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"The first generation of "Digital Natives" - children who were born into and raised in the digital world - are coming of age, and soon our world will be reshaped in their image. Our economy, our politics, our culture, and even the structure of our family life will be forever transformed." "Based on extensive original research, including interviews with Digital Natives arou "The first generation of "Digital Natives" - children who were born into and raised in the digital world - are coming of age, and soon our world will be reshaped in their image. Our economy, our politics, our culture, and even the structure of our family life will be forever transformed." "Based on extensive original research, including interviews with Digital Natives around the world, Born Digital explores a broad range of issues, from the highly philosophical to the purely practical: What does identity mean for young people who have dozens of online profiles and avatars? Should we worry about privacy issues - or is privacy even a relevant concern for Digital Natives? How does the concept of safety translate into an increasingly virtual world? Are online games addictive, and how do we need to worry about violent video games? What is the Internet's impact on creativity and learning? What lies ahead - socially, professionally, and psychologically - for this generation?" A smart, practical guide to a brave new world and its complex inhabitants, Born Digital will be essential reading for parents, teachers, and the myriad of confused adults who want to understand the digital present - and shape the digital future.


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"The first generation of "Digital Natives" - children who were born into and raised in the digital world - are coming of age, and soon our world will be reshaped in their image. Our economy, our politics, our culture, and even the structure of our family life will be forever transformed." "Based on extensive original research, including interviews with Digital Natives arou "The first generation of "Digital Natives" - children who were born into and raised in the digital world - are coming of age, and soon our world will be reshaped in their image. Our economy, our politics, our culture, and even the structure of our family life will be forever transformed." "Based on extensive original research, including interviews with Digital Natives around the world, Born Digital explores a broad range of issues, from the highly philosophical to the purely practical: What does identity mean for young people who have dozens of online profiles and avatars? Should we worry about privacy issues - or is privacy even a relevant concern for Digital Natives? How does the concept of safety translate into an increasingly virtual world? Are online games addictive, and how do we need to worry about violent video games? What is the Internet's impact on creativity and learning? What lies ahead - socially, professionally, and psychologically - for this generation?" A smart, practical guide to a brave new world and its complex inhabitants, Born Digital will be essential reading for parents, teachers, and the myriad of confused adults who want to understand the digital present - and shape the digital future.

30 review for Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives

  1. 4 out of 5

    Brooke

    PASSAGE: “Like we teach our kids to wear a helmet when riding a bike, or not to get into a car with a stranger, or to call us anytime they face a problem while away from home, we can also ask them to follow rules and respect certain norms while surfing the Web or making connections online.” (281) Kids can be taught how to use the internet safely! As evidenced in this quote, danger lurks everywhere. As parents and educators, it is our job to alert children to potential dangers and how to cope with PASSAGE: “Like we teach our kids to wear a helmet when riding a bike, or not to get into a car with a stranger, or to call us anytime they face a problem while away from home, we can also ask them to follow rules and respect certain norms while surfing the Web or making connections online.” (281) Kids can be taught how to use the internet safely! As evidenced in this quote, danger lurks everywhere. As parents and educators, it is our job to alert children to potential dangers and how to cope with them when they take place. Pornography, violence and bullying – three main concerns –take place online and in person. While these are truly areas of concern, they are not new areas of concern. The new factor is the media through which they are being obtained. Pornography worries parents the most; however, “children have access to mind-bending violence and sexually explicit images as soon as they learn how to use the television remote control.” (86) There is also no reliable data that support there is more bullying now than there was in the past. Issues seem to be treated so much differently since they are “online issues.” The “issues” haven’t changed one bit. What has changed is the ability for adults to relate to children about the issues. Adults see the issues as different since the problems are taking a multimedia form. “Parents and teachers should not treat them as two separate worlds just because [they:] are more familiar with one of them.” (281) They should try to explore the issue through their child’s eyes in an effort to understand the digital world. “Parents and teachers need to take on a greater responsibility for helping Digital Natives make good choices about their personal information in networked publics.” (82) If Digital Natives learn how to assume responsibility for their actions, maybe they would have more access to web-based educational resources. THEME: This book is primarily written for an audience of Digital Immigrants to understand the current generation of Digital Natives. A Digital Native (spelled with a capital ‘D’ and a capital ‘N’ throughout the book) is described as a person who is “born into and raised in a digital world.” Digital Immigrants are simply the older generations who were not raised with digital technology. It is important for Digital Immigrants (primarily parents and educators) to understand that life is different for children who are growing up today. Digital Natives have access to a plethora of technologies that their parents and teachers have never heard of and/or have never experimented with. While parents and educators have heard of certain digital terms, many are unaware and unable to be a role model for today’s children because they don’t have experience in that area. Born Digital encourages parents and educators to explore the technology that the children are using so they can educate about proper usage. Every picture, paragraph, posting, etc. that someone writes on the web is like making a footprint showing where that person has been. Children seem to be carefree about the images they post on the internet. Has anybody taught them that leaving something in cyberspace can “become a lot like a tattoo – something connected to them that they cannot get rid of later in life, even if they want to, without a great deal of difficulty?” (53) A thirteen-year old student entering high school will be ready to search for colleges in the next three years. What if her future college decides to look at her Facebook page to see if she is worthy enough to become a student there? Will anyone have taught her about appropriate images to post on the web? REACT I definitely agree with the authors points of view, and I think that educating parents and teachers is something that needs to take place sooner rather than later. It’s important not only to educate parents about cyberbullying and pornography protection, but also about copyright infringement. I disagree with one of the statements in this book. On page 246, the authors say, “We don’t need to overhaul education to teach kids who are born digital.” If children are learning differently than ever before, multi-tasking more than any previous generation, and using hours upon hours of digital media tools, why should we continue to teach the same way? It’s obvious that Digital Natives have different needs that need to be addressed. One part of the book mentioned how children may be developing shorter attention spans because information is so quick and accessible. If this is so, how can we expect students to sit in their seats for a 75-minute lecture? “We need to determine what our goals are, as teachers and parents, and then figure out how technology can help us, and our kids, to reach those goals.” (246) CONNECT One of the hot debates in class is about websites that are blocked by school districts. There are oodles of educational resources on the web; however, they cannot be accessed from the educational facilities where students spend over 30 hours per week. Administrators are fearful of the unknown and the few barriers between students and harmful content. Whether or not students are blocked from a site, a filter will not prevent them from accessing the desired site. Type in “how do I get past internet filters” on Google and you will see 923,000 resources that may help children figure out how to get past the barrier. Instead of “protecting” children, educators and parents need to teach proper usage. Parents should play the same online games as their children so they can see what their children are doing online. If our job as educators is to prepare children for the future, and Digital Natives are going to shape our future, how are we preparing them to succeed and innovate? Creativity, innovation, and collaboration are being hindered by Digital Immigrants who would rather prevent access than teach accountability. CONCLUDE I give this book five stars because I honestly did not want to put it down. Since I am interested in educating administrators and parents about the power of digital technology, I gained useful information for how to introduce the subject matter. The website, www.digitalnative.org has links to other projects and studies associated with the subject matter. If parents or educators read this book, I think they will gain a better understanding of the role of Digital Natives in society. I hope that they would be more open-minded about seeing all of the positives of the internet versus focusing on how to limit children’s access. While readers will not gain specific ideas on how to educate students about proper usage, they will learn the importance of becoming familiar with Digital Native’s media outlets. Once parents and teachers see how children are using digital media, they will be able to figure out what needs to be taught.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Alison

    I didn't get through this. I found it to be very dry, which was strange considering how much interest this topic holds for me. I think my issue lays in the fact that the book was written for an audience that's older than I am and really not engaged with the online world at all. So, a lot of what was covered was stuff that was nothing new to me, because I am interested in this stuff and use it myself. But even the intro chapter about how kids born now will have all kinds of digital flotsam & jets I didn't get through this. I found it to be very dry, which was strange considering how much interest this topic holds for me. I think my issue lays in the fact that the book was written for an audience that's older than I am and really not engaged with the online world at all. So, a lot of what was covered was stuff that was nothing new to me, because I am interested in this stuff and use it myself. But even the intro chapter about how kids born now will have all kinds of digital flotsam & jetsam following in their wake (everything from medical records to baby photos), and how they will have zero control over most of it, didn't really grab me. So, I was a bit disappointed.

  3. 5 out of 5

    TheSaint

    Melvil Dewey formulated Dewey Decimal Classification. Not John. Melvil. Lost a star just for that failure to fact-check. Now, sorry, everything these authors say is suspect. Other than that, this book was not as compelling as I'd hoped. The first few chapters seemed slow and plodding, but then I got to a couple I was really interested in, and I was able to engage a little more. So I'm thinking that Born Digital is a book that need not be read cover to cover. Just pick out your particular interest Melvil Dewey formulated Dewey Decimal Classification. Not John. Melvil. Lost a star just for that failure to fact-check. Now, sorry, everything these authors say is suspect. Other than that, this book was not as compelling as I'd hoped. The first few chapters seemed slow and plodding, but then I got to a couple I was really interested in, and I was able to engage a little more. So I'm thinking that Born Digital is a book that need not be read cover to cover. Just pick out your particular interests and leave the rest be.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Courtney

    Courtney Lynch ITS 650 27 June 2011 Book Chat Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives John Palfrey and Urs Gasser There are two main passages that stood out the most for me in Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives. The first occurs in the introduction to the book: “There is one thing you know for sure: These kids are different. They study, work, write, and interact with each other in ways that are very different form the ways that you did growi Courtney Lynch ITS 650 27 June 2011 Book Chat Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives John Palfrey and Urs Gasser There are two main passages that stood out the most for me in Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives. The first occurs in the introduction to the book: “There is one thing you know for sure: These kids are different. They study, work, write, and interact with each other in ways that are very different form the ways that you did growing up. They read blogs rather than newspapers. They often meet each other online before they meet in person. They probably don’t even know what a library card looks like, much less have one; and if they do, they’ve probably never used it. They get their music online – often for free, illegally – rather than buying it in record stores. They’re more likely to send an instant message (IM) than to pick up a telephone to arrange a date later in the afternoon. They adopt and pal around with virtual Neopets online instead of pound puppies. And they’re connected to one another by a common culture. Major aspects of their lives – social interactions, friendships, civic activities – are mediated by digital technologies. And they’ve never known any other way of life” (Palfrey & Gasser, 2008). This passage stood out to me for two different reasons. The first is that I think it gives a good description of the students we are seeing in our classrooms today. It compares what they are doing to what perhaps the typical reader would have done. This book is geared towards Digital Immigrants rather than Digital Natives. The second reason this passage struck me is that I am considered to be a Digital Native. According the book, Digital Natives are born after 1980; I was born in 1986 and I found myself scratching my head at a few of the differences mentioned above. I did have a library card and used it quite frequently. I used to go to record stores with my cousins to purchase CDs and I don’t download my music illegally – anymore. But for the most part, the rest of the passage is a very apt description of the life I have experienced growing up, yet I did know another way of life. I remember before we had a computer in my house (we got the Internet when I was 8) and I remember calling friends to make plans. There are, however, students nowadays who do not have the experiences that I do and who have experiences with technology that I never had. The second passage that stood out for me came towards the end of the book in a chapter titled “Learners”: “Schools and libraries should start by putting the learners first. Teachers and administrators need to get serious about figuring out how kids are learning, and they must build digital literacy skills into their core curricula. Librarians should embrace the crucial role that they can play in guiding Digital Natives through the increasingly complicated world of digital information. Our children find information in digital formats and are processing it in ways that those who came before them could only have imagined. This information is sometimes surrounded with far less context than in the past, while at other times, it is surrounded with far more. Our challenge is to help them make sense of these new contexts and new meanings, and to think synthetically and critically, rather than letting them lose their way. Digital Natives may be able to lead us into these new environments and show us how they work, but parents, teachers, and librarians still need to teach children and students who to interpret the signals they pick up with such perception. We find ourselves in a period of transition. Digital tools will find their place in schools and libraries. We have managed transitions of this sort before. The hard part, during the transition, will be to discern what to preserve about traditional education and what to replace with new, digitally mediated processes and tools. Sometimes, this will mean teaching kids to use computers; sometimes, computers will have no place in the room. We need to get much better at telling the two apart. Only then can we exploit what we know about how kids are learning in the digital age” (Palfrey & Gasser, 2008). To me, this passage recognizes that we have to make changes but we need to do it in an effective and efficient manner. It also acknowledges the role that educators have in this era of change. We, as educators, are still needed to help guide our students and the idea that teachers are becoming obsolete is not ever entertained. If anything, we are needed now more than ever to help facilitate the transition. If teachers and administrators accept that students are different, they can start to make positive changes to continue educating them. If teachers are willing to change, they will find it a lot easier to connect with their students. We cannot stand in front of a classroom and preach Internet Safety or claim to understand what students are going through if we are unwilling to experience what the students do on a daily basis. The authors speak a lot about having credibility with the students, “it is difficult for parents and teachers who have no online identity to be credible, particularly if their children or students are Digital Natives” (Palfrey & Gasser, 2008). The ideas presented in this book will have a great positive impact on students and learning if teachers and parents are willing to accept that students today are different and they are the ones that must adapt to meet their needs. Before reading, as I was researching some background on the book, I explored the website for it: http://www.borndigitalbook.com. The book is a product of the Digital Natives Project. “The aim of the Digital Natives project is to understand and support young people as they grow up in a digital age” (Palfrey & Gasser). This statement sums up the theme for the book. The authors cover topics from identities, privacy, and safety to the creativity and innovations of Digital Natives. They discuss the implications on the quality of products created by Digital Natives (e.g. Wikipedia) and the overload of information students can experience. The whole purpose of the book is to inform Digital Immigrants of the world in which Digital Natives live, but at the same time to explain the role of parents and educators in their development. Students today have large digital footprints but they are also, for the most part, very aware of what is accessible about their lives. It does fall to parents and educators to teach them about safety and privacy but at the same time, “the answer is not to keep chasing them away from safe spaces into more remote zones” (Palfrey & Gasser, 2008). We need to have open lines of communication with students rather than trying to completely limit what they are able to do online. Modeling is key to help students learn to use the Internet safely and to protect themselves. Again, the idea is that Digital Immigrants need to be credible when talking to the Natives, “there’s no way to share the knowledge and common sense that we have if we’re not credible about the topics Digital Natives are struggling with” (2008). The book offers practical suggestions for parents and educators who are Digital Immigrants trying to work with and reach the Natives. Digital Immigrants should not alienate the Natives simply because they are different, instead they need to learn to adapt their teaching styles and educate themselves in what the younger generations are experiencing. Aside from the discrepancy mentioned in the beginning, I absolutely agree with everything the authors have said. I only find fault with their categorization that anyone after 1980 is a Digital Native but then go on to say that Digital Natives have never had experiences with other ways of life. “Digital Natives don’t think in terms of recorded music in the form of LPs, eight-tracks, cassette tapes, or even CDs, purchased at a record store; music, for them exists in a digital format they can download from the Internet, move around, and share with their friends and relatives” (Palfrey & Gasser, 2008). While this statement is true for how I think about music now, but I remember falling asleep to cassette tapes and that I got an Ace of Base cassette for my 8th birthday! It was a big deal when I got my first CD and I saved all my money for the ones that followed. But aside from that point of contention, I think the authors accurately portray the students we see in classrooms today. I also really respect that the authors realize we are just entering the digital age; it is hard to keep up with the rapid evolution of technology. There is no one answer for how to effectively integrate technology and we will constantly need to evaluate and adapt our methods of instruction. As previously discussed, the book directly addresses many of the current educational issues. One in particular that hits home for me is cyberbullying. The authors contend that “there’s no reliable data to support the argument that cyerbullying is anything more or less than an extension of bullying into the converged environment of online and offline life” (Palfrey & Gasser, 2008). I would have to agree with them but as they say, “The lesson is that we ought to redouble our efforts to stop harmful bullying, wherever it occurs, using strategies that get a bullying both offline and online” (2008). I feel in my experience that many Digital Immigrants will hear terms associated with technology and shut down. In reality, they have the knowledge and tools to make an impact but need to get over the fear of the technological aspect. The bottom line in how this book connects to current educational issues is that Digital Immigrants need credibility with the children and they need to keep the lines of communication open. Digital Natives are not going away, in fact they clearly outnumber the faculty in schools, therefore, Digital Immigrants need to get on board with the changes that are happening and continuing to develop in education. I give this book a 5-star rating. It is an excellent first step for Digital Immigrants to take in order to better understand and support Digital Natives. Perhaps surprisingly to some, it was a very insightful read for a Digital Native because it gave me a different perspective for dealing with colleagues. I now have practical advice I can offer both parents and educators regarding our students’ technology use. I think this book should be a part of new teacher education as well as professional development for current teachers because there is so much to learn and understand about our students that is often overlooked. The book also helps to put all of that information in one location, broken down into meaningful, easy to read chapters with anecdotes about real students and experiences. Anyone who will be working with Digital Natives should read this book. References Palfrey, J, & Gasser, U. (2008). Born digital: Understanding the first generation of digital natives. New York: Basic Books. Palfrey, J., & Gasser, U. (n.d.). Born digital: Understanding the first generation of digital natives. Retrieved from http://www.borndigitalbook.com/resour...

  5. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Born Digital is a phenomenal book written to educate digital immigrant parents and teachers about their digital native children and students. The book, written in independent chapters, takes the reader down a road that not all have traveled and shows the reader the world through a digital native’s perspective. Two concepts within the book stood out most for me. The first was the concept of creating an identity of self in the digital age. As the book states, “…identity formation among digital nat Born Digital is a phenomenal book written to educate digital immigrant parents and teachers about their digital native children and students. The book, written in independent chapters, takes the reader down a road that not all have traveled and shows the reader the world through a digital native’s perspective. Two concepts within the book stood out most for me. The first was the concept of creating an identity of self in the digital age. As the book states, “…identity formation among digital natives is different from identity formation among predigital generations in the sense that there is more experimentation and reinvention of identities, and there are different modes of expression, such as YouTube and blogging…Among the many changes in what it means to form an identity in a digital age, two stand out as likely to have the most impact over time: instability and insecurity.” This hit me hard because we as teachers need to be aware that students create their identity and then can chance it in seconds online. It is also important to point out that other people can easily add, alter, or subtract from one’s identity though the Web. Another concept that stuck out for me was how the book addressed the way digital natives learn and the impact of technology on learning. Born Digital suggests that technology should not just be thrown in because it is “cool,” but because it has a pedagogical place in the lesson. It also addresses the fact that the digital learner learns in shorter spans, multitasks, and very rarely gets information in printed form. In Born Digital, each chapter addresses the differences between a digital native and a non-digital native. The concepts touched on include identities, the gathering and processing of personal information, safety while online, learning, and the impact of learning in a different way. Each chapter shares the way people used to do things, and the way the world has changed because it is becoming more and more populated with digital natives. It was very interesting to read this book, because according to the book, I am technically a digital native because I was born after 1980. Therefore, I feel as if I have one of the first perspectives of adults who grew up with AIM and email, but who is now teaching all digital natives. I would agree with almost all of the ideas addressed within the book, as I could relate to many of them from both sides of the spectrum. Being a bit younger and a “digital native” myself, I thought that I had a handle on the way kids grow up today, however, this book gave me much more insight to a whole world I, in fact, knew very little about. It was comical in the last chapter, because it addresses the fact that if a digital native was to read the book, they would probably just “skim” and not read the whole thing. In the “Learners” chapter, it can be connected to today’s education because it addresses how schools should approach the new styled learner within their walls. It addresses that schools should just use technology more within the curriculum, but that it should be used more effectively and that no matter what, there will always be a place for the teacher to actually teach, without the help of technology, and the student to actually learn something still. It also addresses the idea that schools really need to encourage team-based learning, because that is how students, whether considered digital natives or not, learn. I would recommend this book for its intended audience, which is for teachers and parents of digital natives. I would also give it 4.5 stars.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Shannon

    I'm sorry. I take offense when a book is not well-written or well-crafted but still released into the world for people to purchase at the tune of $25 a pop. This book contains an overwhelming amount of repetition, and if that isn't enough, each time a topic is repeated it is "reintroduced" as if I the authors did not spend several previous paragraphs telling me exactly the same thing, albeit using a slightly different combination of words. Sure it has good facts and some interesting points, but I'm sorry. I take offense when a book is not well-written or well-crafted but still released into the world for people to purchase at the tune of $25 a pop. This book contains an overwhelming amount of repetition, and if that isn't enough, each time a topic is repeated it is "reintroduced" as if I the authors did not spend several previous paragraphs telling me exactly the same thing, albeit using a slightly different combination of words. Sure it has good facts and some interesting points, but all this is prone to get lost under the sheer volume of redundancy. You'd think they could have at least employed a decent editor - of course then the book would be about 3/4 shorter, (and probably therefore couldn't pull in so much money). Anyway, this leads me to my final point about books and authors discussing the topic of media and its effects on society and culture in the 21st century. Sure everyone wants to put their two cents in. But, for heaven's sake, whether the "medium is the message" or not (a phrase that everyone in this discussion is apt to bring up), the least you could do is respect the medium. If you want to get information to digital natives who skim instead of doing a deep reading, don't, I repeat don't write a book. Write a blog. Create a website. Make a facebook page. If you're trying to write to non-digital natives write a book. But actually write something worthy of the medium. Don't copy-paste your blog onto a linear document and ship it off to a publisher. Respect the medium.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Laura

    Since someone asked if the book were really worth only two stars, I decided to post my thoughts. I didn't even bother finishing this; I flipped through the last section quickly because I needed to turn it back in at the library. I felt like the book was rushed into publication and needed more editing. For example, education reformer John Dewey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dewey) was credited with the invention of Melvil Dewey's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melvil_D...) library classificat Since someone asked if the book were really worth only two stars, I decided to post my thoughts. I didn't even bother finishing this; I flipped through the last section quickly because I needed to turn it back in at the library. I felt like the book was rushed into publication and needed more editing. For example, education reformer John Dewey (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/John_Dewey) was credited with the invention of Melvil Dewey's (http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Melvil_D...) library classification system. There were also sections of the book that seemed repetitious, as if the authors were trying to stretch limited material into chapter-length writing. It appeared that the writers were in a hurry to produce a book on a timely topic. I would have preferred to wait for a more thoughtful tome.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Aaron

    There is no question that today's young people are in a world that is very different from those of us from previous generations. They don't remember a world without cell phones, computers, and the Internet. This ability to be constantly connected has changed the way they view the world and the way they operate in it. It also provides them with so many different opportunities and dangers that they need to be prepared for if they are going to be successful. Palfrey and Gasser take a look at the var There is no question that today's young people are in a world that is very different from those of us from previous generations. They don't remember a world without cell phones, computers, and the Internet. This ability to be constantly connected has changed the way they view the world and the way they operate in it. It also provides them with so many different opportunities and dangers that they need to be prepared for if they are going to be successful. Palfrey and Gasser take a look at the various aspects of living in a digital world and what it means for our kids and teens as well as what it might mean for their (and our) future. Each chapter is designed to focus on a certain aspect of the digital world, how it relates to young people, and what we as adults (parents, teachers, businesses, and the law) should be doing to help optimize the experience. Each issue is explored with related research, examples from the field, and discussions about the current popular sites, platforms, and interfaces. Surprisingly, while the book is a couple of years old, much of the content is still quite current and relevant, including a discussion about how the Internet may drive attempts to strive for democracy and freedom in more oppressive societies. The authors start with an introduction that presents the idea of the Digital Native and the characteristics related to them because of their totally interconnected lives. Once that is defined, they progress into a full definition of what that means not only for them, but for the rest of us in society. The other chapters explore the following issues: *Identities - From the moment we are born at the hospital, various organizations, businesses, and other groups start compiling information about us. While some of this information is compiled with our assistance, much of it is not, and it is also information that we have little control over as we don't own or maintain it. *Profiles - These are compiled by all of the interactions we do on social networking sites and other interactions we do online from our searches at search engines to our clicking on links. *Privacy - This is a logical exploration based on the earlier two chapters. It also explores how young people today are taking a different approach to privacy and what we should and shouldn't share. *Safety - The media has done a wonderful job of exploring the dangers of our increasingly digital world from cyberbullying to identity theft to stalking/kidnapping. The authors take a close look at whether the media attention is overblown and indicate that the dangers are pretty similar to the real world. The digital element is just an additional format, and the root problems are the same whether the bullying (or other issues) are online or in-person. *Creaters - This wonderful chapter highlights how blogging sites and video sites like YouTube have provided all sorts of arenas for people to show their artistic and creative talents. *Pirates - The authors explore the case history of the music and film industry lawsuits against those who pirated content and provide suggestions for better options. *Quality - This includes a great comparison of the quality of Wikipedia versus Encyclopedia Britannica and highlights that not all online resources are of limited quality *Overload - We have all heard stories of people who have become so addicted to being online that they stop their classes, work, or other aspects of their lives. *Aggressors - This is a great discussion of whether exposure to violence online, primarily through gaming or videos, contributes to a higher level of violence in real life. Much of the theory ties in to previous discussions of violence on TV and in films *Innovators - Starting with the great examples of the founders of Facebook, Napster, and other sites/resources founded by young entrepreneurs, this chapter really highlights the opportunities for young people to make it big on a global scale because their innovations have broader exposure. *Learners - You would think this would focus more on how Digital Natives are big multitaskers with short attention span. That is a part of the discussion, but it also highlights how teachers and instructors should not just totally change how they are teaching because of online tools. Teachers should become familiar with such tools and cherrypick the best ways to use them while holding on to some of their existing tools that are already working. This is an additional toolset ... not a replacement one. *Activists - This chapter does a great job of highlighting how the Internet is really spurring young people to be politically and socially active all around the world. This includes a growing involvement in the American electoral system as well as reaching out to make a difference in areas of global concern, such as Darfur. The authors really do a great job of exploring these issues, but they also highlight that they realize the book is just a starting point. As the Internet is constantly changing and evolving, what is being talked about and how to deal with it will also continue to change. As a result, they have set up a wiki site at borndigital.com. This allows the authors and the rest of us to continue the discussion. I really did like this book and the way it approached the topic. I would say it is a must-read for those of us working with young people.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Helen

    I was hoping to get some insight and information about working with students who are part of the Digital Native generation from this book. It was a real struggle to get through this book, which seemed repetitive and rather dry. I almost stopped reading when I was about two-thirds of the way through the book and read about "John Dewey and his famous decimal system". It seems that somewhere in the editing process of this book, someone would have pointed out that John Dewey was an educational refor I was hoping to get some insight and information about working with students who are part of the Digital Native generation from this book. It was a real struggle to get through this book, which seemed repetitive and rather dry. I almost stopped reading when I was about two-thirds of the way through the book and read about "John Dewey and his famous decimal system". It seems that somewhere in the editing process of this book, someone would have pointed out that John Dewey was an educational reformist and the Dewey Decimal System was created by Melvil Dewey, a librarian. I kept hoping to find answers to the problems of how to teach with technology, but most of what I got was more questions. What I did get from this book is that the Internet and related technologies will continue to change and grow and we must help our students with tools to recognize the good and discard the bad.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Wendy

    Overall, Born Digital should be required reading for anyone born before 1985 who has a management or teaching position that deals with the after-1985 set. The authors provide a very good overview of the perspectives the digital generation have and the kinds of issues that their world is going to create, or is creating, as it intersects with and supercedes the pre-digital world. At times the authors use a pretty broad brush and/or a superficial analysis of what's going on, making some of their co Overall, Born Digital should be required reading for anyone born before 1985 who has a management or teaching position that deals with the after-1985 set. The authors provide a very good overview of the perspectives the digital generation have and the kinds of issues that their world is going to create, or is creating, as it intersects with and supercedes the pre-digital world. At times the authors use a pretty broad brush and/or a superficial analysis of what's going on, making some of their conclusions suspect. In part, this weakness may be because they weren't born digital, and are therefore limited by their prejudices. However, this book can serve as a great basis for starting to understand the new world and its inhabitants, instead of just condemning them.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Andrew

    Very dry to read..... glad I bought this 2nd hand from Amazon as opposed to the full price. Geared up to the parent who has kids plugged into the internet continually, and parents who are worried about the risks etc. After reading it I am struggling to find anything that I didn't already know.... very boring to read, and is unlikely to encourage a person to read it to completion. Glad I bought it 2nd hand.... Very dry to read..... glad I bought this 2nd hand from Amazon as opposed to the full price. Geared up to the parent who has kids plugged into the internet continually, and parents who are worried about the risks etc. After reading it I am struggling to find anything that I didn't already know.... very boring to read, and is unlikely to encourage a person to read it to completion. Glad I bought it 2nd hand....

  12. 5 out of 5

    Amy

    certainly written by academics, and already tremendously out of date.

  13. 4 out of 5

    CTEP

    This month I read John Palfrey and Urs Gasser’s “Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives”. I am not sure I would recommend it, but I would definitely encourage reading and reflecting on the topic. I have been curious about the affect technology is having on younger generations. Generations who will not remember or know life before the Internet. This interest was sparked after perusing the TIME article “Person of the Year 2010: Mark Zuckerberg”. And thinking about how This month I read John Palfrey and Urs Gasser’s “Born Digital: Understanding the First Generation of Digital Natives”. I am not sure I would recommend it, but I would definitely encourage reading and reflecting on the topic. I have been curious about the affect technology is having on younger generations. Generations who will not remember or know life before the Internet. This interest was sparked after perusing the TIME article “Person of the Year 2010: Mark Zuckerberg”. And thinking about how my generation will be the last to tell stories that begin: “Back when I used to have to pull the encyclopedia off the shelf…” I found the chapter on privacy to be quite riveting. The authors discuss how public information becomes when shared and stored on the Internet. They analyze the idea of the “digital footprint” and how little control younger generations have over their own. The digital footprint is a human’s recorded trail on the Internet. For example, some people’s footprint can begin before they are even out of the womb. Excited parents are posting pregnancy photos to Facebook and e-mailing them as attachments to family and friends. I can’t blame them! It will be interesting to see what happens in the next 20 years with Internet privacy. Can you imagine having all of your old family albums or baby book posted to the web? This could be a recipe for disaster while growing up, if it gets into the wrong hands. I think there will need to be more emphasized education on web safety. Schools are a good starting place for this, but big tech companies like Apple, Microsoft and Google could also be better advocates for the issue. Where does all of that info end up- even if we remove or delete it? In addition to privacy, I also found the chapter on overload to be worth reading. There’s a good quote at the beginning which states there is no beginning and end with the Internet. The Internet is designed to suck us in until we decide to stop, similar to shopping at Target. This chapter discusses how access to overwhelming amounts of information is affecting youth. Growing up I remember my subscriptions to Highlights magazine and TIME for kids. Each month I would get my new issue, and happily read that month’s topics. There was little pressure with how much info I was responsible for seeking out, because it came to me in monthly increments. The downfall, I was often limited to the perspective those magazines gave. I realize there is good and bad with this method of accessing information. In the book the authors write about high anxiety issues and low concentration capabilities with younger generations, due to the Internet. Doing one simple Google search can lead to a never ending chain of articles, websites, blogs etc. What it boils down to is moderation and setting limits.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    This book is a great read. Palfrey and Gasser look into the first generation of digital natives in a must read for teachers and parents alike. Topics touched on include; information overload, as well as all the key players in this digital world we live in. One of the more interesting aspects of this book was the discussion of public vs private and how those lines are blurred with the internet. This book is merely the beginning of a long conversation about how we will use the internet as the year This book is a great read. Palfrey and Gasser look into the first generation of digital natives in a must read for teachers and parents alike. Topics touched on include; information overload, as well as all the key players in this digital world we live in. One of the more interesting aspects of this book was the discussion of public vs private and how those lines are blurred with the internet. This book is merely the beginning of a long conversation about how we will use the internet as the years go on. Each new generation comes with new beliefs, norms, and morals; how will that effect our world in the coming years? I will refer back to this book for information and guidance as my daughter grows up and technology inevitably becomes a major part of her life.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Mukit-Ul Islam

    This books provides evidence based information from the perspective of individuals who are relatively new to the era of the digital landscape. It is an excellent holistic read that talks about various challenges, issues about the internet as well as the feats and it's role in reshaping the world we know today. For parents and teachers who are looking for practical approaches in dealing with various issues such as privacy, safety and understanding this new global phenomena, the book provides a go This books provides evidence based information from the perspective of individuals who are relatively new to the era of the digital landscape. It is an excellent holistic read that talks about various challenges, issues about the internet as well as the feats and it's role in reshaping the world we know today. For parents and teachers who are looking for practical approaches in dealing with various issues such as privacy, safety and understanding this new global phenomena, the book provides a good easy to understand text with definitions, too. However, being born into this digital era, there has been a lot of repetition in the book which could have been written more succinctly.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Rena Barlow

    Truth be told, I read the updated version printed in 2015. While this book may have been helpful in educating and demystifying the internet in 2008, the 2015 version could have been adapted to also address the fact that many of its readers were "born digital" and therefor did not need the "what is this whole, scary, internet place?" question answered. It was very well organized and the advice spot on, however, I found it to be a little hard to read given that much of it was outdated (probably wi Truth be told, I read the updated version printed in 2015. While this book may have been helpful in educating and demystifying the internet in 2008, the 2015 version could have been adapted to also address the fact that many of its readers were "born digital" and therefor did not need the "what is this whole, scary, internet place?" question answered. It was very well organized and the advice spot on, however, I found it to be a little hard to read given that much of it was outdated (probably within six months of being printed). Take this conversation to a podcast or blog and it holds much more value than a dusty old book about the internet. That's my two cents

  17. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    Some interesting aspects to ponder regarding digital users that are still relevant today. However, many of the points are redundant and fresh observations and arguments seem to be lacking in this updated edition.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Gary Bourke

    Good. Especially enjoyed the 'Identity' and 'Learners' sections. Many valuable questions asked. Good. Especially enjoyed the 'Identity' and 'Learners' sections. Many valuable questions asked.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Marcos d Ornellas

    Outdated. It should be read in 2007 and not in 2017.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Kelly

    "Born Digital" has some decent insight but as a 2008 publication it's grossly outdated. "Born Digital" has some decent insight but as a 2008 publication it's grossly outdated.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Rawan Adawi

    The book is outdated. I didn't continue reading :) The book is outdated. I didn't continue reading :)

  22. 5 out of 5

    Koleś

    It was a little boring for me, because I know quite a lot about the topics found in this book. But it seems like it is a good read for people that are not very tech savvy but want to learn about the effects of technology on young people lives, for example for teachers, parents.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Dorothy

    The content was interesting, the writing wasn't great. It became a little repetitive, certain chapters probably could have been combined and shortened. The content was interesting, the writing wasn't great. It became a little repetitive, certain chapters probably could have been combined and shortened.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Lisaashton

    This book is aimed to reach parents, teachers, and others who work with digital natives. I agree with previous reviewers. The authors include much research; however, there are not as many practical strategies for parents and teachers as I had expected. The authors do touch on having conversations with your children, modeling good internet use, and the debate over monitoring children's internet use. The authors call out technology companies and their responsibilities in technology design and help This book is aimed to reach parents, teachers, and others who work with digital natives. I agree with previous reviewers. The authors include much research; however, there are not as many practical strategies for parents and teachers as I had expected. The authors do touch on having conversations with your children, modeling good internet use, and the debate over monitoring children's internet use. The authors call out technology companies and their responsibilities in technology design and helping children make good choices and protect personal information. One suggestion is to clearly label the privacy policy in a way digital natives and understand and see. I had not considered the responsibility of technology companies, like social networking websites, in helping digital natives to use the internet in a safe and healthy way. Having read the authors ideas, I began to think that the technology companies do have more responsibility than we give them. People often think of the internet to be a world of its own creation, but there are people on the other end. The suggestion to post reminders about privacy policies and make privacy policies clear and easy to understand is important. Simply showing a small icon on a photo posting page that says the photos will be public to anyone may be enough to get some children to stop and think about their decisions on the internet. I think parents can similarly remind children to be careful about the choices they make online with a simple post it on the computer now and then. Non digital natives need to remember that they are not powerless to the digital world. This book helps readers to understand this new generation. I would say it is a must read for those who are completely unaware of new generation of digital natives; however, for those who do have some experience with the digital generation, the book can be slightly repetitive and lacking in practical advice and solutions.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Sheryll

    I have an eight year old who can navigate the web better than her dad, has installed aps on my iPod sans adult supervision nor permission, and has enough wherewithal to use the search feature of said device in a quest for “free games for eight year old girls.” To call this kid a digital native would be an understatement. So when the opportunity presented itself to read a book about the world that my kid is, and will be, navigating through for the rest of her life, I jumped on it. John Palfrey an I have an eight year old who can navigate the web better than her dad, has installed aps on my iPod sans adult supervision nor permission, and has enough wherewithal to use the search feature of said device in a quest for “free games for eight year old girls.” To call this kid a digital native would be an understatement. So when the opportunity presented itself to read a book about the world that my kid is, and will be, navigating through for the rest of her life, I jumped on it. John Palfrey and Urs Gasser effectively paint the portrait of the digital world, and cover relevant topics such as privacy, safety, and quality, among others. I quaked at the revelation of how, even without her knowledge or consent, my daughter’s life is being digitally documented – because of my incessant need to send life updates to far-flung members of our family. Grateful I am for the guidance that the authors provide on how to protect the digital natives in our lives from predators that skulk around in the darker recesses of the online world. Admittedly, our primal response as parents is to shield our little one from the harmful components of the digital world. But experience is teaching us that this is not enough. As Palfrey and Gasser point out, digital natives are savvy enough to find a way around whatever limitations are placed on them, which may not necessarily be a bad thing, as proven by the creative geniuses of digital innovators such as Mark Zuckerberg and Shawn Fanning of Facebook and Napster fame. But for a relatively inexperienced and not-so-mature native, these safeguards are a life-line. Having read this book, I now purpose to journey with my child as she learns to navigate her digital existence – to equip her with skills and “streetsmart” so that she need not fear technology. I purpose to be more open to innovations, keeping in mind that these will inadvertently become interwoven into the fabric of her story, so that I continue to be part of hers as well.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Carrie

    Palfrey and Urs have raised some important questions about the generation now growing up in the digital age. Many young people today are unaware of important concerns such as privacy, safety, and internet piracy. Although it is pointed out that some problems such as bullying and stalking have always been around, they now just have a new platform. Young people today need knowledgeable adults to communicate with them about some of these issues, so it is important for particularly parents and teach Palfrey and Urs have raised some important questions about the generation now growing up in the digital age. Many young people today are unaware of important concerns such as privacy, safety, and internet piracy. Although it is pointed out that some problems such as bullying and stalking have always been around, they now just have a new platform. Young people today need knowledgeable adults to communicate with them about some of these issues, so it is important for particularly parents and teachers to familiarize themselves with new ways of learning in order to guide digital natives. Teachers and librarians are needed more than ever to instruct digital natives about selecting appropriate resources in a world of information overload. Beware, however, of a few inaccuracies in this work. According to Born Digital, anyone born after 1980 is a digital native, but no digital native has yet made it to adulthood. Is 30 years old not considered an adult? There is some misinformation about which Dewey created the decimal system, and uncertainty about the correct way to Google someone (in quotes so 691,000 hits aren’t returned). Also, many digital natives scoff at older technologies such as email, so attempting to appear technologically savvy by using emails as the final chapter really just shows your age. The creation of a wiki surrounding the book, however, was an apt choice, and can be found here: http://www.digitalnative.org/wiki/Mai... Overall, Born Digital is a thoughtful look into some of the issues surrounding the digital divide, the barrier widening between those with internet fluency and those without. It is recommended for digital immigrants trying to get a handle on this new generation of digital natives.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    Good book. I've got some issues with the category "Digital Native" as it's often overzealously applied in edtech circles. Palfrey & Gasser usually (though not always) avoid making broad generalizations about an entire generation of people, remembering (or reminding the reader) that any Digital Natives that do exist are a subset, a population, not a whole generation. A large part of this book is about the information that's collected about them or the information they're exposed to, rather than t Good book. I've got some issues with the category "Digital Native" as it's often overzealously applied in edtech circles. Palfrey & Gasser usually (though not always) avoid making broad generalizations about an entire generation of people, remembering (or reminding the reader) that any Digital Natives that do exist are a subset, a population, not a whole generation. A large part of this book is about the information that's collected about them or the information they're exposed to, rather than the mindblowing, jawdropping things that they may or may not do with the Web at their fingertips. Though erring on the side of caution in most cases, the authors are largely optimistic about the Web and the young people who use it. This is a good book for offering up some key questions for digital humanities folks. Should be required reading for educators and parents not so much because of research and conclusions the authors offer, but rather because of the useful and highly readable (yes, skimmable) way it treats central issues such as privacy, identity, creativity, and the like. Their selected bibliography is quite nice, as well. A revisit to Negroponte's Being Digital, If you've read Jenkins, Weinberger, and Benkler, a lot of Palfrey & Gasser's perspectives will be familiar (but not derivative). Don't expect a series of hard conclusions about "Digital Natives"--expect a well-rounded (if easily skimmable) exploration of life in a world where there is indeed nothing new under the sun; rather, there's just a lot more of it.

  28. 4 out of 5

    NaiNai

    It's an interesting following of both the internet, so called "Digital Natives" (defined as those born after 1980), and the interactions "Digital Natives" have with the internet and other technology, from an outsider's perspective. The authors raise some interesting points, including that they believe privacy of "Digital Natives" to be of a greater concern (due to the tendency of "Digital Natives" to disclose personally identifying information on the internet) than of safety. They also address the It's an interesting following of both the internet, so called "Digital Natives" (defined as those born after 1980), and the interactions "Digital Natives" have with the internet and other technology, from an outsider's perspective. The authors raise some interesting points, including that they believe privacy of "Digital Natives" to be of a greater concern (due to the tendency of "Digital Natives" to disclose personally identifying information on the internet) than of safety. They also address the issue of trading convenience (e. g., online shopping) for privacy (targeted advertisements), and imagine some interesting projections into the future. For example, health insurance premiums may one day take into account fast food purchased online with credit cards. I am still reading this book (about halfway through), and, although the language is a bit obtuse in some places (possibly relating to the fact that both authors are lawyers), this book feels like it should be required reading for everyone who uses the internet. Thoughts the 2nd: Discusses teens’ (Digital Natives) interactions with each other through the internet, and with the internet itself. It covers the subtopics of identities, dossiers, privacy, safety, creators, pirates, quality, overload, aggressors, innovators, learners, activists, and synthesis (i. e. the chapter titles). Both authors are lawyers and parents of digital natives. Also provides coverage of popular social networking sites of the day (facebook, myspace).

  29. 4 out of 5

    Joan

    This was an informative, well-researched book. As a "non-native," I have developed a strong interest in the grand possibilities of ever-changing, ever-expanding technology. At the same time, I've had to battle strong fears (what if my mp3 gets smaller and vaporizes in my pocket, or--worse yet--ends up in the washing machine?), and listen to the tech naysayers who are still hoping it's just a fad, and they don't wish to deal with it right now. In my educational profession, I don't believe we can This was an informative, well-researched book. As a "non-native," I have developed a strong interest in the grand possibilities of ever-changing, ever-expanding technology. At the same time, I've had to battle strong fears (what if my mp3 gets smaller and vaporizes in my pocket, or--worse yet--ends up in the washing machine?), and listen to the tech naysayers who are still hoping it's just a fad, and they don't wish to deal with it right now. In my educational profession, I don't believe we can wish technology to go away, or even to stay the same for any amount of time. Is there honestly any profession that doesn't stand to improve with technology literacy? I believe it is imperative that us "old" folks get on the ball, and get ourselves educated in technology, so we can assist these digital natives as they come up through the grades. Technology's going to be a large part of their lives, whether we use it (and ALLOW it) in our classrooms or not. It's time to be proactive and share the positive aspects and safe usage practices of recent technology leaps with these curious young minds.

  30. 4 out of 5

    E

    Characteristics of the first generation to grow up online Many kids under the age of 15 have no idea what a typewriter is. Why would they be familiar with such an outmoded, archaic tool? They are members of “the first generation of digital natives.” Internet and law experts John Palfrey and Urs Gasser offer an accessible, informed and concerned investigation into cyberculture. Although they often indulge in platitudes and generalizations, they bring a new, useful focus to the discussion. They del Characteristics of the first generation to grow up online Many kids under the age of 15 have no idea what a typewriter is. Why would they be familiar with such an outmoded, archaic tool? They are members of “the first generation of digital natives.” Internet and law experts John Palfrey and Urs Gasser offer an accessible, informed and concerned investigation into cyberculture. Although they often indulge in platitudes and generalizations, they bring a new, useful focus to the discussion. They delve into such important issues as privacy and Internet safety, and they examine how these issues affect young people, in particular. Of necessity with this kind of structure, the authors repeat some of the same points, such as the glut of information and the interconnected nature of online life – but they do so to show how these core factors affect different areas. getAbstract recommends this book to lawmakers, hiring managers, teachers and parents who want to understand life in the cyberculture. To learn more about this book, check out the following Web page: http://www.getabstract.com/summary/11...

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