape, and wonders when someone will come save him.” A Thousand Unspoken Words by Paulami Dutta Gupta is a story or more precisely a journey of a fallen hero. The novel begins with the description of a popular Hindi classic song “Wahan kaun hai tera, Musafir jaayega kaha” and which according to me is so apt for the plot of the novel. As the book progresses, one can feel the thrill and mystery unfolding with every turn of page revealing a sensitive story of love. The story basically revolves around Tilottama, a sensitive young woman and Riddhimaan, a writer who gets his books published under the pen name ‘Musafir’(Traveler). The dilemma of Tilottama for choosing either Musafir or Riddhimaan is described quite impressively. The loving bond between Tilottama and Krishnakoli, mother of Riddhimaan is portrayed beautifully. All the characters of the story are very well developed by the author. The author has wonderfully woven the tale amidst the backdrop of Kolkata, Darjeeling and Shantiniketan. The story telling makes you feel as if you are watching a classic romantic movie painted with shades of mystery and emotions. The story is quite capable of keeping the reader engrossed though somewhere I felt that the powerful symbol of ‘Musafir’(Traveler) could have been used more vigorously and poetically. But that doesn't take away the charm of the story at all as the author has been quite successful in knitting a free flowing story with apt characters.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Vinitha

    This is the second book of Paulami I am reading and I quite like her narrative style. I was intrigued by the title and the book made a good weekend read. The book tells the love story of Tilottama and Musafir aka Riddhimaan. The characters especially Tilottama and Musafir are extremely real and flawed. They are not the perfect characters some romances showcase. They have their own insecurities and issues. They rise and they fall. They stumble and seek living. I also loved how the other characters This is the second book of Paulami I am reading and I quite like her narrative style. I was intrigued by the title and the book made a good weekend read. The book tells the love story of Tilottama and Musafir aka Riddhimaan. The characters especially Tilottama and Musafir are extremely real and flawed. They are not the perfect characters some romances showcase. They have their own insecurities and issues. They rise and they fall. They stumble and seek living. I also loved how the other characters in the book were developed. Be it Tilottama's dad who lost his tea estates in Darjeeling or Krishnakoli, Riddhimaan's mother and Tilottama's mentor/boss they each carry a depth and a face that adds intrigue to the story. Set in Kolkata, the book does take one on a culinary and visual tour of the region making it a delight. The story has twists at the expected and some unexpected places making it a worthy read. I found the prologue to be a tad too long and in someways it took away from the experience for me. Also, the protagonists complex character and journey stumbled somewhere in-between and I lost the author's vision. I received a copy of this book from the author. All opinions are mine.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Deepti

    “Make change, be a part of change.” There is no perfect man or woman in this world, and thank God for that! Here is a book that, once again, brings out this fact, as many others have done earlier. 'A Thousand Unspoken Words' is a beautiful and apt title for a theme where the male and the female protagonists keep many vital thoughts to themselves, almost expecting the other to be able to read the mind. Tilottama is the spirited modern heroine, feisty, yet afraid to take a step towards love. She “Make change, be a part of change.” There is no perfect man or woman in this world, and thank God for that! Here is a book that, once again, brings out this fact, as many others have done earlier. 'A Thousand Unspoken Words' is a beautiful and apt title for a theme where the male and the female protagonists keep many vital thoughts to themselves, almost expecting the other to be able to read the mind. Tilottama is the spirited modern heroine, feisty, yet afraid to take a step towards love. She is in love with a shadow, Musafir, an idealistic writer who wants to change the world. “He gives me a reason to love, to feel each moment of life, to write.” She is level headed, but does have her moments of impulsiveness. When she runs into photo journalist, Riddhimaan, she is disillusioned with his frivolous attitude to life, despite the fact that it turns out that it is just a facade. "Somebody must have hurt him very badly. He has sad eyes that he hides behind his antics." Riddhimaan’s mother, Krishnakoli Banerjee, comes across as a strong woman, a character that one falls in love with, for her sense of humour and her solid support of Tilottama, who calls her 'Mashima'. In turn, the older lady refers to Tilottama as an Amazon, a warrior princess, which shines a light on the girl's nature. Krishnakoli and Riddhimaan share a beautiful bond. This makes the events that ensue all the more heartwrenching. Her banter with her son, her hope that he will marry Tilottama who is already like a daughter to her, and the fact that she herself has lost so much in life, makes her hope that her son will not throw his life away. The attraction between the two main characters is palpable. However, Tilottama’s heart belongs to Musafir, and Riddhimaan hates that, for he always finds himself wanting. He comes across as a tragic hero with dark alleys around him. Tilottama says at one stage, “I know this brings a rush of uneasy memories. But you have nothing to hide. You’ve worked hard to prove yourself. Why do you need to run?” Riddhi tells his mother, “She is beautiful, brave and intimidating. But she also reminds me of my past, something I sometimes want to forget. Tillottama and I will be a disaster.” Will events cast their shadows ahead? The best advice that Riddimaan gets is from Shoumo Sen, Tilottama's father. “Ridhimaan, if you ever feel something is plaguing you just look at the ideas and beliefs you so love and try and become friends with them again. And then watch how magically things work out.” The irony is that both Shoumo Sen and Riddhimaan have robbed Tilottama a chance to love in their own ways. This is a subtle point that comes across beautifully. The crux of the book comes across in a broken hearted Tilottama’s words. “He feels like… like I would always choose Musafir over Riddhimaan. In fact, I've always felt Riddhimaan is jealous of Musafir. He has always wanted me to discard Musafir." Will Tilottama be able to choose between the two? Is this a battle in her mind between the intellectual but slightly escapist Musafir, or the more practical Riddhimaan, who has seeds of instability in him? There is much reality in this book - the plight of the farmers and hawkers, protesters being killed indiscriminately, concrete spaces eating away the greenery, land acquisition issues and police firing, displaced people, the ban of the English language. Paulami has incorporated these issues without sounding preachy, which is a feat in itself. "If you are grains of sand, I will be the waves. Every time I come to you, you might push me away, but you would also mingle with me little by little until we both forget who the wave is and who the sand." It is lines like the above that reveal Paulami’s literary prowess. Both Tilottama and Riddhimaan are irrevocably in love with the City of Joy. Maybe why Paulami has written a love story in which the soul of her city, Kolkata, resides. Verdict: Highly readable

  9. 4 out of 5

    Rubina

    To do or not to do Is a dilemna in every girl's heart when she meets her soul mate. But here it is an entirely different story. To love the myth or the reality? One of the most complex characters I have read in the recent past. Ms. Duttagupta has created a man with many layers - a writer, a reformer, a struggler- disillusioned and lost; and above all, a lover. That is Musafir for you. Tilottama, is idealism personified. Her strength is her love for the writings of Musafir. Her strong belief in hi To do or not to do Is a dilemna in every girl's heart when she meets her soul mate. But here it is an entirely different story. To love the myth or the reality? One of the most complex characters I have read in the recent past. Ms. Duttagupta has created a man with many layers - a writer, a reformer, a struggler- disillusioned and lost; and above all, a lover. That is Musafir for you. Tilottama, is idealism personified. Her strength is her love for the writings of Musafir. Her strong belief in his writing is not held by Musafir himself. When he meets Tilottama for the first time, he is standing on the precipice of idealism and materialism. And when Tilottama lays her eyes on him for the first time she is already in love with Musafir. ​ Yes. I am. I love him. He gives me a reason to love, to feel each moment of life, to write. And if Musafir is a woman, I will still be in love,‟ she said with fierce passion. ​ But then, he is no longer only Musafir. But a man who has accepted his Doppelganger self -Riddhimaan. Riddhimaan or Musafir? There is no mystery in the fact that Riddhimaan and Musafir are one and the same. Yet the transition is profound. One might find Riddhimaan very practical and rude compared to the idealistic Musafir and just like Tilottama one might fall in love with Musafir. It will then hit you that he is nothing but an mirage. The more Tilottama runs towards him, the faster he merges into Riddhimaan. The more she craves for Musafir, the more he becomes the shadow of Riddhimaan. Tilottama feels cheated in love for she was not only in love with the man but also his ideals. Naive Idealism It is at this moment I found Tilottama's naivety belonging to the old world. In the same house lives another couple - Rajdeep and Mimi. Just perfect. A huge contrast to the imperfection of Tilottama and Riddhimaan. Which itself is strange for both of the brothers, Riddhimaan and Rajdeep are product of the same culture and environment but by creating this difference the author has cleverly woven why Riddhimaan became Musafir and vice versa. My favorite part of the story was when a pseudonym becomes a split personality. You could make out the hatred Riddhimaan has for Musafir. Riddhimaan sighed and looked for an answer. What was the problem with him? He had wanted people to read his works, he had wanted money, and to come back to Kolkata. And he had all of it now. Was he slipping into depression? Weakness clashes with idealism and the loss is suffered by everyone touching his life. And the person burned the most is none other than Tilottama. Growing up And it was then you see the transition in her. A girl child growing to become a woman. A girl child who has lost the mother figure in her life, has lost the love of her life to a world of insanity and who knows that she is the "key" who can bring her Riddhimaan back. The only question is - what will happen to her true love - Musafir? This novel is by no means an easy read. Not following the thread of boy meets girl and falls in love, this novel is more about the aftermath of falling in love. When you fall in love with a person and he changes, it is fine. But when you are bound together by idealism and belief - to let go of all that is one of the most difficult thing a girl can do. Moreover, Ridddhimaan is one of the most selfish characters I have read about. His self pity was maddening and his self loathing, to me, was degrading. Which makes him all the more realistic to the readers. I have read the other works of Paulami Duttagupta; and always found her language simple yet empowering. Politically inclined which I suspect is Ms. Duttagupta's poison or should I say passion? I also suspect that Tilottama's naive idealism is none other than a reflection of the author's thoughts which in this novel is very endearing. Check out my reason for rating @ http://www.tbcblogtours.com/tbc-blog/...

  10. 4 out of 5

    Esha Chakraborty

    A Thousand Unspoken Words is Paulami Dutta Gupta’s 4th novel. Published by Readomania, this 2015 novel, though essentially a love story, is also a poignant tale of courage, idealism, failure and redemption. Though I read the book a couple of months back this year, this is one review which I kept pushing, afraid that I might not be able to do full justice to its brilliance The book cover is a beautiful mustard with the half hidden face of the hero and the Hoogly Bridge in the background. I have a A Thousand Unspoken Words is Paulami Dutta Gupta’s 4th novel. Published by Readomania, this 2015 novel, though essentially a love story, is also a poignant tale of courage, idealism, failure and redemption. Though I read the book a couple of months back this year, this is one review which I kept pushing, afraid that I might not be able to do full justice to its brilliance The book cover is a beautiful mustard with the half hidden face of the hero and the Hoogly Bridge in the background. I have a thing for beautiful covers, on many occasions I have picked up a book only because of the cover. The title is almost poetic but what drew me to the book was the blurb ‘journey of a hero who falls’. The story begins with a miserable Tilotamma wondering where Musafir was. Musafir, a writer, a hero, her hero, who dared to write against the establishment. Nobody knows who Musafir is, nor does Tilotamma, but that does not stop her for being in love with him. A chance encounter brings her face to face with her Musafir, but she fails to recognise him. Their paths cross again after a couple of years but as Ridhhimaan, the one who despises Musafir as much as she still loves him. The writer pens a soulful love story taking us deep into the minds of Tilotamma and Ridhhimaan. Just as the idealist Tilotamma is not able to let go of Musafir, Riddhimaan struggles to come to terms with the new he. It becomes not just a story of finding love but also about discovering oneself. Though both Tilotamma and Ridhimaan are flawed and relatable, they are also larger than life. The writer succeeds in creating characters that will stay with you long after the book is over. But do not mistake it to be simply a love story, it is also a scathing take on the convenient communism we see in on display today. As the story progressed I found myself completely engaged, I felt rage and despair as I saw Ridhimaan moving away from Musafir, I, like Tilotamma hoped that he would sooner or later make his peace with Musafir. As Tilotamma pined away for Musafir, not realising how much she was distancing herself from Ridhimaan, I like Ridhimaan, wondered if she was ever in love with him. So much so that when the story ends I cannot decide whose side I am on, Ridhimaan or Tilotamma. Not only is it a great story, it is a great read as well. The writing is evocative and engaging, the scenes pan out in front of you as if you are watching a film. The language is lucid and beautiful, the pace just perfect. This definitely is one of the best books I have read this year and as a little birdie tells me that a sequel is in the making I cannot but wonder if Tilotamma will ever go ‘knocking at Ridhhimaan’s door’ https://bookhippo.wordpress.com/2016/...

  11. 5 out of 5

    Inderpreet Uppal

    Musafir is Riddhimaan or is it the other way round? He is a writer, entrepreneur and A Thousand Unspoken Words is his story. All the other characters support him and help him find his way. He suffers, fails and fumbles his way through life yet he is the chosen one. Tillotama is his fan, girlfriend and much more. This is a bittersweet love story. Not like the typical boy meets girl story. This has a lot of depth and substance. A bit of struggle, heartbreak, passion, anger and finding oneself. Such Musafir is Riddhimaan or is it the other way round? He is a writer, entrepreneur and A Thousand Unspoken Words is his story. All the other characters support him and help him find his way. He suffers, fails and fumbles his way through life yet he is the chosen one. Tillotama is his fan, girlfriend and much more. This is a bittersweet love story. Not like the typical boy meets girl story. This has a lot of depth and substance. A bit of struggle, heartbreak, passion, anger and finding oneself. Such a dramatic meeting too! These lines in the book define the story, as it explores the maze of finding and cherishing your soul mate. It is not an easy journey but a good one. Paulami talks about life and how we fight what is good for us, our loved ones and our goals. ‘It depends; if you find your soul mate, then yes. Silences don’t feel empty, they are companionable. If not, silence can be the most claustrophobic thing.’ This is a story that grows on the reader, initially, I wondered where the story was going but once I was a fan of Musafir I was hooked as I worried about him. I felt his despair and passion while I rooted for him. As the author has said he is a ‘fallen hero’ but we love him nonetheless. My only crib is that it should have been named ‘Musafir’ since it is so much about him. It is the decision of the author and I agree that there were a lot of unspoken words left but still, in the end, all things got sorted and love survived and triumphed. All the secondary characters are well etched and add to the story line. The book does slow down a bit but eventually finds its way just like life and is filled with a lot of details that moved the reader in me. Her etching of the characters was so spot on that I was engrossed in their lives and wanted to eagerly know more about their life. The book transported me back to Calcutta, yes I still call it that even though I left it a few decades ago. It was wonderful revisiting an old friend with this book. What I liked best was that the characters are strong, well written and they fight for what is important. A Thousand Unspoken Words is a story with a lot of heart and soul. There is passion, drive and compassion that make this a read that should be savoured. A relaxed read that asks you to introspect as well. (I received a copy of the book from the author and this is my honest unbiased review.)

  12. 4 out of 5

    Mahathi Ramya

    This is my second book by the author. I loved the first one - Ri-Homeland of Uncertainty and here is the review. This is the story of a famous young writer, Ridhiman who writes revolutionary books with pen name 'Musafir' and influenced many people with his writings. His books are pulped for his controversial ideologies and he escapes his death from very nearer due to his writings. This incident changes him forever and he hates his ideals and wants to run away from Musafir and make more money. Bu This is my second book by the author. I loved the first one - Ri-Homeland of Uncertainty and here is the review. This is the story of a famous young writer, Ridhiman who writes revolutionary books with pen name 'Musafir' and influenced many people with his writings. His books are pulped for his controversial ideologies and he escapes his death from very nearer due to his writings. This incident changes him forever and he hates his ideals and wants to run away from Musafir and make more money. But, his love interest Tilottama, an independent woman who works in the NGO run by his mother is a devoted fan of Musafir's ideologies. This is the story of Ridhiman's struggle between something he loves to do and something he has to do to earn money. Paulami plays with words magically to create that romantic aura. I loved the subtle romance between Ridhi and Tilottama. Characterization is a major plus for this novel. Characters are very deep and novel displays different layers in a person. The character of Tilottama's father and lively Krishnakoli (Ridhi's mother), always enthusiastic Deep etc., are very naturally portrayed by the author. I got to know something about Bengali culture, cuisine to some extent through this novel :-) I loved the way the author touches upon the issues during the division of Bangladesh from India and the plights of refugees. Mischievousness and sometimes the arrogant behavior of hero with ego reminded me of the famous novel 'Devdas'. Tilottama with her beauty and intelligence compliments Ridhi. Overall, a good read, but I felt bored in the last few pages as the pace became slow. My Rating: 4/5 I would recommend this to everyone who love subtle romance and deep, complex characters with different layers.

  13. 5 out of 5

    R Kundu

    A Thousand Unspoken words by Paulami DuttaGupta- the novella transport you to an old world romantic milieu. It ventures where very few romance novella contemplate going. Mind and Dualistic reality of a writer...a dark apocryphal place. Two main protagonists Riddiman/Tilottoma grows into you with their lucidity. The narrative is taut with a underlying limerance of loss and uprootment ( an echoing of Poulomee's other writing as well) . The linear romantic pacing is at tandem. Riddiman/Musafir has A Thousand Unspoken words by Paulami DuttaGupta- the novella transport you to an old world romantic milieu. It ventures where very few romance novella contemplate going. Mind and Dualistic reality of a writer...a dark apocryphal place. Two main protagonists Riddiman/Tilottoma grows into you with their lucidity. The narrative is taut with a underlying limerance of loss and uprootment ( an echoing of Poulomee's other writing as well) . The linear romantic pacing is at tandem. Riddiman/Musafir has disconnection from his ideological realism. His moody-artistic angst has been portrayed fluidly. The socio-political undertone gives the narrative hue it's crux. Riddhhiman/Musafir veer from stability to dilemma to depression. He is angst-ridden, cynical with a certain charm. Towering above it is Tilottama-the protagonist who idolize, loves, loses and gains again. The story has a haunting vulnerability of romanticism. The feel of the book has the pace of a classic romance in between Calcutta/Shantiniketan and it does not overwhelm you. It has the progression of young love, separation, longing and closure. The storytelling is linear. The mental health angle has a bit overwrought and abrupt introduction in the pacing. We do feel for the compelling vulnerability of Musafir. Kudos for writing an insecure main character who experiences a literary cocktail of depression and writers' block...She introduces idealistic integrity and the pressure of consumer sell-out. On a side note...special brownie points for sprinkling the narrative with delicious food reference and Darjeeling tea!! Happy Reading

  14. 4 out of 5

    Vasudha Gulati

    ‘A Thousand Unspoken Words’ the name itself grabs attention on the onset and the story does it justice as it explores the tumultuous emotions of love in its nascence. A well written tale by Paulami DuttaGupata, that takes one on a journey from the by lanes of Kolkota to the cultural serenity at Shantiniketan, with the two protagonists and their stormy relationship within and without. An easy narrative style that beautifully explores many relationships between father-daughter, mother-son and sibli ‘A Thousand Unspoken Words’ the name itself grabs attention on the onset and the story does it justice as it explores the tumultuous emotions of love in its nascence. A well written tale by Paulami DuttaGupata, that takes one on a journey from the by lanes of Kolkota to the cultural serenity at Shantiniketan, with the two protagonists and their stormy relationship within and without. An easy narrative style that beautifully explores many relationships between father-daughter, mother-son and siblings and even the ones that we foster as in the case of Tilottama and Krishnakoli enrich the story and do not deflect from that of the central one of Musafir. Musafir or Rhiddhimaan, the flawed yet so real protagonist takes your breath away like so many did in period romances of yesteryears. Who does one sympathise with more Musafir, the hero, fighting with the pen as his weapon of choice for the marginalised of society, or Rhidhimaan, the man, who jaded and disenchanted forsakes his ideals and succumbs to the lure of wealth? And then there’s the lovely Tilottama, who idolises Musafir, searching for him in Rhiddhimaan. Will her ideals let her love the man? Or will she be his Muse? Will the thousand unspoken words be expressed?

  15. 4 out of 5

    Bhavya

    The characters are well developed and even the supporting cast (if I may say so) have well developed persona, be it Tama’s father or Riddhimaan’s mother. The narration is lucid and there is not a single dull moment in the story. The backdrop and setting of the novel is interesting and the book easily toys with more than just romance. The only rue I have is that the reader does not get enough of Musafir. We are left wanting to know more about what happened to him during his exile and why he becam The characters are well developed and even the supporting cast (if I may say so) have well developed persona, be it Tama’s father or Riddhimaan’s mother. The narration is lucid and there is not a single dull moment in the story. The backdrop and setting of the novel is interesting and the book easily toys with more than just romance. The only rue I have is that the reader does not get enough of Musafir. We are left wanting to know more about what happened to him during his exile and why he became who he became. All in all, A Thousand Unspoken Words is a great book. Read complete review here

  16. 5 out of 5

    Sudha Kuruganti

    Lovely! I like books that can take a more realistic views of love stories. The heroine was a little too naive for my taste, although perhaps this was a deliberate choice. Certainly, it explains why the love story pans out the way it does. (view spoiler)[Sometimes they don't work out, despite all the love in the world. Tilotamma wouldn't have been good for Musafir in the long run, mostly because she could never separate her idol, Musafir from the real man behind the facade. (hide spoiler)] A good Lovely! I like books that can take a more realistic views of love stories. The heroine was a little too naive for my taste, although perhaps this was a deliberate choice. Certainly, it explains why the love story pans out the way it does. (view spoiler)[Sometimes they don't work out, despite all the love in the world. Tilotamma wouldn't have been good for Musafir in the long run, mostly because she could never separate her idol, Musafir from the real man behind the facade. (hide spoiler)] A good read if you can get past the Indianisms that seem to creep into most Indian English writing nowadays.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Kanchan Jindal

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. “To make the change- become a part of it” A Thousand Unspoken Words – What a  beautiful and appropriate title to the story. The story will keep you enchanted in the world full of classic romance. The Story shows ups and downs, heartbreak, reconciliation, desire, passion brimming with Tilottama and Musafir’s turbulent love. Tilottama is a high-spirited modern woman, she is feisty and in love with her hero “Musafir”, an idealistic writer wants to change the world. When fighting with the world for he “To make the change- become a part of it” A Thousand Unspoken Words – What a  beautiful and appropriate title to the story. The story will keep you enchanted in the world full of classic romance. The Story shows ups and downs, heartbreak, reconciliation, desire, passion brimming with Tilottama and Musafir’s turbulent love. Tilottama is a high-spirited modern woman, she is feisty and in love with her hero “Musafir”, an idealistic writer wants to change the world. When fighting with the world for her Musafir she came across with Ridhiman- A photo journalist and she is enlighted with his superficial attitude to live, despite the fact that it was just a facade. She works for the upliftment of women’ with Krishnakoli Banerjee (Ridhiman’s Mother) who is a strong woman and a character with whom one will fall in love. She calls Tilottama an amazon – a warrior princess and takes her as a daughter.  The bond she shares the warm bond with Ridhiman, Rajdeep, Mimi, Tilottama and other people in Stree. Ridhiman Banerjee- The lead protagonist, is a person who wants to change the world. He doesn’t blindly follow what others say is true or believe into. He has a mind of his own and is never afraid to speak.He sought shelter in Tilottama’s place to save himself from death, where he came across Tilottama’s undying trust and love for Musafir. The attraction he felt towards Tillotama is obvious. He tells his mother, “She is beautiful, brave and intimidating. But she also reminds me of my past, something I sometimes want to forget. Tillottama and I will be a disaster.” Though they got their share of love and romance still he felt it’s just Musafir whom Tilottama always dotted on and hates him as Ridhiman.He also shares a  warm bond with Shoumo Sen, Tilottama’s father. The story takes an interesting turn after the sad demise of Ridhiman’s mother. Ridhiman took himself guilty for her mothers death and started behaving crazy. It the turn when Tilottama realized how deep his wounds were. How much he is drowning himself. Even though its heart wrenching to see Tilottama’s nightmare come true regarding Musafir dying. “He feels like…like I would always choose Musafir over Riddhimaan. In fact, I’ve always felt Riddhimaan is jealous of Musafir. He has always wanted me to discard Musafir.” Both the protagonist has this irrevocable love for their city Kolkata, which also represent the author’s love for the city. Paulami Dutta Gupta, in her every story depicts this love for her place very well. Paulami’s writing has a unique cinematic quality; it seems that you are watching a movie in your mind. Wishing Paulami lots of success and recognition for the story.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Aashisha Chakraborty

    A love story of a writer tormented by his ideals and ruled by his assumed name, this novel revolves around the eternal debate between idealism and rationalism. Musafir is the quintessential activist who seeks to upturn the society and create a new order. However, hounded by his own people who pulp his books and want to take his life, his world views undergo a drastic transformation causing much grief and consternation to the woman who worshipped him. This tale is beautifully spun and hits the re A love story of a writer tormented by his ideals and ruled by his assumed name, this novel revolves around the eternal debate between idealism and rationalism. Musafir is the quintessential activist who seeks to upturn the society and create a new order. However, hounded by his own people who pulp his books and want to take his life, his world views undergo a drastic transformation causing much grief and consternation to the woman who worshipped him. This tale is beautifully spun and hits the reader hard with its social message wrapped in an emotional cover.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Piyusha Vir

    What an emotional and fulfilling read this was. Definitely recommend this to all those who like real romance stories that reflect real people and real life.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Glen McGopi

    What an emotional journey it has been. What a well shaped characters Tama and Ridhi are! Musafir is what society needs. And no other right time to read this.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Amrit Sinha

    It’s a joy to come across books that leave an indelible mark on your mind. They make you think and ponder, and question the ideas that the pages bestow on you. However, it is all the more pleasurable to grab a story that also wins over your heart. They are words with soul, connecting with you. They narrate you tales that are fictional, and yet, you can never come to terms with the fact that they are not real. Tilottama and Riddhimaan could have been just another pair of protagonists woven from an It’s a joy to come across books that leave an indelible mark on your mind. They make you think and ponder, and question the ideas that the pages bestow on you. However, it is all the more pleasurable to grab a story that also wins over your heart. They are words with soul, connecting with you. They narrate you tales that are fictional, and yet, you can never come to terms with the fact that they are not real. Tilottama and Riddhimaan could have been just another pair of protagonists woven from an author’s imaginative bend of mind, residing between the front and back cover of a novel, and then finding a permanent place in the book shelf. But what Paulami DuttaGupta does to them is something that every book lover fantasizes about. She makes them real; so real that you could find them coming out of the pages on some instances, while at other times you yourself are sucked in the vortex of words that flow with a kaleidoscope of emotions. There are laughters, joy and smiles, and fights and misunderstandings. There is love and there is loss. And then, there are tears, which flow from the paragraphs and stream right onto your cheeks. ‘A Thousand Unspoken Words’, true to its name, speaks less and emotes more. It is a story of a man, confronting his identity, and getting trapped in his own name, unable to differentiate between what is real and what is right. This is the tale of a woman, bold, brave and smart, who admires a particular writer and his ideologies. However, truth can be harsher, and can bring forth the best, and the worst in individuals. This is the saga of a family, of people associated with each other, through invisible threads, bonds that are held in places with hope, courage, perseverance and love, but can also threaten to break when stretched a bit too far. Tilottama harbours a crush towards Musafir, the controversial author, who raises valid and pertinent questions through his books. However, his views are not taken kindly by several sections of the society, as a result of which he has to flee from his homeland. Musafir is Riddhimaan’s pen name, who is the son of Tilottama’s friend and guide, Krishnakoli. When he returns, a fiery attraction grows between the two. As expected, they come closer, and eventually decide to tie the knot. However, time can often be a cruel master, and though it teaches a lot, it also tests you in the most adverse of circumstances. ‘A Thousand Unspoken Words’ explores the different facets of relationships between a mother and her sons, a husband and his wife, and the bond between two brothers. There are quarrels and arguments, but also forgiveness and love. There are prayers and curses, and the fear of losing oneself. The burden of expectation, of trying to be what one isn’t, can be heavy, and there is no better way to understand this than by reflecting on Riddhimaan’s character. Paulami has based her story in and around Kolkata, and the vibrancy of the city’s moods reflects in her character. There are periods of sudden rain and storm, and days of calm pleasant weather. Perhaps, as I think of it now, Calcutta plays as vital a role in the setting of this story as any other protagonist does. ‘A Thousand Unspoken Words’ is one of those novels that will keep you awake all night. The pages turn on their own, and you lose sense of the time. There are chapters, happy and sad, and they call out to us in hushed voices. This is a story that needs to be read, and told. Moreover, this is a narrative that is felt right from the heart, a journey beyond a thousand words, where fiction blends with reality, and the line between them blurs. Paulami DuttaGupta, you have indeed done a tremendous job.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Shree

    In this age where a sizable proportion of the Indian literary world churns out stories which are akin to instant coffee – flavorless and bland, there are few stories which pop once in while and leave an inexpugnable bond. This story was one such story. It’s been a while since I read a good literary fiction like this book. People would probably disagree with me and would prefer to classify this book as a romantic fiction. Wikipedia agrees with me too. The Wiki definition of literary fiction is – In this age where a sizable proportion of the Indian literary world churns out stories which are akin to instant coffee – flavorless and bland, there are few stories which pop once in while and leave an inexpugnable bond. This story was one such story. It’s been a while since I read a good literary fiction like this book. People would probably disagree with me and would prefer to classify this book as a romantic fiction. Wikipedia agrees with me too. The Wiki definition of literary fiction is – “Literary fiction, also known as serious fiction, is a term principally used for fictional works that hold literary merit, that is to say, they are works that offer deliberate social commentary or political criticism, or focus on the individual to explore some part of the human condition.” At the end of this review, I assure to have explained my stand. A Thousand Unspoken words by Paulami Duttagupta is the tale of a fallen hero, Musafir. He is the brutal voice of the underdogs. He is forced to disappear after his last book wreaks a havoc while stirring souls of people in Kolkatta. Tilottama, Musafir’s ardent fan, comes into his life. An affair brews. The fallen hero sincerely attempts to write again. Is he successful in completing it? or is there a thousand unspoken word which would be lost forever? The book back summary and my version of the plot above isn’t much to go on at all. However, revealing anything more would simply destroy the experience of the reader. The story isn’t actually much. It’s a simple tale of identity crisis - something that every other person who uses a pseudonym or goes by a different name in public go through. Just that it isn’t overly filled with philosophical explanations to justify the characters pains. This is exactly what makes the book a good literary fiction. The protagonist is on a path of self discovery. The journey is made both difficult and easy by people who love him - Tilottama, his mom and his brother. It’s not just about Musafir, it about the journey of other characters too. Delivering such an emotionally packed story isn’t possible without good narration and characterisation. Each and every character required depth and shades which would eventually contribute to the protagonist’s character. Tilottama’c character would be the perfect example of when one protagonist contributes to the character of the other. Needless to say, the writer has mastered the art of narration and got the characterisation perfectly right. The writing particularly deserves a special mention. Having never been to Kolkatta or Shantiniketan, I was able to picture and feel both the places thanks a perfectly vivid description. Nevertheless, I do have a couple of things that I thought could have been better - First, the climax. Cliffhanger climaxes seem to be the “in” thing these days. A proper closure for such an intense tale would have been way better. Second, idealism and beliefs are two intense topics as such. Mingling them is simply emotionally burdening. Musafir as a writer is a different person - he is selfish and is the person Tilottama expected him to be. This combined with the actual person (as in Musafir’s) idealism (about money etc) was simply too much to handle at one point. Of course, I did love it. It was more of a bittersweet experience for me! I hope I made my stand as to why this book is a literary fiction. Or if you want a rather simple answer - The story is about a human’s struggle to find his identity. Fits Wiki definition of exploring a human condition doesn’t it. MY SAY: An emotionally packed read. Not for people who look for instant fiction. If you savor and revere true fiction, this book is for you.

  23. 4 out of 5

    R Kundu

    A Thousand Unspoken words by Paulami DuttaGupta- the novella transport you to an old world romantic milieu. It ventures where very few romance novella contemplate going. Mind and Dualistic reality of a writer...a dark apocryphal place. Two main protagonists Riddiman/Tilottoma grows into you with their lucidity. The narrative is taut with a underlying limerance of loss and uprootment ( an echoing of Poulomee's other writing as well) . The linear romantic pacing is at tandem. Riddiman/Musafir has A Thousand Unspoken words by Paulami DuttaGupta- the novella transport you to an old world romantic milieu. It ventures where very few romance novella contemplate going. Mind and Dualistic reality of a writer...a dark apocryphal place. Two main protagonists Riddiman/Tilottoma grows into you with their lucidity. The narrative is taut with a underlying limerance of loss and uprootment ( an echoing of Poulomee's other writing as well) . The linear romantic pacing is at tandem. Riddiman/Musafir has disconnection from his ideological realism. His moody-artistic angst has been portrayed fluidly. The socio-political undertone gives the narrative hue it's crux. Riddhhiman/Musafir veer from stability to dilemma to depression. He is angst-ridden, cynical with a certain charm. Towering above it is Tilottama-the protagonist who idolize, loves, loses and gains again. The story has a haunting vulnerability of romanticism. The feel of the book has the pace of a classic romance in between Calcutta/Shantiniketan and it does not overwhelm you. It has the progression of young love, separation, longing and closure. The storytelling is linear. The mental health angle has a bit overwrought and abrupt introduction in the pacing. We do feel for the compelling vulnerability of Musafir. Kudos for writing an insecure main character who experiences a literary cocktail of depression and writers' block...She introduces idealistic integrity and the pressure of consumer sell-out. On a side note...special brownie points for sprinkling the narrative with delicious food reference and Darjeeling tea!! Happy Reading

  24. 5 out of 5

    Nibha

    You get hooked to this book just as you pick it up because it reflects the fragility of our life so beautifully. Story moves gradually , subtly pin-pointing numerous issues from the society. It describes the struggle of a writer who has fallen out of muse. It shows the struggle of a fan who loves a persona than a person. It speaks of dark topics of depression that we don’t talk about. It gives voice to innumerable words of our life that are often left unsaid. It speaks about how ideology falls a You get hooked to this book just as you pick it up because it reflects the fragility of our life so beautifully. Story moves gradually , subtly pin-pointing numerous issues from the society. It describes the struggle of a writer who has fallen out of muse. It shows the struggle of a fan who loves a persona than a person. It speaks of dark topics of depression that we don’t talk about. It gives voice to innumerable words of our life that are often left unsaid. It speaks about how ideology falls apart at the hands of money. The characters are so real that you can almost imagine living them next you or sometimes even you. Tilottama is a fan with an obsession. Musafir, the male protagonist, is a person who is torn between his two distinct personalities. Their dilemma and emotions come alive to make you think about the complexity of life. Their life goes on a single thing called hope. Other characters comfortably fit in their roles as do they in the story. Emotional turmoil of the events of their lives can be felt throughout the book. There are no nail-biting scenes or steamy romance to sell. What holds the reader is the brilliant narration about the daily life of a family. It makes the reader jump in the book and live with the characters. Though not fast-paced, yet the book manages to continue with constant pace unfolding life. Bottom Line: You know you love a book when a books calls you back again and again without any mystery, thrill or uncertainty as excuse. This books subtly speaks of the familiar circumstances of Life. A book, that stays on your mind and makes you ponder.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Ashwini Gopalkrishnan

    A Thousand Unspoken Words by Paulami Duttagupta is book of struggle with inner demons and outer world′s chaos .The Author Paulami Duttagupta has penned her heroine who wears her heart on her sleeves .She is Jabra Fan of Musafir and has the guts to punch a person who speaks ill of her ideal Musafir by arguing her case in her style. While I was reading about Tilottama′s side of story , I wondered why she choose to study human right instead of studying law ? and this thought will come pass through A Thousand Unspoken Words by Paulami Duttagupta is book of struggle with inner demons and outer world′s chaos .The Author Paulami Duttagupta has penned her heroine who wears her heart on her sleeves .She is Jabra Fan of Musafir and has the guts to punch a person who speaks ill of her ideal Musafir by arguing her case in her style. While I was reading about Tilottama′s side of story , I wondered why she choose to study human right instead of studying law ? and this thought will come pass through your mind too readers whenever you will find her arguing with any Tom Dick and Harry kind of guy . A Thousand Unspoken Words is story of Riddhimaan (Musafir ) as his plaguing emotions . It is also the story of each and every struggling individual who want achieve something in life in a true sense .Although He/She might have set ideals or principles in his/her life which he/she will be forced to break it just for sake of their family .In this story Riddhimaan breaks his ideals. How he breaks his principles for this you will have to read the whole book .. The Author has used all nine rasas (emotions ) in this book and has shaped her male and female protagonist in a very effective way . The plot is good and phase of story is normal .There are no short chapters in this so readers can easily finish reading this book within a weeks time .

  26. 4 out of 5

    Arti

    The story is simple and the language is easy to follow. The flow is good and makes the story fast paced. The author has touched a lot of current issues. The author has described many scenes in detail making me easy to picturise them. there are many twists in the story, once I felt that, now things fall in place, the story would turn suddenly. At certain points in the story, I felt that I was watching a movie. The characters are very realistic, very true to life and very well developed. All the ch The story is simple and the language is easy to follow. The flow is good and makes the story fast paced. The author has touched a lot of current issues. The author has described many scenes in detail making me easy to picturise them. there are many twists in the story, once I felt that, now things fall in place, the story would turn suddenly. At certain points in the story, I felt that I was watching a movie. The characters are very realistic, very true to life and very well developed. All the characters, even the supportive ones have a substantial role to play in the story. The friendship between Krishnakoli and Tilottama, the relationship between the mother and sons and also between the father and the daughter has been beautifully described. The cute, friendly banter between the brothers was very realistic. The story has a lot many emotions: Love, betrayal, friendship, forgiveness and fights. I felt for Tillotama, she was confused forced to choose between Riddhiman, the materialist and Musafir, the idealist. The story goes deep, leaves a long lasting impression on the reader. Me, I was left wanting for more. I am eagerly waiting for a sequel. A must read for everyone.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Niranjan Navalgund

    I am glad I picked this book! I am amazed with the author's ability to convey the intricacies without literally telling it. The instances in the story will make you think and experience the pinch. We play so many different roles in our lives and we are also judged by how well we enact them. I loved the thread of dichotomy stitched through Musafir and Riddhiman. The story feels real and authentic; I loved the use of bengali words, it added glow to the overall setting. I also loved the dynamic con I am glad I picked this book! I am amazed with the author's ability to convey the intricacies without literally telling it. The instances in the story will make you think and experience the pinch. We play so many different roles in our lives and we are also judged by how well we enact them. I loved the thread of dichotomy stitched through Musafir and Riddhiman. The story feels real and authentic; I loved the use of bengali words, it added glow to the overall setting. I also loved the dynamic conversations between Riddhiman and Tama's father. The story has many layers and reminded me of Kamal Hasan's films. It is more than just a love story! I loved a lot of lines in the book. These lines certainly deserve a mention : 'Do you really feel silences can talk?' she asked quietly. 'It depends; if you find your soulmate, then yes. Silences don't feel empty, they are companionable. If not, silence can be the most claustrophobic thing'. It would be interesting to read a sequel too. I feel the story could go on, because at some level - we all can relate to Riddhiman and would want to know more about Riddhiman and Tilottama!

  28. 4 out of 5

    Arpita Banerjee

    The story of two souls who are designed to be together but are they destined to be so? I would not want to divulge more than this. The author has a superb ability to draw visuals through her descriptions, and so we find ourselves at different places at different times without having to do guesswork. The story not only has two strong central characters, but equally strong supporting ones- you end up thinking and clearly remembering about some of these characters as well, even after you finish the The story of two souls who are designed to be together but are they destined to be so? I would not want to divulge more than this. The author has a superb ability to draw visuals through her descriptions, and so we find ourselves at different places at different times without having to do guesswork. The story not only has two strong central characters, but equally strong supporting ones- you end up thinking and clearly remembering about some of these characters as well, even after you finish the story; a privilege usually reserved for the "hero-heroine" of ordinary tales- but then, this is no ordinary story. The story has immense potential for a sequel, since most of the characters have enough depth to carve out more stories. I conclude with the hope that Paulami seriously contemplates a sequel. There are quite a few readers awaiting it.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Priya

    A beautiful unconventional story! What happens when a woman falls in love with an idealistic persona of a man and is then forced to come face to face with the same man without the passion of his ideals? Musaphir was the anonymous hero who used his pen to write about those no one else bothered about and to bring out the injustices in a society rife with them. But when he is chased out of his own home for holding those views, reality wins over ideals and he settles for a life of sedate luxury. However A beautiful unconventional story! What happens when a woman falls in love with an idealistic persona of a man and is then forced to come face to face with the same man without the passion of his ideals? Musaphir was the anonymous hero who used his pen to write about those no one else bothered about and to bring out the injustices in a society rife with them. But when he is chased out of his own home for holding those views, reality wins over ideals and he settles for a life of sedate luxury. However, his most ardent fan Tilottama still hopes Musaphir is alive and well inside him. Will she be able to bring out the hidden ideals or accept the changed man as he is? What I liked most is the POV of both Musaphir and Tilo is presented and one isn't blamed for the others disillusionment. They are both in different places and the story traces their journey of finding a common path if it exists!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Neil Singh

    The protagonist is so full of life yet lifeless at times . Changing times and life in the city of Kolkata has been eruditely described by the author. How a place being the hotbed of ideological , religious clashes coupled with high-headedness and complete apathy of the govt in the 70s embraces modernity without forgetting the misgivings and turmoils of the past. The author has quite eloquently made all the lead characters stakeholders in the troubled past and future prosperity of the region. What s The protagonist is so full of life yet lifeless at times . Changing times and life in the city of Kolkata has been eruditely described by the author. How a place being the hotbed of ideological , religious clashes coupled with high-headedness and complete apathy of the govt in the 70s embraces modernity without forgetting the misgivings and turmoils of the past. The author has quite eloquently made all the lead characters stakeholders in the troubled past and future prosperity of the region. What strikes me the most is the range of emotions on display from our hero and the female lead , the tight-storyline never misses a beat . It gets a bit slow in the middle but overall it's a good read and an inspiring story of a fallen hero who not only rises but shines too.

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