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One of the Few: A Marine Fighter Pilot's Reconnaissance of the Christian Worldview

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A US Marine fighter pilot explores life’s important questions as he prepares for combat, searches for truth, and wages spiritual warfare during his mission to become a better husband and father. “I highly recommend it.”— John Njoroge, speaker and radio host at Ravi Zacharias International Ministries. Jason B. Ladd grows up in a military family with loving parents but spends A US Marine fighter pilot explores life’s important questions as he prepares for combat, searches for truth, and wages spiritual warfare during his mission to become a better husband and father. “I highly recommend it.”— John Njoroge, speaker and radio host at Ravi Zacharias International Ministries. Jason B. Ladd grows up in a military family with loving parents but spends his young life filled with spiritual apathy. Ladd enters the US Marine Corps, becomes a fighter pilot, and sees combat in Iraq before life events align to nudge him into profound spiritual inquiry. Digging deep into his quest for truth, he realizes the art and science of fighter pilot fundamentals can help him on his journey. Filled with stories that contrast his spiritual apathy with his post-Christian worldview passion, One of the Few is the compelling life story of a spiritual seeker engaged in a thrilling profession combined with a strong, reasonable defense of Christianity. For fans of Ravi Zacharias, Lee Strobel, and Frank Turek, Ladd’s remarkable journey shares the transformative power of faith during a time when belief in God is dismissed and religious liberty in the military is attacked.


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A US Marine fighter pilot explores life’s important questions as he prepares for combat, searches for truth, and wages spiritual warfare during his mission to become a better husband and father. “I highly recommend it.”— John Njoroge, speaker and radio host at Ravi Zacharias International Ministries. Jason B. Ladd grows up in a military family with loving parents but spends A US Marine fighter pilot explores life’s important questions as he prepares for combat, searches for truth, and wages spiritual warfare during his mission to become a better husband and father. “I highly recommend it.”— John Njoroge, speaker and radio host at Ravi Zacharias International Ministries. Jason B. Ladd grows up in a military family with loving parents but spends his young life filled with spiritual apathy. Ladd enters the US Marine Corps, becomes a fighter pilot, and sees combat in Iraq before life events align to nudge him into profound spiritual inquiry. Digging deep into his quest for truth, he realizes the art and science of fighter pilot fundamentals can help him on his journey. Filled with stories that contrast his spiritual apathy with his post-Christian worldview passion, One of the Few is the compelling life story of a spiritual seeker engaged in a thrilling profession combined with a strong, reasonable defense of Christianity. For fans of Ravi Zacharias, Lee Strobel, and Frank Turek, Ladd’s remarkable journey shares the transformative power of faith during a time when belief in God is dismissed and religious liberty in the military is attacked.

30 review for One of the Few: A Marine Fighter Pilot's Reconnaissance of the Christian Worldview

  1. 4 out of 5

    Pawan Mishra

    One of the Few from Jason B. Ladd is a curious examination of a number of vital aspects of life that we often take for granted. The author has seen much more than the average person sees in his/her life and has come across as someone who has a firm grip on a wide range of topics he is speaking about. And he has done it in such a way that it seems a friend from school days has visited you after years of assignments and is telling you details of his marvelous life journey over a coffee. Ladd has ma One of the Few from Jason B. Ladd is a curious examination of a number of vital aspects of life that we often take for granted. The author has seen much more than the average person sees in his/her life and has come across as someone who has a firm grip on a wide range of topics he is speaking about. And he has done it in such a way that it seems a friend from school days has visited you after years of assignments and is telling you details of his marvelous life journey over a coffee. Ladd has made complex topics seem simple by relating to events in his own life and providing connected references to characters/ shows in popular culture. Also, I did not understand a lot of military process and terminology prior to reading this book--so the book was full of education from that perspective as well. I am a spiritual seeker myself and was pleasantly surprised by the book for it's ability to handle the morality at such a deep level. The book quotes the Bible and speaks about the Christianity, but, if you have exposure to the books and practices from multiple religions, you would see that everything being said is as applicable to any religion--for they all teach the same thing. Lastly, I loved that the book has been written in an experimental way. Leaves the reader more curious after each chapter as to what to expect in the next.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Lydia Howe

    Why I Choose this Book: The author contacted me via email several months ago saying he seen on my blog that I "enjoyed Christian Living titles" and wondered if I would be willing to review his book. My curiosity was peaked, because hey, helping out fellow authors is cool, but what really got me interested was his P.S. to the email where he said I could find out more about his homeschooling family of nine who lives in Alaska. People. They live in Alaska. (For all you who don't know, I'm pretty su Why I Choose this Book: The author contacted me via email several months ago saying he seen on my blog that I "enjoyed Christian Living titles" and wondered if I would be willing to review his book. My curiosity was peaked, because hey, helping out fellow authors is cool, but what really got me interested was his P.S. to the email where he said I could find out more about his homeschooling family of nine who lives in Alaska. People. They live in Alaska. (For all you who don't know, I'm pretty sure Alaska and I would be best friends if we ever got to know each other.) Mr. Ladd and I emailed back and forth a few times because I had various questions about the book, and needless to say, I agreed to review it. (Although, to be clear, the book itself has nothing to do with Alaska.) What I Thought About this Book: The book is divided into three parts, and the first part was most assuredly my favorite. It received a very solid four stars. Parts two and three were a bit disjoined and made it somewhat hard to follow, but in the end I also appreciated the information that was presented. Part One has more of the story of Mr. Ladd's life than the other two parts, and I really liked how he tied different lessons he'd learned into how they would later make sense to him spiritually. Mr. Ladd also described the world in a way that I greatly enjoyed. His word pictures and descriptions made me smile more than once. Part Two explores a lot of various issues and sins in the world, and how they affect people, and how Christians should view those issues. Although Mr. Ladd explains in the introduction what Part Two is going to be, I was still really surprised by the sudden switch, not only in content, but also in style. Part Two took me a while to get through because I normally read in the evening, and I found it hard to focus when I was tired. I also skim-read a chapter or two because although I think the subjects presented in the chapters are very important to talk about, I don't feel the need to personally read about them at this time. Part Three talks about other religions and how they are different from Christianity, and also why it's important to study things for ourselves and not just mindlessly accept what other people tell us. Conclusion: The book wasn't what I was expecting, and I wish it had all been more like Part One, but all in all I'm glad I read it. Mr. Ladd didn't grow up in a Christian environment, so it was especially neat to get to "watch" his journey toward believing the Bible and God. He obviously spent a lot of time exploring the topic before he believed, so that was really cool to see. Although handled well, the book does talk about some subjects that aren't suitable for kids (plus, I don't think they'd grasp a lot of the info anyway), so I'd recommend this book for ages 17 and up. Rating: I'm giving One of the Few 4 out of 5 stars and 7 out of 10. *I received this book free from the author. Find out more about Jason B. Ladd at his website.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Carrie (The Butterfly Reader)

    First off I want to say that Non Fiction and Christian aren't genres I ever, and I mean ever go for. I am very much Wiccan and so when the author asked me if I wanted to review this book, I almost said no after seeing what it all was about. But something told me to go for it. So he gifted me a copy and I got to reading. It's actually a really good story, it's mostly stories from the author's time in the Marine's. This book is not a sweet read, the author has seen and lived through things that mo First off I want to say that Non Fiction and Christian aren't genres I ever, and I mean ever go for. I am very much Wiccan and so when the author asked me if I wanted to review this book, I almost said no after seeing what it all was about. But something told me to go for it. So he gifted me a copy and I got to reading. It's actually a really good story, it's mostly stories from the author's time in the Marine's. This book is not a sweet read, the author has seen and lived through things that most people will never go through. Now as someone who has a retired Air Force father-in-law, I didn't find myself too lost with some of military words but even for the ones I didn't understand, the author explains them perfectly so anyone will understand. The author makes a lot of very true points, there is a spiritual war going on and most are just too busy to open their eyes and see. I do like how this author sees both sides, he used to not be Christian, but something happened in his life that changed that. The writing is easy to follow and seamless. This is a great book for anyone who is wanting to learn about the Christian God, or anyone who already walks that path of life. It can even be for the person like me, the one who used to be Christian. Some people who aren't Christian or those with no open mind, will not like this book. Honestly, give this one a go, it's actually pretty damn good. I do knock off one star because in a few parts of the book, I felt more like the author was preaching rather that sharing his story and walk with God.

  4. 4 out of 5

    Audrey

    Review reposted from my blog at https://forwardsandbookwords.wordpres... I was lucky enough to be approached by the author of this book to receive an ARC e-book copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much! I wasn’t too sure what to expect going into this book. I love reading and learning more about Christianity but non-fiction is never my strong suit. I have a hard time keeping track of all the dates and events, and honestly reading about things that aren’t real and serio Review reposted from my blog at https://forwardsandbookwords.wordpres... I was lucky enough to be approached by the author of this book to receive an ARC e-book copy of this book in exchange for an honest review. Thank you so much! I wasn’t too sure what to expect going into this book. I love reading and learning more about Christianity but non-fiction is never my strong suit. I have a hard time keeping track of all the dates and events, and honestly reading about things that aren’t real and serious is just usually more fun for me. Not only that, but since this book largely tells stories from the author’s time as a Marine, I was worried that all of the military vocabulary and phrasing would be way over my head, making it hard for me to enjoy it. However, I was very pleasantly surprised. Ladd does an awesome job of explaining the military terms he uses and using very relatable examples to make it easier to understand. It was fun to see how he used his own story and references to things like The Simpsons, The Sounds of Music, and Harry Potter to strengthen and add details to the points he was making. One thing I found interesting about this book is that it didn’t exactly read like one continuous story. The book is broken up into three parts. Within those parts you have chapters and within those chapters there were broken up little sections that told a little story and then usually connected back to the Bible, showing what we could learn from it. In this way, I thought the book was really nice because it almost read like a devotional if you chose to read it over time, bit by bit, instead of in huge chunks at once. My favorite thing about the book was the quotes at the beginning of each section. There would be one quote from a non-believer, and then a quote from the Bible or from a Christian that completely contradicts the first quote. It was cool to see the misconceptions disproved. I also loved the fact that I read this on my Kindle because it was so easy to highlight and make notes on my favorite quotes. My only issues with this book is that sometimes it seemed like the connections from the short story bits back to the life lessons and Bible were a bit of a stretch. There were a bunch of really interesting ones, but some seemed unnecessary and forced. There were also some cases where Ladd seemed to do too good of a job explaining certain military things, when it wasn’t too important to the story. I know some people would probably really enjoy getting all of the details, but personally it seemed like a little too much. Overall, I really enjoyed this book and learned a lot from reading it. While it was serious and non-fiction, a couple of the stories had me laughing out loud. It’s definitely not a light and fluffy read, but it is incredibly interesting and didn’t bore me. I would highly recommend Christians who are looking to gain more perspective on their faith and further their knowledge of Christianity to give this book a chance – I really liked it.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    I was expecting to learn about Mr. Ladd's experience in the military while at the same time I was intrigued about how they relate to his Christian values. I am a Christian. I found myself struggling with this book. What I first noticed in the beginning was that while I did appreciate getting to know Mr. Ladd and what his childhood was like growing up until he enlisted, the chapters read more like snippets. This was a little clunky to read as I would start to be interested in a section of the boo I was expecting to learn about Mr. Ladd's experience in the military while at the same time I was intrigued about how they relate to his Christian values. I am a Christian. I found myself struggling with this book. What I first noticed in the beginning was that while I did appreciate getting to know Mr. Ladd and what his childhood was like growing up until he enlisted, the chapters read more like snippets. This was a little clunky to read as I would start to be interested in a section of the book or that topic and then it would end and the next part would jump around to a different time period. After I got used to this, the second part of this book was while Mr. Ladd really started explaining how military and religion intertwine. Again, I found this enlightening but at times I know Mr. Ladd did not mean to but it came off preachy. This could have been helped if the length of the topic had been shortened just a little. For example, Mr. Ladd talks about the subject of alcohol. This goes on for several pages. After a while my feelings went from intrigued to semi-intrigued. Yet, I came to realize that this book really should be read slower and in small portions. This way you can reflect more on what Mr. Ladd is talking about. I did get from this book that Mr. Ladd has a deep understanding of the world and that God is great.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    This is a non-fiction memoir and apologetic, so to speak, of a Marine fighter pilot and his journey to faith. Jason begins this account as a cocky, self-assured agnostic with a fiery ambition to be the best of the best, a Top Gun fighter pilot in the Marines, who DON'T just take 'anybody.' He ends the account in a settled faith in the Lord of Creation, and his journey from A to B is laid out for all to see, with a well-thought-out, erudite apologetic for the faith, for purity, for moving on with This is a non-fiction memoir and apologetic, so to speak, of a Marine fighter pilot and his journey to faith. Jason begins this account as a cocky, self-assured agnostic with a fiery ambition to be the best of the best, a Top Gun fighter pilot in the Marines, who DON'T just take 'anybody.' He ends the account in a settled faith in the Lord of Creation, and his journey from A to B is laid out for all to see, with a well-thought-out, erudite apologetic for the faith, for purity, for moving on with God. Content: Drug Content: PG - Alcoholism is quite common in the military, and it is unveiled in a frank and clear exposition as to its dangers and effects. Jason is clear that while drinking is not prohibited in scripture, drunkenness is described therein as unwise. Smoking and other drug use are also discussed briefly. Violence: PG - In wartime, there is bound to be death on both sides, whether dealing or receiving it. The struggle in military conflict is exposed without giving sensitive information. Jason struggled with the death of insurgents he was ordered to take out. A death by dragging is described. Language: G - I do not recall any language in the book at all. Adult Content: PG - There is a brief description of the soldiers' life and forays on leave with the ladies in town calling for attention. Nothing is described, but one soldier who left early as the group went to a strip club, later mentioned offhand that he left early because he took two girls home with him. There is some mention of the struggles of loneliness and infidelity when deployed, and the high divorce rate in the military. Pornography, its additive perils and collateral damage are clearly explained and decried. Christian content: This is a solidly Christian conversion story. It is rife with apologetics at every step as Jason takes us along on each step from unbelief through reasoning and analysis of the Christian faith, to solid belief. He doesn';t just cover the basics, but also delves into God's requirements for purity and holiness, and several of the common threats to it. Each chapter begins with two opposing quotes - one from the worldly, atheistic point of view, and one from either a biblical apologist or straight from scripture, exposing the opposing worldview for what it is. Quotes from Chuck Colson, Ravi Zacharias, Norman Geisler, Walter Martin, and C. S. Lewis share pages with Deepak Chopra, The Satanic Bible, and Manuals on Military Codes of Conduct. Strange bedfellows, but every page is directed to the cross. Final analysis: Jason has done a masterful job of presenting the truth couched in terms a person in the military (or anyone else) can identify with, as well as clear guidance for a seeker beginning from where he was, an agnostic or atheist with an open mind. It is well-written, erudite, well-informed, solidly Christian, informative, hard-hitting, challenging, even convicting. Five Stars! * I received an electronic copy for an honest review.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Jane

    I haven’t read many books like this one. I would not call it a novel. It’s part memoir, part Christian research paper, and part small history of the Marine Corp. For me, that makes it more unique than my usual genre. And that made it worthwhile. My favorite elements in this book were the personal stories Jason shares. I enjoyed his candor and humor as he related events from his childhood, dating stories when courting his wife, and experiences while in training and combat as a U. S. Marine. These I haven’t read many books like this one. I would not call it a novel. It’s part memoir, part Christian research paper, and part small history of the Marine Corp. For me, that makes it more unique than my usual genre. And that made it worthwhile. My favorite elements in this book were the personal stories Jason shares. I enjoyed his candor and humor as he related events from his childhood, dating stories when courting his wife, and experiences while in training and combat as a U. S. Marine. These stories created a positive tone and engaging story line for readers to follow. They highlight a myriad of emotions and experiences that all led Jason to God in some way. These stories made me stop and think about which experiences are my defining moments in life. How has my life been changed because of my Christian faith? If anything, I would have liked more personal anecdotes from Jason and less theological history. There were several chapters that felt long-winded and difficult to focus in because of the extended quoting from historical sources and shortness of his personal stories. The historical sources were sometimes boring to read through. (Perhaps this comes from my personal background in Christianity so it often was not new information for me). I wanted more from him and less from other sources. I admit that I skimmed through some of the parts to get back to the main narration of Jason’s story. Because of his frankness and openness, Jason creates a bond between himself and his readers as the book progresses. He shares many stories about his life and those stories offer his readers a window into his life. We get a glimpse of his struggles and his triumphs, his difficulties and his successes. Jason shares some very personal memories with his audience (I’m thinking especially of his and his wife’s experiences with losing a young baby) that draw out deep emotional responses. That makes Jason a relatable and enjoyable narrator. He doesn’t present himself as perfect. In fact, often he does the complete opposite. He is just like so many of us who are on the path to understanding Christian discipleship–trying to be a positive influence in the world. It is refreshing to read a book that focuses on the ways that Christian faith can bring meaning and happiness to life. In today’s society, we often see less faith rather than more in the media. We are surrounded by scientific advances that seem to taunt or discard the reality of God. Faith is not always popular or easy. But Jason’s book shows us that the journey is worth it. It is worth going through the self discovery to discover what you believe. It is worth it to study and learn about Christ and come to know Him. It is worth it to attend church and gain a strong faith. It is worth building on that faith for times of difficulty. This book is replete with inspirational quotes about Jason’s journey and the ways we can begin similar journeys to strengthen our faith. Jason writes quite eloquently about the ways his training in the marines is similar to everyday life. He makes several profound connections between fighting the enemies of our country and of God and between preparation for those battles. Some of the most powerful ones for me were the chapters that discussed the role of parents. It was encouraging to read a book that forwards the importance of the influence of parents in today’s world. The title of this book creates a beautiful call to action for readers. A book like needs to empower readers to act–to do something different after they finish reading. I think the title creates that needed empowerment. Jason acknowledges that Christian faith is not always popular today. It will probably be difficult. But it will also be worth it. Will you choose to be “One of the Few?” For me, this book wasn’t revolutionary or life-changing. Jason didn’t relate anything that blew my mind or made me question my entire worldview. As I have mentioned before, I am LDS or Mormon so I am already Christian. I am building my foundation of faith everyday and finding that my faith can sustain me though intensely difficult times. If anything, I appreciated this book because of it’s simplicity and faith. I’m glad such a book exists and felt my determination to strengthen my faith increase as I read this book.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Julia

    One Of The Few by Jason B Ladd is Christian nonfiction. It is an amazing book as Jason Ladd unpacks Christianity and reveals his journey as he moved "from apathy to inquiry." Within the book Jason Ladd covers topics such as suffering, evil, porn, faith, belief, going to church and much more. One Of The Few really is a comprehensive guide to the Christian faith that will appeal to both Christians and those searching for the answer to the question "Do you know what you believe?" Jason Ladd is a U.S One Of The Few by Jason B Ladd is Christian nonfiction. It is an amazing book as Jason Ladd unpacks Christianity and reveals his journey as he moved "from apathy to inquiry." Within the book Jason Ladd covers topics such as suffering, evil, porn, faith, belief, going to church and much more. One Of The Few really is a comprehensive guide to the Christian faith that will appeal to both Christians and those searching for the answer to the question "Do you know what you believe?" Jason Ladd is a U.S. Marine. Within his book he explains life as a marine and the parallels with the Christian faith. Jason Ladd did not grow up in a Christian family. As a marine he asked the question "Why would a good person like me need Jesus?" Everyone needs Jesus. He is not a crutch for the weak. He is the Saviour of the world. Jason Ladd believes as much as he was seeking God, "God was seeking me." Within the book Jason Ladd discusses the Bible, calling it "the tactics manual for life." All the answers to all of life's questions can be found within the sixty six books that make up the Bible. Jason Ladd discusses how the media has caricatured the Christian, citing Ned in The Simpsons as an example. Too many Christians hide who they are and whose they are, and that is sad. We should be shouting Jesus' name from the rooftops as He defeated death and is the key to eternal life. As Christians it is important to meet with others weekly in church. Jason Ladd discusses how there are fewer men in church as other things such as golf and football compete. He put it perfectly. "I get up early and drive to a place where they tell me what to think, pester me to volunteer, beg for money and read from a book written twenty centuries ago? And I miss golf?" This is an outsiders view of church. Church is nothing like that. It is so much more - it is fellowship with other believers, it is worshipping and meeting with God, it is having fun. Marines need to know their enemy. Christians also need to know their enemy, the devil. And they need to know how to defeat him. Marines use tactics to defeat their enemy. Christians need to stand on God's word and His truths to defeat the devil. A profound truth that leapt out from the book was how we attract others to Jesus - not by ramming Christianity down their throats but by "simply showing others what a life transformed by Jesus looks like." Simple really. And beautiful. I really enjoyed One Of The Few. It was packed full of godly advice. I have only scratched the surface with my review, to give you a taster. I urge you - please read One Of The Few - if you are a Christian you will be strengthened and encouraged. If you are searching, you may just find God. "If you seek God, you will find Him." We are all searching for something. We are all searching to belong. We all have a God-shaped hole inside us, that no-one but God will satisfy. Jason Ladd quotes G.K. Chesterton "When people stop believing in God, they don't believe in nothing - they believe in anything." Please read One Of The Few and transform your life. I received this book for free in exchange for a fair and honest review. No monetary compensation was received and all views expressed are my own.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    What's your worldview? Have you given it much thought? Is your worldview perhaps pieced together, here and there? How much importance do you place on it? You may be thinking, well, I don't even have a worldview. But the truth is, every single person has a way of viewing the world, of making sense of the world around them, of piecing together the way they fit into the world, of what it all means, or if life means anything at all. Whether you've given it just a little time or a LOT of your time, J What's your worldview? Have you given it much thought? Is your worldview perhaps pieced together, here and there? How much importance do you place on it? You may be thinking, well, I don't even have a worldview. But the truth is, every single person has a way of viewing the world, of making sense of the world around them, of piecing together the way they fit into the world, of what it all means, or if life means anything at all. Whether you've given it just a little time or a LOT of your time, Jason B. Ladd's One of The Few could prove quite a beneficial read. I think it could also prove a timely read as well. Perhaps your own worldview has been challenged, tested, or brought closer to the surface as the events of this past summer have unfolded. It is hard to watch the news and not react--physically, emotionally, and spiritually. Perhaps recent events have you asking questions, or, perhaps you're too angry or frustrated to form your questions into words and order them logically. One of the Few is several books in one. It is, in part, a record of one man's journey from careless agnostic (agnostic by default, careless in that he didn't spend any time whatsoever thinking out these kinds of things) to Christian believer. It is, in part, an actual biography of a Marine. It is also a passionate pleading to readers. A passionate plea to parents to be involved in their children's spiritual lives, to teach and to train their children in the Christian faith. A plea to NOT be passive and dismissive when it comes to their child forming a world view. You do not want the sole influencers of your child's worldview to be the school system, the news, social media, movies, television shows, music, etc. Also, it is a passionate plea for believers to lead pure, holy lives. He tackles two issues in this one: sexual purity--the dangers of pornography--and alcohol usage--the dangers of drunkenness. He has one more plea for readers: WHETHER YOU LIKE IT OR NOT, THERE IS A SPIRITUAL WAR GOING ON, AND YOU NEED TO BE PREPARED FOR IT. My favorite chapter is "Never Surrender." In this chapter, he discusses the Code of Conduct for the military, and, how it is relevant to spiritual warfare as well.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Daenel

    First and foremost, this is a book about faith and how shifting ones worldview from secular to biblical can transform one's life. Ladd begins each chapter with a quote that states a secular view and a biblical view of a situation {from page 22}: "I've begun worshipping the sun for a number of reasons. First of all, unlike some other gods I could mention, I can see the sun."-George Carlin "I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen, not only because I see by it, but because by it First and foremost, this is a book about faith and how shifting ones worldview from secular to biblical can transform one's life. Ladd begins each chapter with a quote that states a secular view and a biblical view of a situation {from page 22}: "I've begun worshipping the sun for a number of reasons. First of all, unlike some other gods I could mention, I can see the sun."-George Carlin "I believe in Christianity as I believe that the sun has risen, not only because I see by it, but because by it I see everything else." - C.S. Lewis He then uses stories from his life to explain why the biblical view makes sense. Because he grew up in a secular household, Ladd has the ability to speak to those with a worldview {or individuals who didn't grow up in a Christian home} in a way that makes sense to them. Ladd also offers tips on how a biblical worldview can shape marriage and family dynamics to create a more positive and loving experience. Marriage is hard, family life is hard, putting Christ first lifts much of the burden. Overall, this book is a quick read and offers a lot of interesting tidbits on various aspects of military life {I even flashbacked to my own days in Basic Training while reading parts of this book}, without being overpowering. Those who're concerned that they won't understand the military language, needn't be; Ladd does a great job of explaining everything. Side note: the librarian in me was happy to see the bibliography. Nothing like a well~researched book even when supporting documentation isn't required. I'd recommend this book for those who enjoy biographies and reading testimonies about how others came to Christ. Because Ladd offers a secular view and a christian view of of the world, One of the Few would make a great witnessing tool for folks who have a hard time grasping the concept of faith.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Rachel

    (This review can also be read at RachelPoli.com.) This novel is inspirational as Jason B. Ladd tells stories of his time in the U.S. Marines and how he found his faith in Christianity. The book was written well and formatted in a way that I haven’t come across before. The prologue was before the introduction and then it started on chapter one. The novel came full circle with the epilogue touching base with the prologue and the last chapter continued from the first chapter. The story touched upon rea (This review can also be read at RachelPoli.com.) This novel is inspirational as Jason B. Ladd tells stories of his time in the U.S. Marines and how he found his faith in Christianity. The book was written well and formatted in a way that I haven’t come across before. The prologue was before the introduction and then it started on chapter one. The novel came full circle with the epilogue touching base with the prologue and the last chapter continued from the first chapter. The story touched upon real life events in Ladd’s life and connected them to what’s taught in the Bible. I enjoyed reading about Ladd’s life and how he discovered his faith thanks to his wife. The book was split up into three parts. I have to admit the second part drew me out of the story a bit. There were a few chapters where I felt I was reading an essay about the Bible rather than reading about Ladd’s life. He always connected the Bible to his life, but the Bible was analyzed a lot. Other than that, I thought One of the Few was a great read and definitely a book for anyone; especially if you’re a Christian. One of the Few: A Marine Fighter Pilot’s Reconnaissance of the Christian Worldview by Jason B. Ladd gets 4 out of 5 stars. Favorite Quote: “I became acustomed to moving every few years; it was an exciting opportunity to travel the world.” –Jason B. Ladd, One of the Few

  12. 4 out of 5

    Kathleen (Kat) Smith

    The one thing I am always impressed with whenever I come across our service men and women is discipline, honor, integrity and duty. During their military training, they seem to come across things that go beyond a human beings natural desires and override them to perform as they have been trained and not what they "feel" like doing. They do what they are called to do and often times have to make the hard decisions many of us would never consider doing. Jason B. Ladd has done double duty in his bo The one thing I am always impressed with whenever I come across our service men and women is discipline, honor, integrity and duty. During their military training, they seem to come across things that go beyond a human beings natural desires and override them to perform as they have been trained and not what they "feel" like doing. They do what they are called to do and often times have to make the hard decisions many of us would never consider doing. Jason B. Ladd has done double duty in his book, One of the Few combining a bit of his own personal memoirs as a Marine alongside learning what it is to become a Christian. He started at the beginning with no training whatsoever in either area, knowing of God but not truly knowing who He is. Along the way Jason shares how each aspect of his training, from basic training to flight school have taught him more than simple military protocol and training as he advanced in the Marines but how each aspect of that training and often mistakes can be applied to a Christian walk of faith. In the chapter Read, Fly, Repeat, he shares how much faith is evident in every aspect of a fighter pilots life. While he doesn't build the plane or maintain it, still each time he steps inside the cockpit, he has to have faith that someone who does that job, has done it to the best of their ability, therefore giving him faith that it will perform as it should. "I have faith in the Marines who work on the jets; they have faith in my ability to fly them - together, we complete the mission. Marines are expected to maintain the highest standards of discipline, professionalism, and integrity. Every lance corporal turning a wrench knows he is part of a team. Without his help, jets will not fly, and without his attention to detail, pilots will not succeed. He does his best because that's what Marines do. They do not settle for average. Marine's work day, night and through the weekend to make sure the job is done right. That's why I have faith in the Marines who maintain the fleet. "This was a revelation. I never thought of myself as a man of faith, yet I was beginning to see how much faith I had in everyday things. I need faith to drive to work every day. I have faith I will receive a paycheck for my work because legal checks and balances ensure compensation and deter unfair business practices. And I must trust architects because I don't worry about roofs collapsing on my head. In order to remain sane, I must trust these even will not occur despite a lack of proof." (95). I received One of the Few by Jason B. Ladd by Boone Shepherd Publishing and applaud this writers use of military memoirs to also illustrate his growing Christian faith. For some who read this book, especially service men and women, this life lessons will resound more to them because it applies to the brotherhood shared among those in our military service. I love the way his faith grew in the different aspects of his learning to become a Marine pilot and even how mistakes teach us valuable lessons of growing in our own walk of faith. We don't quit, we simply get up, shake off the dust and soldier on. For me, this one really earned a 4 out of 5 stars in my opinion because I really LOVED his duality in this novel, one from growing up in the military and becoming a Marine and the life lessons he gained from that, but secondly, how his walk of faith grew out of those very same lessons in a remarkable way.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Sarah

    Will you be one of the few? Jason Ladd, a former marine fighter pilot, draws a powerful correlation between our Christian search for truth with his own experience in and out of uniform in his book, One of the Few, a semi-autobiography that tells the story of Ladd’s own journey to Christ as he grappled with the disparity between his preparedness for the role of soldier and the role of husband and father and the resulting theological research that arose from his search for truth. One of the Few is Will you be one of the few? Jason Ladd, a former marine fighter pilot, draws a powerful correlation between our Christian search for truth with his own experience in and out of uniform in his book, One of the Few, a semi-autobiography that tells the story of Ladd’s own journey to Christ as he grappled with the disparity between his preparedness for the role of soldier and the role of husband and father and the resulting theological research that arose from his search for truth. One of the Few is at its core a Christian worldview field guide, peppered with insightful war stories and personal anecdotes, that lends itself toward study and reference. Similar to Priscilla Shirer’s Fervent, this isn’t a “light read;” it’s not a book that you can (or should) read passively sipping on a mocha in your local Jittery Joes. Reading One of the Few will challenge you to consider why you believe what you believe and take a stance on many of life’s most important issues. Similar to the style of Jim Wallace’s Cold-Case Christianity, Ladd builds his case for Christianity by weighing claims from a variety of sources, secular and Christian, and allowing the facts to speak for themselves. As any good teacher would, Ladd also takes the time to define more technical apologetics terms like objective and subjective truth, highlight major worldviews and their corresponding viewpoints, and the like. Sometimes it can be easy to forget that your readers don’t know everything you do, leaving them confused and struggling with the vocabulary, but Ladd’s book is a great example of an audience-conscious text. Although it does take extra time and space, particularly in nonfiction, ultimately time spent defining uncommon terms is time well spent, especially when it ensures material clarity. Although Ladd’s intention to draw the reader to Christ through his personal the testimony of both his conversion and the theological evidence that led to it brought about that conversion is clear, Ladd also doesn’t bother with wandering rhetorical narratives, and instead focuses more on appeals to logos and ethos, making it a useful reference for authors who want to improve their mastery of these appeals and rely less on their more sensational relation, pathos. While this writing strategy doesn’t necessarily lend itself to page-turning excitement, Ladd addresses the need for a “story” as well through frequent anecdotes from his military career, stopping to explain jargon to civilian readers when necessary. Ladd also takes care to give these stories purpose and often leads his chapters with these kinds of narratives, tying them to the overall theme of the chapter. Overall, One of the Few is an excellent example of a well-written, no-nonsense book and is definitely worth reading if you want to expand your grasp of the Christian worldview, get a taste of the life of a marine fighter pilot, and learn firsthand what it looks like to be part of one of the few.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Shaun Lee

    Before I went to bible school, my book shelves consisted mainly of military history and military biographies. Fast forward 5 years or so, they are now dwarfed with theological titles. I still relish reading about the exciting accounts of men at war, and looked forward to reviewing this title. As a seminary student, I recognise Ladd's mammoth effort to read, digest and cite from a large variety of sources to substantiate his thesis - from the military experience of himself and others, from pop cul Before I went to bible school, my book shelves consisted mainly of military history and military biographies. Fast forward 5 years or so, they are now dwarfed with theological titles. I still relish reading about the exciting accounts of men at war, and looked forward to reviewing this title. As a seminary student, I recognise Ladd's mammoth effort to read, digest and cite from a large variety of sources to substantiate his thesis - from the military experience of himself and others, from pop culture, from Christian theologians, from secular thinkers. Ladd's retelling of military accounts/situations were intense, it rekindled my love of reading about men at war and gave me quite an adrenaline rush. I initially wanted to flag out the rarity of Scripture in the book, but as I reflected, I think that is not a big issue as Ladd's purpose was probably apologetics and therefore his primary audience (which would not be the bible scholar types) probably would prefer extra-biblical accounts to substantiate the logical arguments put forth. And as the most helpful review on amazon points out, as the beginning of each chapter, Ladd's juxtaposition of quotations of a non-Christian against Scripture is a masterpiece. I was however rather irritated at being left hanging about the outcome of Arnold the helicopter pilot in the prologue. This was an unwelcome distraction - I found that I was more interested in finding out what happened to Arnold - and the pages in between were standing in my way. When I finally got to the epilogue, I was disappointed at the short conclusion; I guess I was hoping to enjoy digesting what had happened after having waited 250 pages to find out the outcome! Here are some suggestions for improvement. Stylistically, I felt that the numerous short chapters were a challenge as a reader. Perhaps similar chapters could be consolidated into larger ones to eventually end up with about 10-15 chapters. Readers take a mental break with the end of a chapter and the beginning of another; I found it exhausting to do so about 30 times and struggled to maintain interest after about 20 chapters. Formatting wise, the margins are far too wide; adjusting them to the usual one inch could save quite a bit of paper and perhaps even make the book a more compact size. Because the book had no illustrations, it felt like a wall of text. Fiverr.com would be a great source to include an inexpensive illustration for example at the beginning of each chapter. I received this book from the author for the purposes of providing an unbiased review. All views are my own.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Nijiko

    Complete review on : https://3by3meters.blogspot.com As written above, this book is written by Jason, a marine pilot, who have been searching for the meaning for life, in the form of Christian worldview. How this worldview changed who he was, and build who he is today. To be honest, this is not a type of book that I would read on my free time. It is not that I am not into non-fiction, it is just how (1st) it is about religion, and (2nd) the book is filled with military jargon, terms, and traditio Complete review on : https://3by3meters.blogspot.com As written above, this book is written by Jason, a marine pilot, who have been searching for the meaning for life, in the form of Christian worldview. How this worldview changed who he was, and build who he is today. To be honest, this is not a type of book that I would read on my free time. It is not that I am not into non-fiction, it is just how (1st) it is about religion, and (2nd) the book is filled with military jargon, terms, and traditions that I am not familiar with, which is quite confusing to start off with, and to hold on to. I have been putting it away and picking it back up again for those reasons. So, I apologize Jason, if it took so long for me to review this piece of yours. Why it is good I personally love how each of the chapter begins with two different quotes, from two different people; one as a secular view, while the other, a biblical view. This gave deep and diverse perspectives towards a certain topic which in this case made me respect the author for not only viewing the world from just one point. I appreciate how well this book is written with intellect and kind knowledge which I believe the author possesses far before the book was planned, and this aspect of writing made the book mature. It doesn't seem rushed, nor does is seem ungainly. To my surprise, I enjoy this book, aside from the fact that it is about religion (a topic I am not highly interested with). Aside from that, reading the book up till the end, left me in awe. The live lived by the author, how he evolved as a person, how his worldview mature in every step of the way, how he overcame what ever, is a beautiful growth that I have yet to admire. Growing up in a secular family, must not be easy for a person to gain faith this strong, yet this book is done. The author knows what he is talking about, and he have been through a lot of thoughts before putting it into words. He seems to know what is wrong and what is right, what is there and what is missing, what is safe and what is fatal, what is weird and what is certain, what is to believe and what is to not. This book also covers up many topics from faith, alcoholism, sex, relationships, love, and many more (I should've note them all down), so readers can follow how he contemplates all of those topics into his worldview.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Amy Langmaack

    When Jason Ladd asked me to read and review his book, I was excited to learn more about how life in the Marines relates to life as a Christian. I've read a few fiction books with a military backdrop and find myself fairly comfortable with a majority of the terminology. Unfortunately, while reading One of the Few, I found myself incredibly lost within the jargon and acronyms used to explain the life of a marine. This book is split into three parts. First, you are given some background on Ladd and When Jason Ladd asked me to read and review his book, I was excited to learn more about how life in the Marines relates to life as a Christian. I've read a few fiction books with a military backdrop and find myself fairly comfortable with a majority of the terminology. Unfortunately, while reading One of the Few, I found myself incredibly lost within the jargon and acronyms used to explain the life of a marine. This book is split into three parts. First, you are given some background on Ladd and his life growing up and how he become a Christian. While the use of military acronyms was distracting to the story, I enjoyed learning about how Ladd grew up in a military family, how that led to him entering the marines himself, and how he became a believer. In this section, Ladd explains some ways that life in the marines echoes the life of a Christian, and I found those analogies fascinating. I think that if the book had stayed with this style of writing, or ended here, I would have enjoyed it much more than I did. The second section, titled Be Not Deceived, is where things started to go downhill for me. The third section is titled Always Be Ready. The point of these two sections, I think, was to lay out a clear doctrine of Christianity. I myself have read several books on apologetics and have taken courses in college on the subject. I found these chapters to be an attempt to fully explain a secular worldview versus a Christian worldview, however, the arguments were not laid out clearly for me. Jumping between marine analogies, quotes from Bible scholars, Scripture, and descriptions from history or media were extremely hard to follow. I was very excited to read Ladd's words saying he was going to lay out the groundwork for leaving a legacy of faith for our children, but I found it to be an unfulfilled promise. Each chapter was thoroughly researched, as you could tell from the evidence presented in each chapter. But the layout of it was hard to follow. It definitely felt like the first part of this book was a separate book from the second two parts. I received a copy of this book from the author. This review is my honest opinion.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Lauser

    I was offered this book for a review, and I am glad I accepted. While there are flaws, even major flaws, in the author’s thinking and conclusions at various points, he sees through the world and its facades with refreshing boldness. My uncle was a Marine, and an Iraq war veteran, like the author of the book. I already had glimpses of that culture as I was growing up, and I was glad to see more details of life in the Marines. Sometimes the spiritual principles the author attaches to the events of h I was offered this book for a review, and I am glad I accepted. While there are flaws, even major flaws, in the author’s thinking and conclusions at various points, he sees through the world and its facades with refreshing boldness. My uncle was a Marine, and an Iraq war veteran, like the author of the book. I already had glimpses of that culture as I was growing up, and I was glad to see more details of life in the Marines. Sometimes the spiritual principles the author attaches to the events of his life feel disconnected; this seems mainly because he is talking about how he would later use the event as a metaphor; but when he speaks of the convictions he came under at the time it is very powerful. One of my favorite quotes from the book is this: “Even religions that claim neutrality and champion the idea of universal acceptance are exclusive because they exclude the exclusivists!” I have been waiting so long for someone to mention this, though it is so obvious it should have been an issue from the start. “All people deserve equal value, not their religions.” His sincerity, and military confidence, often gives his words a feeling of poetry. “Right and wrong exist, and the world, while sometimes grey, still has poles of black and white. Be not deceived.” This reminds me of something said in “Come What May”, if I remember it correctly: “I never said everything is black and white, you’re the one who said nothing is.” The author seems to have swallowed some common unbiblicalities along with the Bible, but someone who is already sound in doctrine can certainly be encouraged by the spirit of the book: there is one truth, and it can be known.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Steven R. McEvoy

    This book was an interesting read. This book is for the most part biography, the biography of a fighter pilot, from school, through military training, to 14 years active duty. But the book is also a spiritual biography. When Ladd open's up about the deficiencies in his personal life, his spiritual life, and how because of the challenge from his wife, he began to explore the Christian worldview and the claims of Christians. Jason Ladd does an intriguing job of creating parallels between his train This book was an interesting read. This book is for the most part biography, the biography of a fighter pilot, from school, through military training, to 14 years active duty. But the book is also a spiritual biography. When Ladd open's up about the deficiencies in his personal life, his spiritual life, and how because of the challenge from his wife, he began to explore the Christian worldview and the claims of Christians. Jason Ladd does an intriguing job of creating parallels between his training and progression in the military, and the spiritual life. There are three main sections in the book, Seek and You Will Find, Be Not Deceived and Always Be Ready. And the chapters in the book are: Introduction Part I: Seek and You Will Find Prologue Chapter 1 The Worst Day Chapter 2 Rising Son Chapter 3 He's Got That Loving Feeling Chapter 4 What's the Question Chapter 5 Bloody Boots Chapter 6 The Marines Chapter 7 Wings of Gold Chapter 8 You Really Believe That? Chapter 9 Read, Fly, Repeat Chapter 10 Will Send the Hornet Chapter 11 More than Atoms Part II: Be Not Deceived Chapter 12 Good-to-Go Chapter 13 Splashing Myths Chapter 14 The Christian Caricature Chapter 15 A Fighter's Faith Chapter 16 A Gift from God Chapter 17 Down in Flames Chapter 18 Your Wingman for Life Chapter 19 Born in a Bar Chapter 20 Down to the Dregs Part III: Always Be Ready Chapter 21 Putting Out Chaff Chapter 22 Going to School Chapter 23 Spiritual Reconnaissance Chapter 24 Climbing Mountains Chapter 25 Never Surrender Chapter 26 Love on the Nishiki Chapter 27 The Best Day Epilogue At the beginning of each chapter is two quotes, some seem to be drawn from sources to offer contradictory views, Shirley Mclean, Deepak Chopra, Richards Dawkins, Bertrand Russell, Eckhart Tolle and others. These clearly non-Christian sources are often paired with quotes from the bible, or Christian authors like C.S. Lewis, Ravi Zacharias, or other historic sources often from the classics. I must admit I was surprised by some of the new age or occult like quotes and their purpose in this book. The best I can come up with is to come up with a contrast to the point being made in the chapter following. Ladd does do a great job of challenging some of the traditions within the military and how they are not compatible with a Christian life; specifically abuse and overuse of alcohol, and partying to blow off steam. Or multiple divorces and remarriages. In some ways this book reads like a military spiritual nomad's story. Or a like Blue Like Jazz by Donald Miller. Or like a Thomas Merton springing from the military rather than academia. The book is an easy read and written in a very engaging manner. It is easily accessible. Ladd shares his story and many of the factors that led to his growth in his Christian walk. The parallels to his military progression will really appeal to some readers. Ladd has experienced things most people never will, 14 years of active USMC duty. A tour in Irac, F16 and F/A18 fighter pilot instructor. He has travelled the world in the military, both growing up as a base brat and through many years of his own service. If you enjoy Military History or the concept of a Church Militant this book will offer you a great view. I know a number of people who would really enjoy this book. But I also know a number that would be put off by the military aspect. This book was a good read but is not for everyone. Read the review on my blog Book Reviews and More.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Becky

    I hate doing posts like this, and I know I will be in the minority in my opinions, but this time I have to do what I have to do. Jason B Ladd has written a book about Marine Life and the Christian World View and what they need to have in common. He comes from a lineage of service and serves gladly on his own, but it is where his Marine life and his Christianity collided that make this book what it is. I found his narratives about his life in the Marines--while growing up, and as an adult--fascin I hate doing posts like this, and I know I will be in the minority in my opinions, but this time I have to do what I have to do. Jason B Ladd has written a book about Marine Life and the Christian World View and what they need to have in common. He comes from a lineage of service and serves gladly on his own, but it is where his Marine life and his Christianity collided that make this book what it is. I found his narratives about his life in the Marines--while growing up, and as an adult--fascinating. The discipline required to be a Marine is incomparable in any other setting. The discipline required to be a Christian is also incomparable in any setting. Here is where Jason tries to merge the two cultures. Here are my criticisms: 1. The narrative of the story is disjointed--hopping back and forth in time and place. It makes the line of thought hard to follow. 2. The comparisons between Marine and Christianity becomes preachy. I found that to be rather off-putting. For someone who is already a Christian, it is rather like beating a dead horse. For someone who is not a Christian, it becomes a point of resistance. I am sure there are other readers who find this kind of material uplifting, but I read another book with the same kind of "preachiness" in it and also found it to be over the top. I will not say there is not a place for this book, but I did not find my place with it. Two Stars.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Chris Harris

    An outstanding look at the journey I purchased this book in part based on the topic and partially as the author was a Marine. I know from my own experience as a Christian serving in the Marine Corps the struggle is real. I wasn't disappointed in hearing Mr. Ladd's story. There are a few rabbit holes the author explores in writing about his conversion story. However, the information he explores is worthwhile. It's a recommended read. An outstanding look at the journey I purchased this book in part based on the topic and partially as the author was a Marine. I know from my own experience as a Christian serving in the Marine Corps the struggle is real. I wasn't disappointed in hearing Mr. Ladd's story. There are a few rabbit holes the author explores in writing about his conversion story. However, the information he explores is worthwhile. It's a recommended read.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mary Jane

    The book we all should read. This book spoke to me. I bought it on my Kindle and was had way through it when I went in search for it in paper. I only buy in paper what will share, give or read again. This book is well put together and has a lot of information. Being a supporter of our troops, I love the style in which this was written. Thank you for your story.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Adam

    Great story! Really enjoyed the personal accounts and how it began and ended with a story about his dad. Well done! Looking forward to reading more.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: A Marine's story of coming to faith, his "reconnaissance of the Christian worldview", and challenging words as one trained in warfare about the nature of the spiritual warfare in which we find ourselves. Jason B. Ladd has served as a Marine fighter pilot and instructor and is an Iraq war veteran. In this book, he combines an account of his training for, and experiences in that role, and an account of his coming to Christian faith. He also argues for that faith by articulating how the "Ch Summary: A Marine's story of coming to faith, his "reconnaissance of the Christian worldview", and challenging words as one trained in warfare about the nature of the spiritual warfare in which we find ourselves. Jason B. Ladd has served as a Marine fighter pilot and instructor and is an Iraq war veteran. In this book, he combines an account of his training for, and experiences in that role, and an account of his coming to Christian faith. He also argues for that faith by articulating how the "Christian worldview" most deeply addresses the challenges we face, from the ultimate of what happens at death to how then we should live. He speaks to the challenges to living a life set apart as "one of the few" in the midst of the pervasiveness of the naturalist worldview, and the permissive ethics around sexuality and alcohol that are often a part of military experience and much of contemporary life. The book is written in three parts. The first focuses on his training as a Marine and some of the spiritual parallels to that training he found. He talks about meeting and falling in love with Karry, a Christian, who he eventually marries. Part two is more teaching oriented, beginning with a chapter on the nature of God, dealing with issues like the taking of life that is implicit in war-making, answers to skeptics about many issues of faith, and a strong challenges on the folly of drunkenness, pornography and sex outside of marriage. Part three centers on spiritual warfare, and lessons that might be drawn from military experience and concludes with moving chapters titled "Love on the Nishiki" and "The Best Day." There were several things I appreciated about this book. One was that the author writes a riveting account of his training as a Marine and a fighter pilot that gives one an appreciation for the rigor as well as the life-endangering risks many of our military face, not only on the battlefield but even in training. The second thing I valued was his "no-nonsense" discussions of things like drunkenness and the foolishness of the "drink responsibly" mantra (why don't we just tell people that it is not OK to get drunk?) And finally, his discussions of the reality of spiritual warfare, and the vigilant discipline this involves concerning our minds and our passions, are valuable reminders. Most compelling was conversation he had with his wife Karry one night that left him with a critical question for which he didn't have a good answer. She asked, "What do you think happens when we die?" to which he responded, "I don't know. Nothing? Blackness?" He admits, "I could not tell her what I believed because I had never given it any serious consideration. I thought religion was the opiate of the masses and the cause of most world conflicts. I figured religion was for little old ladies with hymnals and people to dumb to realize Darwin killed God. Virgins don't have babies, and dead people stay dead." He goes on to acknowledge, "I came to a disconcerting realization: I was unprepared to give my children meaningful answers to life's important questions." This led to a concerted investigation of these questions that finally concluded with his baptism. This leads me to my one criticism of this self-published work. I think he tries to do too much, particularly in the sections where he moves from personal narrative to teaching on Christian worldview and spiritual warfare. The strength of this work is personal narrative, both of his training and life as a Marine, and his journey to faith. I would have liked to seen him address the issues of apologetics and lifestyle much more in terms of his own journey to faith, which seemed disjointed and, sometimes a bit abstract, as he discourses on a number of theological issues. Perhaps in military terms, I felt that he was scattering rather than concentrating his fire. This was especially the case in the chapters on his training, where he feels compelled to draw a spiritual "life lesson" in each subsection rather than a single key point. Focusing on personal narrative, both in telling the story of his training and in describing his journey to faith, particularly in how the answers he found persuaded him to change his mind and changed his life, would have been more compelling. The parts of the book where he does this had the most energy and were the most effective. My hunch is that Ladd is a riveting public speaker, and the book is a great adjunct to his public addresses. I think it would appeal to military audiences and to those who value service to country. His own narrative of beginning to question the unchallenged assumptions of a naturalistic worldview and his clear recognition that the choice of worldview is a life and death matter is a breath of fresh air in the miasma that says "whatever." ______________________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the author. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joy Kidney

    "Military personnel must act under the tension of man's responsibility and God's sovereignty." This book is a remarkable weaving of a man's search for truth with his training as a Marine fighter pilot. Married with children, he still felt inadequate as a father, to teach values to his children. Ladd recognized the wreckage created when worldviews collide, and asked such questions as, "What happens to our humanness when our DNA is spread to the winds?" It's refreshing to follow the thoughts and s "Military personnel must act under the tension of man's responsibility and God's sovereignty." This book is a remarkable weaving of a man's search for truth with his training as a Marine fighter pilot. Married with children, he still felt inadequate as a father, to teach values to his children. Ladd recognized the wreckage created when worldviews collide, and asked such questions as, "What happens to our humanness when our DNA is spread to the winds?" It's refreshing to follow the thoughts and seekings of one of our elite fighter pilots, and to where it ultimately led him. Each chapter, which has footnotes at the end, is a mix of his experiences and what he learns. It also has a Bibliography and an index.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth Johnson

    In "One of the Few: A Marine Fighter Pilot’s Reconnaissance of the Christian Worldview," Marine fighter pilot Jason B. Ladd chronicles his personal journey from passive unbelief (perhaps even atheism) to a worldview grounded firmly in the truth of God’s Word. It's part memoir, part spiritual instruction. Rather than simply expounding on the lessons he learned, telling us what to believe and why, the author takes a unique approach by sharing real-life events from his various roles as a son, a fig In "One of the Few: A Marine Fighter Pilot’s Reconnaissance of the Christian Worldview," Marine fighter pilot Jason B. Ladd chronicles his personal journey from passive unbelief (perhaps even atheism) to a worldview grounded firmly in the truth of God’s Word. It's part memoir, part spiritual instruction. Rather than simply expounding on the lessons he learned, telling us what to believe and why, the author takes a unique approach by sharing real-life events from his various roles as a son, a fighter pilot, a husband, and a father, and then drawing very practical spiritual application from those situations. It’s like a book of spiritual object lessons, told from the perspective of a fighter pilot. The book offers a rather thorough study of the importance of having a Christian worldview in realistic, down-to-earth situations (aka, civilian life). Here’s how the author describes it: “As I learned how to fly for the Marines, my list of questions about life grew, and I started learning about a man glorified through suffering on a cross… As I studied the art and science of Basic Fighter Maneuvering (BFM), Air-to-Air employment, and Close Air Support, I realized that principles based on fighter pilot fundamentals could help me in my search for truth.” Just a note about the Marine/fighter pilot aspect: while I have limited background knowledge in both of those realms, the author’s stories and explanations were very easy to follow and simple to comprehend. All the stereotypical military acronyms and shorthand were clearly explained, and the principles drawn from each example were universal in their application. For instance, chapter 7 includes a story from his training as a pilot. During a more difficult period of instruction, he was required to navigate the plan with instruments only. The simulation was effected by tacking a “bag” (or a tarp) over the windows to block any visual clues from the ground or the horizon that might help guide the pilot — aka, “flying under the bag.” From this experience, he drew a very valuable lesson: “Living with an insufficient worldview is like flying under the bag. While it is easy to move forward, it is difficult to stay pointing in the right direction. If you don’t know how to fly using instruments, or you read them incorrectly, you will veer off course.” From there, the author goes on to explain how we can “take down the bag” and learn to navigate more clearly by developing a worldview based on God’s ultimate truth, which will then allows us to steer clear of obstacles and steadfastly continue in the right direction. The rest of the book is spent developing how to do that–from learning to filter out false teaching on topics like marriage, alcoholism, science, and education; to understanding how to fight against the enemy’s attacks. Each chapter in the book opens with two quotes that highlight the distinction between secular and Christian worldviews, one from some popular secular figure (such as Deepak Chopra, Bruce Lee, Richard Dawkins, even Ovid), while the other is from either Scripture itself or those with a firm Christian testimony (like C.S. Lewis or Ravi Zacharias). The book also includes anecdotes from his childhood growing up in a military family, the progression of his relationship with the woman who became his wife, and even some scenes from his time as a parent. He even speaks directly to parents at one point, encouraging them to teach their children the significance of a Christian worldview. Although I consider my views well-formed by Scripture, I found this book helpful and thought-provoking as it offered a different perspective on seeing the “big issues in life” and caused me to consider the sheer significance of how our worldview shapes our actions. I’d recommend it to those searching for truth or answers, as well as those who are concerned about shaping the worldview of future generations. Disclaimer: I received this book for free in exchange for an honest review. All opinions expressed herein are completely my own.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Reg Rivett

    This is not an autobiography. Although Jason Ladd could write a very interesting one, I am sure. The life of a Marine fighter pilot is full of interesting and powerful stories that people all over the world would like to know. But Ladd has decided to do something else. And this is not a Case for Christ, or some other Lee Strobel book. Though the world needs all the brilliant resources to give intellectual reason for our faith in Jesus, One Of The Few is something else. It's a hybrid. It is a mix o This is not an autobiography. Although Jason Ladd could write a very interesting one, I am sure. The life of a Marine fighter pilot is full of interesting and powerful stories that people all over the world would like to know. But Ladd has decided to do something else. And this is not a Case for Christ, or some other Lee Strobel book. Though the world needs all the brilliant resources to give intellectual reason for our faith in Jesus, One Of The Few is something else. It's a hybrid. It is a mix of autobiography and faith journey/exploration rolled up into one. For those looking for a pure autobiography or pure faith exploration book, you will be disappointed, but you will also miss out on something powerful. One Of The Few is a testimony, a man's journey from a feeble worldview and understand of life, to a solid faith in Christ and the love of Scripture to guide him. It is a look at what changed a young man, a Marine pilot, into a hero, not only for the United States, but of the Christian faith. Following the story of his life in the military, the trials and triumphs that he experienced, Jason Ladd shares what God has taught him in easy to understand terms. This presentation of the Gospel, how it has transformed him, and why it should transform you is all part of Ladd's calling to strengthen people in their faith. Referencing Matthew 22:14, Ladd invites you to not be one of the many that is called, but be One Of The Few that are chosen. As a Canadian, I know very little about Marine pilots. Top Gun may have given me most of the information I have one these brave military personnel. So when I was asked to review this book, I jumped at the chance to. I would gladly learn more about the life and times of some of the most courageous people out there. I was both shocked and surprised when I actually dove in. One, this wasn't an autobiography. It was a story of a man's journey into faith in God. Two, that this man hasn't stumbling into Jesus and telling us about it. No. This is the story of a man that investigated, searched, and fought to understand the Christian faith, and why it was essential to believe in. There are books about Christian faith, and the reasons why we believe in it, that can overwhelm you with facts, and knowledge, and statistics, and doctrine, and theological ideas. They tend to be an overload of information and quickly dropped by readers. I have done that to a number of books myself, but One Of The Few was not one of them. Would I have had uninterrupted hours to read this, I would be telling you to pick this book up sooner. One of the things that I found particularity clever about One Of The Few was the way each chapter opened. Ladd gives the reader a quote from a well individual and then a portion of Scripture. The two quotes contrast so much that you know what is coming next; a realization of a flawed worldview, and the undeniable truth of the Bible, and Ladd's journey from one to the other. While some may not agree with all of Jason Ladd's theology, there is no denying that he is a well educated man, and he is ready to back up his beliefs with good exegesis and sound logic. What One Of The Few offers is a thoughtful examination of the traditional Christian life, wrapped in the interesting life of a Marine pilot, shared with a heart to see others stand firm in their faith. One Of The Few is a special kind of book. I would be hard pressed to think of another autobiography/witnessing tool like Jason Ladd's. Readers of any age would learn something from this book. I would give One Of The Few 4 out of 5 stars.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Olivia

    When I started to read this book, I was captivated both by the contents of the book as well as the smoothness of the flow of words. Each chapter blended in perfectly to the next and I loved reading the multiple quotes given at the beginning of each chapter to signify two different views. It reminded me of the saying “two sides of the same coin” and prompted me to really pause and reflect on the meaning behind those quotes. One of the Few was wonderfully human as it tells of bits and pieces of Jas When I started to read this book, I was captivated both by the contents of the book as well as the smoothness of the flow of words. Each chapter blended in perfectly to the next and I loved reading the multiple quotes given at the beginning of each chapter to signify two different views. It reminded me of the saying “two sides of the same coin” and prompted me to really pause and reflect on the meaning behind those quotes. One of the Few was wonderfully human as it tells of bits and pieces of Jason’s life from his childhood to his training and up till the present time. I’m glad to read that his first love is his only love. It shows that such love still exist in this world. He uses his life and his time in the Marines as examples and analogies to Christian principles and God’s Word to allow the reader to catch the meaning of certain Scriptures in the modern sense. I truly admire his ability to see the distinct similarities between the Marines and Christianity. More often than not, I would be caught by surprise at how certain experience or lesson from the Marines can be tied to Christianity and the Bible. His struggles and determination to search for the answers he needed showed me what most that were born in Christian families lacked: the tenacity and the thirst for God’s Word and to truly understand what is stated in the Scriptures. I often had the opinion that those who weren’t born in Christian families but found God (or most accurately found by God) were more grounded in their faith. Reading One of the Few confirms it. For that, I believe that his actions to think skeptically and critically about Christianity and studying the Scriptures are a good way to strengthen our faith in God. But of course, every action should and must be accompanied by a prayer because I believe only God can show us the answer that we seek. In this book, many social issues were addressed such as alcohol abuse, pornography, whether or not abortion is right and the difference between killing and murder. I don’t think I agree fully on his opinions on murder and killing but where my life currently does not require me to make such difficult decisions, for him, it could be a matter of life and death. While reading One of the Few, I was introduced not only to how the Marine functions but also to certain new information such as the many worldviews in the world today. The New Age Movement is a relatively new term for me since the first time I heard it was in a sermon I listened a few months ago. This movement was also mentioned in this book and warns of its many dangers and traps. My eyes were open to many things to look out for after reading this book and certain things doesn’t seem so innocent to me now. The many references and quotes from other books especially from the Scriptures serve to strengthen what Jason is trying to drive home through this book: to reveal the Christianity worldview as what is originally is, shedding all stereotypes and labels many attach to this religion which is actually a relationship with God. Some often asked questions by believers and non-believers alike are addressed and explained in this book which helps the reader to understand what Christianity is about and at the same time to dig deeper into the Word of God to see for themselves. Jason doesn’t mince words and every word cuts deep and allows the reader to think and to question the world around them.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Sally

    About the Book: A US Marine fighter pilot explores life’s important questions as he prepares for combat, searches for truth and wages spiritual warfare during his mission to become a better husband and father. As a child Jason grows up in a loving military family but does not have much spiritual guidance. He draws from his life experiences and training as a fighter pilot to lose his spiritual apathy and find true salvation. My Review: Before I begin my review of “One of the Few”, let me say without About the Book: A US Marine fighter pilot explores life’s important questions as he prepares for combat, searches for truth and wages spiritual warfare during his mission to become a better husband and father. As a child Jason grows up in a loving military family but does not have much spiritual guidance. He draws from his life experiences and training as a fighter pilot to lose his spiritual apathy and find true salvation. My Review: Before I begin my review of “One of the Few”, let me say without a doubt it is the most insightful book (except the Bible), I have ever read. It gives concrete evidence of the truths of Jesus Christ. Be prepared…this book may cause thought-provoking emotions that will cause you to read the footnotes for a better understanding and it will not be a book you can whiz right through! You might even find yourself in prayer because you found a picture of yourself in the same doubt and misconceptions as Mr. Ladd on his way to finding real peace in Jesus Christ. I really don’t know where to begin as this book touches on almost every question a non-believer could ask and then out of left center field cautioning the Christian about the pitfalls of drinking to pornography and how to look for the hidden messages in seemingly innocent TV programs we watch right down to children’s cartoons (just to name a few). He even explains the difference between killing during war-time and actual murder. In every situation he has scripture to back up his statements and in many instances scientific findings that parallel the Bible. Mr. Ladd has taken the events of his life, to share his journey on the quest to find real peace in Jesus! Mr. Ladd explains that as we search for the truth for God, the only thing that will hinder us from accepting word of God is our pride. He also doesn’t shrink away from telling Christians it is time to quit being apathetic and stand up for what is right. In about the twenty-fourth chapter of his book I came across a passage that truly spoke to my heart. It brought tears to my eyes and peace to my heart to be reminded again of what God means to me and the price he paid so that I might have eternal salvation. With Mr. Ladd’s permission to use this quote, I would like to add that passage to my review…”In him, I will put my trust. On him, I will depend. Through him, I will persevere. For him, I have meaning, purpose and destiny. By him, I see my own brokenness. Out of him, comes forgiveness and love. I am a follower of Jesus Christ—owned by the Father and purchased with blood of his Son.” (end of quote). This book is not only for the non-believer, looking for peace, but also a reminder to the Christian to be ever vigilant in the fight against the war on evil. It is everywhere…even in places it shouldn’t be. Thank you Mr. Ladd for this wonderful book! It is a wake-up call for all who may read it. I highly recommend this book. It is well worth the time it will take you to read it and you will be thinking about it for a long time after you have read the last page. Disclosure: I was given a copy of this eBook by the author, Jason B. Ladd for an honest review. I was not required to write a favorable review nor was I compensated for my review. The opinions in this review are my own.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Donna Chadwick

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Author: Jason B. Ladd Title: One Of The Few: A Marine Fighter Pilot's Reconnaissance Of The Christian Worldview Genre:Christian Books and Bibles, Christian living, Religion and Spirituality, I got this book for free in exchange for an honest review.The author contracted me through my book reviewing blog asking me to review his book. First of all I would like to say a big thank you to Jason B. Ladd for sending me his book and giving me the chance to read it. I would tell people that you should step ou Author: Jason B. Ladd Title: One Of The Few: A Marine Fighter Pilot's Reconnaissance Of The Christian Worldview Genre:Christian Books and Bibles, Christian living, Religion and Spirituality, I got this book for free in exchange for an honest review.The author contracted me through my book reviewing blog asking me to review his book. First of all I would like to say a big thank you to Jason B. Ladd for sending me his book and giving me the chance to read it. I would tell people that you should step outside your comfort zone with books because it is good to add more authors and genres to your reading portfolio. Even if you do not read books like this. I normally do not read books of this genre but l stepped outside my comfort zone with authors and genres I am so glad l did because l have read so many great books and come across some great authors. The author kindly signed my book. This book has 317 pages and 36 chapters and 3 parts in it. I highly recommend this book. Review: I found this book really easy to get in to and hard to put down once l started reading it. I like reading about Jason and his wife, Karry. I was sad to read that his wife was hit with something in the eye I was glad the doctors saved her eyesight. It was nice that Jason and his wife have been together since they was younger you do not hear much of that these days. I got this book in hardback. I also take pictures of every book I get and share them to my Instagram that l made to share pictures of my books too it is called donnareviewsbooks and l put my link to my book reviewing blog on there so people can read my reviews. I have been reviewing books a year now it is the best thing I get to share my views on my favorite things books. If my reviews help other people read the great books I have read, I listen to magic when l am reading books and writing up my reviews. I can not put in to words how great this book is l would tell people to read it for themselves to know how great it really is. It did not take me long to finish this book. I was hooked after reading the first page. I love the quotes in this book. I normally do not read books about god but l am enjoyed this book. I have christian's in my family. I wish this book did not finish because it is amazing I was sad to finish reading this book. I love reading about the military and christian's. Jason sounds like a great guy. I wish l could rate this book more then 5 stars because it is worth more then the 5 stars l rated it. I reviewed this book on amazon UK and us, goodreads and on my blog. I found this book a great read l am glad this book is on my bookshelf and this book is a must read. I was sad to read about the loss of Jason and Karry's baby son Boone Shepherd Ladd I would like to say to the author and his wife that l am sorry for your loss. About The Author: Jason B. Ladd is an author, marine, and Iraq war veteran. He has flown as an instructor pilot in both the F,A-18 and the F-16. He and his wife, Karry, are the parents of five children. About The Book: I really love this book cover and the colours. I like that the font is white because it makes it stand out more. Star Rating: Five Out Of Five Stars

  30. 5 out of 5

    Ioana

    In the beginning, the author mentioned a remark made by one of his friends: "Your life is not that important to grant writing a book about." I read this book, and I agree with what the author said towards the end- every life is important enough to be worth writing abook about. This is all the more true when during the course of that life, the individual realizes their importance as a human created by God, made in His image, for His glory. Jason B. Ladd is a Marine fighter pilot, so this book is p In the beginning, the author mentioned a remark made by one of his friends: "Your life is not that important to grant writing a book about." I read this book, and I agree with what the author said towards the end- every life is important enough to be worth writing abook about. This is all the more true when during the course of that life, the individual realizes their importance as a human created by God, made in His image, for His glory. Jason B. Ladd is a Marine fighter pilot, so this book is packed-full with analogies and metaphors about the resemblance between a Christian's life and a Marine's. Prepare yourself for a lot of Marine talk and many capital letters words. I was unfamiliar with all of these, so it was a new thing I learned. However, at times it got overwhelming and I stopped trying to remember what all the words meant. I just accepted that they were relevant to the book. If you are familiar with the US Marine and other military structures in US, you're good. If you are not, don't give up, there are some good stuff in this book. The book starts from the author's young years as a military kid, back when his family was stationed in Japan. The events of the book (although "events" is a bit much said, because events are not the focus of the book) are not chronological. However, the main idea of the book is Ladd's repentance and acceptance of God and Christianity. It is not (as I was tempted to think) an easy-breezy kind of book, where you learn about a man who decided to just accept God. This is about someone who researched God, who read a lot, inquired a lot, and then accepted that this God of the Christians is the only God. At times the book covers some hard topics, and deep theological issues. Reading this as a Christian should be no problem, but for someone who is not used to such aspects of faith it may be a bit challenging. Worth reading, though. One of the Few is divided into three main parts. The second and third part are the most "practical", if you will. They approach various daily life situations. This is great - it's like showing the basics to a new believer, or showing a non-believer what this Christian living is all about. As someone who's lived both lives, so to say, Ladd is not talking gibberish, he knows what being a Christian entails in the everyday life. It is encouraging to read it as a Christian, and thought-provoking as a seeking person who wants to learn more about God. As I mentioned, this is a well researched book. It is clear he's read and studied a lot, and I liked all the references written down at the end of every chapter, not all added at the end of the book. They are useful for anyone who wants to learn more about a certain topic covered in a chapter. Although at times it may seem difficult to read because of the subject approached, it's something useful. I am glad and grateful I had the chance to read it. I was contacted by the author and offered a free e-book copy to read and review. All thoughts expressed here are my own.

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