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The deaths that still shape the Spider-verse! During the early 1970s, a pair of plotlines changed comic-book mortality forever. Shock followed shock when Spider-Man lost a friend, a lover and an enemy in a dynamic drama that stunned readers as no comic deaths had before and few have since! COLLECTING: Amazing Spider-Man 88-92, 121-122


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The deaths that still shape the Spider-verse! During the early 1970s, a pair of plotlines changed comic-book mortality forever. Shock followed shock when Spider-Man lost a friend, a lover and an enemy in a dynamic drama that stunned readers as no comic deaths had before and few have since! COLLECTING: Amazing Spider-Man 88-92, 121-122

30 review for The Amazing Spider-Man: Death of the Stacys

  1. 4 out of 5

    Alejandro

    ...and the Marvel Universe was never the same. This collected edition includes “Amazing Spider-Man” #88-92 and #121-122. Due the spoiling TPB’s title (and chosen cover art) is pointless to avoid mentioning that the deaths of Captain Stacy and Gwen Stacy are featured here. Creative Team: Writers: Stan Lee & Gerry Conway Illustrators: Gil Kane & John Romita, Sr. DEADLIEST FOES I was always your superior – mentally – physically – in every way! Doctor Octopus and Green Goblin. I grew up in an er ...and the Marvel Universe was never the same. This collected edition includes “Amazing Spider-Man” #88-92 and #121-122. Due the spoiling TPB’s title (and chosen cover art) is pointless to avoid mentioning that the deaths of Captain Stacy and Gwen Stacy are featured here. Creative Team: Writers: Stan Lee & Gerry Conway Illustrators: Gil Kane & John Romita, Sr. DEADLIEST FOES I was always your superior – mentally – physically – in every way! Doctor Octopus and Green Goblin. I grew up in an era when those two characters were the deadliest foes of Spider-Man. In Costa Rica (my country) there weren’t Marvel comic books when I was a kid, only from DC translated through a Mexican publishing company (Editorial Novaro). So, my knowledge about Spider-Man came from the now classic TV animated series (that one with the catchy music theme!). Therefore, I knew about many classic villains like Vulture, Dr. Lizard, Electro, and even The Fly that I really liked a lot since he was always framing Spider-Man, so I found a more dangerous enemy, of course, how The Fly could survive if Venom just took his basic semblance adding a cool White Spider-symbol and a menacing mouth? No, The Fly resulted pointless after Venom had risen. Rest in Peace, The Fly. Long Live Venom, the deadliest foe of Spider-Man. However, since I wasn’t able to buy any Marvel comics at that time. To me, the deadliest foes were Doctor Octopus and Green Goblin, and while I do like Venom and recognize why he is so popular between fans, I still have a preference for Doc Ock and The Green Goblin. What hits first, hits twice. Reading now, this classic storyline was such a treat when I read that quote that I put at the beginning of this block. Superior, that word, in 1970. Priceless, now when we live in an era after the storyline of Superior Spider-Man, where Otto Octavious interchanged minds with Peter Parker, taking control of his body. It wasn’t an adjective chosen by chance. All was part of the plan (sort of, hehe). That’s why I love comic books! Doctor Octopus wasn’t directly responsible of Captain Stacy’s death, but one of his actions during the battle did contribute to it. And Green Goblin was directly responsible for Gwen’s death. When villains kill major characters and provoke pain and suffering to the hero, that’s why they clearly become the deadliest foes of that hero. It’s not about how cool the villain looks, it’s not about how powerful is, it’s not about if that villain has some unfair advantage over the hero. No. Pain and suffering to the hero defines the deadliest foes of that hero. SNAP ...you killed the woman I love... ...and for that you’re going to die! I guess that Stan Lee hadn’t the heart to kill Gwen (since he left the title a few issues before), so Gerry Conway got in to do it. It wasn’t hard for him, since on the introduction to the collected edition, Conway is quite honest and he confessed that he didn’t like Gwen and that he found her boring and he prefered Mary Jane. I am unbiasied about it, since (once again) I learned about Spider-Man through the TV animated series, so I grew up thinking that Betty Brant was THE love interest of Peter Parker! What a shock to me later to hear about those girls, Gwen and Mary Jane. (Yes, Mary Jane did appear in late episodes of the TV animated series but seriously, it was when the animation become awful and classic villains weren’t appearing anymore, so I had remembered better the more amazing early episodes). But, getting back to Conway, he was honest about his feelings about the character and definitely Gwen’s death redefined the whole course of Marvel Universe, but I think that killing off a character just because the writer found it boring and/or just don’t like it, it’s the easy way, too easy. Even the whole scenario was left open to interpretation. Was Gwen already dead? Did she really died while falling? Did the sudden stop due the webbing caused it? There is a craftiness to leave open to interpretation all that, but again, if Conway really dislike Gwen, and he decided to kill her off, he must had some balls (every good writer need them (even if it’s a female writer! (You know what I mean!))) and to write her death, in clear way, just as he designed it on his mind. For me, I found more adequate the sad possible scenario where Peter killed her by accident due the way that he grabbed her with the webbing. Sad, horrible and unforgivable, but what the story deserved. That’s why Gwen’s death is so impacting. Captain Stacy died by his decision, died as a hero, a great death. But Gwen’s death is so sad, so soon, so unfair, that breaks the heart of anyone with warm blood on the veins. Writing is not only a job, it’s a “call”, and writers must give to readers what they deserve to “hear”, even if readers don’t like it. And sometimes, leaving open to interpretation isn’t the right choice. Moreover, I think that a talented writer works with characters that doesn’t like and gets the better out of them and turning to be interesting even for the writer him/herself, Killing is cheap. Living is hard. However, I meditated about what Conway said in his introduction, exposing that Gwen’s death unchained a darkness factor in the whole Marvel Universe. After her death, the Marvel Universe turned to be a darker place. Original Captain Marvel died. The first son, of Reed and Susan, died. Even Peter Parker’s soul got a darkness inside that makes him more susceptible to... yes... that black suit... ...and Venom had risen. So, while I think that it could be more challenging for Conway to find a way to work with Gwen’s character and making her an appealing character to him. I have to recognize that certainly her death gave, in 1973, a darkness that Marvel Universe needed to mature, to evolve, to move to the next step of storytelling. Marvel Universe become a colder place without Gwen Stacy’s warm heart on it anymore. What was her sin? To be sweet and beautiful? Is that really something boring? Sweetness and beauty is what stop us to fall into the madness’ abyss. Did her death helped to make Marvel Universe stronger? Oh, yes. But definitely it was a too high price to pay. Additional Comment: (November, 12th, 2018) R.I.P. Stan Lee Thanks for sharing your brilliance with the world.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jeff

    Warning: If you’ve never read a Spider-Man comic or seen a Spider-Man movie, then spoilers! You can’t go home again! You can’t put that magic and wonder of your first comic back in a bottle and re-apply it; especially if you were weaned on Silver Age comics. This was the very first comic that I remember reading – my first introduction to Spider-Man. I was captivated, thrilled. Spider-Man vs. the Lizard!! And the Astonishing Ant-Man against his arch-nemisis – Egghead. I was five years old and discov Warning: If you’ve never read a Spider-Man comic or seen a Spider-Man movie, then spoilers! You can’t go home again! You can’t put that magic and wonder of your first comic back in a bottle and re-apply it; especially if you were weaned on Silver Age comics. This was the very first comic that I remember reading – my first introduction to Spider-Man. I was captivated, thrilled. Spider-Man vs. the Lizard!! And the Astonishing Ant-Man against his arch-nemisis – Egghead. I was five years old and discovered something that would carry me through for many years of excitement and enjoyment. Antman vs. Egghead = That’s entertainment, baby!! Now, how does revisiting comics from this era (to be honest, towards the end of the Silver Age) register on the Wow meter now that I have a tendency to review most of these stories from a jaundiced, cynical POV? Should I embrace my comic book reading inner child? Let’s parse this volume up, shall we? Part, the first: Captain Stacy bites the dust. Nice save, Pops! The kid grows up to run a meth lab… Five issues of Stan Lee phoning it in and let's face it, his days as a writer were almost behind him – Cheesy dialogue, expositional writing and thought balloons out the wazoo, overall, it’s a comic written down to your average 1st grader. The first two issues are about Stacy’s death, the other three devoted to Spider-Man going after a crooked politician named Bullitt, all the while being chased by Iceman because of one of those kooky, classic super hero misunderstandings. It was sorta a reunion of Spider-Man and his Amazing Friends sans the hot babe. Next: How to rate one of those top 10 watershed comics moments. Gerry Conway, the writer, in an introduction written for this volume, claimed that the dark tone of the book set the stage for other darker comic stories to come (e.g. The Dark Phoenix Saga). He might be overstating his case a bit, but this story still packs somewhat of a punch. We know it’s not Aunt May, cuz that withered old broad is immortal. This story is a huge part of the Spider-Man mythos and the death scene(s) were incorporated into both runs of the Spider-Man movies. For starters, Harry Osborn has just dropped acid (I’m not kidding) and this puts Norman Osborn over the edge. So it’s a fine day to wreak havoc on the Spider-Man, with the target being Gwen Stacy. Sadly, push comes to shove and we get an uncharacteristically vengeful hero. They don’t build Goblin Gliders like the used to… Don’t be sad for Norman Osborn, he took his weird, carpet-headed haircut and vacationed in Europe for twenty years of continuity to come back just in time for the “fabulous” Clone Saga. A little pathos: Mary Jane steps up and out of her go-go boots. Bottom line: Skip the Death of Captain Stacy and read the last two issues. Sure they’re over forty years old, but it’s what every Spider-Man fan should read at least once. And…You can’t go home again. *sigh*

  3. 5 out of 5

    Zack! Empire

    I had already read most of this collection in an Essential book, but I wanted to see how it read put together in a single collection. This is a very solid book. One of the more enjoyable I read recently. The book deals with the death of both Captain Stacy and Gwen Stacy, but even without those two major Spider-Man events, it would still be an enjoyable read. As a fan of the early days of Spider-Man, I'm a fan of both Doctor Octopus and Green Goblin. A book with them both as the main villains is I had already read most of this collection in an Essential book, but I wanted to see how it read put together in a single collection. This is a very solid book. One of the more enjoyable I read recently. The book deals with the death of both Captain Stacy and Gwen Stacy, but even without those two major Spider-Man events, it would still be an enjoyable read. As a fan of the early days of Spider-Man, I'm a fan of both Doctor Octopus and Green Goblin. A book with them both as the main villains is basically a guaranteed hit with me. Here we get to see why they are both such classic and dangerous foes. Both have taken the life of someone close to Peter. (Although both did it inadvertently) The art and color are both amazing. I love John Romita. He only draws one issue of the book, but for the rest of it he is inking and you can definitely tell his influence is still very strong. Gil Kane does some great work in here as well. I'm not a huge fan of the way he draws faces, but with the Romita inks it's not a problem. There is also a few pages after Gwen's death where the art really shines. Peter has this look on his face that so perfectly captures his feelings at the time. He looks both overcome with grief and furious with anger. He goes over to Norman Osborn's house, basically expecting to kill the guy, and the way his eyes, forehead, and eyebrows are drawn: Amazing. I also really like the coloring from this period. Just the solid flat colors. It's also cool to see pages where the limited color choices actually make the pages better. You'll get things like all purple buildings, or figures in a crowd colored from head to toe in one color. This is a pretty important book, and I would say that if you're a fan of Spider-Man this collection is a must read. And even if you aren't you should still check out this book. Nothing was the same in the whole of Marvel Universe after this.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Caroline

    It took me a while to get past the seriously obnoxious commentary in the intro to this book -- Gerry Conway whines about how boring Gwen was, and basically takes credit for anybody being interested in her right now, saying it's only because he decided to kill her -- But once I was done rolling my eyes, I read this and it really is an indisputably great comics story (or, rather, two stories since the first part is a Stan Lee-written Doctor Octopus arc which includes the death of Peter Parker's fr It took me a while to get past the seriously obnoxious commentary in the intro to this book -- Gerry Conway whines about how boring Gwen was, and basically takes credit for anybody being interested in her right now, saying it's only because he decided to kill her -- But once I was done rolling my eyes, I read this and it really is an indisputably great comics story (or, rather, two stories since the first part is a Stan Lee-written Doctor Octopus arc which includes the death of Peter Parker's friend George Stacy, and the second part is the Gerry Conway Green Goblin story about the death of George's daughter/Peter's girlfriend Gwen). The real creative star here isn't Lee or Conway but artist Gil Kane. The packaging on the book is beautiful (I *love* Marvel's premiere hardcovers, and it's a real showcase for Kane's dynamic layouts and expressive faces; the inking, mostly by John Romita, Sr., is no slouch either). I still find it pretty obnoxious that Gwen hardly even has any dialogue in Conway's issues; also that Norman Osborn's rant about Gwen as he's about to kill her is eerily like what Conway says about her in the introduction. It's a pretty nasty, cold-blooded way to treat a character who deserved better. (Also, better =/= the much later retcon that Gwen and Norman had been lovers). After reading this, I did go to read the final issue of Kurt Busiek's 'Marvels'; this story and the Loeb/Sale work in 'Spider-Man Blue' are largely responsible for my strong affection for Gwen, and while they both stumble a little by viewing her through rather idealized/rose-colored glasses (I'm sure Conway's right that she was only written that way because those writers remembered the brutal nature of her death, but I'm still not convinced that's something to take credit for!) they both do a much better job than this of showing Gwen as a real, human person whose fate is worth caring about. Critiques aside, though, these are still really engaging, lively, and honestly ground-breaking stories; they also call shenanigans on the argument that good spider-man stories require Peter to be a carefree, immature loser. Not that I'd want all Spidey stories to be this dark, but they're definitely both intense and engaging; and oh yeah, there's even room for an Iceman teamup.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Gary Butler

    27th book read in 2013. Number 61 out of 318 on my all time book list. Follow the link below to see my video review: http://youtu.be/ml4xZ25xkRU 27th book read in 2013. Number 61 out of 318 on my all time book list. Follow the link below to see my video review: http://youtu.be/ml4xZ25xkRU

  6. 5 out of 5

    Koen

    Wow, this was probably one of the most intense (Spiderman) comics I've read... Great work on the story, characters, artwork, well, everything! Come on Spidey fans, grab hold of this one.. Wow, this was probably one of the most intense (Spiderman) comics I've read... Great work on the story, characters, artwork, well, everything! Come on Spidey fans, grab hold of this one..

  7. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Two plot lines that are integral to understanding Peter Parker/Spider-Man's character. This is a nicely collected set. The art is classic but it has been cleaned up color wise to look smoother than what was available when these stories were first published. The stories feel a little dated but the themes and emotion of them are timeless. A must have for any Spider-Man fan that is a good reread every once in a while. Two plot lines that are integral to understanding Peter Parker/Spider-Man's character. This is a nicely collected set. The art is classic but it has been cleaned up color wise to look smoother than what was available when these stories were first published. The stories feel a little dated but the themes and emotion of them are timeless. A must have for any Spider-Man fan that is a good reread every once in a while.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tehanu

    Perhaps you are aware that I LOOOOVE Peter Parker. He's my fave. No matter the writer, no matter the decade, no matter the actor. Spidey is the best. So this comic was a must. Previously I had read (and was gutted by) Spiderman: Blue (dunno why GR won't let me link it). So reading the story first hand was long time coming. I feel that, for the time it was written, this comic book is really impressive. Is it weird to say that I feel that if I had read this comic at the time it came out I would have Perhaps you are aware that I LOOOOVE Peter Parker. He's my fave. No matter the writer, no matter the decade, no matter the actor. Spidey is the best. So this comic was a must. Previously I had read (and was gutted by) Spiderman: Blue (dunno why GR won't let me link it). So reading the story first hand was long time coming. I feel that, for the time it was written, this comic book is really impressive. Is it weird to say that I feel that if I had read this comic at the time it came out I would have felt that Gwen's death came out of nowhere but, at the same time, was hinted out and layed out for months? Because it sure feels so. This kind of writing in comics was way ahead of its time. Anyway, I don't know if I'm making any sense. I liked this comic for what it is and taking in consideration the time it was released in. Nowadays perhaps this would had been handled with more space to grief? But I'm not sure that what we got was perfect as it was. Specially the last pages with MJ. I'm making a mess haha. Bye. PETE I LOVE YOU (?)

  9. 4 out of 5

    Adam Bender

    I've known about this classic story arc for years but don't think I'd ever read it. You have to like comics from the time period to get into it, but it's got to be one of the best of the era. Great writing and great artwork. It's got all the fun of Spider-Man with a tragic edge. I've known about this classic story arc for years but don't think I'd ever read it. You have to like comics from the time period to get into it, but it's got to be one of the best of the era. Great writing and great artwork. It's got all the fun of Spider-Man with a tragic edge.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Samantha

    I have heard a lot about Gwen but still dont feel like I know her much. This was pretty saddening to read though.

  11. 5 out of 5

    A.J. Howells

    Reading pre-1980’s comics is a great pastime. The signs of the times on display force nostalgia on the reader, even if he or she hadn’t been around during said era. Death of the Stacys contains fantastic references to the clean-air movement and name-drops Ralph Nader. These types of reads act as cultural barometers in addition to being fine stories. Also, it’s always funny to read the characters commenting on every single action the reader sees them doing. To find a comic that waxes nostalgic, Reading pre-1980’s comics is a great pastime. The signs of the times on display force nostalgia on the reader, even if he or she hadn’t been around during said era. Death of the Stacys contains fantastic references to the clean-air movement and name-drops Ralph Nader. These types of reads act as cultural barometers in addition to being fine stories. Also, it’s always funny to read the characters commenting on every single action the reader sees them doing. To find a comic that waxes nostalgic, employs wacky dialogue, and manages a story with depth is a great find. Death of the Stacys does just that. I didn’t know much about the Stacys before this, as I’m not a huge Marvel fan. This book presents the Doctor Octopus storyline that leads to Captain Stacy’s death, and then quickly switches to the Green Goblin storyline that ends in Gwen’s death. Between the two storylines Gwen does some major growing up, starting as a not-to-be-taken-seriously party girl and ending as a serious professional whose life is cut tragically short. WARNING: START OF POSSIBLE SPOILERS Of particular interest is the way in which Gwen dies, which is left up to reader interpretation. Was she dead before the Green Goblin dropped her off the bridge? Did the fall cause her to die from shock? Did Spiderman snap her neck when he shot a web at her to stop her fall? Also interesting is the fact that there’s no real resolution to the psychological impact on Peter Parker. The Green Goblin dies shortly after Gwen, but this fails to bring him comfort. Peter attempts to kick Mary Jane out of his apartment at the end of the story, but she refuses and stays with him, setting up his next love interest. At the time, though, it didn’t seem like Spiderman would ever move beyond this moment. Pretty heavy stuff for a short volume. END OF POSSIBLE SPOILERS The presentation of these deaths is remarkable for the time period. Captain Stacy’s death comes out of nowhere, and Spiderman is viewed as the culprit. Gwen becomes embittered and, in an effort to remove Spiderman from the streets, begins supporting a crime lord for the new mayor. This is not an arc that ends leaving the characters fulfilled. The drama ends, but the death is still there and the characters (Gwen in particular) do not get over it. Gwen’s death is presented in the same way. Peter returns from fighting with the Hulk in Canada to find Harry Osborn on LSD again (another sign of the times) and the Green Goblin running amuck with knowledge of Spiderman’s true identity. When issue 121 (Gwen’s death) comes along, we are told that a major character will die, but we won’t know until the end of the issue. That’s all the foreshadowing the reader gets. This is a random issue—not a major event—where a main love interest loses her life. It’s easy to see how this would have flipped the comic world on its head, signifying the end of the Silver Age of comics. There’s a lot to take from this comic. Knowing that the Stacys are going to die does not lessen the impact of the read. Also, fans of the movie franchise (particularly Spiderman and The Amazing Spiderman) will enjoy seeing where some of the major actions were derived from. I haven’t read much Spiderman before this, but this was a good place to start. There’s not a lot of prior knowledge you need to enjoy it. The stories are not convoluted in the slightest, and anything questionable about the storyline is quickly explained.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Dave

    I was 5 when this story line ran the 1st time. But a few years later, after I had gotten "into" Spider-Man, I read landmark issue #121 in a reprint. While death may seem very much a part of comics now, it was not always the case. This was a landmark storyline, and changed the thinking for comic book writing. Wondersul artwork, great story. A must read for the comic book and/or Spider-Man fan. I was 5 when this story line ran the 1st time. But a few years later, after I had gotten "into" Spider-Man, I read landmark issue #121 in a reprint. While death may seem very much a part of comics now, it was not always the case. This was a landmark storyline, and changed the thinking for comic book writing. Wondersul artwork, great story. A must read for the comic book and/or Spider-Man fan.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Brodie Vickers

    A major turning point and milestone in the Web-Slinger's history. It's worth a read. A major turning point and milestone in the Web-Slinger's history. It's worth a read.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Gabriel Mero

    A quintessential story line for classic Spider-Man. While battling Doc Ock, Spider-Man is witness to the death of his girlfriend, Gwen Stacy's father, a man whom he cares about deeply and sees as a surrogate for his deceased Uncle Ben. In the second story line, Norman Osborn remembers his true identity as the Green Goblin and kidnaps Gwen, in order to get Spider-Man's attention. During the battle, Gwen is knocked off of the bridge and Spider-Man uses his web to save her...only to discover her de A quintessential story line for classic Spider-Man. While battling Doc Ock, Spider-Man is witness to the death of his girlfriend, Gwen Stacy's father, a man whom he cares about deeply and sees as a surrogate for his deceased Uncle Ben. In the second story line, Norman Osborn remembers his true identity as the Green Goblin and kidnaps Gwen, in order to get Spider-Man's attention. During the battle, Gwen is knocked off of the bridge and Spider-Man uses his web to save her...only to discover her dead. There is a lot of controversy over how, in fact, she died as the Green Goblin states that the fall killed her, and yet, when the webbing catching her legs, you can see SNAP punctuated next to the image, suggesting that the act of stopping her abruptly mid-fall snapped her neck/spine. With Gwen dead, Spider-Man decides to end the Green Goblin once and for all, only to come to his senses before actually exacting his revenge, though the Green Goblin does perish at the hands of his glider. These dark events forever changed comic books, Spider-Man in particular, and I think they both played out perfectly. Do I think that Gwen was dead already? No. I think it is so much more tragically beautiful if, in trying to save her life, Spider-Man was the one to kill his beloved. In more recent comics, it was revealed that Gwen was actually conscious prior to her fall, which lends more credence to the Spider-Man causing her death angle, though whether that fact fits in the original writer's canon or not is not known. I would recommend this graphic novel to any Spider-Man fan, or anyone wanting a darker plot out of a comic.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Daniel

    This is where Spider-Man comics start to get enjoyable for the modern reader. What came before had its glimpses of brilliance (The Final Chapter, Spider Man No More, etc.), but otherwise it consists of fairly forgettable Silver Age stories that are mildly entertaining at best and annoyingly goofy at worst. The Death of Captain and Gwen Stacy, along with issues 96-98 that broke with the Comics Code, mark Marvel's passage into the Bronze Age where plot-developments finally feel like they have actu This is where Spider-Man comics start to get enjoyable for the modern reader. What came before had its glimpses of brilliance (The Final Chapter, Spider Man No More, etc.), but otherwise it consists of fairly forgettable Silver Age stories that are mildly entertaining at best and annoyingly goofy at worst. The Death of Captain and Gwen Stacy, along with issues 96-98 that broke with the Comics Code, mark Marvel's passage into the Bronze Age where plot-developments finally feel like they have actual weight to them and not just because Stan Lee wrote it so in yellow-colored narration boxes. It would be very cynical to say that only lasting consequences such as the death of important characters could have lead to the maturation of superhero comics. Frankly, if Gwen survived somehow, the story still would have worked because of the skillful storytelling that is finally not condescending and has some semblance of synergy between the visual and textual narrative. The largest surpise for me though was the discovery of Gil Kane. Every old-school Marvel fan is raving about Ditko, Romita Sr., but barely heard any praises for Kane, even though the stories drawn by him were my favorites so far.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jon Shanks

    Yes, the title is a spoiler and these stories have been revisited countless times and there have been clones, parallel universes and what ifs? However, there is a reason that these tales have such a prominent place in Marvel & Spider-Man's mythos: because they have stood the test of time and are still just a powerful now as they were back in the day. Sure, some of the fashions and "Daddy-o" language have dated, but Stan Lee and Gerry Conway crafted masterful plots with art by Gil Kane and John R Yes, the title is a spoiler and these stories have been revisited countless times and there have been clones, parallel universes and what ifs? However, there is a reason that these tales have such a prominent place in Marvel & Spider-Man's mythos: because they have stood the test of time and are still just a powerful now as they were back in the day. Sure, some of the fashions and "Daddy-o" language have dated, but Stan Lee and Gerry Conway crafted masterful plots with art by Gil Kane and John Romita Sr. so vibrant that it almost leaps out of the pages. Peter's anguish and anger are palpable. J. Jonah Jameson is ever the blowhard, but show moral judgement and nobility, admitting his mistakes and standing up for his friend Robbie Robertson when bigotry raises its ugly head. Doctor Octopus is as arrogantly superior as ever. Norman Osborn is deliciously deranged as the Green Goblin. Captain Stacy is noble and heroic to the last and Gwen, poor Gwen and the snap that echoed around the Marvel Universe. And the last click that marked the beginning of a new chapter. Every bit the classic that broke the mould. Worth reading and revisiting again and again.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Matt

    Collects Amazing Spider-Man issues #88-92 and #121-122 I had previously read the story of Gwen's death, but this was my first time reading the story where her father dies. Lately I've been enjoying reading older comic books more than I did in the past. Maybe they are an aquired taste, but it has been fun to go through some of this older material. Even though the death of these two Stacys are well-known tales, particularly Gwen's death, the emotional nature of the stories still hit hard. The writin Collects Amazing Spider-Man issues #88-92 and #121-122 I had previously read the story of Gwen's death, but this was my first time reading the story where her father dies. Lately I've been enjoying reading older comic books more than I did in the past. Maybe they are an aquired taste, but it has been fun to go through some of this older material. Even though the death of these two Stacys are well-known tales, particularly Gwen's death, the emotional nature of the stories still hit hard. The writing and storytelling is definitely of its time, feeling very dated, but I think this story still holds up. In my opinion, the loss of Gwen is the greatest tragedy in Peter's life, even more so than the death of Uncle Ben.

  18. 5 out of 5

    David

    Key issues for any Spidey fan to read. Many fans will be familiar with the story as it is a major moment in Peter Parker's growth, and has been referenced in numerous issues, movies, and other iterations. This edition of the book does provide background information written by the authors explaining the decision to kill the Stacys and provides deeper insight into the importance of the events in these issues. Key issues for any Spidey fan to read. Many fans will be familiar with the story as it is a major moment in Peter Parker's growth, and has been referenced in numerous issues, movies, and other iterations. This edition of the book does provide background information written by the authors explaining the decision to kill the Stacys and provides deeper insight into the importance of the events in these issues.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    Important story with incredibly dated writing. Death of the Stacys is loaded with internal dialogue, characters monologuing to themselves, and footnotes where none are needed. Not good today, but standard practice for the time it was produced. Luckily, the plot points and art are interesting enough to make it worth a read. Essential, but not for the writing.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Adam Spanos

    The writing is good and the art is solid, but what makes this a must own is it's long lasting impact on Spider-man history. This is one of the defining moments of Spider-man mythology. Anyone looking to know the character should really read this as it is essential. The writing is good and the art is solid, but what makes this a must own is it's long lasting impact on Spider-man history. This is one of the defining moments of Spider-man mythology. Anyone looking to know the character should really read this as it is essential.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Eddie

    Classic character-defining Spider-Man story, and maybe one of the most famous in comic book lore? The early chapters/issues are dated (some of that dialogue...), which is to be expected, but seemed to improve as things progressed. Overall, very affecting.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Redwan Orittro

    Such a heart breaking story of the Spider-man losing the love of his life Gwen Stacy and then hunting his arch nemesis Green Goblin for revenge. Strong dialogues, great artwork, couldn't ask for a better story arc. Such a heart breaking story of the Spider-man losing the love of his life Gwen Stacy and then hunting his arch nemesis Green Goblin for revenge. Strong dialogues, great artwork, couldn't ask for a better story arc.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Yosef Shapiro

    Two major turning points in the history of Spider Man. The first was the death of Captain Stacey, the father of Gwen. The second, was Gwen's death. These stories had major implications for the development of Spider Man stories that still affect the Spider verse until the present day. Two major turning points in the history of Spider Man. The first was the death of Captain Stacey, the father of Gwen. The second, was Gwen's death. These stories had major implications for the development of Spider Man stories that still affect the Spider verse until the present day.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Reyel2107

    a classic death that made me cry for the first time with comics !!!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Pablo

    This was really really really good, specially #122, the best issue ive read up to now, so much happens in there

  26. 5 out of 5

    Rod

    Since I was not really familiar with these characters (until recently), the emotional impact of their deaths did not resonate strongly.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Algali

    This comic book is really cool.

  28. 5 out of 5

    McKenzie Bunkall

    Heart wrentching. Probably the book that really defines Spiderman. Very different from the movie. Even if the novel has less details.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Lloyd

    Here we go with another set of stories that are supposed classics, turning points, monumental tales of everyone's favorite wall crawler. This one was slightly less burdensome to read than other "classic" tales I've read. A lot of older comics (at least the ones I've read lately) seem to be too concerned with recapping what happened in prior chapters, even sprinkling burdensome summaries into the dialogue! For me, that's really off-putting. This book contains, as you may gather from the title, th Here we go with another set of stories that are supposed classics, turning points, monumental tales of everyone's favorite wall crawler. This one was slightly less burdensome to read than other "classic" tales I've read. A lot of older comics (at least the ones I've read lately) seem to be too concerned with recapping what happened in prior chapters, even sprinkling burdensome summaries into the dialogue! For me, that's really off-putting. This book contains, as you may gather from the title, the stories of the deaths of Captain Stacy and Gwen Stacy. This story (especially the one where Gwen bites it) is one that I've always wanted to read. It's a bit of Spider-Man history that I really wasn't familiar with and one that seems to be discussed a fair amount. These stories bring out the dark side of Spider-Man and his hunger for revenge like none I've ever seen. This may be the turning point everyone refers to. If I recall, he even threatens the Green Goblin with death after Gwen dies (largely due to the actions of the Goblin). This makes for interesting reading, even if it does bring Peter Parker/Spider-Man completely out of character. The art is nice and solid for the time. Maybe I'm not well-read enough in classic comics, maybe I'm just biased, but the art in these older ones doesn't grab me like the flair of current art in comics. Still, Gil Kane and John Romita, Sr. brought it on this one, putting together some stunning covers and interiors. One recommended for those who, like me, wanted to do their homework on this chapter of Spidey's life... or simply would enjoy classic Spider-Man.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Jon Arnold

    Inevitable double bill given retellings of these stories have formed the basis of the two most recent Spider-Man movies. The first two-thirds, the death of Captain Stacy, is an example of how culture can build up myths. It’s an ordinary Spidey tale, a standard multi-issue scrap with Doctor Octopus, with Gwen’s dad becoming collateral damage, saving a kid from falling debris. Far more interesting is what Stan Lee, Gil Kane and Romita the elder make of the consequences; a ruthless politician using Inevitable double bill given retellings of these stories have formed the basis of the two most recent Spider-Man movies. The first two-thirds, the death of Captain Stacy, is an example of how culture can build up myths. It’s an ordinary Spidey tale, a standard multi-issue scrap with Doctor Octopus, with Gwen’s dad becoming collateral damage, saving a kid from falling debris. Far more interesting is what Stan Lee, Gil Kane and Romita the elder make of the consequences; a ruthless politician using his death as propaganda. It’s fun enough, with all the verve and energy of what’s my favourite Marvel period, but it’s hardly a tale to echo down the ages. Much better is the death of Gwen Stacy. It uses the death of Peter Parker’s girlfriend to fashion a tale of two madnesses; Norman Osborn’s insanity and Spider-Man’s drive for revenge at any cost. One man becomes lost in his madness, the other abandons friends, provokes the law and enemies… and still ends up doing the right thing, despite the most extreme provocation he could ever face. It’s Spider-Man’s ultimate trial and he comes through, restating his heroic credentials. It’s simple and elegantly told, with Kane and Romita providing plenty of dash to match the power of the story. It resonated with me when I first read it thirty years ago; it’s still one of the all-time Spider-Man highlights now. Really, all the Spider-Man stories since have merely been fiddling in the margins compared with this

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