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Has your life been a failure? Let's make your death a success With the twenty-first century just a distant memory and the world in environmental chaos, many people have lost the will to live. And business is brisk at The Suicide Shop. Run by the Tuvache family for generations, the shop offers an amazing variety of ways to end it all, with something to fit every budget. The Has your life been a failure? Let's make your death a success With the twenty-first century just a distant memory and the world in environmental chaos, many people have lost the will to live. And business is brisk at The Suicide Shop. Run by the Tuvache family for generations, the shop offers an amazing variety of ways to end it all, with something to fit every budget. The Tuvaches go mournfully about their business, taking pride in the morbid service they provide. Until the youngest member of the family threatens to destroy their contented misery by confronting them with something they ve never encountered before: a love of life.


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Has your life been a failure? Let's make your death a success With the twenty-first century just a distant memory and the world in environmental chaos, many people have lost the will to live. And business is brisk at The Suicide Shop. Run by the Tuvache family for generations, the shop offers an amazing variety of ways to end it all, with something to fit every budget. The Has your life been a failure? Let's make your death a success With the twenty-first century just a distant memory and the world in environmental chaos, many people have lost the will to live. And business is brisk at The Suicide Shop. Run by the Tuvache family for generations, the shop offers an amazing variety of ways to end it all, with something to fit every budget. The Tuvaches go mournfully about their business, taking pride in the morbid service they provide. Until the youngest member of the family threatens to destroy their contented misery by confronting them with something they ve never encountered before: a love of life.

30 review for The Suicide Shop

  1. 4 out of 5

    Idarah

    "Too many people do an amateurish job. You know, out of a hundred and fifty thousand people who make the attempt, one hundred and thirty-eight thousand fail. These people often find themselves disabled in wheelchairs, disfigured for life, but with us … Our suicides are guaranteed. Death or your money back!" –Mishima Tuvache I don't usually venture into books that I'm not sure I'll like. Probably close minded of me, but there are so many books that I know I will like and not nearly enough time to "Too many people do an amateurish job. You know, out of a hundred and fifty thousand people who make the attempt, one hundred and thirty-eight thousand fail. These people often find themselves disabled in wheelchairs, disfigured for life, but with us … Our suicides are guaranteed. Death or your money back!" –Mishima Tuvache I don't usually venture into books that I'm not sure I'll like. Probably close minded of me, but there are so many books that I know I will like and not nearly enough time to read them. A friend recommended this little French novella, and I was willing to give it a try because it wasn't very long. She said it was funny, and boy was that the understatement of the year. This book is hilarious! It's a sort of Beetlejuice meets The Hunger Games breakfast mimosa. It makes you question a lot of things, like whether or not you should be laughing...or drinking alcohol before 10 am. Far into the future, the world is on its ninth cat life and people are killing themselves in throngs. To meet the growing demand, the Tuvache family's generations old Suicide Shop has been providing every tool necessary to end one's life. Everything from sepukko paraphernalia to hemlock are in stock and consultations are free. But what is a family to do when their youngest child is so naturally cheerful?! Is there a better solution to a disappointing life other than suicide? Alan Tuvache seems to think so, and his infectious optimism seems to be leaving its mark. A good read if you're looking to read something a bit offbeat and enjoy satire at its blackest.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kortessa Giachanatzi

    The Suicide Shop is the first book of black humour I bought (unfortunately bought). I really wanted to like it because I could not imagine how comedy and morbidity can be combined. I really tried to. I read, and read trying to find something to attract me and keep my interest alive, but unfortunately something like that never happened:-(... Deapite the fact that it was a pretty short book I struggled to finish it. Through the story we follow a family in their small bussiness which is one that he The Suicide Shop is the first book of black humour I bought (unfortunately bought). I really wanted to like it because I could not imagine how comedy and morbidity can be combined. I really tried to. I read, and read trying to find something to attract me and keep my interest alive, but unfortunately something like that never happened:-(... Deapite the fact that it was a pretty short book I struggled to finish it. Through the story we follow a family in their small bussiness which is one that helps people in commiting suicide. Suicide in the book is something very usual, by the way. The whole family follows the stereotype of the time, by being sad and miserable. Exçept for their younger son who ia supposed to have a problem, and that is him being happy and content in his life. I believe that the author tries to convey us something deep about the alienation of our society and the frenzy pace of the life we have, but he fails to do so. The book is utterly boring and dull. It is really so and repetitive. The charactera have no developement or depth. Well, I cannot tell it was this specific book I didn't like or the genre it belongs to. As I mentioned before I have never read something of this kind previously...

  3. 5 out of 5

    Armina Salemi

    Mostly an average book, however, what an ending..!

  4. 5 out of 5

    R K

    3.75 This book will be hard to discuss without going into spoilers but I'll do my best. We are many years into the future. The world is a complete wreck. Climate change has ruined he environment. It rains sulfuric acid. Countries are ready to start wars at the drop of a pin. Every single culture and religion has meshed into one diagnostic thing that's not questioned. The currency system is also meshed together. People don't seem to do much. And suicide is abundant. In comes the Tuvache family and 3.75 This book will be hard to discuss without going into spoilers but I'll do my best. We are many years into the future. The world is a complete wreck. Climate change has ruined he environment. It rains sulfuric acid. Countries are ready to start wars at the drop of a pin. Every single culture and religion has meshed into one diagnostic thing that's not questioned. The currency system is also meshed together. People don't seem to do much. And suicide is abundant. In comes the Tuvache family and their little shop that provides items to kill oneself in a multitude of ways. This family plays it's role to the max. From birth they are encouraged to be depressed and suicidal in order to best serve their customer and understand their pain. Happiness is not encouraged. Birthday's are celebrated as being one day closer to death. Even the names they are given are after infamous people who have killed themselves. But here's the twist, they are not allowed to kill themselves in order to keep the business going. Into this family comes a young boy named Alan. From the start, Alan is not perturbed by his world or family and is constantly jolly, kind, and encouraging. Everything his family is, he isn't. His family is appalled and frustrated by this and repeatedly try to change him. But it doesn't work and bit by bit he starts to effect them. It's a splendid book to show a multitude of themes depending on how you interpret it, especially since suicide is an extremely taboo topic in Western culture. The only thing that kept this from a 4 star rating is the translation and its effect on the writing style. I felt as if the translation wasn't handled with care. It really felt like a rushed job because some the lines said by the characters felt flat. Alan's optimistic nature felt a bit silly and forced at times, especially when he was singing to himself. And the family's development seemed like a sudden jump over a gradual shift. I don't know if this is the author's style or the depth of literature lost in translation. And now for Spoilers. Below is my interpretation of the story, so don't read if you want to read this book. At the very end of this book, the family has a change of mind and business. They now wish to help people with their problems through food, music, and conversation. They are ever thankful to Alan but when they are telling him this, he accidentally falls out the window. They manage to send rope to him and as he's climbing up, he observes his happy family and lets go of the rope. Here is where the story ends. Interpretation 1: Alan was the only character who was seriously depressed. Often, when one is seriously depressed and suicidal, they invert those emotions and instead portray extreme happiness and energy towards those around them. It might be Teulé's attempt to show that many of us heighten our emotions to extremes that they are not as many of the customers have very simple reasons as to why they want to die. Meanwhile, those who truly feel depressed and lost associate these emotions as normal and not substantial if they are unable to be open about it and thus, don't ever feel comfortable in their skin. Alan himself asked every customer the reason to why they wanted to die and always tried to help them. It would make sense given how initially, he was alienated from his family and from everyone in general due to his happy nature. When he saw how happy his family is now, he was happy to have helped them (be of use), but realized that he will no longer be needed and thus lets go of life. There are flaws in this theory which brings me to interpretation 2. Interpretation 2: Alan died because he was brainwashed. This is much sinister but really fits given the plot. Alan's father sends Alan to this military base where they train soldiers to be suicide bombers (although they're not really called that). When he comes back, he claims it was because they gave upon trying to brainwash him due to his optimistic nature, but is it? Throughout the rest of the book, he doesn't seem to change much but then dies right when his family embraces this new change to their life. Maybe his aim was to hurt his family, after all, they would be devastated given the moment he decided to die.

  5. 4 out of 5

    D.J.

    The Suicide Shop by Jean Teule and published by Gallic Books. I first read about it on Scott Pack's blog. Consumed with jealousy over the cleverness of the title, I jumped at the opportunity to review it, hoping to find it was nothing more than a clever title. It arrived on my doorstep as a spiral bound manuscript. I spent several Aspie moments delighting over how it opened out flat without the usual struggle to break the spine of the book...before I forced myself to stop digressing and got on wi The Suicide Shop by Jean Teule and published by Gallic Books. I first read about it on Scott Pack's blog. Consumed with jealousy over the cleverness of the title, I jumped at the opportunity to review it, hoping to find it was nothing more than a clever title. It arrived on my doorstep as a spiral bound manuscript. I spent several Aspie moments delighting over how it opened out flat without the usual struggle to break the spine of the book...before I forced myself to stop digressing and got on with discovering the contents of 'The Suicide Shop'. The blurb describes it as a black comedy, a term I've seen used many times before without grapsing the concept until I read this novel. It is set sometime in the future and tells the tale of a rather morose and dysfunctional family who are perfectly suited to managing the day to day business of their 'suicide shop'. The fact that they have no repeat customers is testament of their skillful sales recommendations to individual customers. The only aberration in their fur lined rut of misery is the youngest child who, from the moment of his birth, is an inextinguishable ray of golden sunshine. I found the book filled with exquisite imagery: 'Soap bubbles are flying up from it. They rise and fall, float, coloured and shining, in the Suicide Shop. They find their way, carelessly, between the shelving.' 'Something escapes from Mishima's throat like a song that has lost its way.' 'Overexposed in the artificial brightness, he is also haloed by the vibrations of an incredible self-destructive passion.' are just a few examples of the vivid, emotive, literary treasures that await the lucky reader. Towards the end I began to feel the story line was becoming slightly tedious in its predictability. I thought that until I reached the startling surprise of an ending! Then I realised how the last chapters had lulled me into making false assumptions in order to hammer the final message home. I recommend this book to everyone simply on the genius of that alone. This book isn't big, but it is clever!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Ana

    I'm not sure if I have a problem with the writing style or the translation, but one thing is clear: the humor fell a little flat for me. With a book like this, where the plot is linear and character growth is nonexistent language matters. But, what can you do?! Blame the translator? This book was a fast read so overall it was okay but I can't see myself remembering much of it a month from now. I'm not sure if I have a problem with the writing style or the translation, but one thing is clear: the humor fell a little flat for me. With a book like this, where the plot is linear and character growth is nonexistent language matters. But, what can you do?! Blame the translator? This book was a fast read so overall it was okay but I can't see myself remembering much of it a month from now.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Bianca

    HAS YOUR LIFE BEEN A FAILURE? LET'S MAKE YOUR DEATH A SUCCESS! The Suicide Shop can help you achieve, well, a good suicide. The Suicide Shop is owned and operated by the Touvache family; the head of the family is Mishima Touvache and his wife is Lucrece Tuvache. They have three children: Vincent is anorexic and suffers from migraines; Marylin is boring, dreary and totally unappealing. And then, there's Alan, the cherubic, smiley, blond boy, who was the result of his parents testing a condom w HAS YOUR LIFE BEEN A FAILURE? LET'S MAKE YOUR DEATH A SUCCESS! The Suicide Shop can help you achieve, well, a good suicide. The Suicide Shop is owned and operated by the Touvache family; the head of the family is Mishima Touvache and his wife is Lucrece Tuvache. They have three children: Vincent is anorexic and suffers from migraines; Marylin is boring, dreary and totally unappealing. And then, there's Alan, the cherubic, smiley, blond boy, who was the result of his parents testing a condom with a hole in it (the one they sell to the people who want to die of sexually transmitted disease). The parents are at a loss to explain the happy disposition and optimism that Alan displays continuously. Will the other members of the family manage to change Alan into being more like them? Read and you will find out. This was such an offbeat, dark and funny novella. And very imaginative. I enjoyed it a great deal, despite death and suicide being at its core. It's quirky, brilliantly dark, and quite different. Recommended I've received this novel via NetGalley, in exchange for an honest review. Many thanks to Gallic Books for the opportunity to read and review this novel.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Maritina Mela

    As a fan of black humor and as a person who was told that this feels like the Addams Family on paper, I decided to give this novel a chance. Here, we follow the Touvaches, a family of mentally unstable merchants of death, living in a futuristic dystopian society, who make a living out of selling stuff like ropes, Japanese swords and all kinds of poison in order to assist people in taking their lives. The Touvache family consists of Mishima, the patriarch of the family, Lucrece his wife and their c As a fan of black humor and as a person who was told that this feels like the Addams Family on paper, I decided to give this novel a chance. Here, we follow the Touvaches, a family of mentally unstable merchants of death, living in a futuristic dystopian society, who make a living out of selling stuff like ropes, Japanese swords and all kinds of poison in order to assist people in taking their lives. The Touvache family consists of Mishima, the patriarch of the family, Lucrece his wife and their children, Vincent, Marilyn and Alan. The two eldest children, keep the tradition of... wanting to die, that has been running in the family for as long as their little shop. Vincent is always tormented by migraines, is anorexic and has an extremely violent temper. He is also very creative when it comes to death, since his biggest dream is to open a suicide theme park. Marilyn hates her appearance, has no friends and constantly begs her parents to let her die, something they won't do because she is a great help in the shop. But the youngest Touvache, is the black sheep of the family. Because, you see, he was born a happy and normal baby. He is a normal kid who sings, laughs, draws, loves his family very much and deep down he doesn't agree with what his family does for living, always trying to talk customers out of going through with their plan. As he grows older, he even goes on to tamper with his parents' stuff (for example he trows away cyanide laced candies, replaces poisons with laughing gas etc.) so that the clients stay alive. Things begin to change after Marilyn's 18th birthday. Since her parents cannot grant her the gift of allowing her to die, they decide to give her a shot that will turn her saliva venomous and use her in the shop for clients who want to commit suicide by a poisonous kiss. The night of her birthday, Marilyn begins to feel a change. She transitions from a depressed plain girl to a femme fatale and her life finally has a purpose. She is a hit in her parents's shop and has many admirers who do not seem to die after her kiss for some reason. But when she denies to kiss a customer and admits she has feelings for him, cursing her venomous gift, Alan and Vincent confess that they changed the poisonous shot, with a shot of insulin. She is actually grateful, but Mishima is furious at Alan for basically tricking the customers. But it's not only her. Vincent is cured of his anorexia and his temper mellows a bit and Lucrece, despite her initial resistance, begins to warm up towards Alan and the way he views life. The only one who doesn't seem positively affected by the situation, is Mishima. He spirals into depression instead and wails at what his shop and family have become. Specifically the shop has turned into a...club/restaurant. When Alan accidentally sabotages the mass suicide of some corrupt politicians who have decided to own up to their mistakes, Mishima becomes furious and threatens to commit suicide, to the horror of his now happy family who threatens to do the same. During this fight, Alan trips and falls from an open window. His family tries to catch him before he crashes to the ground. When he is almost pulled back up, his family laughs and denounces their old depressed ways. Even Mishima. Content that the transformation of his family is complete, Alan...lets go and commits suicide.... And now, on to my thoughts. Well, first of all, this doesn't feel like the Addams family and I also wasn't a big fan of the black humor here, which was too little and too flat. The book isn't awful, but to be honest, it is a bit monotonous. The dialogue is a bit meh and the parts where Marilyn's hot body was described, were a bit off putting. I appreciate the original subject of the book and the ways the author tried to make it thought provoking but it wasn't as groundbreaking for me. Plus, I wasn't a fan of the emotional abuse Alan was going through and I still don't know how to feel about the ending. Because, yeah, it was a twist I'm sure no one saw coming but also, a weird way to transform the message. Like, yeah, life is a gift and we should make the most of it etc etc, but, are you sure the best way to make the reader feel that, is to have the one non depressed character, jump to his own death, after the rest of his family finds happiness? If you made it this far, congratulations! 'Till next time, take care :) :) :)

  9. 5 out of 5

    Kristina

    The Suicide Shop is an original, highly inventive, darkly humorous story. I can't remember the last time I read such an offbeat book. I may need to read it again because the surprise ending really caught me off guard. Altogether it's a quick but enjoyable read. Thank you to Netgalley and Gallic Books for a copy of this in exchange for an honest review. The Suicide Shop is an original, highly inventive, darkly humorous story. I can't remember the last time I read such an offbeat book. I may need to read it again because the surprise ending really caught me off guard. Altogether it's a quick but enjoyable read. Thank you to Netgalley and Gallic Books for a copy of this in exchange for an honest review.

  10. 5 out of 5

    David Katzman

    Abandoned. I like a good anti-humanist, Gothic satire every once in a while. But this was cruel without being funny. It was like The Adams Family plus emotional child abuse. I'm sure it "turns around" by the end, and everyone learns a good lesson. But no. Fuck this noise. Abandoned. I like a good anti-humanist, Gothic satire every once in a while. But this was cruel without being funny. It was like The Adams Family plus emotional child abuse. I'm sure it "turns around" by the end, and everyone learns a good lesson. But no. Fuck this noise.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Jin

    The initial idea of a shop to guarantee suicide and death is great. But unfortunately, the story and character development were not as good as the idea. Also, I think the message that life is worth living, was too weak and not strong enough compared to the suicide shop idea. After reading this one, I only remember about the shop supporting people to arrange a successful suicide.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Craig Wallwork

    Jean Teule has created a sublime and satirical look at the dynamics of family life set against the backcloth of mortality. Balancing precariously on the precipice of life, the desperate and lonely folk of Teule’s future world seek a means to end their pathetic lives, and find it within a small shop aptly titled, The Suicide shop. Having been in the Tuvache family for generations, morose and embittered father Mishima, and his dutiful and equally morbid wife Lucrece, have forged a business designe Jean Teule has created a sublime and satirical look at the dynamics of family life set against the backcloth of mortality. Balancing precariously on the precipice of life, the desperate and lonely folk of Teule’s future world seek a means to end their pathetic lives, and find it within a small shop aptly titled, The Suicide shop. Having been in the Tuvache family for generations, morose and embittered father Mishima, and his dutiful and equally morbid wife Lucrece, have forged a business designed for one purpose – death. Teule’s detail given to the means of achieving this is nothing short of genius. From the Alan Turin frieze to the belladonna, from the digitalis petals to the corporate branded breezeblock, every conceivable and ingenious method of ending your life is catered for at the Suicide Shop with hilarious detail. Imagine if Jean Pierre Junet had remade the Adam’s Family, and you’re nearly getting there. And while funny, ingenious and awe-inspiring, it’s through innocence and sanguinity that Teule interweaves a buoyancy to the book that lifts your heels. It is the youngest of the Tuvache family, Alan, that Tuele uses to express the innocence of life that is at times suffocated by the outside world, the forces beyond our control, and callousness of evolution. Alan is the light flickering in the vast abyss of nothingness. He is hope incarnate, and much to his family’s annoyance, Alan offers salvation to the unsalvageable. I don’t want to go too much into the detail of how this is achieved, but at the end of the book you’ll feel several pounds lighter, and yet your chest will be aching. A quick and wonderful read that needs further attention. In truth, it needs to be a film, and if Teule himself doesn’t make it (he’s a filmmaker, illustrator, and TV presenter) then here’s hoping Junet does. Please, before you die, read this book!

  13. 5 out of 5

    khungkhing

    I decided to read this book because someone told me that if I love Adams Family and Tim Burton, I shouldn't miss "The Suicide Shop." 'Has your life been a failure? Let's make your death a success.' Jean Teulé is introduced me to the strangest family that seems to pop out of the Tim Burton film, Tuvache Family. This family runs the business names The Suicide Shop. The shop offers an amazing variety of ways to end your misery life, with something to fit every budget. The Tuvaches goes mournfully abo I decided to read this book because someone told me that if I love Adams Family and Tim Burton, I shouldn't miss "The Suicide Shop." 'Has your life been a failure? Let's make your death a success.' Jean Teulé is introduced me to the strangest family that seems to pop out of the Tim Burton film, Tuvache Family. This family runs the business names The Suicide Shop. The shop offers an amazing variety of ways to end your misery life, with something to fit every budget. The Tuvaches goes mournfully about their business, taking pride in the morbid service they provide. Until the youngest member of the family threatens to destroy their contented misery by confronting them with something they have never encountered before: a love of life. Despite the title and the subject matter, this is not a dark or depressing book (even though I feel depress at the end of the book). It is a very quick and easy to read. It is quirkiness, lively, and irony makes me laugh and love the Tuvaches. For me, Alan is like an angel of the Tuvaches because he teaches his family how valuable love and life are. He also shows that life can bring misery to people as well as joy. Life is like a coin, you have to flip and see another side of it.

  14. 4 out of 5

    May May

    This book takes place in a far future where pollutions reach their climax and people don't seem to care about it or being dead by polluted environment anymore. People see no meaning in living, so they simple pursue the idea of committing suicide because really, what is left to be felt? All characters were miserable, pessimistic and dull and living their unmeaningful lives except for one little boy whose smile at the infant stage disappointed and scared his parents. No one in his family is suppos This book takes place in a far future where pollutions reach their climax and people don't seem to care about it or being dead by polluted environment anymore. People see no meaning in living, so they simple pursue the idea of committing suicide because really, what is left to be felt? All characters were miserable, pessimistic and dull and living their unmeaningful lives except for one little boy whose smile at the infant stage disappointed and scared his parents. No one in his family is supposed to be happy, he was a family member but he was different, totally. Little by little he initiated some small changes in his family, one by one they began to become new people without knowing about the changes. The ending however made me sob and hurt my feelings....5*

  15. 5 out of 5

    Maral Goudarzi

    Amazing and a new story, a new way a new fantastic way to write a sad and somehow dark story! It was one of my favourites i'm so glad to choose and read this book.suggest this book to anybody who is searching for a good book to read. Amazing and a new story, a new way a new fantastic way to write a sad and somehow dark story! It was one of my favourites i'm so glad to choose and read this book.suggest this book to anybody who is searching for a good book to read.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Colin McKay Miller

    Most black comedies follow seedy individuals. Often times, the protagonist will have an epiphany (catalyzed by falling in love, discovering family and/or an increasing disenchantment with their seedy behavior) and will begin to change, even if the world they’ve lived in for so long won’t let them. Jean Teule’s The Suicide Shop, however, is a unique and delightful take on black comedy; dropping a hopeful individual into a world gone sour. At the end of the twenty-first century, the world is in in Most black comedies follow seedy individuals. Often times, the protagonist will have an epiphany (catalyzed by falling in love, discovering family and/or an increasing disenchantment with their seedy behavior) and will begin to change, even if the world they’ve lived in for so long won’t let them. Jean Teule’s The Suicide Shop, however, is a unique and delightful take on black comedy; dropping a hopeful individual into a world gone sour. At the end of the twenty-first century, the world is in increasing disarray and more and more people are looking to take themselves out. Though the Tuvache family can’t actually just kill these melancholy people, they can sell them the perfect means of ending it all—concrete blocks, guns with one bullet, poison candies—from their suicide shop. Even the Tuvache children willingly work there—the headache-riddled Vincent (with his constantly bandaged head), and Marilyn, who feels she’s too overweight and unattractive to ever find love—until the youngest Tuvache, Alan, comes along. Alan loves life, is full of joy, and his blunt hope could ruin everything. Visitors to the shop want to be around his smiling face and upbeat music. They don’t seem to mind that he’s switched their poison or replaced their concrete block with Styrofoam. Everyone enjoys Alan except his parents, who are trying to thwart him in order to keep their death business afloat. Most of the joy of The Suicide Shop is seeing how annoying Alan’s hope can be in the bleakest of situations. Very few deaths appear on the page and the ones that do are eerily affecting. At 170 pages, it’s an easy, swift read, but much of the dystopian surrounding is axed with the minimalism, and it’s clear that the setting’s only purpose is to create a universe where the suicide shop could (publicly and openly) exist. This minimalistic bend also dulls much of the impact of the story, as there’s simply not enough there for it to go deeper than the great humor and the fleeting poignant moments. Then there’s the ending: It’s one of those endings that has an immediate impact, but that you start debating the merits of thirty seconds later. Here I am a few days later and I’m still not sure what to think of it. It’s not cliché. It’s more like one of those things that has to happen for the story, even if it’s not what should happen for the characters. Inevitably, when it comes to being a short, fun read—all the while bending the conventions of black comedy—Jean Teule’s The Suicide Shop easily makes the grade. Three stars, but reaching higher.

  17. 5 out of 5

    John

    In some kind of post-apocalyptic future (it's never fully depicted; all we have are occasional allusions) the seemingly irremediably morose Tuvache family runs the Suicide Shop, where people can go to purchase the necessary equipment -- ropes, razor blades, poisons, etc. -- with which to bump themselves off. The only fly in their ointment is the youngest child, Alan (named for celebrated suicide Alan Turing), who's unfailingly, infectiously cheery. Thanks to the pernicious influence of Alan -- b In some kind of post-apocalyptic future (it's never fully depicted; all we have are occasional allusions) the seemingly irremediably morose Tuvache family runs the Suicide Shop, where people can go to purchase the necessary equipment -- ropes, razor blades, poisons, etc. -- with which to bump themselves off. The only fly in their ointment is the youngest child, Alan (named for celebrated suicide Alan Turing), who's unfailingly, infectiously cheery. Thanks to the pernicious influence of Alan -- born in consequence of his parents testing a piece of the stock, a perforated condom designed for those hoping to die by STD -- things start running rapidly downhill. As you might guess, this short novel is something of, so to speak, a one-joke pony, but the variations on that joke are diverse and inventive enough that it doesn't really matter: I was laughing to the extent that at one point my wife appeared from the far end of the house to check there was nothing the matter with me. The ending comes as one of those surprises that is, satisfyingly, completely predictable in hindsight. The final page of the book, the one telling us about the author and translator, contains a couple of surprises as well. Jean Teulé is the life partner of the French actress Miou-Miou; since Miou-Miou occupied a place in my youthful heart not far from Diana Rigg, you can imagine my mixed emotions on reading this. And translator Sue Dyson is better known as her alter ego, novelist Zoë Barnes. This is a French novel, and the English translation mirrors that. I can imagine a few readers might be offput by the French narrative mode. For anyone else, though, here's a very funny novel that can be comfortably read in an evening.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kirsty

    I have been wanting to read Teule’s books for quite a while, and haven’t come across any physical copies of them to date. When I spotted The Suicide Shop on Netgalley, therefore, it seemed fated that this was the Teule which I would begin my foray into his work with. The novella - for that is what the book essentially is - has been well written and well translated. Throughout, Teule works with an incredibly simple yet clever concept, the like of which I have not come across in fiction before. The I have been wanting to read Teule’s books for quite a while, and haven’t come across any physical copies of them to date. When I spotted The Suicide Shop on Netgalley, therefore, it seemed fated that this was the Teule which I would begin my foray into his work with. The novella - for that is what the book essentially is - has been well written and well translated. Throughout, Teule works with an incredibly simple yet clever concept, the like of which I have not come across in fiction before. The progression of time which he works with fitted marvellously with the whole, as did the dark humour which peppered the whole. An inventive novel, which has made me want to go and find the rest of Teule’s work - and fast!

  19. 5 out of 5

    F

    Accidently read thinking it was an adults books but it was a YA and I am not used to this type. The book was a decent read with an original storyline. Short read, very unusual and witty :)

  20. 5 out of 5

    SUSAN *Nevertheless,she persisted*

    If Edward Gorey and Tim Burton collaborated on a book it would be this. This book is funny, charming, sweet, I just can't recommend it enough. If Edward Gorey and Tim Burton collaborated on a book it would be this. This book is funny, charming, sweet, I just can't recommend it enough.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Regina / cà rốt và thỏ

    so. freaking. good. kill. me. please. oh. wait. no.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Parisa Sh

    Full of hope despite of its title. I liked it very much.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ha-Linh

    Very interesting idea with French dark humour, but the translation didn’t seem to convey the sophistication of that sense of humour very well.

  24. 5 out of 5

    GUD Magazine

    The Tuvaches, a sort of working class Addams Family, operate The Suicide Shop--a shop where anyone can purchase the equipment and/or training required to off themselves (though children can only purchase sweets that have a 50% chance of killing them). The story is set some time after North America has been laid to waste by the Big One--but for the most part it could pass as contemporary, with the odd bit of future tech: holographic greeting cards; a solution that turn one's kiss poisonous to othe The Tuvaches, a sort of working class Addams Family, operate The Suicide Shop--a shop where anyone can purchase the equipment and/or training required to off themselves (though children can only purchase sweets that have a 50% chance of killing them). The story is set some time after North America has been laid to waste by the Big One--but for the most part it could pass as contemporary, with the odd bit of future tech: holographic greeting cards; a solution that turn one's kiss poisonous to others; 3d semi-immersive full-sensory television. Mishima and Lucrèce Tuvache have three children--two depressed and/or ailing, and the youngest, bright and cherubic. This latter child, Alan, is the force that changes everything. The chapters are brief, often terse, and the story progresses swiftly--at times a little too swiftly, in that I felt the characters bounced a bit too much in mood and disposition. At the same time, the quick pace kept me turning pages. I was somewhat disappointed by the direction of the narrative--it's described as a quirky black comedy, but I found it more comedy, verging on slapstick, and less black (until, perhaps, the end). Alan's cheer and undauntable optimism quickly infects the rest of the family (except for Mishima, the father); even suicide commandos are shown to not be able to withstand his barrage of cheerfulness (a favorite quote: "I'll only be demonstrating this to you once!"). Still, it has a definite charm, and if you are perhaps less jaded you might get a real kick out of it throughout. I could easily see it being a cult favorite in the right circles.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pia

    In a not so distant future, where religions are all mixed into one and smiling is not a normal thing, the Tuvache family owns a suicide shop. That is, a shop full of artifacts to aid the general and depressed public in ending their life swiftly and safely. The family is composed of Mishima, the father, Lucrèce the mother, Marilyn the daughter and Alan and Vincent, the sons. Perfect names for their profession. But Alan, the youngest is not normal. He smiles, he sees life as beautiful and in a subtl In a not so distant future, where religions are all mixed into one and smiling is not a normal thing, the Tuvache family owns a suicide shop. That is, a shop full of artifacts to aid the general and depressed public in ending their life swiftly and safely. The family is composed of Mishima, the father, Lucrèce the mother, Marilyn the daughter and Alan and Vincent, the sons. Perfect names for their profession. But Alan, the youngest is not normal. He smiles, he sees life as beautiful and in a subtle way, changes all that surrounds him. This little book (it's less than 200 pages long) is full of black macabre humor. And the ending... the ending is perfect! I received an ARC of this book in exchange for an honest review.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Leila Soltani

    It started 4 star and ended 2 star. Fun read if you want to laugh a little bit.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Alexxy

    Meh Good idea, bad execution.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Sadena

    3.75 apples out of 5 So I’ve read mixed reviews about this..and honestly? I liked it. Despite how people mostly agree that the book progresses from good to bad, I thought it was good altogether. The plot is a really interesting, engaging plot. The story was good. The characters were interesting (their names? I LOVED them) and all in all, a solid read. The ending though? It killed me.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Victoria Calo

    Short Version of the Review 4 stars out of 5 for: - honest-to-goodness narrative - effective and efficient and, most importantly, entertaining writing - interesting spin on showing our way of thinking - consistently amusing and quirky characters (-1) star for: - lacking impact and gravity in moments that should have been poignant - slight predictability - that goddamn ending Long Version of the Review I read the English translation of the book. The world is hopeless, and its inhabitants even more. N Short Version of the Review 4 stars out of 5 for: - honest-to-goodness narrative - effective and efficient and, most importantly, entertaining writing - interesting spin on showing our way of thinking - consistently amusing and quirky characters (-1) star for: - lacking impact and gravity in moments that should have been poignant - slight predictability - that goddamn ending Long Version of the Review I read the English translation of the book. The world is hopeless, and its inhabitants even more. No wonder a shop like The Suicide Shop is profiting. Selling cheap, convenient, and effective suicide in world not worth living in? Terrific. That is until the owners, Mishima and Lucrece Tuvache, conceive Alan, whose transient optimism gradually changes the objectives and perspectives of his miserable family and community as he grows up. But the book is not actually about Alan; rather, it revolves around him, if that makes sense. It is about the other people in the City of Forgotten Religions who live with or encounter him. Now, I have no idea what the hell black comedy is. I'm not even sure if it's supposed to make me laugh at all. I picked up this book, read the summary at the back, and expected a simple, amusing story that would keep me entertained for the short span of it. And do that it did. I see the story as an exaggeration of how we actually think in life. A great majority of us think negatively (scientific proof here), and a great majority of us do find it odd or unusual when we come across an optimistic person. When this fact is put in an almost black-and-white world, you get The Suicide Shop. The book is straightforward and true. Accept the book for what it is, or you will absolutely hate it. The length of the book does not give it space for too many details, but its writing is efficient. It is able to paint a clear picture of the kind of world the characters live in with just a few words. My one complaint with the efficient style of the author is how it failed to give some gravity and impact to certain moments that were due to be poignant. For the entire span of the book, you will be kept amused by the quirks of the crumbling world’s inhabitants. The book gets predictable at certain points, but some consistency is inevitable in any world. The book is great. It’s a wonderful read. The few hours you’ll need to reach the end will be worth your while. And then the book ends. Abruptly. Faster than you can even say “abruptly.” And then you will be left with a ton of unanswered questions for you to solve and simmer in your mind for the next few minutes. The one-star deduction is 5% out of spite for that ending.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Pardis

    پایین فارسی Could be a good start for an escuela. Should read more of his books to can see from his point of view! The greates thing I can say is that the writer come from the 22th century for us the people of 21th all sadist, writing a cool story . 22th century where everyone know about mythology and leave behind the religion, reading philosophical books and make celebrities important . And all the clear symbols all of us we know them. He sacrificed himself or he killed himself... being happy or b پایین فارسی Could be a good start for an escuela. Should read more of his books to can see from his point of view! The greates thing I can say is that the writer come from the 22th century for us the people of 21th all sadist, writing a cool story . 22th century where everyone know about mythology and leave behind the religion, reading philosophical books and make celebrities important . And all the clear symbols all of us we know them. He sacrificed himself or he killed himself... being happy or being sad both ends to death. Haha no 💡 میتونه شروع خوبی باشه برای یک مکتب. باز هم نیاز دارم از تووله کتاب بخونم یا دوستاش یا خودش یا همکاراش. میتونه هم هیچی باشه هم پر ایده باشه کلی نقدش کنی. پارادوکس عظیمی است برای ما. همش اینترروگاسیون پاره هایی ای کتاب: ص۱۱/ جایی که کلمه ی «واقع گرایانه» دوباره می اید و معنایش تغییر می‌کند. جایی که کلمات معنایشان به کلی ۱۸۰ درجه تغییر می‌کند . عجب دهنی میخواهد/ انسان های پستمدرن قرن بیست و دوم ص۱۵/ از زیادی خوندن و همون ایده ای که پردیس من میگم: “عزیز جان سریع تر حرکت کن، زودباش عجله کن داره تاریخ دو سال پیش هم یادمون میره، سریعتر، داره اسممون یادمون میره، اسطوره ها رو حفظ کردی؟ افسانه ها رو خوندی، فیلم برنده اسکار امسال رو چی؟ من که میگم زودباش عه دیدی جا موندی؟” از زیادی خوندن ادبیات و فیلم و ایده دیالوگ‌های روزمره شون میشه quote. اسم بچه هاشون میشه اسطوره و سلبریتی ص۲۳/ پری شنی: موجودی افسانه ای در فولکلور اروپا کا با ریختن شن تو چشم مردم (کودکان بدخواب) آنها را در خواب خوش فرومیبرد. ص۳۵/ انگاری قبول کردن ما سادیسم داریم ما قرن بیست و یکمی ها. ععههههه نویسنده داره از قرن بیست و دو برامون میگه یک قرن از ما جلو تره و میدونه سادیسم داریم مارو داره ارضا میکنه. اومده و کفته بیا اینم رمان کتاب پیور سادیسم، انجوی ایت! ص۵۰/ چرا یک مغازه ی دیگه باز نشده تا باهوشن رقابت کنه؟! ص۶۰/ تو هم بروتوس؟! خخخخ (ینی تو هم خیانت کردی؟)

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