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Immortal Iron Fist Vol. 1: The Last Iron Fist Story (Immortal Iron Fist

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Collects Immortal Iron Fist #1-6. Many years ago, in the mystical city of Kun' Lun, young Danny Rand stared at a suit behind glass -- the garb of the "Immortal Iron Fist" -- and knew that he was destined to wear it. But where did this costume come from? Why did it wait for Danny all those years like a shadow of his future? This history-spanning kung-fu epic will shatter ev Collects Immortal Iron Fist #1-6. Many years ago, in the mystical city of Kun' Lun, young Danny Rand stared at a suit behind glass -- the garb of the "Immortal Iron Fist" -- and knew that he was destined to wear it. But where did this costume come from? Why did it wait for Danny all those years like a shadow of his future? This history-spanning kung-fu epic will shatter every perception of what it means to be the Immortal Iron Fist!


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Collects Immortal Iron Fist #1-6. Many years ago, in the mystical city of Kun' Lun, young Danny Rand stared at a suit behind glass -- the garb of the "Immortal Iron Fist" -- and knew that he was destined to wear it. But where did this costume come from? Why did it wait for Danny all those years like a shadow of his future? This history-spanning kung-fu epic will shatter ev Collects Immortal Iron Fist #1-6. Many years ago, in the mystical city of Kun' Lun, young Danny Rand stared at a suit behind glass -- the garb of the "Immortal Iron Fist" -- and knew that he was destined to wear it. But where did this costume come from? Why did it wait for Danny all those years like a shadow of his future? This history-spanning kung-fu epic will shatter every perception of what it means to be the Immortal Iron Fist!

30 review for Immortal Iron Fist Vol. 1: The Last Iron Fist Story (Immortal Iron Fist

  1. 5 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    Fun Fact: The first Iron Fist story I ever read was an issue of Marvel Team-Up pitting Spider-Man, Daredevil, Moon Knight, Power Man, and Iron Fist against the Purple Man. 1 - Danny Rand turns down a billion dollar deal with China and goes to investigate the Chinese investors as Iron Fist! This was a solid way to kick off a new ongoing Iron Fist series, lots of Kung Fu, lots of intrigue, lots of HYDRA. I think the idea that there have been many Iron Fists throughout history gives the character som Fun Fact: The first Iron Fist story I ever read was an issue of Marvel Team-Up pitting Spider-Man, Daredevil, Moon Knight, Power Man, and Iron Fist against the Purple Man. 1 - Danny Rand turns down a billion dollar deal with China and goes to investigate the Chinese investors as Iron Fist! This was a solid way to kick off a new ongoing Iron Fist series, lots of Kung Fu, lots of intrigue, lots of HYDRA. I think the idea that there have been many Iron Fists throughout history gives the character something beyond his 1970s Kung Fu craze origins. 2 - Luke Cage saves Iron Fist's bacon. The Chinese corporation is trying to take over Danny Rand's billion dollar empire. And Orson Randall, the previous Iron Fist, is in town. Again, the notion of past Iron Fists is cool, especially if there is some kind of time travel story where they unite to kick ass somewhere down the line. I like that Fraction and Brubaker explore Iron Fist's past with Luke Cage and the Daughters of the Dragon. 3 - Orson Randall is in America. Will the Iron Fists clash? Of course they will. Like all super heroes, they'll battle and then become best buds. I'm curious to see how these two Iron Fists meeting shakes out. 4 - The Iron Fists are united and the Steel Serpent is on his way to destroy them! More of the background of the Iron Fists is explored and the elder Iron Fist teaches Danny some new skills. The background of the Steel Serpent is also revealed, setting the stage for the next two issues. 5 - The Iron Fists battle hordes of HYDRA agents for a book containing the history of the Iron Fists. This issue was mostly setup. It looks like next issue will be a colossal battle between the two Iron Fists, Luke Cage, and the Daughters of the Dragon against Steel Serpent, HYDRA, and the Daughters of the Crane. 6 - The first chapter of The Immortal Iron Fist comes to a close as Danny Rand and Orson Randall fight for their lives! It was pretty bad ass to see the Heroes for Hire back together again and I love where the series is going, exploring the background of the 66 Iron Fists and the other Immortal Weapons. Closing Thoughts: It's interesting that my best Marvel Unlimited experiences have been with heroes that have normally been considered B-listers. Hawkeye, Daredevil, and now Iron Fist. Funny how actually having creative freedom with a character yields good stories. While Iron Fist isn't in the league of the other two yet, I'm definitely on board for another book or two. 3.5 out of 5 stars.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Patrick

    I picked this up because I really enjoy a lot of Brubaker and Fraction's work. Given that I didn't know anything about Iron Fist before I picked up the book, I think it was a success. By the end I was interested in the character, and eager to pick up the next trade to find out what happened with the rest of the story. Plus he was fighting nazis in the book. You can't really go wrong with that. I picked this up because I really enjoy a lot of Brubaker and Fraction's work. Given that I didn't know anything about Iron Fist before I picked up the book, I think it was a success. By the end I was interested in the character, and eager to pick up the next trade to find out what happened with the rest of the story. Plus he was fighting nazis in the book. You can't really go wrong with that.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Terence

    The past and present of the Iron Fist is on display, but what does the future hold. The Iron Fist's have a long and violent history and The Last Iron Fist story covers much of that history in a shallow fashion. The present story involves Danny Rand trying to protect his company from some Chinese business he just can't seem to trust. Neither story really gripped me. I was hoping to find something interesting and unique with Iron Fist, but unfortunately it's very familiar which isn't what I was ho The past and present of the Iron Fist is on display, but what does the future hold. The Iron Fist's have a long and violent history and The Last Iron Fist story covers much of that history in a shallow fashion. The present story involves Danny Rand trying to protect his company from some Chinese business he just can't seem to trust. Neither story really gripped me. I was hoping to find something interesting and unique with Iron Fist, but unfortunately it's very familiar which isn't what I was hoping for. I was fairly indifferent with this volume so I'm not sure if I'll continue reading this series.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I’m a huge fan of Matt Fraction and David Aja’s multi-Eisner Award-winning Hawkeye series so when I saw an earlier book they’d done together - with Ed Brubaker, no less! - I jumped at it. That said, having read Immortal Iron Fist Vol 1 just a couple of days ago, I’m really struggling to remember what the book was about - and I’m not sure I had such a great handle on it while I was reading it in the first place! This might be partly because I have no history with the Iron Fist character. His hand I’m a huge fan of Matt Fraction and David Aja’s multi-Eisner Award-winning Hawkeye series so when I saw an earlier book they’d done together - with Ed Brubaker, no less! - I jumped at it. That said, having read Immortal Iron Fist Vol 1 just a couple of days ago, I’m really struggling to remember what the book was about - and I’m not sure I had such a great handle on it while I was reading it in the first place! This might be partly because I have no history with the Iron Fist character. His hands flame, he knows kung-fu, and he’s the sometime partner of Luke Cage - that’s about it. I don’t know what his powers mean so maybe picking up a book entitled “The Last Iron Fist Story” wasn’t the best place to start, but whatever. Also, while I like Fraction’s latest output, I haven’t always been the guy’s champion - his early stuff at Marvel really stinks, and Brubaker sometimes doesn’t bring his A-game to everything he writes, and I think that’s why Immortal Iron First Vol 1 made little impression on me. So Danny Rand, an American, is the Iron Fist. Right away I’m thinking, why can’t there be an Asian superhero? Even if it’s the stereotypical martial artist hero-type, why are there so many damn American superheroes in the Marvel Universe?! The plot, as near as I can make out, is that Rand’s company (because every superhero’s alter-ego is a billionaire industrialist!) is being taken over by a Chinese company secretly run by HYDRA, a group who made the Nazis look liberal. There are several flashbacks to the past where we see other Iron Fists - Iron Fist is a title, ok got it - throughout the ages, fighting (presumably) bad guys, and for some reason Danny meets the Iron Fist from the First World War who somehow looks about 40. They team up to fight someone called Davos the Steel Serpent who’s basically Iron Fist but bulkier. That was the finale to the book - a dull boss fight. How many Marvel stories have we seen where the hero fights a version of themselves only bigger? How about the Iron Man and 2008 Incredible Hulk movies for a start! Not very imaginative, chaps, tres formulaic! David Aja’s art was the real surprise here. I love his artwork in Hawkeye and thought it’d be interesting to see how his early comics looked - and what do I see? I see almost exactly the same kind of art style being used in Iron Fist - a series from 2006 - that’s used in Hawkeye from 2012! There’s a scene where Danny Rand is being patched up and I swear Danny Rand IS Clint Barton - not even a similarity, they are the exact same character design! Even the cover to #4 is recognisably Hawkeye-ish with the same purple, black and white colour scheme being used. That’s not a big surprise given that Matt Hollingsworth, the Hawkeye colourist, worked on this series too. Well… damn. I suppose it’s good to get more of that great art but wow, I guess I’m seeing the limitations of Aja which makes his work on Hawkeye seem a bit less impressive as a result. Iron Fist really was this creative team’s warm-up for Hawkeye. Even as a Brubaker/Fraction/Aja fan, I’m shocked to say that I came away from Immortal Iron Fist disappointed at its quality. It’s a very forgettable and poorly written first volume that didn’t enlighten me very much on the character or why I should care about him. Hawkeye is an amazing title - Iron Fist very simply isn’t.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Michael Finocchiaro

    Never really read about IF before but found him interesting, while somewhat derivative of fellow rich boys with military/martial arts expertise (Bruce Wayne, Tony Stark...). That being said, the art work was compelling and the story kept me engaged.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Bradley

    Wow, I wasn't expecting *quite* that much story packed into the first volume! Color me very pleasantly surprised. I mean, we've got hints as to Danny's creation, the fact that he's the 66th of his line, that he has the powers of a vast cosmological dragon running through his veins, and that that fist of his does a ton more than just explode bad guys. It mesmerizes, too! Cool! Oh, yeah, and his cowardly predecessor who should be dead shows up and decides to give himself the fateful sendoff that all Wow, I wasn't expecting *quite* that much story packed into the first volume! Color me very pleasantly surprised. I mean, we've got hints as to Danny's creation, the fact that he's the 66th of his line, that he has the powers of a vast cosmological dragon running through his veins, and that that fist of his does a ton more than just explode bad guys. It mesmerizes, too! Cool! Oh, yeah, and his cowardly predecessor who should be dead shows up and decides to give himself the fateful sendoff that all Iron Fists usually get in the end. It's all about the good death, after all. And Hydra. Lots of Chinese Hydra and boardroomy hijinx and massive scorpion mecha-beasts and LUKE is here too!!! :) Best of all, though, is the fact that there's SO MUCH STORY going on. Did I mention when I LOVE when there's tons of good story going on in a comic? Yup. Delicious. :)

  7. 4 out of 5

    Eli

    I expected to really enjoy this because I love the Fraction/Aja team so much, and Brubaker is also good. But that didn't really happen here. The storytelling style and chronology became a little hard to follow (especially since I'm an Iron Fist noob, this being my first experience with him). The artwork was great, of course. The characters were slightly interesting, but I wasn't as into Danny Rand as I expected to be. The plot fell kind of flat for me, not necessarily feeling very compelling or I expected to really enjoy this because I love the Fraction/Aja team so much, and Brubaker is also good. But that didn't really happen here. The storytelling style and chronology became a little hard to follow (especially since I'm an Iron Fist noob, this being my first experience with him). The artwork was great, of course. The characters were slightly interesting, but I wasn't as into Danny Rand as I expected to be. The plot fell kind of flat for me, not necessarily feeling very compelling or action-packed. Overall, it was a fine read. I probably won't continue this series, though.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Clarissa

    Ah the familiarity of Fraction and Aja! Plus, Brubaker! Okay, I decided to start reading this because the Netflix series starts in less than a month and I know next to nothing about Iron Fist. I wasn't all that intrigued at first but it's research. Which reminds me, I need to read more about Luke Cage. The story begins with Danny Rand refusing to do business with a Chinese corporation, Wai-go (actually Hydra) who then later try to kill him. Enter Luke to the rescue (with Chinese take out)! Through Ah the familiarity of Fraction and Aja! Plus, Brubaker! Okay, I decided to start reading this because the Netflix series starts in less than a month and I know next to nothing about Iron Fist. I wasn't all that intrigued at first but it's research. Which reminds me, I need to read more about Luke Cage. The story begins with Danny Rand refusing to do business with a Chinese corporation, Wai-go (actually Hydra) who then later try to kill him. Enter Luke to the rescue (with Chinese take out)! Through the volume we get some flashbacks to past Iron Fists and are introduced to Orson Randall, Danny's predecessor. "Are you my grandfather?" He and Danny but heads and then, of course, decide to work together and fight whoever is trying to kill them. An interesting introduction for someone who has never read anything about this character. Anyway, even though I sit here wondering why a martial arts hero is white (though I'm never surprised), I did enjoy what we get of Danny in this. What can I say, I have a weakness for heroes with a Dick Grayson-like sense of humor (minus the puns) that often need their ass saved. I'm interested to see where this story goes. Also, we get a little bit of the old Heroes for Hire team and I now I'm even more in love with Misty. Oh, and hello Colleen! You really don't need to know anything about the character before reading this. You get some history and makes for a fun read!

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gavin

    Yup. This works. Fraction and Aja (Hawkguy bro) AND Brubaker? Solid crew. Hollingsworth on colours? This is an A-Team. Danny discovers there's another Iron Fist alive, actually his predecessor, Orson Randall, who reveals truths to him and seeks to redeem himself for past mistakes. There are similarities between the two men, and Danny eventually buys in. Hydra is after Rand Corp., and Iron Fist, and it's time to make a stand. Features Luke Cage and Misty Knight in support too. Pretty solid, Iron Fist Yup. This works. Fraction and Aja (Hawkguy bro) AND Brubaker? Solid crew. Hollingsworth on colours? This is an A-Team. Danny discovers there's another Iron Fist alive, actually his predecessor, Orson Randall, who reveals truths to him and seeks to redeem himself for past mistakes. There are similarities between the two men, and Danny eventually buys in. Hydra is after Rand Corp., and Iron Fist, and it's time to make a stand. Features Luke Cage and Misty Knight in support too. Pretty solid, Iron Fist is Batman if Bruce Wayne were raised in Shangri-La and had Dick Grayson's sense of humour. If you want to start somewhere, I think this would be the ideal spot. This writing and art team can't be beat. Yea some say it's stupid, but when you're a living weapon from a Dragon? It's not gonna be 100% believable, but people take other heroes seriously? Where do you draw the line? I like good writing, so this works for me.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Heather Sinclair

    Iron Fist is a character that's been around for a long time, but until now no writer has managed to give him a personality or reasonable motivation (after all, the revenge backstory that started his comic series was resolved within the first few issues). He's always been defined by the people around him (Power Man or the Daughters of the Dragon) and his "superpower" was absurdly one-trick (a one shot punch, always delivered when he was on the brink of defeat). This series has the daunting task of Iron Fist is a character that's been around for a long time, but until now no writer has managed to give him a personality or reasonable motivation (after all, the revenge backstory that started his comic series was resolved within the first few issues). He's always been defined by the people around him (Power Man or the Daughters of the Dragon) and his "superpower" was absurdly one-trick (a one shot punch, always delivered when he was on the brink of defeat). This series has the daunting task of making a C-list character interesting, powering him up and giving him new abilities, and cleaning up the stupid parts of his backstory. It manages to do this very well, AND still deliver a great story that is probably one of the best of 2007.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Logan

    Beware The Iron Fist! So like many of the oddball comics I've read of late, it's because there making an iron fist Tv series so this is research! So this story we have Danny Rand, a billionaire who fights crim... (Wait a minute where have I Heard of this before? Batman, Iron Man, Green Arrow.. lol) But no that's actually the best part he doesn't use money to fight crime, just his Kun Fu, which was a nice addition, at least it's original, being a billionaire is more his Day job. But you don't nee Beware The Iron Fist! So like many of the oddball comics I've read of late, it's because there making an iron fist Tv series so this is research! So this story we have Danny Rand, a billionaire who fights crim... (Wait a minute where have I Heard of this before? Batman, Iron Man, Green Arrow.. lol) But no that's actually the best part he doesn't use money to fight crime, just his Kun Fu, which was a nice addition, at least it's original, being a billionaire is more his Day job. But you don't need to know anything about iron fist to read this, in fact you learn a lot, like that they have been precisely 66 Iron Fists before Danny Rand! ( That's an actual fact! But all in All, it's a decent volume, now I can't wait for the tv series and volume 2 of this series!

  12. 5 out of 5

    Rosa

    So this is not a book to jump into with no knowledge of the Iron Fist or Marvel's Civil War. I had a tiny bit of knowledge about each and that got me through but it took me a while to figure it out. That being said story was still interesting if a bit confusing. I am wishing that there are some books out there on the previous Iron Fists though I think it's unlikely. You can absolutely see Iron Fist's roots in the 70s kung fu craze, but I think the characters update was pretty good (of course I n So this is not a book to jump into with no knowledge of the Iron Fist or Marvel's Civil War. I had a tiny bit of knowledge about each and that got me through but it took me a while to figure it out. That being said story was still interesting if a bit confusing. I am wishing that there are some books out there on the previous Iron Fists though I think it's unlikely. You can absolutely see Iron Fist's roots in the 70s kung fu craze, but I think the characters update was pretty good (of course I never read any old stories so I'm just guessing, but what can you do.)

  13. 4 out of 5

    David Dalton

    I forgot how powerful Iron Fist is! Great stories. Gets deep into Iron Fist's history. An Iron Fist will guns? I will bmp need to check out Vol 2. I forgot how powerful Iron Fist is! Great stories. Gets deep into Iron Fist's history. An Iron Fist will guns? I will bmp need to check out Vol 2.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Bárbara

    Watching the TV show, I felt like I was missing a lot of information on the Iron Fist story that seemed so interesting but was lacking heart. This was exactly what I was looking for. Immortal Iron Fist was a lot of fun. The Danny Rand on the TV show was lacking in humor and charisma that the Danny Rand on the comic has plenty. Hopefully the characters get a second chance with a Heroes for Hire show. Luke, Misty, Danny and Colleen deserve better.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Milo

    http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/07/... Writers: Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction | Art: David Aja | Publisher: Marvel Comics | Collects: Immortal Iron Fist: #1-6 Many years ago, in the mystical city of Kun’ Lun, young Danny Rand stared at a suit behind glass – the garb of the “Immortal Iron Fist” – and knew that he was destined to wear it. But where did this costume come from? Why did it wait for Danny all those years like a shadow of his future? The answer to those questions will stun both him and hi http://thefoundingfields.com/2013/07/... Writers: Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction | Art: David Aja | Publisher: Marvel Comics | Collects: Immortal Iron Fist: #1-6 Many years ago, in the mystical city of Kun’ Lun, young Danny Rand stared at a suit behind glass – the garb of the “Immortal Iron Fist” – and knew that he was destined to wear it. But where did this costume come from? Why did it wait for Danny all those years like a shadow of his future? The answer to those questions will stun both him and his readers, as Danny Rand leaps from the pages of his breakout hit in Daredevil to his own history-spanning kung-fu epic that will shatter every perception of what it means to be the Immortal Iron Fist! Brought to you by top-ten writer Ed Brubaker and breakout talent Matt Fraction (Punisher War Journal), with action-packed art by David Aja (Daredevil, Giant-Size Wolverine). Iron Fist is a character that I’ve never encountered in the comics before aside from Avengers vs. X-Men. My knowledge of the character is next to nil as well. In fact, the only reason I picked it up was because of the creative team of Ed Brubaker, Matt Fraction and David Aja. Brubaker is an incredible writer, and Fraction and Aja are currently excelling on Hawkeye right now, so I thought I’d give this a try. And I am so very glad that I did, because The Last Iron Fist Story is amazing. The character is very well created, captivating and someone to root for, and David Aja pretty much excels himself, as he manages to give the story a dark and realistic feeling even if the character himself may be your slightly more unrealistic Marvel superhero. He’s certainly one that is impressive, and it really upgrades a character that I’ve never heard of before into a volume that I’ll certainly check out more of from this series depending on whether my comics store or Amazon has them in stock, as having picked up the first print volume, I’d love to follow this series through in print like Astonishing X-Men. Some stories make you feel like you want to learn more about the character, and this is no different – Danny Rand is a character that has leaped to the top of my to-watch out for list, and whilst I’m not quite sure where to start apart from more of this series, he’s certainly nonetheless an interesting option, and if Marvel released a new Iron Fist title for Marvel Now, then I would certainly be on board for it especially if it was written by the same creative team. Heck, I’d be any book written by this creative team, even if the whole series was Iron Fist chatting with another superhero (Luke Cage, for example) in a bar. This graphic novel takes place around the same era as Civil War, and whilst it’s not necessary to understand what happens in Civil War to get what happens here, it helps for the backup extra that I got that featured Danny Rand taking over the Daredevil duties from Matt Murdock, who was imprisoned by Tony Stark during the story’s events. It allows the readers to get a brief glimpse at the friendship between Iron Fist and Daredevil, and it’ll be interesting to see how things progress in future volumes. Rating: 5/5

  16. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer

    I quite enjoyed Iron Fist, and I'm surprised that even Brubaker, Fraction, and Aja were able to breathe life into such an "uncool" superhero as Iron Fist. I love the action and hand-to-hand combat in the series. The series maintains some of its camp as a sort of tongue-in-cheek, self-deprecating homage to the original, for instance through the cheeky comments from the Danny's afroed black ex-girlfriend (novel when the character first appeared in the 1970s) making a crack about loving her teammat I quite enjoyed Iron Fist, and I'm surprised that even Brubaker, Fraction, and Aja were able to breathe life into such an "uncool" superhero as Iron Fist. I love the action and hand-to-hand combat in the series. The series maintains some of its camp as a sort of tongue-in-cheek, self-deprecating homage to the original, for instance through the cheeky comments from the Danny's afroed black ex-girlfriend (novel when the character first appeared in the 1970s) making a crack about loving her teammate, "that crazy white girl so much I could holler." Furthermore, the series doesn't take itself *too* seriously, because, how could it really, when 1) it's a kung fu series, and 2) it's a kung fu series with a white guy protagonist? I think this Iron Fist comic strikes a good balance between camp and seriousness, since there is enough character development and angst for you to want to root for the main character. In general, I like the art. In Iron Fist, you can see the full-size spreads split up into bite-sized panels that I now associate with Aja after reading both this series and the new Hawkeye. The colors are more muted and textured than splashy or flat,which I typically like better, but which I also think gives the story some gravity to balance out the cheesiness of the kung fu and nameless hordes of enemies. As a random observation, I was surprised at how feminine some of the Iron Fist fighting panels looked since Danny Rand is not only svelte as far as superheroes go, but is also a graceful fighter and tumbler, rather than a basher like Captain America, for example. P.S. I could see some people being offended by the portrayal of Asians (especially the hordes of scantily-clad Asian bird girls whose chi gets consumed by the villain for power) and/or the fact that the heir to the Iron Fist's power is a white dude, but I can get past this by realizing that this is a ridiculous comic book setting, and the series was made at a time when white ninja movies were becoming popular. Plus, old kung fu movies tend to have an air of goofiness to them, and this comic channels that same feeling.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Danielle

    Read this review and more on my blog. I was browsing the Amazon store when I found this available for free (it was free when I got it on December 30th 2016), so of course I had to get it! A new character for me to dive into, I could not wait. Now it is no secret in my family that I have a bias for DC over Marvel, the main reason being I grew up with DC not Marvel. When I started reading comic books, the first comic book that I seriously read was Old Man Logan, not Batman like I expected. So I do t Read this review and more on my blog. I was browsing the Amazon store when I found this available for free (it was free when I got it on December 30th 2016), so of course I had to get it! A new character for me to dive into, I could not wait. Now it is no secret in my family that I have a bias for DC over Marvel, the main reason being I grew up with DC not Marvel. When I started reading comic books, the first comic book that I seriously read was Old Man Logan, not Batman like I expected. So I do try and keep my mind open around the DC vs Marvel debate when reading comic books, but unfortunately it is stories like this that make me realise why I love DC. Lets start with the art style, for me this was the best part of this comic book. At times it did not draw my attention to where it should have been which lost the flow of the comic. During the fight scenes, the style chosen seemed to be less coherent and I got lost as to what was going on and how it related to the pervious panel. The actual storyline seemed like an origin story for Iron Fist. We follow Danny Rand on him deciding on some business decisions that affect him as Iron Fist. Also a previous Iron Fist makes an appearance that makes Danny Rand question what he was told about being the Iron Fist. If you enjoy the character of Iron Fist or have a understanding of his character, then I suspect that you will enjoy this story more than I did.

  18. 5 out of 5

    James Arlemagne

    This is one of those stories that doesn't make you feel like you need to know more about the character or that you are missing something. Brubaker creates a solid story in a style that generates an experience that maximizes the use of a limited page count. An excellent stand alone trade - highly recommended. This is one of those stories that doesn't make you feel like you need to know more about the character or that you are missing something. Brubaker creates a solid story in a style that generates an experience that maximizes the use of a limited page count. An excellent stand alone trade - highly recommended.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Mike

    After reading all of Brubaker's Captain America run, this feels like a knock-off of the whole epic, history-spanning story arc we saw there. Other than that tho, Fraction brings these characters to life with modern, natural-sounding (and funny) dialogue, and the action is suitably fluid and compelling in the art. After reading all of Brubaker's Captain America run, this feels like a knock-off of the whole epic, history-spanning story arc we saw there. Other than that tho, Fraction brings these characters to life with modern, natural-sounding (and funny) dialogue, and the action is suitably fluid and compelling in the art.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Adriana

    Solid art with a (slightly) confusing plot line that keeps the action front and center. I do concede that I might have been confused due to my utter lack of knowledge when it comes to this particular character, but I wonder what a casual reader (someone intersted after watching the Netflix show) will make of all the background elements that are included, from Heroes for Hire to the Civil War.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Katie

    I have no idea what's going on but I desperately want a comic series about that lady Iron Fist. Like, they keep rebooting everything instead of making a series about 1545 AD Wu Ao-Shi pirate lady Iron Fist? WHAT THE CRAP I have no idea what's going on but I desperately want a comic series about that lady Iron Fist. Like, they keep rebooting everything instead of making a series about 1545 AD Wu Ao-Shi pirate lady Iron Fist? WHAT THE CRAP

  22. 5 out of 5

    Dan

    First time read Iron Fist,and very interesting. It was cool seeing the different ones throughout time,and explaining how he became the Iron Fist.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Allie

    FREE TODAY ON COMIXOLOGY I had never even heard of Iron Fist before, but after reading this I'll definitely keep reading it. FREE TODAY ON COMIXOLOGY I had never even heard of Iron Fist before, but after reading this I'll definitely keep reading it.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Keith

    So confused have I been by the suckfest that is the Iron Fist Netflix show, I found myself wondering: what is the point of this character? What is supposed to be so cool about him? I think that the one thing the MCU has almost always gotten right is demonstrating why you should like a bunch of characters whose comics you've never read. I really can't think of one Marvel protagonist I haven't found more charming after watching their respective movie or show -- in fact, with the Netflix series', I' So confused have I been by the suckfest that is the Iron Fist Netflix show, I found myself wondering: what is the point of this character? What is supposed to be so cool about him? I think that the one thing the MCU has almost always gotten right is demonstrating why you should like a bunch of characters whose comics you've never read. I really can't think of one Marvel protagonist I haven't found more charming after watching their respective movie or show -- in fact, with the Netflix series', I've felt so completely keyed in to what makes Daredevil, Jessica Jones, and Luke Cage cool that I've had no desire to seek out their comics afterward. I've already gotten 'it,' whatever it is, and I've gotten it for 13 damn hours. Ready to move on. Not so with Iron Fist. We're currently about 9 episodes deep and I think it is just starting(?) to get good, but it honestly just might be a TV version of Stockholm's Syndrome. And I haven't really been convinced by the ongoing internet argument that the character should have been rewritten as Asian, because it does seem like the incongruity of a white dude with ancient kung fu powers is sort of essential to the character (despite my not really understanding the character at all.) The comic-nerd-internet overwhelmingly recommends Immortal Iron Fist as the modern iteration of the character that gets it right, and although I didn't love this first volume, I did (obviously) like it a lot more than the show. It also gave me a little bit more to chew on about what is supposed to be the 'formula' for an Iron Fist story, and I think part of the TV show's problem is that Iron Fist is a street-level character that requires Hollywood special effects. It's not enough to give him the occasional glowing fist: he needs to be fighting interdimensional gods and dragons, and we need a lot more flashbacks to the Himilayas. Without those ingredients, it's basically a lot of martial arts starring a self-serious white dude fighting some ninjas, and like, Daredevil already does that, and does it better. What's more, Daredevil's sandbox includes mob bosses and supervillains -- like Batman (because he is obviously Batman), Daredevil has a lot of narrative flexibility while still maintaining a consistent central tone. And since one of the shades of Daredevil is lots o'ninjas, that doesn't give Iron Fist a lot of room to move. I mean, the problems with overlapping story characteristics is only a problem in the scope of the Netflix series, which is a weird thing to be complaining about on Goodreads. But I do think it's interesting how the translation of these characters from one medium to another can either serve to bring out what's essential about them, or reveal that there's little that's essential in the first place. The one thing Iron Fist has going for it is, in fact, the weird East-meets-West kung-fusion of the everyday with the mystical, but the problem is that this has become questionable territory in modern times. Admittedly, I think Big Trouble in Little China and Mortal Kombat and even the first ten minutes of Gremlins are all fucking awesome, and I know I shouldn't, but for whatever reason the tropes of Eastern mysticism in a Western setting don't offend me the way that Native American characters named 'Tracker' totally do. It might be because Chinese cinema is just as excited by dragons and mystic warriors as American media is -- and it also might be that, for whatever reason, western culture is still more intellectually aware of Asian whitewashing than we are emotionally aware of the blunders we've made (and continue to make) regarding our representation of other cultures. Please note that in no way am I an apologist for any of the media I'm describing here -- instead, I'm really just trying to roll the cultural moment back and forth in order to figure out why I'm not immediately offended by the idea of Iron Fist, when I feel like I should be. Like, when Danny Rand tries to teach his highly-trained female Japanese sidekick that she'd fight better if she knew kung fu in one of the early episodes of the Iron Fist TV show, I am genuinely offended by how fucked up that is. When the original creator of the character comes out and says he's sick and tired of people being politically correct in wanting an Asian version of the character, I want to punch that dude. I do think that the Iron Fist show would have worked with an Asian lead -- but I also think it would have needed to be an Asian American lead, because I'm still convinced that part of what makes the character tick is that East-meets-West formula. But hell, maybe I'm wrong there too! Maybe the key to the story is the modern vs the ancient, the real vs the unreal. Maybe Iron Fist just needs more dragons than a TV budget allows. Anyway, The Immortal Iron Fist is a comic book. It's not as good as my friends say, but it's not as bad as that TV show. The art is great, the dialogue isn't bad -- I still can't tell if Danny Rand is supposed to have a personality or what, because he really doesn't. But there's at least a few panels of a dragon, which seems important to note.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Skjam!

    When Daniel Rand was nine years old, his father Wendell Rand took him, his mother Heather, and business partner Harold Meachum on an expedition to the mystical city of K’un L’un, which appears in the mountains of China only once every ten years. When Danny slipped into a crevasse, endangering his parents, Meachum, who was in love with Heather, treacherously murdered Wendell. Heather refused to go with Meachum, and continued onward with her son. They came across a bridge that hadn’t been there be When Daniel Rand was nine years old, his father Wendell Rand took him, his mother Heather, and business partner Harold Meachum on an expedition to the mystical city of K’un L’un, which appears in the mountains of China only once every ten years. When Danny slipped into a crevasse, endangering his parents, Meachum, who was in love with Heather, treacherously murdered Wendell. Heather refused to go with Meachum, and continued onward with her son. They came across a bridge that hadn’t been there before, but a pack of wolves attacked. Heather sacrificed herself to give Danny time to cross the bridge. Archers from K’un L’un attempted to rescue Heather, but were unable to drive away the wolves before her death. As the years passed inside the mystical city, Danny Rand became the best martial arts student of Lei Kung, the city’s guardian. Eventually, he was allowed to battle the dragon Shou-Lao the Undying and plunge his fist into its heart. This branded his chest with the crest of Shou-Lao, and gave Danny the ability to focus his ch’i energy into his fist, making it like unto a thing of iron. He is not the first Iron Fist, but questions about the past ones are not encouraged. At the next opportunity, Danny left K’un L’un to seek revenge upon Harold Meachum, a quest that ultimately proved hollow. He instead embarked upon a career as the martial arts superhero Iron Fist. Iron Fist was created by Roy Thomas and Gil Kane as part of a martial arts fad at Marvel Comics inspired by the popularity of kung fu movies at the time. He first appeared in Marvel Premiere #15 in 1974, ran for ten issues, then got his own starring series. It was notable for the rare second-person narration. (“You are Iron Fist, and you are about to die!”) When sales fell, Danny Rand was teamed up with blaxploitation-inspired character Luke Cage in Power Man and Iron Fist. As the “Heroes for Hire”, they became an iconic team for Marvel. The volume under discussion here appeared in 2007, after several status changes (including being dead for a while) for Iron Fist. As of the opening of this series, Daniel Rand is the head of Rand International, the company his father and Harold Meachum had founded. They have been approached by the Chinese corporation Wai-Go Industries, which wants to buy mag-lev train technology and infrastructure from Rand Intl. Danny senses something wrong with the deal, and cancels it, much to the dismay of Jeryn Hogarth, the person who actually runs the company for Danny. Investigating the offices of Wai-Go as Iron Fist, the hero learns that the company is actually a front for the terrorist organization HYDRA, and is forced to battle their agents and their latest weapon, the Mechagorgon. Ordinarily, Iron Fist would call in his allies in the superhero community to assist with a threat of this size, but this series takes place during the Civil War event, when all superhumans are required to register their identities with the government or else. Many of his friends have joined the pro-Registration side, which Danny is opposed to, and the remainder are now fugitives. (Iron Fist only remains free due to a legal loophole.) At about the same time, the Steel Serpent resurfaces. Davos, the son of Lei Kung, believes that the power of the Iron Fist is his by right, and has frequently tried to steal it from Danny. He has come to believe there is a conspiracy to keep him from attaining the Iron Fist. (Mild spoiler: he’s not entirely wrong.) Steel Serpent has allied with HYDRA and a previously unknown being called the Crane Mother, and is looking for a man named Orson Randall. Orson Randall (the name is probably not a coincidence) turns out to have been the previous holder of the Iron Fist title, one of the Immortal Weapons. He relinquished the title and disappeared for reasons not adequately explained in this volume, but can still tap into the power of Shou-Lao. Flushed out of hiding, Orson seeks out Danny Rand to give the newest Iron Fist some vital information about their legacy. Lots of kung-fu action ensues! As the original Iron Fist stories were inspired by the low-budget kung-fu flicks of the early 1970s, this one is heavily influenced by the special effects extravaganzas of the more recent wuxia movies. There are mystical kung fu powers being unleashed right and left, and huge battle scenes. The art goes well with this, including some nifty effects to show how Iron Fist finds the precise areas to attack. Iron Fist’s backstory is somewhat problematic these days, given its use of the Mighty Whitey trope (white person goes to foreign land and is better at what the natives do than they are themselves.) This series tries to mitigate it somewhat by revealing a more diverse array of past Iron Fists, and hinting in this volume that there’s a specific reason the last two have been Caucasian. (It remains to be seen how the upcoming Netflix series will deal with the issue.) Orson Randall is a good guest star as a pulp hero gone sour, and with hints at his own extensive backstory and heritage. Most of the plot threads are still left dangling at the end of this volume, to be resolved later in the series. The volume also contains a short piece referring to a period when Danny Rand was wearing the costume of Daredevil while Matt Murdock was otherwise occupied. Overall, a good update to the Iron Fist concept and a rollicking adventure story.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Emily

    I wondered if the comic book would be better than the show. The answer? I think so, but it still didn't grab me enough to make me rush out and get the next volume. The appearance of the Heroes for Hire sparked my interest, though. Maybe I'll try one of those. I wondered if the comic book would be better than the show. The answer? I think so, but it still didn't grab me enough to make me rush out and get the next volume. The appearance of the Heroes for Hire sparked my interest, though. Maybe I'll try one of those.

  27. 5 out of 5

    A.J. Howells

    Read the full review at The Books in My Life! Before I dawn the critical lenses, note that I do not believe all stories need to have a social edginess to them in order to be meaningful. Also note that I won’t be able to help myself in unfairly comparing this print series to its Netflix counterparts, which is peaches to plums. That being said, the fact that Jessica Jones featured a super-powered heroine rendered helpless in the wake of rape-induced PTSD and Luke Cage featured a black hero donning Read the full review at The Books in My Life! Before I dawn the critical lenses, note that I do not believe all stories need to have a social edginess to them in order to be meaningful. Also note that I won’t be able to help myself in unfairly comparing this print series to its Netflix counterparts, which is peaches to plums. That being said, the fact that Jessica Jones featured a super-powered heroine rendered helpless in the wake of rape-induced PTSD and Luke Cage featured a black hero donning a bullet-ridden hoodie gave each series a politically-tinged edge, but not a focus. The fact that these “comic book” stories (Yes, I know they are TV Shows and not comic books! Nonetheless, they are stories about super-people punching their problems.) don’t beat their viewers over the head with politics the way classics like Watchmen (1985) or Batman: The Dark Knight Returns (1986) elevates their enjoyability. If I’ve learned anything in in 2016, it’s that I can’t ignore politics completely, as it’ll eventually walk right up and grab me by the pussy. I don’t, however, need it to be the focal point of the culture I inhabit. Danny Rand doesn’t beat the audience over the head with politics because there is no political edge here. He’s a billionaire using his wealth to help fuel his war on crime. He attained his powers though loss of his parents and an Asiatic adventure. (Stop me if you’ve heard this before.) Additionally, despite the fact that he is one of a long-line of Iron Fists, he’s white, as is the only other living Iron Fist in this story. I know I’m not the first to raise an eyebrow over Rand’s skin color, but think about it. This 2009 series is not a reboot, but it is a jumping-on point. If you know that Marvel’s Civil War (2007) happened, then you’re ready to read this volume. Might this not be a good time to pull in a new iteration of Iron Fist, considering that the character is not a novel one in this mythos? This is not heavy-handed stuff. This is a double bill of kung-fu zaniness and blaxploitation suave, and Brubaker and Fraction set the tone well without cranking the goofiness into absurdity. Yet a bit more social consciousness could go a long way. Consider Gojira (1954), the first Godzilla movie. After its debut, the entire franchise followed a path the American version of Gojira, re-titled Godzilla: King of the Monsters, set. The original was a stark nightmare reflecting the social consciousness of a populace that had recently faced nuclear devastation. It was enjoyable both as social commentary and as a film about a mutant T-Rex stomping on model buildings. The American version jammed in a white protagonist and stripped the film of its political edge. And while I adore the nearly 30 films that followed, they are undoubtedly pure cinematic junk food, and they have been until the most recent iteration, which is very Japanese and very political. My point is that a balance of smashy-smashy and political savvy would perhaps have made for a more enjoyable viewing experience with Shin Godzilla (2016) and the same can be said for this iteration of Iron Fist. Seeing his brief team-up with Luke Cage, Misty Knight, and Colleen Wing reveals this absurdity. The story shifts its tone to blaxploitation, effectively white-washing (black-washing?) Colleen (who I later discovered to be Japanese only after a Wikipedia check) and leaving Rand to break the scene’s otherwise focused style. Maybe none of this would matter if the story displayed some originality. It’s enjoyable the way trashy cinema is enjoyable. I like knowing that these distinct tones exist within a larger universe and can somehow link to other stories fairly seamlessly. That being said, there’s not much here to hook me through the rest of this series and it leaves me with a little less enthusiasm for the upcoming Netflix show. And that’s the real problem here. After all, it’s now 2017, and soon nobody will be reading because they’ll have too much to binge-watch.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jordan

    While I always have a soft spot for any of Marvel's B-list "street level" heroes, I have really warmed to Luke Cage and Iron Fist lately. I get jazzed any time they make an appearance, and I'm sure it's due to Brian Bendis and his spot-on characterization of them over the last few years in "New Avengers." Building off of that exposure, Brubaker and Fraction have created an outstanding solo book and possibly the best new title Marvel launched this year. We get a deeper look than ever before at Dan While I always have a soft spot for any of Marvel's B-list "street level" heroes, I have really warmed to Luke Cage and Iron Fist lately. I get jazzed any time they make an appearance, and I'm sure it's due to Brian Bendis and his spot-on characterization of them over the last few years in "New Avengers." Building off of that exposure, Brubaker and Fraction have created an outstanding solo book and possibly the best new title Marvel launched this year. We get a deeper look than ever before at Danny Rand as an individual and the Iron Fist as a concept with a rich and interesting heritage. There are contributions from more than half a dozen artists in this initial story arc (often within the same issue), but it all works. The art switches as the story jumps to different time periods, enhancing the effect rather than detracting from it as fill-in art usually does. David Aja uses the same gritty style full of dirt and shadows that Alex Maleev perfected on "Daredevil" and really nails everything from a Chinese takeout dinner between two old friends to an all-out kung fu fight with a legion of Hydra troops. Volume one was an unexpected dose of fun and excitement and I can't wait for more.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Edward

    This is a pretty cool book. I'm familiar with the street level heroes at Marvel except for Iron Fist. I wanted to get an idea of who he was before the Netflix show starts. Basically he's a cross between Batman and Daredevil but with magical Kung fu powers and a long lineage of Iron Fists. I love old Kung fu movies so his character was really appealing to me. The mythology behind him with k'un l'un and shou Lao and the brief glimpses of old Iron Fists was pretty interesting too. Some issues I had This is a pretty cool book. I'm familiar with the street level heroes at Marvel except for Iron Fist. I wanted to get an idea of who he was before the Netflix show starts. Basically he's a cross between Batman and Daredevil but with magical Kung fu powers and a long lineage of Iron Fists. I love old Kung fu movies so his character was really appealing to me. The mythology behind him with k'un l'un and shou Lao and the brief glimpses of old Iron Fists was pretty interesting too. Some issues I had though is that Danny Rand is yet another rich guy who owns his own corporation and plays superhero. Batman and Iron Man being rich guys makes sense because of all the tech they use but Iron Fist has magical powers. Why does he need to be a rich guy too? He even has his own Jarvis/Alfred character in Jeryn. Also The art was just ok. It's very simplistic and gritty which works well with Daredevil or Punisher but I'm not sure it really fit with Iron Fist. Aside from those minor things it was a good book. The ending left on somewhat of a cliffhanger and now I want to read the rest of the series.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Azim Durrani

    3.5 stars Had no interest in Kung Fu related superheroes before and dont anymore after reading this collection. The only reason I got around to reading it in the first place was because of the 3 names on the Creative team i.e Ed Brubaker,Matt Fraction and David Aja. I dont really feel much of Brubaker's footprint here. As I said earlier reading the first story arc "the last iron fist story" makes me feel like im reading a hawkye spinoff which also was written by Matt Fraction and illustrated by 3.5 stars Had no interest in Kung Fu related superheroes before and dont anymore after reading this collection. The only reason I got around to reading it in the first place was because of the 3 names on the Creative team i.e Ed Brubaker,Matt Fraction and David Aja. I dont really feel much of Brubaker's footprint here. As I said earlier reading the first story arc "the last iron fist story" makes me feel like im reading a hawkye spinoff which also was written by Matt Fraction and illustrated by David Aja. But in actuality this was done before Hawkeye. So in a way it reads like a Beta version of the formula that made Hawkeye so great. Lastly, david Aja's Danny Rand looks so much like Clint Barton its not funny. He looks like his long lost twin brother. Moving on,theres a ton of lore here revolving around the Iron Fist Mantle,though not great but still good one shots that appear back and forth in the main issues.

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