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The Lone Star Ranger: Illustrated Platinum Edition

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How is this book unique? 15 Illustrations are included Short Biography is also included Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Best fiction books of all time One of the best books to read Classic historical fiction books Bestselling Fiction The Lone Star Ranger is a Western novel published by Zane Grey in 1915. The book takes pla How is this book unique? 15 Illustrations are included Short Biography is also included Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Best fiction books of all time One of the best books to read Classic historical fiction books Bestselling Fiction The Lone Star Ranger is a Western novel published by Zane Grey in 1915. The book takes place in Texas, the Lone Star State, and several main characters are Texas Rangers, a famous band of highly capable law enforcement officers. It follows the life of Buck Duane, a man who becomes an outlaw and then redeems himself in the eyes of the law.


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How is this book unique? 15 Illustrations are included Short Biography is also included Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Best fiction books of all time One of the best books to read Classic historical fiction books Bestselling Fiction The Lone Star Ranger is a Western novel published by Zane Grey in 1915. The book takes pla How is this book unique? 15 Illustrations are included Short Biography is also included Original & Unabridged Edition Tablet and e-reader formatted Best fiction books of all time One of the best books to read Classic historical fiction books Bestselling Fiction The Lone Star Ranger is a Western novel published by Zane Grey in 1915. The book takes place in Texas, the Lone Star State, and several main characters are Texas Rangers, a famous band of highly capable law enforcement officers. It follows the life of Buck Duane, a man who becomes an outlaw and then redeems himself in the eyes of the law.

30 review for The Lone Star Ranger: Illustrated Platinum Edition

  1. 4 out of 5

    Harry Fox

    Strange that the blurb for the book says that this is Zane Grey's only western written from a first-person perspective. It is not. I wonder if the blurb is for the wrong book. Anyway, this is about Buck Duane, a basically good young man, who is forced into a gunfight and feels sure he has to run or face a noose. He is a complicated character, a bit of a rare thing for a hero of the Western genre. He feels a strange impulse to violence, but tries hard to NOT fall into the pit of crime as he mingles Strange that the blurb for the book says that this is Zane Grey's only western written from a first-person perspective. It is not. I wonder if the blurb is for the wrong book. Anyway, this is about Buck Duane, a basically good young man, who is forced into a gunfight and feels sure he has to run or face a noose. He is a complicated character, a bit of a rare thing for a hero of the Western genre. He feels a strange impulse to violence, but tries hard to NOT fall into the pit of crime as he mingles with the dregs of society on the western Texas frontier. He mostly succeeds, killing only when necessary. There is a love interest. He first falls for a young girl, whom he rescues, only to have her kidnapped. He never sees her again. Strange, that. I kept expecting to meet her again, but she appears and then disappears like a wisp of smoke. He later falls for the bandit chief's daughter, Ray. This is a love affair that grows slowly and credibly. Nice touch of romance to go with all the gun-slinging. Overall, I liked the book. It was heavy on narrative and what could be called purple prose. Zane caught the mood of the frontier pretty well, even though things dragged at times. The ending was entirely forgettable. Won't give any spoilers, but Zane fumbled the ball badly at the very last.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jim

    This isn't cassettes, but a downloadable audio book from Recorded Books via my library & listened to on my MP3 player. Ed Sala is the narrator & at first I didn't think I was going to like his voice. It's kind of scratchy, old & often drops too low, but it really fits the story, except for when he tries to do the female voices. Luckily, there are very few. Seriously, he's awful at them. I pretty much quit reading most formulaic westerns years ago. They were cliches run rampant with plots laid out This isn't cassettes, but a downloadable audio book from Recorded Books via my library & listened to on my MP3 player. Ed Sala is the narrator & at first I didn't think I was going to like his voice. It's kind of scratchy, old & often drops too low, but it really fits the story, except for when he tries to do the female voices. Luckily, there are very few. Seriously, he's awful at them. I pretty much quit reading most formulaic westerns years ago. They were cliches run rampant with plots laid out in the first few paragraphs. Grey is the reason. He was one of the first authors to become a millionaire & molded many of the violent, romantic myths of the old west. His success launched a host of imitators, many of whom used his version of the west as their own. So, I wasn't expecting a fresh western from Grey. After all, he first published this novel in 1914. He's old school & the last time I tried reading one of his novels, I wasn't too thrilled. What really surprises & delights me about this story is just how well the cliched young, quick-draw, gone-down-the-wrong-road-but-good-at-heart-anyway kid is drawn. After looking at the back end of those cliches all these years, seeing it from the front end is surprisingly refreshing. How can that be? I don't really know, just that it is. I think part of that comes from the laconic, gravelly drawl of Sala, but no reader can make a poorly written story into a delight. There's an economy & down-home fun to Grey's prose that just makes it fun to listen to. The story started out well for the first 9 chapters when I wrote the above. Chapter 10 suddenly bogs down with a loooong description of our hero's mental state. It was incredibly verbose & boring, pounding the same ideas into me until I was ready to surrender. Then the pace picked up & was good again for next 4 chapters until we reach the end of book 1. Unfortunately, there was some time travel going on. We skipped ahead a few years & then looked back, completely out of keeping with the story to this point, which had all been in the present tense. I'll give it 3 stars. Chapter 15 is a new book & chapter in Buck's life & it breaks much of the previous mood. It starts out quite refreshingly, totally expected, but not terrible. I was glad to see the book get back on track & listened through chapter 16 with delight. Chapter 17 started out with a lot of promise & then suddenly the book becomes a complete train wreck. Stupid, gaping plot holes, horrible dialog, & so much less that it is not worth listening to, although I did. At the end, there is one slight, redeeming moment, (view spoiler)[ Buck doesn't beat a bad guy to the draw (hide spoiler)] but it was too little, too late, & really didn't help at all. One star rating. All in all, it wasn't a complete waste of time. I may listen to Riders of the Purple Sage, one of his most famous books at some point, but I'll need some recovery time.

  3. 4 out of 5

    carl theaker

    During a recent visit to the Texas State Cemetery I viewed the Prayer of the Texas Rangers and several of their graves, one of which was of Captain John Hughes. A little investigation revealed that Zane Grey based 'Lone Star Ranger' on Hughes, and indeed when I picked up a copy, there is a dedication from Grey to Hughes and the Rangers. No, I didn't expect an accurate historical biography. I did get a good ol' wild west shootem up, with purple prose passages describing the Texas country side, a true, During a recent visit to the Texas State Cemetery I viewed the Prayer of the Texas Rangers and several of their graves, one of which was of Captain John Hughes. A little investigation revealed that Zane Grey based 'Lone Star Ranger' on Hughes, and indeed when I picked up a copy, there is a dedication from Grey to Hughes and the Rangers. No, I didn't expect an accurate historical biography. I did get a good ol' wild west shootem up, with purple prose passages describing the Texas country side, a true, though wronged hero, Buck Duane, a good horse, opponents in the most outlawy of outlaws, and a feel of how news, well rumors of news, and reputations traveled about the West. As it was written in 1915, I knew movies based their cowboy heroes on books like this, but you could easily swear it was the other way around as it reads so much like the old westerns of Hollywood. In other words, yes corny at times, occasional plot devices that come out of no where, but the action keeps coming, and you wonder just how is Buck going to get out of this fix? By time I was done reading, I found myself occasionally checking my imaginary holster on my hip, what would be the fastest way to draw? Would I be quicker than the remorseless, steely eyed Poggin ? And thinking about watching the western movie 'Unforgiven' again.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Michele

    Dear ladies, When a cowboy says this, he is trying to say that you are one good lookin' lady: "She looked tired, quiet, even melancholy. A finely chiseled oval face; clear, olive-tinted skin, long eyes set wide apart and black as coal, beautiful to look into; a slender straight nose that had something nervous and delicate about it which made Duane think of a thoroughbred;" page 223 Yep, why are you wasting your money on Estee Lauder when you just need a nervous nose that makes you look like a horse Dear ladies, When a cowboy says this, he is trying to say that you are one good lookin' lady: "She looked tired, quiet, even melancholy. A finely chiseled oval face; clear, olive-tinted skin, long eyes set wide apart and black as coal, beautiful to look into; a slender straight nose that had something nervous and delicate about it which made Duane think of a thoroughbred;" page 223 Yep, why are you wasting your money on Estee Lauder when you just need a nervous nose that makes you look like a horse? Although I sometimes felt like the writing was switching gears and a bit all over the place, the nobleness of Buck Duane really drew me in and I found the ending very suspenseful. I loved how he was just a tough guy but yet wouldn't hurt a lady, stood up for them and still was able to fall in love. (Sigh, a real manly man.) If we met in real life we would be instant friends. One last thing: The utter absence of foul language. You still got the idea that people swore but I loved how he didn't use the swear words but you still got the picture. So appreciative.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Marythios (AkaSusanne )

    Buck Duane, becomes an outlaw when he is forced into shooting a bloodthirsty gunman intent on killing him. He goes through many internal struggles as he strives so hard not to become the infamous gunman his completely fabricated reputation precedes him to be. This is a story about how easily a person might lose their way in life. It focuses heavily on loss, self sacrifice, and finally redemption. It was a great experience being inside Buck's head. He's such an interesting, intelligent character. Buck Duane, becomes an outlaw when he is forced into shooting a bloodthirsty gunman intent on killing him. He goes through many internal struggles as he strives so hard not to become the infamous gunman his completely fabricated reputation precedes him to be. This is a story about how easily a person might lose their way in life. It focuses heavily on loss, self sacrifice, and finally redemption. It was a great experience being inside Buck's head. He's such an interesting, intelligent character. The main character does come alive as you follow his redemption story from outlaw to lawman as a Texas Ranger. Being a fast gun helps. I did enjoy the book and I am a fan of old westerns. The romance in them is less then desirable for me because the women seem helpless and need saving. Even if they have strength they still seem weak in the eye of the male hero. I like the gun slinging battling the bad guys part of it better than the romance side of westerns.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Thom Swennes

    Zane Grey’s Lone Star Ranger has only rated two stars from me. This isn’t very common as I tend to like and highly rate almost everything I read. This book was published in 1915 when Grey was already an established writer of ever increasing repute. I found the story naïve in conception and full of spurious assumptions and bogus facts. One example of this is Duane’s hasty assumption that he would be hunted down as a criminal and desperate outlaw after killing a man in a witnessed gun fight. This Zane Grey’s Lone Star Ranger has only rated two stars from me. This isn’t very common as I tend to like and highly rate almost everything I read. This book was published in 1915 when Grey was already an established writer of ever increasing repute. I found the story naïve in conception and full of spurious assumptions and bogus facts. One example of this is Duane’s hasty assumption that he would be hunted down as a criminal and desperate outlaw after killing a man in a witnessed gun fight. This story takes place in post war Texas (1870’s) where life was often dictated by violence and the six shooter. His life as an outlaw takes him west but for some unexplained reason he refuses to leave Texas. Halfway through the novel he is offered a deal and becomes a Texas Ranger and uses his many talents to apprehend cattle rustlers and outlaws in general around the El Paso/ Big Bend area. As in most of his stories, women and love are a major part. The naïve approach and immature descriptions and exchanges between the sexes often brought a smile to my lips or a laugh to my voice. The overall impression, however, is one of disbelief, skepticism and cynicism. I generally pass over faults and do my utmost to look for and enjoy any story. The blatant and manifest errors in this spoof proved too much to overlook. Anyone that is considering reading this book should keep in mind that I consider it one of the lesser works of an otherwise good author.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    Not my favorite Zane Grey novel. The first part, where he was hiding from the law (for killing someone in self-defense!) was much better than the second. The romance was not very believable, (view spoiler)[ and we never heard what happened to the first young woman he helped out of a difficult situation, though I kept waiting, and assumed she would be the love interest. (hide spoiler)] But it still kept my attention, and was beautifully read by a talented reader in a free audio download from Lib Not my favorite Zane Grey novel. The first part, where he was hiding from the law (for killing someone in self-defense!) was much better than the second. The romance was not very believable, (view spoiler)[ and we never heard what happened to the first young woman he helped out of a difficult situation, though I kept waiting, and assumed she would be the love interest. (hide spoiler)] But it still kept my attention, and was beautifully read by a talented reader in a free audio download from LibriVox.org. (The summary of this book given in GoodReads names the wrong characters, and gives inaccurate information for this particular novel.) First published in 1914.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tom Stevenson

    classic Zane Grey with a couple twists. Good guy becomes "bad guy" becomes good guy. Gotta love a good ol' Western. classic Zane Grey with a couple twists. Good guy becomes "bad guy" becomes good guy. Gotta love a good ol' Western.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrea

    Buck Duane's transformation is described as he goes from a kid to an outlaw to a redeemed man. The gunfights, the action, the motives are all superbly described. While there may not be outlaws of the same brand today, there are men who are ruled by the same motives and haunted by the same deeds. It was interesting that the author was able to delineate between shades of gray in men who have committed crimes. This gives the reader the ability vicariously to ponder the humanity in all men as only G Buck Duane's transformation is described as he goes from a kid to an outlaw to a redeemed man. The gunfights, the action, the motives are all superbly described. While there may not be outlaws of the same brand today, there are men who are ruled by the same motives and haunted by the same deeds. It was interesting that the author was able to delineate between shades of gray in men who have committed crimes. This gives the reader the ability vicariously to ponder the humanity in all men as only God can see. In the end the author posits that the only power strong enough to fight the blood-lust is love. You'll have to decide if he's right. In the meantime enjoy the ride.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matt

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Buck Duane- son of a gunslinger. Buck an outlaw turned Texas Ranger. Gets the bad guy and wins the girl. I haven't read much by Zane Grey but I can see why he is so popular. Good characters, good description and good plot. I'll read more by him. Buck Duane- son of a gunslinger. Buck an outlaw turned Texas Ranger. Gets the bad guy and wins the girl. I haven't read much by Zane Grey but I can see why he is so popular. Good characters, good description and good plot. I'll read more by him.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Matthew Hunter

    The Lone Star Ranger is pure American mythology. Outlaw-gunfighter-turned-Texas-Ranger Buckley Duane would fit in any advertisement for Stetson or Marlboro. He's tall, dark, handsome, bloodthirsty, and passionately romantic. Love and murder war for supremacy in his life, with constant vigilance required to ensure civilization/love/family holds sway over chaos/hate/lone-wolfism:It would come back--that wind of flame, that madness to forget, that driving, relentless instinct for blood. It would co The Lone Star Ranger is pure American mythology. Outlaw-gunfighter-turned-Texas-Ranger Buckley Duane would fit in any advertisement for Stetson or Marlboro. He's tall, dark, handsome, bloodthirsty, and passionately romantic. Love and murder war for supremacy in his life, with constant vigilance required to ensure civilization/love/family holds sway over chaos/hate/lone-wolfism:It would come back--that wind of flame, that madness to forget, that driving, relentless instinct for blood. It would come back with those pale, drifting, haunting faces and the accusing fading eyes, but all [Duane's] life, always between them and him, rendering them powerless, would be the faith and love and beauty of this noble woman. Even a "noble woman" like Ray Longstreth has limited agency in Zane Grey's lawless world of Southwestern Texas. Fathers and outlaws--the gun- and physical power-wielders--make most of the decisions. Women are kidnapped or married off for advantage. In many ways, they're pawns in a deadly game between groups of men who can't control their bloodlust. Grey depicts most men as savages and/or heroes; most women saints and/or damsels in distress. I'm grateful for the hard questioning of gender roles that has occurred between Grey's day and now. In the end, I certainly don't like this book for its naive and unfortunate portrayal of male/female relationships. I don't like the assumption that the bloodlust of the father inevitably must mark the life of the son. (We do have a choice in the matter, I believe.) What I did like, however, is the window Grey provides into the "ideal" of heroic individualism, of the conflict between the desire to achieve something great on one's own and to be in close relationship with others. There is a common good, after all, and personal, social and political lives often involve struggle to find balance between personal liberty and responsibility to something greater. Grey does a laudable job of getting at this angel/devil-on-the-shoulder interior conflict.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Martin Gibbs

    Curse me for reading Riders of the Purple Sage first. While this book is a fine output by Zane Grey, it is by no means his best. However, that does not mean it is not a worthwhile read. Grey’s books are far deeper and have more psychological and emotional impact than other Western authors; here we have an outlaw/bandit who is not a shallow, one-sided criminal. Rather, Buck Duane is a human being, and human beings settled the west. The transformation of Duane from outlaw to Ranger was well-writte Curse me for reading Riders of the Purple Sage first. While this book is a fine output by Zane Grey, it is by no means his best. However, that does not mean it is not a worthwhile read. Grey’s books are far deeper and have more psychological and emotional impact than other Western authors; here we have an outlaw/bandit who is not a shallow, one-sided criminal. Rather, Buck Duane is a human being, and human beings settled the west. The transformation of Duane from outlaw to Ranger was well-written. Of course there is a love interest. It’s been said that ZG’s books are romances dressed as westerns, but I go back to my first assessment, and state it differently: They are books about the human condition in an era that shaped much of what our country is today. And so, with the lurid descriptions of the landscape, we are treated to detailed and in-depth examination of the creatures that crawled across that land. This book is missing some oomph, in my opinion. When Duane was listening to the outlaws, I had thought perhaps they heard/saw him, and that we’d have some sort of twist or betrayal or something. Not that the ending was bad, it’s just my jaded 21st-century mind expected a few dirty tricks. Recommended.

  13. 4 out of 5

    John

    Zane Grey, without a doubt, makes the western genre come to life. Regardless of his lack of realism in many cases (i.e. can anyone really shoot a six shooter that accurately and swiftly?, can a horse really take that much punishment?, etc), many of his scenes will be long remembered after the reader has finished the book. As an example, and without revealing too much of the book, the event of Buck hiding out in the willows, was one the reader won't soon forget. If nothing else, Mr. Grey's books Zane Grey, without a doubt, makes the western genre come to life. Regardless of his lack of realism in many cases (i.e. can anyone really shoot a six shooter that accurately and swiftly?, can a horse really take that much punishment?, etc), many of his scenes will be long remembered after the reader has finished the book. As an example, and without revealing too much of the book, the event of Buck hiding out in the willows, was one the reader won't soon forget. If nothing else, Mr. Grey's books are hard to put down, and every time they are picked up, it is a joy to read them and forget about the hectic pace of today for awhile. It is also refreshing to read about a character that is a true hero and not one of today's anti-heroes. I love reading the statement, "Duane had intelligence and keenness enough to see his peril - the danger threatening his character as a man, just as much as that which threatened his life. He cared vastly more, he discovered, for what he considered honor and integrity than he did for life." Oh take me back to the wild west of yesteryear, with a good horse and the open sky!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Breon Blair

    I think that this book catches the eyes of many young gals as well as older women. I love the way the author expressed the love and feelings for the characters towards each other and that it will affect them in the long run but that he placed his book very well and i cant say anything bad about it except for the fact that it had to end. That was just such a tragedy that i had to read this book over a second time. I love it and I am reading it again and I think that it is just as great as it was I think that this book catches the eyes of many young gals as well as older women. I love the way the author expressed the love and feelings for the characters towards each other and that it will affect them in the long run but that he placed his book very well and i cant say anything bad about it except for the fact that it had to end. That was just such a tragedy that i had to read this book over a second time. I love it and I am reading it again and I think that it is just as great as it was the first time. And, this is coming from a fifteen year old freshmen in high school and i love to read.

  15. 5 out of 5

    larry brashear

    Wonderful! Zane Grey is a great author! His books contain all the emotions of the human psyche. I love them also because they have good grammar and editing as well. It is so refreshing to read books which are not cheapened by profanity.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Susan

    This book had everything you wold expect in a western!

  17. 4 out of 5

    Alger Smythe-Hopkins

    The blurb is referencing the wrong novel, it describes Rangers of the Lone Star, a different book in this series. Lone Star Ranger on the other hand is the first of this trilogy of formula novels and is largely the same as the other lesser stories Grey wrote by the dozen after finally making good as an author. Like other books by Grey, the hero's actions in the final showdown are directed by his interest in a girl. This one girl will be a sparkling angel in the hero's life. A girl too good for th The blurb is referencing the wrong novel, it describes Rangers of the Lone Star, a different book in this series. Lone Star Ranger on the other hand is the first of this trilogy of formula novels and is largely the same as the other lesser stories Grey wrote by the dozen after finally making good as an author. Like other books by Grey, the hero's actions in the final showdown are directed by his interest in a girl. This one girl will be a sparkling angel in the hero's life. A girl too good for the corruption and violence about her. He will rescue her. What sets this book apart is that Grey spends considerable prose on the inner struggle of the lead character to reconcile his uncontrollable murderous urges (inherited from his notorious father) with his equally urgent bourgeois desires for home and family. Like any good boy of 1915, Buck Duane cries at the thought of his mother, and worships and protects good girls. This clues the attentive reader in on how Buck will eventually prove to be a hero, and predictably win her too. The ending of this novel is as contrived and absurd as Grey's other novels, but that's part of the charm of these books. Good always wins. The true gem of this book though was the biographical sketch at the front, which was very poorly written and emphasized a number of minor details in Grey's life to a remarkable degree. As an example, the biographer really wanted to highlight the editorial malpractice of Ripley Hitchcock of Harper and Brothers, who rejected several of Grey's early works. The biographer presented him repeatedly as an adversary that Grey eventually humiliated by getting a more senior editor at Harper to accept Riders of the Purple Sage. I was considerably amused by this detail, and wondered why Grey never tried another publishing house. So the novel's pulp, but it's good pulp, and very readable. I guess I like a book that insists on being charming even as it plods along a silly plot line toward an entirely predictable ending.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. While it might be exciting, intriguing even, this book will probably leave you disappointed. The main character, Buck Duane, is almost portrayed as some sort of ideal, you like THE one and only Buck Duane, to feared and respected, sort of thing. The plot was bad. It really was. You think there is going to be so sort of love affair then the girl disappears, and Zane Grey really doesn't do a very good job of making it at all clear that she was dead or why she died at all. Then he meets another gir While it might be exciting, intriguing even, this book will probably leave you disappointed. The main character, Buck Duane, is almost portrayed as some sort of ideal, you like THE one and only Buck Duane, to feared and respected, sort of thing. The plot was bad. It really was. You think there is going to be so sort of love affair then the girl disappears, and Zane Grey really doesn't do a very good job of making it at all clear that she was dead or why she died at all. Then he meets another girl and falls in love with her......no mention of the other girl at all. The middle of the second half is probably the best part. The ending was terrible. I know it's supposed to portray the whole thing with hotblooded Texans where they can't control the blood and thirst to kill, but yeah.....it was bad. You'll probably be better off not reading it. It's not worth your time. Particularly if you think objectively about good vs. bad plots. Cause then it will REALLY annoy you.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Rob Smith, Jr.

    This book started very well. Then it got more and more bogged down in narrative and prolonged dialogue. A good editor could have cut a good 25 pages out of this and made it far stronger. Seems to me Grey initially had a vision of a story following a very confused young fellow through life to a point of becoming a Texas Ranger. Seems Grey got confused and really creates 4 books and attaches two at a part and the two others as another part. if that sounds confusing, I'm perplexed, too. The the firs This book started very well. Then it got more and more bogged down in narrative and prolonged dialogue. A good editor could have cut a good 25 pages out of this and made it far stronger. Seems to me Grey initially had a vision of a story following a very confused young fellow through life to a point of becoming a Texas Ranger. Seems Grey got confused and really creates 4 books and attaches two at a part and the two others as another part. if that sounds confusing, I'm perplexed, too. The the first half of each part is better than the second halves. Making half the book worth reading. Adding to this is that the character changes. Well it would over so many years. But the changes are multiple and inconsistent and illogical. The changes seem to fit each turn in the tale. Almost as if Grey had really intended the 4 stories with different characters. Best to skip the whole thing. Bottom line: i don't recommend this book. 3 out of 10 stars.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Charles Castell

    I have had the opportunity to read many books by Mr. Zane Grey, but I believe this one is probably the best I have read. The story is believable. Well deserving of the five stars I awarded the story, as the story touches even the hardest hearts. The storylines and characters depicts the real old west and there is enough exiting escapades to fill the needs of any reader. I have always enjoyed stories of the Texas Rangers and their accomplishments, this story is so in depth that my attention never I have had the opportunity to read many books by Mr. Zane Grey, but I believe this one is probably the best I have read. The story is believable. Well deserving of the five stars I awarded the story, as the story touches even the hardest hearts. The storylines and characters depicts the real old west and there is enough exiting escapades to fill the needs of any reader. I have always enjoyed stories of the Texas Rangers and their accomplishments, this story is so in depth that my attention never varied throughout the entire book. There is adventure, a great love story and plenty of shootouts to satisfy the desire of anyone. I sincerely recommend this book to all of you lovers of great Western excitement, as well as romance, and the storylines and characters will fill your greatest desire.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Lloyd

    This western by Zane Grey is written in the fine tradition of Westerns. A gunman in west Texas is given a pardon to join the Texas Rangers and bring to justice a feared outlaw gang. This story ranges from his days as a gunman to his redemption as a Texas Ranger. The main character is Buck Duane, who is deemed to be the fastest gunman in the whole state of Texas. But is he? That doubt drives him to test himself again and again while on both sides of the law. The author, Zane Grey, seems to captur This western by Zane Grey is written in the fine tradition of Westerns. A gunman in west Texas is given a pardon to join the Texas Rangers and bring to justice a feared outlaw gang. This story ranges from his days as a gunman to his redemption as a Texas Ranger. The main character is Buck Duane, who is deemed to be the fastest gunman in the whole state of Texas. But is he? That doubt drives him to test himself again and again while on both sides of the law. The author, Zane Grey, seems to capture the thoughts of a man in that position. He has both supreme confidence mixed with self-doubt which propels him on to further encounters with outlaw gunmen. Plus, there is a chase sequence in this story that rivals any modern car chases for danger and tension. If you love westerns and man to man confrontations, this book is for you.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Violet

    Another great story by the number one old western writer (in my opinion). Zane Grey always managed to write about the cowboys and crooks of the west but didn't neglect inserting a bit of romance ... intriguing to me at the age of 12 or 13 when I first read his books. Today, at the age of 88 I still really like his books, except that the amount of description, I think, is kind of a drag; maybe I am just a slower reader now. At any rate, I did enjoy this story about Buck Duane, outlaw, and then Te Another great story by the number one old western writer (in my opinion). Zane Grey always managed to write about the cowboys and crooks of the west but didn't neglect inserting a bit of romance ... intriguing to me at the age of 12 or 13 when I first read his books. Today, at the age of 88 I still really like his books, except that the amount of description, I think, is kind of a drag; maybe I am just a slower reader now. At any rate, I did enjoy this story about Buck Duane, outlaw, and then Texas Ranger, and it had a good ending.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Heather

    I listened to this as an audiobook and it was bloody brilliant. The main character, Buck Duane, becomes an outlaw when he is forced into shooting a bloodthirsty gunman intent on killing him. He goes through many internal struggles as he strives so hard not to become the infamous gunman his completely fabricated reputation precedes him to be. This is a story about how easily a person might lose their way in life. It focuses heavily on loss, self sacrifice, and finally redemption. It was a great e I listened to this as an audiobook and it was bloody brilliant. The main character, Buck Duane, becomes an outlaw when he is forced into shooting a bloodthirsty gunman intent on killing him. He goes through many internal struggles as he strives so hard not to become the infamous gunman his completely fabricated reputation precedes him to be. This is a story about how easily a person might lose their way in life. It focuses heavily on loss, self sacrifice, and finally redemption. It was a great experience being inside Buck's head. He's such an interesting, intelligent character. I enjoyed his thought process and how he analysed his environment, the people he meets, his instincts, and his emotions. I really love character driven stories. All in all, a great western adventure story about an outlaw in Texas. Didn't predict that ending at all! Thought I had it all figured out, but apparently not! My only gripe was the insta-love, but it kind of works for the story. Not a stretch to believe a man on the dodge, lonely and starved of any kind of affection, could fall quickly in love with a woman so I can forgive the author.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Diane F Martin

    Lone Star Ranger: Standard Zane Grey Anyone that enjoys a strong western novel will enjoy this title. A strong, introspective man's man who endures life-directing trials in his youth, then finds a direction to reclaim dignity later in his life. The strong characters in this story provide an interesting read. It w as s a fun adventure. Lone Star Ranger: Standard Zane Grey Anyone that enjoys a strong western novel will enjoy this title. A strong, introspective man's man who endures life-directing trials in his youth, then finds a direction to reclaim dignity later in his life. The strong characters in this story provide an interesting read. It w as s a fun adventure.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Frank

    In The Lone Star Ranger, written in 1913, involves the travails of a young gun-toting cowboy who thinks he is an outlaw and is on the run from the law. While he endeavor not to become a gunfighter, he meets good and bad outlaws and beautiful women, eventually finding himself. This is a typical western and the ending is about as sentimental as one can be. Though not as good as Zane Grey's later books, it is still a good one to read at the beach or on a rainy day. In The Lone Star Ranger, written in 1913, involves the travails of a young gun-toting cowboy who thinks he is an outlaw and is on the run from the law. While he endeavor not to become a gunfighter, he meets good and bad outlaws and beautiful women, eventually finding himself. This is a typical western and the ending is about as sentimental as one can be. Though not as good as Zane Grey's later books, it is still a good one to read at the beach or on a rainy day.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Shae

    The first section of this book feels like a little novella tacked onto the more interesting, and more fleshed out, second part of the book. I suppose it was Buck Duane's origin story, though I felt the transition between the two parts was very rocky. I did enjoy the second half better. Just a classic Texas Ranger-Western-clean up the town of rustlers book. The first section of this book feels like a little novella tacked onto the more interesting, and more fleshed out, second part of the book. I suppose it was Buck Duane's origin story, though I felt the transition between the two parts was very rocky. I did enjoy the second half better. Just a classic Texas Ranger-Western-clean up the town of rustlers book.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    Barely three stars and a repeat of another book of his with characters changed and the plot altered a bit. The theme is the same. I am done with Mr. Grey. Classics and I never had read him, so glad to say I did and glad to say I'm finished. Really not my genre. Barely three stars and a repeat of another book of his with characters changed and the plot altered a bit. The theme is the same. I am done with Mr. Grey. Classics and I never had read him, so glad to say I did and glad to say I'm finished. Really not my genre.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Richard

    Zane knows how to write. Zane Grey knows how to tell a story that makes you feel like you are there. All want to be writers should have to study ZG. You can feel the story and the pain.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Dennis O'Daniel

    Ranger - Redeemed A very good read as the Character fights through the travails of a life he did not choose but later redeemed from by friends and the love of a woman. Fast paced- enjoyable read.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Ken Hubbard

    Not my normal genre, but I decided to try something different. I really like the first half of the book, but there is a major narrative shift in the middle. Same main character, but a completely different story line. I couldn't get into the second story line, and eventually gave up. Not my normal genre, but I decided to try something different. I really like the first half of the book, but there is a major narrative shift in the middle. Same main character, but a completely different story line. I couldn't get into the second story line, and eventually gave up.

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