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Bristol Folk: A Discographical History Of Bristol Folk Music In The 1960s and 1970s

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Bristol Folk features painstakingly researched profiles of all the artists known to have recorded in and around Bristol’s vibrant folk scene in the 1960s and 1970s: from Ian Anderson’s country blues to the manic 1920s jug-based jazz of the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra; from Adge Cutler & the Wurzels’ novelty rural folk to the sophisticated bedsit images of Shelagh McDonald; Bristol Folk features painstakingly researched profiles of all the artists known to have recorded in and around Bristol’s vibrant folk scene in the 1960s and 1970s: from Ian Anderson’s country blues to the manic 1920s jug-based jazz of the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra; from Adge Cutler & the Wurzels’ novelty rural folk to the sophisticated bedsit images of Shelagh McDonald; from the rustic rock of Stackridge to the finely-crafted ‘psych blues’ of Al Jones; from the magical ballads of Bob Stewart to ethereal pop hits by Sally Oldfield; from the inspired, original guitar work of Dave Evans to the ‘acid folk’ of Keith Christmas – and much more. Amongst those who contributed specially-written pieces are Ian Anderson, Andy Leggett, Rodney Matthews (yes, the world-famous fantasy artist started out designing LP sleeves and gig posters for Bristol’s folk set), Steve Tilston and the late and much lamented Fred Wedlock, all of whose diverse careers either started in Bristol or were shaped by their time on Bristol’s folk scene. The book also looks at the local labels that released many now highly-collectable folk records, as well as at Bristol’s numerous folk clubs – from the Troubadour, which put Bristol firmly on the national folk map between 1966 and 1971, and the Stonehouse, to the now less well-remembered, but equally-missed clubs, such as Bristol Ballads & Blues, White On Black, Folk Blues Bristol & West and many more.


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Bristol Folk features painstakingly researched profiles of all the artists known to have recorded in and around Bristol’s vibrant folk scene in the 1960s and 1970s: from Ian Anderson’s country blues to the manic 1920s jug-based jazz of the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra; from Adge Cutler & the Wurzels’ novelty rural folk to the sophisticated bedsit images of Shelagh McDonald; Bristol Folk features painstakingly researched profiles of all the artists known to have recorded in and around Bristol’s vibrant folk scene in the 1960s and 1970s: from Ian Anderson’s country blues to the manic 1920s jug-based jazz of the Pigsty Hill Light Orchestra; from Adge Cutler & the Wurzels’ novelty rural folk to the sophisticated bedsit images of Shelagh McDonald; from the rustic rock of Stackridge to the finely-crafted ‘psych blues’ of Al Jones; from the magical ballads of Bob Stewart to ethereal pop hits by Sally Oldfield; from the inspired, original guitar work of Dave Evans to the ‘acid folk’ of Keith Christmas – and much more. Amongst those who contributed specially-written pieces are Ian Anderson, Andy Leggett, Rodney Matthews (yes, the world-famous fantasy artist started out designing LP sleeves and gig posters for Bristol’s folk set), Steve Tilston and the late and much lamented Fred Wedlock, all of whose diverse careers either started in Bristol or were shaped by their time on Bristol’s folk scene. The book also looks at the local labels that released many now highly-collectable folk records, as well as at Bristol’s numerous folk clubs – from the Troubadour, which put Bristol firmly on the national folk map between 1966 and 1971, and the Stonehouse, to the now less well-remembered, but equally-missed clubs, such as Bristol Ballads & Blues, White On Black, Folk Blues Bristol & West and many more.

3 review for Bristol Folk: A Discographical History Of Bristol Folk Music In The 1960s and 1970s

  1. 5 out of 5

    Steve Gillway

    A well-researched description of the scene and the records of that time

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jan

  3. 4 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

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