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Poetry. California Interest. Native American Studies. Containing the work of 31 poets from 29 tribes, Red Indian Road West is the first poetry anthology encompassing the entire range of Native American experience in California. With more than 720,000 Native Americans, California has by far the largest Native American population of any state and perhaps the most diverse. Th Poetry. California Interest. Native American Studies. Containing the work of 31 poets from 29 tribes, Red Indian Road West is the first poetry anthology encompassing the entire range of Native American experience in California. With more than 720,000 Native Americans, California has by far the largest Native American population of any state and perhaps the most diverse. There are currently more than one hundred American Indian tribes indigenous to California, as well as many Native Americans from tribes nationwide now residing in the state. Contributors: Indira Allegra, Judi Brannan Armbruster, J.P. Dancing Bear, Nanette Bradley Deetz, E.K. Cooper, Roberta Reyes Cordero, Lucille Lang Day, Natalie Diaz, Carolyn Dunn, Jennifer Elise Foerster, Jewelle Gomez, Janice Gould, Alison Hart, John Hershman, Senna Heyatawin, Dave Holt, Frank LaPena, Sharmagne Leland-St. John, James Luna, Sal Martinez, Shaunna Oteka McCovey, Stephen Meadows, Deborah A. Miranda, Manny Moreno, Catherine Nelson-Rodriguez, Linda Noel, Wendy Rose, Sylvia Ross, Kurt Schweigman, Marlon Sherman, Kim Shuck, Georgiana Valoyce-Sanchez "RED INDIAN ROAD WEST is an assertion and a statement saying, 'We have always been here. You will never forget us. You cannot do so.' Indigenous people and their insistent passion. Traveling from inland hills to seashores. Their experiences in hot desert and hard mountain. Vital moments to viral moments like no other, but always within the present one. Karuk. Wintu. Konkow. Pomo. Miwok. Mohave. Chumash. Costanoan Esselen. Ohlone. And more. And more than we can name but which will always be remembered. And later on, the Lakota, Dakota, Cherokee, Wampanoag, and others, so our indigenous essence will always be momentous. Read, listen, hear, and be assured. Know again and always!"--Simon J. Ortiz "An anthology is a community, each voice telling its story in this tribal gathering. RED INDIAN ROAD WEST is a pow wow of sorts. It takes many voices to tell the story of the Native spirit and experience. The voices often are uprooted, yet find place within language. There is camaraderie, wounding, anger, defiance, celebration and disclosure in these wolf songs of the heart."--Diane Glancy


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Poetry. California Interest. Native American Studies. Containing the work of 31 poets from 29 tribes, Red Indian Road West is the first poetry anthology encompassing the entire range of Native American experience in California. With more than 720,000 Native Americans, California has by far the largest Native American population of any state and perhaps the most diverse. Th Poetry. California Interest. Native American Studies. Containing the work of 31 poets from 29 tribes, Red Indian Road West is the first poetry anthology encompassing the entire range of Native American experience in California. With more than 720,000 Native Americans, California has by far the largest Native American population of any state and perhaps the most diverse. There are currently more than one hundred American Indian tribes indigenous to California, as well as many Native Americans from tribes nationwide now residing in the state. Contributors: Indira Allegra, Judi Brannan Armbruster, J.P. Dancing Bear, Nanette Bradley Deetz, E.K. Cooper, Roberta Reyes Cordero, Lucille Lang Day, Natalie Diaz, Carolyn Dunn, Jennifer Elise Foerster, Jewelle Gomez, Janice Gould, Alison Hart, John Hershman, Senna Heyatawin, Dave Holt, Frank LaPena, Sharmagne Leland-St. John, James Luna, Sal Martinez, Shaunna Oteka McCovey, Stephen Meadows, Deborah A. Miranda, Manny Moreno, Catherine Nelson-Rodriguez, Linda Noel, Wendy Rose, Sylvia Ross, Kurt Schweigman, Marlon Sherman, Kim Shuck, Georgiana Valoyce-Sanchez "RED INDIAN ROAD WEST is an assertion and a statement saying, 'We have always been here. You will never forget us. You cannot do so.' Indigenous people and their insistent passion. Traveling from inland hills to seashores. Their experiences in hot desert and hard mountain. Vital moments to viral moments like no other, but always within the present one. Karuk. Wintu. Konkow. Pomo. Miwok. Mohave. Chumash. Costanoan Esselen. Ohlone. And more. And more than we can name but which will always be remembered. And later on, the Lakota, Dakota, Cherokee, Wampanoag, and others, so our indigenous essence will always be momentous. Read, listen, hear, and be assured. Know again and always!"--Simon J. Ortiz "An anthology is a community, each voice telling its story in this tribal gathering. RED INDIAN ROAD WEST is a pow wow of sorts. It takes many voices to tell the story of the Native spirit and experience. The voices often are uprooted, yet find place within language. There is camaraderie, wounding, anger, defiance, celebration and disclosure in these wolf songs of the heart."--Diane Glancy

30 review for Red Indian Road West: Native American Poetry from California

  1. 5 out of 5

    Wyndy Carr

    Powwow Means Dreamer in Algonquian We are all more connected than we are separate. Fighting and hating other humans and depriving them of life and livelihood is what’s shocking and obscene. Even between women and men. Author Linda Hogan wrote that when she was having a hard time being “Native American” one time, a voice came to her, saying, “you are the result of the love of thousands,” not a cause for rage, despair, isolation or ostracism. “These wolf songs I hold in my heart do more than spark Powwow Means Dreamer in Algonquian We are all more connected than we are separate. Fighting and hating other humans and depriving them of life and livelihood is what’s shocking and obscene. Even between women and men. Author Linda Hogan wrote that when she was having a hard time being “Native American” one time, a voice came to her, saying, “you are the result of the love of thousands,” not a cause for rage, despair, isolation or ostracism. “These wolf songs I hold in my heart do more than spark memories and our forgotten guilt, they remind me that once we walked the earth as the earth.” (p.36, “Wolf Songs,” J.P. Dancing Bear) Oddly enough, we were all “Indigenous” somewhere - Scotland, Somalia, Mexico, Finland – and some greater power, religious choice, land grab, adventure, escape, servitude, marriage, parent or army conscription brought us here. Lucille Lang Day and Kurt Schweigman’s poetry collection, Red Indian Road West: Native American Poetry from California, hearing Sherman Alexie at last year’s Bay Area Book Festival, seeing a documentary on the late John Trudell at the Omni on Shattuck, hearing about Standing Rock water protectors in North Dakota and the human remains under the proposed Berkeley Shellmounds construction site make me pause and grow silent the way my Grampa did sometimes. He’d gone to France in World War I as a young medic and drove an ambulance there; seen things that made him “an agnostic” for the rest of his life. Even the massive forests of northern Wisconsin, Michigan and Minnesota he’d worked in had been decimated for Chicago and Detroit’s clapboard houses when he returned. My “ecological” revelation came in a Lake Superior gift shop in 1986 – the maps of forest covering the continent in 1700, then dwindling Westward in 1800, and mostly wiping out the virgin forest by 1912-1915. The same thing happened to “The People” when epidemics seared the tribes. “A village became known /as “stench fish” /because it was impossible /to bury the rotting bodies It was a hard /and difficult time /We remember it as the time / of falling stars” (p. 74-74, Frank LaPena) Not every poem is so grim – many are laser-sharp in the telling like the first “Native American” poem Sherman Alexie read in a class he took because “maybe I’d meet some girls.” “It described how a piece of reservation-issue baloney on a greasy frying pan would puff up and sort of fart and spatter, and I knew there was poetry that belonged to me.” That poem made him become a writer, and he could “say explicitly to people… the most ordinary parts of life are worthy… the simplest word.” The “power of naming” was helping him “be beautiful and a survivor” in spite of “mistreatment” and “racism all over.” In The Lone Ranger and Tonto Fistfight in Heaven, though, the nightmare truth seeps out: “The enemy keeps our dismembered tongues tied to his belt,” and “’I don’t know,’ she said, ‘I want to change the world.’” “I wish I could sleep,” he says, “I know how all my dreams end anyway.” Wounded Knee and the American Indian Movement were at their height in February 1973. When “eloquent” and “dangerous” John (I call him “true words”) Trudell was demonstrating by burning a U.S. flag “desecrated by racism, sexism and class” in DC in 1979, his pregnant wife and two small children were trapped and burned to death in their home in South Dakota, probably by the FBI man who had been harassing him for decades. When Pennie Opal Plant was asked by the tense, well-meaning White women, “What can we do for the Earth to help it survive?” she replied simply, “She’s our Mother” with a rock-steady gaze. “Mothers and Aunties together, laughing with each story, /Native men afraid to join in for fear of being given hell.” (p. 50, “Women Laughing,” E. K. Cooper.) “These beat-up, raggedy Kaibab moccasins /I wear are stained and worn rough /by hard years in my friend’s life. /I wear them when I need her courage.” (p. 82-83, “Marge’s Shoes,” Sylvia Ross.) “Yet in summer…Washoes…and Wampanoags…Dance to keep the world /in balance and remind us that the Earth is living, every /rock is sacred, and every tree and salmon has a soul.” (p. 71, “At Lake Tahoe,” Lucille Lang Day.) “Count us with you this night /Each of us living in our own worlds alone /All of us calling with our separate ghost voices /To unbind you once and for all.” (p. 79-81, “Through the Walls I am Calling, for Leonard Peltier,” Stephen Meadows.) “Wakan Tanka, /Creator, /send us a dream/ so we can all dance together.” (p.94-5, “Night Eagle,” Nanette Bradley Deetz) Schweigman, Kurt and Lucille Lang Day, eds., Red Indian Road West: Native American Poetry from California, Scarlet Tanager Books, Oakland CA, 2016, are available from lucillelangday.com and at local independent bookstores. When asked to speak about Indigenous Ecology at the Ecumenical Peace Institute annual dinner the year I came to Berkeley, Pennie Opal Plant said something proudly that stuck in my mind: “I will not live in fear.” The FBI wrote in one of their dossiers about poet and activist John Trudell, “He is extremely eloquent, and therefore extremely dangerous.” I jumped at the chance to go to Canada for a First Nations (Native American) Core Concentration Master’s program in 2002, even though I wasn’t a tribal member, am only 6.25% Indian and had to pay (4x) International Tuition; because I was able to spend 6 out of 8 years of the Bush Administration there. Maybe my 15-year-old Great-Great-Grandmother had been “trafficked,” maybe she “immigrated,” but she made her 40-something-year-old employer marry her before she bore him two children on the cusp of that last U.S. Civil War. More soldiers died in the Civil War than in all other wars America’s been in combined. I always knew my Grandpa was “different;” a great observer of nature, fun game-player, story and joke-teller; but it wasn’t until he was dying that he “revealed” her history to my Mom, the origin of the “Nokomis” Grandmother he’d shadowed and learned from as a child. When Louise Erdrich sat down next to me at Book Passage last summer, she was wearing Emeraude perfume, just like my own Grandma, and a wave of “primal” childhood remembrance washed over and through me, as powerful as her characters and scenes. () https://www.linkedin.com/pulse/powwow... () W.J. Knox Carr can be contacted through The Berkeley Times, P.O. Box 559, Berkeley, CA, 94701-0559. Extended versions of these reviews are available online on her LinkedIn page.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Liz Murray

    Thirty poets from around the state of California contribute to this collection. Each poem adds a piece of beauty to the poetic world. Putting these authors together speaks back to an idea that Native Americans are from the past. It confirms the distinct yet connected languages and culture of the Golden State.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Kate

  4. 4 out of 5

    Richard Levine

  5. 5 out of 5

    Drew

  6. 4 out of 5

    Shari

  7. 5 out of 5

    Caleb Tankersley

  8. 4 out of 5

    Dave Holt

  9. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wendi

  11. 5 out of 5

    Ching-In

  12. 5 out of 5

    Missy

  13. 5 out of 5

    abcdefg

  14. 4 out of 5

    Sylvia

  15. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  16. 4 out of 5

    ❄Elsa Frost❄

  17. 4 out of 5

    Marleah

  18. 5 out of 5

    Chasity Mayo

  19. 4 out of 5

    Jennifer Bradshaw

  20. 4 out of 5

    Emily

  21. 5 out of 5

    Rakko Farrah

  22. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  23. 4 out of 5

    Isabella

  24. 5 out of 5

    Annie

  25. 5 out of 5

    Adam Brown

  26. 5 out of 5

    Mary Lipiec

  27. 5 out of 5

    Alden

  28. 5 out of 5

    Meekly

  29. 4 out of 5

    Sandra Pfeifer

  30. 4 out of 5

    Jade

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