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The 10 Laws of Trust: Building the Bonds That Make a Business Great

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Trust is the glue that holds an organization together. It turns deflection into transparency, suspicion into empowerment, and conflict into creativity. With it, a tiny company like John Deere grew into a worldwide leader. Without it, a giant corporation like Enron toppled. In The 10 Laws of Trust , JetBlue chairman Joel Peterson explores how a culture of trust gives com Trust is the glue that holds an organization together. It turns deflection into transparency, suspicion into empowerment, and conflict into creativity. With it, a tiny company like John Deere grew into a worldwide leader. Without it, a giant corporation like Enron toppled. In The 10 Laws of Trust , JetBlue chairman Joel Peterson explores how a culture of trust gives companies an edge. Consider this: What does it feel like to work for a firm where leaders and colleagues trust one another? Freed from micromanagement and rivalry, every employee contributes his or her best. Risk taking and innovation become the norm. And, as Peterson notes, "When a company has a reputation for fair dealing, its costs drop: Trust cuts the time spent second-guessing and lawyering." In clear, engaging prose, highlighted by compelling examples, Peterson details how to establish and maintain a culture of trust. Steps include: Start with integrity - Invest in respect - Empower everyone - Require accountability - Create a winning vision - Keep everyone informed - Budget in line with expectations - Embrace conflict - Forget "you" to become an effective leader - And more With this book in hand, you'll be able to plant the seeds of trust--and reap the rewards of reputation, profits, and success.


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Trust is the glue that holds an organization together. It turns deflection into transparency, suspicion into empowerment, and conflict into creativity. With it, a tiny company like John Deere grew into a worldwide leader. Without it, a giant corporation like Enron toppled. In The 10 Laws of Trust , JetBlue chairman Joel Peterson explores how a culture of trust gives com Trust is the glue that holds an organization together. It turns deflection into transparency, suspicion into empowerment, and conflict into creativity. With it, a tiny company like John Deere grew into a worldwide leader. Without it, a giant corporation like Enron toppled. In The 10 Laws of Trust , JetBlue chairman Joel Peterson explores how a culture of trust gives companies an edge. Consider this: What does it feel like to work for a firm where leaders and colleagues trust one another? Freed from micromanagement and rivalry, every employee contributes his or her best. Risk taking and innovation become the norm. And, as Peterson notes, "When a company has a reputation for fair dealing, its costs drop: Trust cuts the time spent second-guessing and lawyering." In clear, engaging prose, highlighted by compelling examples, Peterson details how to establish and maintain a culture of trust. Steps include: Start with integrity - Invest in respect - Empower everyone - Require accountability - Create a winning vision - Keep everyone informed - Budget in line with expectations - Embrace conflict - Forget "you" to become an effective leader - And more With this book in hand, you'll be able to plant the seeds of trust--and reap the rewards of reputation, profits, and success.

30 review for The 10 Laws of Trust: Building the Bonds That Make a Business Great

  1. 4 out of 5

    Annie

    I give this 3.5 stars. This book does a good job of breaking down the elements of trust and different types of trusting relationships. Trust depends on all three of these conditions to be present in order to develop: - Character: Those we trust will value our interest as their own. - Competence: Those we trust have the requisite intelligence, ability, and training to achieve our best interest. - Authority: Those we trust are empowered to deliver on promises. It would have been a good guide on buildi I give this 3.5 stars. This book does a good job of breaking down the elements of trust and different types of trusting relationships. Trust depends on all three of these conditions to be present in order to develop: - Character: Those we trust will value our interest as their own. - Competence: Those we trust have the requisite intelligence, ability, and training to achieve our best interest. - Authority: Those we trust are empowered to deliver on promises. It would have been a good guide on building trust but the writing style was a little dull.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Stoykova

    Concise and straight to the point! Very useful for people working and leading others.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Anna

    Trust: one of the most important words in the tissue of a healthy society. Americans trust God as their main entity and guidance. In God We Trust there is written in dollars. But...What is trust? It's that feeling and condition able to give at a person a complete dignity and able to let express him/her all the best of qualities. Trust is important and crucial for great and healthy relationship in every sectors of life: family, friends, organizations and nations. Trust is the freedom to be who we want Trust: one of the most important words in the tissue of a healthy society. Americans trust God as their main entity and guidance. In God We Trust there is written in dollars. But...What is trust? It's that feeling and condition able to give at a person a complete dignity and able to let express him/her all the best of qualities. Trust is important and crucial for great and healthy relationship in every sectors of life: family, friends, organizations and nations. Trust is the freedom to be who we want to be and to develop and to enrich our personal human experience at work, in the society, and in our family. Trust is important at every level and we don't just trust at little levels. We trust nations, we trust thinking better also...the world! I found truly interesting to read The 10 Laws of Trust: Building the Bonds That Make a Business Great by Joel Peterson with David A.Kaplan, published by AMACON BOOKS. cover84263-medium cover84263-medium In economy what means to give trust? To stop to control other people with too much pressure, ceding a measure of control to the other. This one is an important step because we decide of giving trust. At every level. There are risks implied but as the author remarks it's better to risk giving trust at work, than to live paradoxical, sad experiences in opposite case. Giving trust means also to enrich our diversified world to Peterson. Trust means earning it, repairing it, evaluating it. Joel Peterson says that trust is "The operative system of a life well lived." The more we trust, the more we are trusted. At work trust is crucial because it increases altruism, growth, and it is positive for everyone's benefit. Trust in general beat opportunism and selfish behavior because people are felt loved and appreciated at work. High trust leaders obtains much more successful results than not the low trust leaders, diffident ones. Groups created by low trust leaders will create selfish people and selfish groups, and these groups will suffer misery withing the ranks, affirms the Peterson in his book. A lack of trust means litigations. But so is there an answer? To give trust, because in opposite case there is just ruin. Being diffident in fact creates unpleasant conditions at work and people can think that they can't go proud of their workplace considering that they're not trusted sufficiently. Investing in trust, writes the author will create great and good fruits for sure. In a big organization giving trust means to give to a worker three important words: character, competence and authority. If we give importance to a person this person will work for us with more enthusiasm than if, in opposite case, abandoned at himself/herself. It will be certain a betrayal in opposite case because we would leave people as in an abandoned ship without captain. Mafia and low trust organization/relationships based more or less on the same factors: mafia means diffidence, danger, between the boss and the various affiliates, and same is in low trust organizations. While power is a big force for low trust organizations where the boss is arrogant in most cases, in high trust organization surely power is still important but there are also other values, much more humans able to help the engine of the structure to stay healthy says the author. The absence of trust is a certain betrayal and the first betrayal admit Peterson. Another important factor in a healthy organization is the personal integrity of the various bosses. It is important to have a good life, to live a good life and not just to be good people at work, but also outside for a leader. And to care and appreciate the various workers in various ways. It's important to follow what a boss says and does because from his conduct we can understand if it's possible to trust him. An anchor of the ABC during a scandal said: "People will forgive you for not being the leader you want to be but never for not being the leader you claim to be." Substantially it is true also this: that a boss will be in grade to influence the group and team of his workers with his example. If the example is poor... Then the Peterson starts to analyzes the various ten laws of trust. The first one, sync words with action. A leader should respect others and they should keep their words. The second law: invest in respect. It's important to respect every worker, remembering their birthdays, who they are, their names, their children, some anecdotes of their life. It's a sign of appreciation a modality for trying to understand if the worker is fine, if his life is OK, and a good way for create a contact and a connection. Law 3: empower others. Trusting means encouraging, empowering, giving satisfaction at work. High trust organization we speak of Google, we speak of big companies, able to treat their workers very well giving various bonus to their workers. I picked up FullContact. They pay an extra of 7500 dollars per year when a person goes in vacation at these conditions: you really must go somewhere, you must not check e-mails texts, or voice-messages. Why trust is so important? Because an organization without trust is without control and because without trust people must suffocate their creativity. Low-trust organizations are stressed like also their bosses because they must watch their back all the time for the fear that their workers could give their worst. In a relaxed environment where trust is an indispensable condition people are happy and joyous, surely creative, and surely they will be able to enrich much more the structure where they're working for. Trust, add the author means to plant a seed. A seed that needs to be nurtured with the time. Another big error committed in low-trust organization is giving trust just at the so-considered "capable subjects" leaving alone the rest of the people, in complete shadow. It's another big error this one affirms Peterson because of course this low-trust organization won't discover any new talent and talent of the workers not trusted will be lost. Law 4: Measure what you want to achieve Where, the seed of trust, can grow up healthy, without illness? Where there is no ambiguity. It's important if a person is a leader to give trust and to specify clearly what expecting from the various workers. Law 5: Create a common Dream It will be important to focusing in practical, big dreams because the team must feel that they're working for something. Law 6, crucial: Keeping everyone informed A great leader will communicate informations with the workers. In good and bad times. In low organization no one is clear. Workers says the author can't trust a leader if they don't tell them what it is going on. Law 7: Embrace respectful conflict In low- trust organization they're all stressed for trying to see how a conflict will be sorted out. In a healthy structure where trust given, the answer is different: not how, but thinking that abrasion, sometimes some creative abrasion as the author calls the conflict is the salt, heat and electricity of a workplace and it is indispensable. Look how these two points of view completely different. In the first case the person creates the conflict should return in the rank without any kind of possibility of dialogue or healthy confrontation. In the second case there is dialogue for trying to grow up together. Peter Drucker said once. "Whenever you see a successful business someone once made a courageous decision." Law 8: Show Humility Big organizations go on healthy because they treasure any individual. In this case the author suggests to take frames of special moment all together with the workers or other artworks for remembering moments. Important also to thank everyone, each one for the work well done. Law 9: strive for winning negotiation Law 10: Proceed with care. It was for sure great to read this book that I would want to suggest to everyone and not just at a niche of people for trying to understand the profound healthy mechanisms able to keep our world in a good state. A big organization didn't become successful and continue to be successful for case. Behind that success there is a healthy team, thanks to inspired bosses and that people will give all together all the best for their beloved workplace. Many thanks for sure to Netgalley for this book!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Adam DuVander

    There are some timeless lessons here, which may be related to me periodically checking the publication date. The tone is old school, though many examples are recent. The best stuff came through the personal stories of the author, whose long career clearly rests on a trustful approach. As someone who is typically trusting, I've wondered whether a more "hardened" approach would improve my own career. I enjoyed seeing through the 10 Laws that someone can be good--authentic and open--while still doi There are some timeless lessons here, which may be related to me periodically checking the publication date. The tone is old school, though many examples are recent. The best stuff came through the personal stories of the author, whose long career clearly rests on a trustful approach. As someone who is typically trusting, I've wondered whether a more "hardened" approach would improve my own career. I enjoyed seeing through the 10 Laws that someone can be good--authentic and open--while still doing good for themselves and their companies. Overall, this book reinforced my ideas of trust, but didn't bring major revelations. That said, I may return to the numbered takeaways from each Law as I need them in the future.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Sandy

    in all human relationships, the virtue of trust is undeniable. but it is not without peril. people are human ; temptations abound; trust can take a beating. Trusting others carries a contingent price. However, not trusting others carries an even higher current levy. the bonds created in high-trust relationships are the others that give life meaning. If you're too worried, you will wind up with fewer opportunities and fewer human connections. you'll spend your life calculating, protecting yoursel in all human relationships, the virtue of trust is undeniable. but it is not without peril. people are human ; temptations abound; trust can take a beating. Trusting others carries a contingent price. However, not trusting others carries an even higher current levy. the bonds created in high-trust relationships are the others that give life meaning. If you're too worried, you will wind up with fewer opportunities and fewer human connections. you'll spend your life calculating, protecting yourself, expecting the worst, and trying to secure the power and position that will serve what your think will bring you happiness, wealth, or fame,. instead, you will either live a stunted life, or you will condemn those who work with you to smaller lives than they deserve.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Cody

    Good quick read. Not bad but not mind-blowing. Probably great for someone trying to find trust and maintain integrity in their professional role.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cory

    Great book which lays out many of the building blocks which build sustained trust over time.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Cruz

    https://saexaminer.org/2017/03/14/boo... https://saexaminer.org/2017/03/14/boo...

  9. 5 out of 5

    Cmswright

    Interesting read, but slow at times. I didn't think there was anything life-changing that I hadn't heard in one form or another before. Even so, a good quick read. Interesting read, but slow at times. I didn't think there was anything life-changing that I hadn't heard in one form or another before. Even so, a good quick read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jake

    This is a quick read and perfect to asses what should be table stakes issues in any relationship. If the CEO or Leadership doesnt match up, run.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Scott Hawk

    Quick, purposeful, and logical It is a well-written short read with practical guidelines for building and maintaining trust. I recommend this book for others.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Fulenwider

    Great read to simplify and articulate the intricate and delicate nature of trust and the empowerment of having it in your life.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Betty

    Work Assignment. Not life changing but a nice reminder to be a good person. and the importance of building relationships.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Bill Needham

    Pretty basic stuff but a decent reminder to do the right things.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Darren

    A little bit of trust goes a long way and a lot of trust goes even further. Yet there can be a distinctive lack of true trust in many business (and personal) lives, no matter what we might say or otherwise believe. This book sets out to hopefully increase the use and strength of trust, assisting to build bonds that can only benefit business. Overall it was an enjoyable, uncontroversial and easy-to-follow read. It felt reasonably open and objective and was not building the reader up with false en A little bit of trust goes a long way and a lot of trust goes even further. Yet there can be a distinctive lack of true trust in many business (and personal) lives, no matter what we might say or otherwise believe. This book sets out to hopefully increase the use and strength of trust, assisting to build bonds that can only benefit business. Overall it was an enjoyable, uncontroversial and easy-to-follow read. It felt reasonably open and objective and was not building the reader up with false enthusiasm and hope that many other similar books can be prone to do. Trust, or the lack thereof, has toppled big companies and powerful individuals alike. What is there not to like about trust and trustworthiness? What is there to fear from it? Yet those who work within many companies will know that things are sadly different. With greater trust within a company, employees can really focus on the challenges and opportunities that the firm faces, instead of fighting within, being micromanaged and cabalist silos being formed. With everyone pulling together, greater innovative, creative and developing opportunities come to the fore. On the whole, this was an interesting, positive book that reeked of potential. The price won’t hardly break the bank either! The author’s use of ten “laws” makes for easy reading, consideration and hopefully positive implementation as well. It can be a recommended read, even if you believe – right or wrong – that your company is a bastion of collegiate cooperation and “good feelings”. You might just find a surprise or two and… if your company needs a lot more remedial work, this book might be delivering a positive dose of medicine.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Charles

    In general, I find business/leadership books to be underwhelming, the advice is generally shopworn and laden with cheerleading cliché after cliché with no real details on how to carry them out. Within that context, this book was refreshing. First off, the points about trust being a two-way street from managers to the managed are so critical. People that work in an atmosphere of fear and uncertainty do not do the best that they can, if there is no trust then opportunities will be missed. Appeal In general, I find business/leadership books to be underwhelming, the advice is generally shopworn and laden with cheerleading cliché after cliché with no real details on how to carry them out. Within that context, this book was refreshing. First off, the points about trust being a two-way street from managers to the managed are so critical. People that work in an atmosphere of fear and uncertainty do not do the best that they can, if there is no trust then opportunities will be missed. Appealing to authority on the part of a manager rather than skills and knowledge is the easy approach and will work for a short time, any improvement is generally a case of the Hawthorne effect rather than a consequence of the decisions. The emphasis here is on the long-term and the realization that there will be a tomorrow where you will have to own the consequences of what you do today. This is a book that should be read by all graduates of management programs, whether they be academic or internal to a business. Easily understood with a positive appeal to your emotions, this is a book that can lead to valuable changes. People with a lot of career miles behind them will no doubt recognize some of the things that went wrong in the projects and organizations that they were a part of. This book was made available for free for review purposes.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Eleodor

    JetBlue chairman Joel Peterson, together with writer Robert Kaplan, detail the “10 laws of trust.” The intro is focused on “what trust is” and “why trust matters”. I find the book a great supplement, and inspired heavily from “The Speed of Trust” by Stephen Covey, who also writes the intro for the book. For a quick preview of the 10 “laws of trust” detailed in the book chapters: 1. First, trust begins with personal integrity. 2. Trust involves respecting others. 3. Trust means that you empower the JetBlue chairman Joel Peterson, together with writer Robert Kaplan, detail the “10 laws of trust.” The intro is focused on “what trust is” and “why trust matters”. I find the book a great supplement, and inspired heavily from “The Speed of Trust” by Stephen Covey, who also writes the intro for the book. For a quick preview of the 10 “laws of trust” detailed in the book chapters: 1. First, trust begins with personal integrity. 2. Trust involves respecting others. 3. Trust means that you empower the people around you. 4. Trust is about setting clear goals for your employees and holding them accountable. 5. Trust occurs when people work together to achieve a shared objective. 6. Trust requires honest communication. 7. To fuel trust, hold genuinely open discussions that seek the best ideas and plans. 8. Humble leaders inspire trust. 9. Trust depends upon negotiating with a win-win, not a zero-sum, mind-set. 10. Trust risks betrayal. Overall, a great supplement to Covey's book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Greg

    There are very few trustworthy organizations in the world. One may judge according to his personal experience while there are some who gauge the trustworthiness in terms of public surveys. This book offers several views on how we can engender trust in people as much as in organizations. It is a very easy read and one may find the views here based on personal experience of the author.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Ryan

    I read a review and was intrigued by how the basis of trust was laid out: as a combination of character, competence, and authority. Unfortunately, the resulting "10 laws" and supporting material were fairly commonplace and provided no deeper insight. It's generally a light and quick read, though. I read a review and was intrigued by how the basis of trust was laid out: as a combination of character, competence, and authority. Unfortunately, the resulting "10 laws" and supporting material were fairly commonplace and provided no deeper insight. It's generally a light and quick read, though.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Aarif Billah

    A great read on relationship building. . https://aarifbillah.com/the-10-laws-o... . thanks, https://aarifbillah.com/ A great read on relationship building. . https://aarifbillah.com/the-10-laws-o... . thanks, https://aarifbillah.com/

  21. 5 out of 5

    Theodore Kinni

    Slim handbook on how leaders can build trust by the chairman of JetBlue

  22. 5 out of 5

    Kathy Cowie

    I am reviewing this in the January-February 2017 issue of Global Business and Organizational Excellence.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Ash

    Spoke to Joel Peterson today in Palo Alto close to Stanford University.. a great person. I like the book more after I met and discussed with him.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Parker Moffat

  25. 5 out of 5

    Crystal Self

  26. 4 out of 5

    Catherine Greenspan

  27. 5 out of 5

    Pierre Pereira

  28. 5 out of 5

    Cody Nabours

  29. 4 out of 5

    Ibin

  30. 4 out of 5

    mikemo

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