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The Expectant Father Audiobook: Facts, Tips, and Advice for Dads-To-Be

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Featuring the latest research on many topics, from the reasons for premature birth to nutritional supplements, this new edition has an updated finance section, advice for expectant adoptive fathers, information for fathers expecting twins and other multiples and the resources section has been expanded.


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Featuring the latest research on many topics, from the reasons for premature birth to nutritional supplements, this new edition has an updated finance section, advice for expectant adoptive fathers, information for fathers expecting twins and other multiples and the resources section has been expanded.

30 review for The Expectant Father Audiobook: Facts, Tips, and Advice for Dads-To-Be

  1. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    So we've got a baby due in the heat of summer. I was planning on winging it, reasoning that people have been having babies for decades now without reading a book first, but my wife handed me this and I knew better than to argue. The Expect Father is written with the dad in mind, obviously. It's laid out month by month, noting what the baby is experiencing, what the mother is experiencing, and what the father should probably be thinking, feeling, and doing. Brott dispenses some good advice and als So we've got a baby due in the heat of summer. I was planning on winging it, reasoning that people have been having babies for decades now without reading a book first, but my wife handed me this and I knew better than to argue. The Expect Father is written with the dad in mind, obviously. It's laid out month by month, noting what the baby is experiencing, what the mother is experiencing, and what the father should probably be thinking, feeling, and doing. Brott dispenses some good advice and also brings up things I wouldn't have considered. He also jabbed me in the chest and reminded me how much stuff my wife and I still have to buy before Miles arrives. Fingers crossed for that 7/31 delivery date! There is a lot of useful information here but also a lot of crazy shit people don't normally talk about, like some babies being born hairy and sparks shooting out of diapers because of static electricity, which is the stuff I mentioned every time my wife asked me how my reading was going. I feel a little more prepared in having read this, which I'm sure will evaporate once the baby makes landfall. 4 out of 5 stars.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Randy

    Kind of a lot of extraneous information gets in the way of what should be a much shorter book. This book insulted my intelligence. I guess this wasn't really what I was looking for. It's too broad to be of any real use to me. I much prefer brief, no-bullshit specific advice on things that are not subjective. This just came across as a really well-meaning collection of good things which don't really match up with each other. Who wants to sift through that? Especially new fathers or fathers to be. Kind of a lot of extraneous information gets in the way of what should be a much shorter book. This book insulted my intelligence. I guess this wasn't really what I was looking for. It's too broad to be of any real use to me. I much prefer brief, no-bullshit specific advice on things that are not subjective. This just came across as a really well-meaning collection of good things which don't really match up with each other. Who wants to sift through that? Especially new fathers or fathers to be. Boo, hiss.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Scott Rhee

    So, it’s the big day. My wife and I are going to the hospital to be admitted, and in a few short hours (hopefully) we will be delivering a healthy baby girl into the world, and I have to say that I’m much less nervous than I would have been had I not read Armin A. Brott and Jennifer Ash’s excellent daddy-to-be prep guidebook “The Expectant Father”. I’m still nervous, of course, but many of my fears and confusions have been allayed somewhat by the thorough and straightforward research done by Brot So, it’s the big day. My wife and I are going to the hospital to be admitted, and in a few short hours (hopefully) we will be delivering a healthy baby girl into the world, and I have to say that I’m much less nervous than I would have been had I not read Armin A. Brott and Jennifer Ash’s excellent daddy-to-be prep guidebook “The Expectant Father”. I’m still nervous, of course, but many of my fears and confusions have been allayed somewhat by the thorough and straightforward research done by Brott and Ash. Brott is, according to his bio, a “nationally recognized parenting expert”. He also has a nationally syndicated newspaper column called “Ask Mr. Dad” and is the host of a weekly talk show about parenting. For all I know or care, Brott could really be a WWE wrestler and a part-time janitor, but his book comes across like it’s written by a guy who definitely knows a thing or two about parenting from the father’s perspective. To hear stories from my father’s generation, books like this---targeted towards dads BY dads---were practically unheard of. Most dads of my parents’ generation never had the pleasure of being in the same room with their wives as she gave birth, let alone caring whether he knew how to hold the baby or change their diapers. Times have changed, and I happen to think it’s for the better. I think it’s vitally important that fathers have more of a say and a role in their child’s upbringing. I also think it’s annoying how TV and movies and the media in general have portrayed most fathers as dim-witted, lazy, or altogether absent in the lives of their own children. Societal views of fathers are generally pretty negative, and perhaps there is some justification, but there is a growing number of men like myself who actually WANT to play as important a role, if not moreso, than the mother’s. Kudos to Brott for writing a book that doesn’t second-guess whether the new father reading his book is reading it because he WANTS to and not because his wife made him read it. Indeed, Brott assumes that the father has as many, if not more, worries and questions (and duties) than the expectant mother. Pregnancy is just as rough (mentally and spiritually, at least) on the daddy-to-be. Physically, too, if one counts the many couvade symptoms (sympathy pains) that a father can succumb to... and I did. The nice thing about Brott’s book is that it is less daunting than the Bible of Pregnancy/Childcare, “Know What to Expect When You’re Expecting”. I’ll be honest, I barely skimmed that enormous tome with its double columned pages and small font and endless FAQs that really just succeeded in making me worry about shit that I probably won’t ever have to worry about. Brott’s book is written for the average guy. Each major chapter deals with one month of the pregnancy, and within each chapter are short to-the-point sections about anything and everything that you, your wife, and the baby is going through via bullet points, lists, and definitions of terms that you’ll definitely be hearing a lot. (I now know everything there is to know about episiotomies, Braxton-Hicks, colostrum, dilation, and the cervix, so thank you for that, Mr. Brott.) There’s also a nice selection of illustrations, charts, and appropriate cartoons. Every expectant father needs some comic relief, too. Clearly, much research (above Brott’s own personal experiences as a father) went into this book, as evident in the lengthy Appendices, 15-page bibliography, six pages of online resources, and Index at the end of the book. Most importantly, Brott never talks down to the expectant father. He’s been there himself, so he knows what it’s like to see weird glances from people (mostly women) who may be unaccustomed to (or indoctrinated by society to think it’s unusual or disturbing) seeing fathers pushing carriages or changing diapers or playing with their kids at playgrounds. Brott has written an intelligent, serious, and immensely readable resource for new fathers. I highly recommend this book for any new dad.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margaret

    I bought this book for my husband to read as we're expecting our first baby. We both read it. I found it generic, he found it insulting and humorous. Here are some of his favorite tips for dads: --If you need a break because you're overwhelmed by your wife's pregnancy and emotional state, take a break from her. Go to the beach. Take a vacation on your own. (This will probably become one of the many in-jokes in our pregnancy.) --You're a hero if you go to the doctor's appointments with her. (When we I bought this book for my husband to read as we're expecting our first baby. We both read it. I found it generic, he found it insulting and humorous. Here are some of his favorite tips for dads: --If you need a break because you're overwhelmed by your wife's pregnancy and emotional state, take a break from her. Go to the beach. Take a vacation on your own. (This will probably become one of the many in-jokes in our pregnancy.) --You're a hero if you go to the doctor's appointments with her. (When we went to our first appointment, every pregnant woman had their SO with them.) --Your pain can be just as difficult as hers, because you can experience the same difficulties as she due to empathy. (More belly laughs from him about this one, especially after I throw up!) Frankly, my husband found the book insulting. He's very clever, and he's a feminist. He doesn't need platitudes and the casual sexism that says 'you're a male hero for doing the things that you should be doing.' When I asked for his review, he merely said "terrible." I also read this book, and found the information to be pretty generic, and easily found online. I agree that it'd be nice if there were a book for dads, but it needs to be researched and informed and to treat parents with respect. Another pregnancy book without sources, by the way.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Mike Mueller

    3.5 stars. This book was pretty helpful overall, with a lot of passages I ended up highlighting (e.g. "list of questions for your pediatrician"). The structure is good, with a chapter per month and listings of physical conditions and emotions you & your partner might be experiencing. A lot of it has lined up with what we've experienced so far! It helps to know what we can anticipate in the coming months. I think this book would be much improved if the information about the individual stages of pre 3.5 stars. This book was pretty helpful overall, with a lot of passages I ended up highlighting (e.g. "list of questions for your pediatrician"). The structure is good, with a chapter per month and listings of physical conditions and emotions you & your partner might be experiencing. A lot of it has lined up with what we've experienced so far! It helps to know what we can anticipate in the coming months. I think this book would be much improved if the information about the individual stages of pregnancy was backed by more rigorous research. As it is, there is a some of dubious information reported (which turned out not to be true after some Googling). The author does have a list of citations at the end of the book, but they're not referenced in context, so it's hard to know what to believe sometimes. Overall, it seems like a good overview and definitely contains useful information for new fathers, but you'll want to supplement with other sources as well.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Josh

    When you’re having a baby, almost everyone whose had one has some advice for you, whether you want it or not. Unfortunately, it’s still considered rude in our society to tell those people to shut up. This book is kind of like that. It’s more or less one person’s opinions and experience with a few studies thrown in. The difference between this and some lady you see at a restaurant is that you can tell the book to shut up. I ended up skimming quite a bit of the book (Is it bad that I skipped the “wh When you’re having a baby, almost everyone whose had one has some advice for you, whether you want it or not. Unfortunately, it’s still considered rude in our society to tell those people to shut up. This book is kind of like that. It’s more or less one person’s opinions and experience with a few studies thrown in. The difference between this and some lady you see at a restaurant is that you can tell the book to shut up. I ended up skimming quite a bit of the book (Is it bad that I skipped the “what to do if you have to deliver the baby yourself” portion?). It isn’t that the information isn’t helpful, it’s just not very helpful, and, for the most part, it’s kind of outdated. The book is written in a world without digital cameras, DVDs or iPods, so I’m forced to question how up to date the baby information is. For instance, the author makes frequent references to a “vagina.” I don’t even know what that is, and I went to Law School. The most helpful parts of this book are descriptions of what is going on with the mother both physically and mentally, as well as what most fathers can expect to feel like at specific parts of the pregnancy. It also has some helpful information on what the father’s role should be. Not surprisingly, it’s not pissing off the mother, and not breaking the baby. The end of the book is a chapter on fatherhood roles in society, and the author seems very passionate about encouraging new father’s to challenge some outdated notions of the father being the outsider in the parent child relationship. This, I fully support. Which is why I’m going to be entering myself and LB into a Mother/Baby beauty pageant next year. Wish us luck!

  7. 4 out of 5

    John

    When I first became a father to the daughters in my pictures, this book was instrumental in my learning journey. It was enlightening and surprising. I didn't realize how much about the whole process that I didn't know. I had grown up around kids my whole life but I was a complete newbie when it came to babies. When I first became a father to the daughters in my pictures, this book was instrumental in my learning journey. It was enlightening and surprising. I didn't realize how much about the whole process that I didn't know. I had grown up around kids my whole life but I was a complete newbie when it came to babies.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Davy

    I'm reading this alongside What to Expect When You're Expecting for a more comprehensive view. So far, it's very similar in content to that book, but with a fatherly slant to it. All in all, it met my expectations and will be reading the next in the series. I'm reading this alongside What to Expect When You're Expecting for a more comprehensive view. So far, it's very similar in content to that book, but with a fatherly slant to it. All in all, it met my expectations and will be reading the next in the series.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Shelly Johnson

    I bought this for my husband, but wound up really enjoying it for myself! It was really interesting to hear about pregnancy from the male perspective, something that is really lacking in probably most books of this type. I thought the author was a good balance between a "real" parent, with perhaps a little "hippie" thrown in there. For example, he pointed out that most practitioners don't love birth plans... I suspected that, but from all the other mommy blogs and books you would think EVERYONE I bought this for my husband, but wound up really enjoying it for myself! It was really interesting to hear about pregnancy from the male perspective, something that is really lacking in probably most books of this type. I thought the author was a good balance between a "real" parent, with perhaps a little "hippie" thrown in there. For example, he pointed out that most practitioners don't love birth plans... I suspected that, but from all the other mommy blogs and books you would think EVERYONE has one and that doctors just LOVE them. I would recommend this to first-time parents. It was entertaining, educational, and suitable for both mom and dad.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Andrew Wiser

    It was nice to read something directed towards fathers and get some encouragement (I don't think my midwife has even made eye contact with me yet). But there was a lot of bad statistics (so much correlation != causation) and self-promotion for other books and websites. It was nice to read something directed towards fathers and get some encouragement (I don't think my midwife has even made eye contact with me yet). But there was a lot of bad statistics (so much correlation != causation) and self-promotion for other books and websites.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Michael Ellsworth

    If anyone actually reads my reviews... preslee is pregnant.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Matt McLain

    A lot to think about that can go wrong but nature has been doing this for a long time. Be present.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    (Expecting my first) Huge fan of this book. It was a great, step by step, nuts and bolts approach to the emotional and physical side of pregnancy for dads. While I didn’t agree with everything, he gave a great framework for expectations. As my kid grows, I’ll read the rest of this series of books.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Michael Hicks

    Armin Brott's THE EXPECTANT FATHER is a terrific resource for new daddies preparing for the biggest, and most rewarding, change in their life. Brott is direct and straight-forward in his presentations, and his information is well-researched and sourced, so if you have any questions or would like to know more about the material presented, it's very easy to find his primary sources. He has also compiled a very handy Resources appendix to further one's own research into this challenging new landsca Armin Brott's THE EXPECTANT FATHER is a terrific resource for new daddies preparing for the biggest, and most rewarding, change in their life. Brott is direct and straight-forward in his presentations, and his information is well-researched and sourced, so if you have any questions or would like to know more about the material presented, it's very easy to find his primary sources. He has also compiled a very handy Resources appendix to further one's own research into this challenging new landscape. Prepping for a baby can be stressful and incredibly time-consuming, so I really appreciated the author's no-frills approach along with personal examples from his own experiences as a father of two daughters. The writing is smooth and he approaches each of his topics, ranging from each month of pregnancy to delivery, up through the first few days at home, with clarity and dashes of smart humor. Which brings me to why I so appreciated this book over a few other expectant father guides out there. Brott recognizes the importance of being a father and he's quick, and happy, to dispel some of the more negative and ridiculous stereotypes about fatherhood. While sitcoms, and way too often our own society (including plenty of other men out there) like to treat fathers as ancillary, barely-there doofuses, the reality (or at least my reality in approaching fatherhood) is quite different. I want to be an active part of my child's life and learn how to do things for him as we grow and bond together. I also consider myself to be reasonably educated, and I liked that Brott treated his readers as equals. There's no talking down to his readers about this subject, and we're all on a level playing field. I did try to read a few other parenting books for men, but couldn't stand the talking points about how changing diapers isn't quite as simple as cracking open a beer can, or presenting information in a "I know you're a caveman, but even your simple mind can do this" fashion. Those books felt like a perpetuation of ridiculous BS, whereas Brott is more than willing to give the subject, and his readers, much deserved respect. While being a parent, and a new one at that, is rife with on the job training and no owner's manual in sight, it certainly can't hurt to have plenty of information on hand. And that's what you get with Brott's work - concise, informative, respectful, and well-delivered topics on the ups and downs, and the joys, of becoming - and being - a father. Now that our son is three weeks old, I'm ready to move onto Brott's next book, THE NEW FATHER.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Brist

    A very good overview for first time dads. I think it's hard to cover this much info and keep the pace moving along but they did it. However, it loses a star for being a little too focused on just mainstream viewpoints. My wife and I were going through a birth center so there was a lot of info that could have been adjusted. A second huge star is taken away for the condescending tone towards men. In every section there was some kind of statement equivalent to, "don't forget to be a caring person a A very good overview for first time dads. I think it's hard to cover this much info and keep the pace moving along but they did it. However, it loses a star for being a little too focused on just mainstream viewpoints. My wife and I were going through a birth center so there was a lot of info that could have been adjusted. A second huge star is taken away for the condescending tone towards men. In every section there was some kind of statement equivalent to, "don't forget to be a caring person and support your significant other." I know this is a massive issue among men, but I am not one of those men that went in to pregnancy unprepared to do my part. The phrasing should have been, "since you want to be there for your significant other, here is what you can do." I think assuming the best out of your reader would go a lot further toward helping him rise to this great occasion.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Madasi

    This book is fantastic. The first time you and your wife become pregnant, books will start appearing out of thin air telling her every minute detail of what is happening each day of the pregnancy, what the baby is doing now, how big it is, what might go wrong now, and how to deal with it. If you are like is, you'll end up with 2.3 copies of each book on the subject. This book is different, because it is for the father. It not only tells you what is going on with your wife, and future offspring, This book is fantastic. The first time you and your wife become pregnant, books will start appearing out of thin air telling her every minute detail of what is happening each day of the pregnancy, what the baby is doing now, how big it is, what might go wrong now, and how to deal with it. If you are like is, you'll end up with 2.3 copies of each book on the subject. This book is different, because it is for the father. It not only tells you what is going on with your wife, and future offspring, but also goes into what is happening with you. It's full of great advice and information. One tip though. If it tells you something, and then says you'd be wise not to mention that to your wife while she is pregnant, Listen To It! I'm still living that one down.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mr. Brammer

    There are a LOT of books out there. And the getting-ready-to-be parents genre is its own cottage industry, selling product to raise parenting expectations. This one has a lot of outdated information, is at times offensive, (especially the comments about why it would be nice to have a "cute, 20 year old au pair in your house") and rather clumsily promotes the idea of an equal partnership in raising children, while the existence of this book presumes a sort of paternal laziness ("I'll just read th There are a LOT of books out there. And the getting-ready-to-be parents genre is its own cottage industry, selling product to raise parenting expectations. This one has a lot of outdated information, is at times offensive, (especially the comments about why it would be nice to have a "cute, 20 year old au pair in your house") and rather clumsily promotes the idea of an equal partnership in raising children, while the existence of this book presumes a sort of paternal laziness ("I'll just read this book and be all set"). There MUST be better, more insightful books out there that don't treat expectant fathers like lazy, horny idiots.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Tony

    Reading this book while watching my wife rest during labor has been one of the most eye-opening experiences of my life. I wish I would have read this book as soon as we discovered we were pregnant but the insight was still very well-received. All dads-to-be should read this!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zetagilgamesh

    Well written, solid and insightful. I can say that the medical information provided is pretty spot on in all regards and that this book should be required reading for all expecting dads.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Mohammed Algarawi

    I'm not even gonna waste my time reviewing this useless sad excuse of a book. I'm intellectually offended by how commercial this book is. I'm not even gonna waste my time reviewing this useless sad excuse of a book. I'm intellectually offended by how commercial this book is.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Xin

    Received this book from a friend, knowing that I was becoming a father soon. The book is very well organized in chronological order of a women's pregnancy, and discussed a lot of practical things as well as expectation changes durning the pregnancy. This book addressed all the questions and curiosities I had as a father that is interested in the whole process of pregnancy. However I wouldn't say it goes into a lot of depth. I find myself more knowledge on certain topics discussed in this book bas Received this book from a friend, knowing that I was becoming a father soon. The book is very well organized in chronological order of a women's pregnancy, and discussed a lot of practical things as well as expectation changes durning the pregnancy. This book addressed all the questions and curiosities I had as a father that is interested in the whole process of pregnancy. However I wouldn't say it goes into a lot of depth. I find myself more knowledge on certain topics discussed in this book based on my reading in other books. Overall would recommend to any Father/Partner that wants to be more supportive during the process.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Brendan Paras

    As comprehensive as it is helpful. Essential reading for every expecting father to be. Walks readers through the initial stages of pregnancy, what to expect each month, and sets the tone for the months immediately following child birth. I was otherwise ill informed, but now feel like a PhD on pregnancy (or an MD on obstetrics?). Bring on the baby and the challenges it brings with it. Onto his next book regarding the first year.. wish me good luck and send me your t’s and p’s.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Zack

    The book provides information about the stages of pregnancy, relative concerns, and ways to feel involved. I read it cover-to-cover and feel it might have been better suited for an initial skim followed by monthly referencing. Overall I feel like it's an OK resource, though nothing about it was exceptional, and the writing style was a little on the nose, which, perversely, seems par for the course. The book provides information about the stages of pregnancy, relative concerns, and ways to feel involved. I read it cover-to-cover and feel it might have been better suited for an initial skim followed by monthly referencing. Overall I feel like it's an OK resource, though nothing about it was exceptional, and the writing style was a little on the nose, which, perversely, seems par for the course.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Chip Adcock

    The premier dad-to-be book. It has all the information you need to be a good partner to the future mother. This book was very well researched and full of great stories, studies, lists, & techniques. It's basically "The Bump" for men. There were times where I knew more about the baby than my wife did. The premier dad-to-be book. It has all the information you need to be a good partner to the future mother. This book was very well researched and full of great stories, studies, lists, & techniques. It's basically "The Bump" for men. There were times where I knew more about the baby than my wife did.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Blaine McGaffigan

    Tons of invaluable information. Best if read month to month during the pregnancy.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Kevin McGinn

    Book took me months and months to get there cause it was so bad. If I could have given this book 0 stars or a negative number, I would have

  27. 5 out of 5

    Karl Gruenewald

    Well laid out and comprehensive, Armin Brott's classic book for expectant fathers manages to be an informative and easy read without resorting to flat-out comedy or assuming that the reader has no interest in playing an active role in their partner's pregnancy. Well laid out and comprehensive, Armin Brott's classic book for expectant fathers manages to be an informative and easy read without resorting to flat-out comedy or assuming that the reader has no interest in playing an active role in their partner's pregnancy.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Chad Warner

    An informative book for expectant fathers. Each chapter deals with a different stage of pregnancy, and tells what’s happening with the woman (physically and emotionally), what’s happening with the baby, and what’s happening with you (the man). The author references many medical and psychological studies, but also adds anecdotes from his own experience, which provides just enough humor. The author’s stance is that men shouldn’t bottle up their feelings, but should be open to expressing them, and s An informative book for expectant fathers. Each chapter deals with a different stage of pregnancy, and tells what’s happening with the woman (physically and emotionally), what’s happening with the baby, and what’s happening with you (the man). The author references many medical and psychological studies, but also adds anecdotes from his own experience, which provides just enough humor. The author’s stance is that men shouldn’t bottle up their feelings, but should be open to expressing them, and should frequently talk about them with their partners. He encourages expectant fathers to be involved; to take an active role in helping during pregnancy, preparing for the baby, and parenting. I appreciated the many helpful tips about medical care, finances, and insurance. This is the first pregnancy book I read, and I highly recommend it. Month 1 Mother's nutrition • Calories: ~300 extra per day • Protein: 75-100 g per day. Low-fat milk, chicken, lean meat, low-fat cheese, tofu, peanut butter, fish, eggs. • Iron: spinach, dried fruit, beef, fortified cereal, legumes. Take with vitamin C. • Citrus fruit & vitamin C: 7 servings of fruit & vegetables daily. • Calcium: ~1500 MG per day. Milk & dairy, pink salmon, tofu, broccoli, eggs, TUMS 500. • Green & yellow vegetables. 1-2 servings of dark green daily. • Grains & complex carbs: whole grain bread, brown rice, potatoes, peas, dried beans. • Water: eight 8 oz glasses daily. • Healthy fats: avocado, peanuts, olive oil, canola oil. Month 3 By the end of month 3, you can tell family and friends you’re pregnant. Month 5 Start speaking to the baby, loud enough that a person across the room could hear. Month 8 • Create a birth plan including your stance on emergencies, pain medication, staying together, freedom of movement, labor, fetal monitoring, delivery method, episiotomy, handling the baby, going home. • Register at the hospital (up to 60 days in advance). • Find a pediatrician. An office with phone nurses is recommended. Month 9 False labor • Contractions not regular. • Contractions don’t get stronger. • Contractions stop or change when changing position. • Little or no vaginal discharge. • Possible pain in abdomen. Real labor • Contractions are regular. • Contractions get stronger, longer, closer. • May be some vaginal discharge. • Water breaks. • Possible pain in lower back. Labor & delivery • Decide what pain relief to accept. • Don’t use fetal monitors unless absolutely necessary. They confine the woman to bed and can scare you. After birth Birth announcements should include baby’s name, date & time, weight, length, and parents’ names. Send to family, friends, and those who gave a gift or shower. Baby care • Wash new clothes before dressing the baby. • The firmer the baby’s mattress, the better. • Don’t use baby powder. • No juice for first 6 months. • Baby should sleep on his back. No pillows, fluffy blankets, or stuffed animals. • If you pay a babysitter over a certain amount each year, you owe social security tax. How to stop the baby’s crying • Hold the baby differently. • Distract with toy, story, song. • Give pacifier or something to suck. • Bathe. • Carry in frontpack. • Walk or drive. • Warm feet with extra socks. Don’t let the baby “cry it out”. Respond promptly and lovingly to crying. If the baby cries for over 20 minutes, put them in the crib for 10-15. If they don’t stop, try something different. Miscellaneous notes • Sex during pregnancy won’t hurt the baby or the woman. • Get life insurance (probably term) and disability coverage. • Make investments in the child’s name for tax benefits.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Peter Knox

    I read The Expectant Father as things progressed during my wife's pregnancy and with her 'estimated due date' tomorrow, I've finished just in time. I'm sure lots of people would tell parents-to-be that if they read "just one book" it should be ___, but for dads, I don't believe there's a better book for THEM than this one. Every chapter covers what's going on with your partner, you, and the baby that month. It touches upon what you need to be doing to prepare for the baby (financially, physically, I read The Expectant Father as things progressed during my wife's pregnancy and with her 'estimated due date' tomorrow, I've finished just in time. I'm sure lots of people would tell parents-to-be that if they read "just one book" it should be ___, but for dads, I don't believe there's a better book for THEM than this one. Every chapter covers what's going on with your partner, you, and the baby that month. It touches upon what you need to be doing to prepare for the baby (financially, physically, emotionally, nursery-wise, etc), and goes far beyond the stock cliche advice into the actual biology and psychology in the process. The sidebars answer almost every question you didn't know you had. The voice and tone is very calm and measured, but casual like a trusted friend giving you advice that comes from a personal (and researched) place. And then the book goes into beyond-the-birth, with newborn care and the changes ahead. In short, it's awesome and worth it. Get the paperback, you'll want to flag parts to reference later. I'm glad I read it.

  30. 4 out of 5

    David Marino

    I love the fact that there is a book dedicated to the sorely underrepresented portion of the population known as fathers. In many pregnancy or newborn books, words for the father are usually relegated to amusing anecdotes or sidebars. The Expectant Father puts dads at the forefront (as one might anticipate). However, for a book with such an extensive bibliography and resource section, I found much of the information inaccurate or unhelpful. Another review already mentioned this, but bumpers are o I love the fact that there is a book dedicated to the sorely underrepresented portion of the population known as fathers. In many pregnancy or newborn books, words for the father are usually relegated to amusing anecdotes or sidebars. The Expectant Father puts dads at the forefront (as one might anticipate). However, for a book with such an extensive bibliography and resource section, I found much of the information inaccurate or unhelpful. Another review already mentioned this, but bumpers are outdated and frowned upon these days, yet Brott makes no mention of that in the book. I also found the section on delivering a child in an emergency completely unnecessary. Find a shoelace to boil? Really? For the sake of brevity, I will wrap this up by saying that the author has good intentions and a lot of research at his disposal, but I cannot give this book more than three stars until a new version is released that corrects many of these deficiencies.

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