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BrewDog's co-founder James Watt offers a business bible for a new generation. It's anarchic. It's irreverent. It's passionate. It's BrewDog. Don't waste your time on bullshit business plans. Forget sales. Ignore advice. Put everything on the line for what you believe in.These mantras have turned BrewDog into one of the world's fastest-growing drinks brands, famous for BrewDog's co-founder James Watt offers a business bible for a new generation. It's anarchic. It's irreverent. It's passionate. It's BrewDog. Don't waste your time on bullshit business plans. Forget sales. Ignore advice. Put everything on the line for what you believe in.These mantras have turned BrewDog into one of the world's fastest-growing drinks brands, famous for beers, bars and crowdfunding.Founded by a pair of young Scots with a passion for great beer, BrewDog has catalysed the craft beer revolution, rewritten the record books and inadvertently forged a whole new approach to business.In BUSINESS FOR PUNKS, BrewDog co-founder James Watt bottles the essence of this success. From finances ('chase down every cent, pimp every pound') to marketing ('lead with the crusade, not the product') this is an anarchic, indispensable guide to thriving on your own terms.


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BrewDog's co-founder James Watt offers a business bible for a new generation. It's anarchic. It's irreverent. It's passionate. It's BrewDog. Don't waste your time on bullshit business plans. Forget sales. Ignore advice. Put everything on the line for what you believe in.These mantras have turned BrewDog into one of the world's fastest-growing drinks brands, famous for BrewDog's co-founder James Watt offers a business bible for a new generation. It's anarchic. It's irreverent. It's passionate. It's BrewDog. Don't waste your time on bullshit business plans. Forget sales. Ignore advice. Put everything on the line for what you believe in.These mantras have turned BrewDog into one of the world's fastest-growing drinks brands, famous for beers, bars and crowdfunding.Founded by a pair of young Scots with a passion for great beer, BrewDog has catalysed the craft beer revolution, rewritten the record books and inadvertently forged a whole new approach to business.In BUSINESS FOR PUNKS, BrewDog co-founder James Watt bottles the essence of this success. From finances ('chase down every cent, pimp every pound') to marketing ('lead with the crusade, not the product') this is an anarchic, indispensable guide to thriving on your own terms.

30 review for Business for Punks: Start Your Business Revolution – the BrewDog Way

  1. 4 out of 5

    Richard Newton

    Hmm. How do I rate this book? Well I think that depends on which way I rate it. The first, most obviously, is the content. Actually, this is a pretty good primer on starting and running a business. Most of the advice is pretty standard, but there is an energy and drive which is lacking from most books of this nature. The advice that such energy and drive is essential for a successful business start-up is absolutely on the money. Also focus on things like cash rather than profits is great advice. Hmm. How do I rate this book? Well I think that depends on which way I rate it. The first, most obviously, is the content. Actually, this is a pretty good primer on starting and running a business. Most of the advice is pretty standard, but there is an energy and drive which is lacking from most books of this nature. The advice that such energy and drive is essential for a successful business start-up is absolutely on the money. Also focus on things like cash rather than profits is great advice. I've been involved in 5 start-ups, none anything like as successful as BrewDog, and all would have been better with this advice. The second is the writing and the writing style. I think it's either a love it or hate it in terms of style. At first it irritated me intensely. Then I realised it was meant to irritate me as I am probably, in the authors eyes, one of the old farts in a suit who the book riles against. Once I had realised this, I started to enjoy it. The tone is part of the message - and it is a good message. But to be frank this worked for the first 100-150 pages. After that it just started to bore me and grate on my nerves. Finally, this book is not really just a book about business start-up - it's all part of the branding and marketing of BrewDog itself. Now you could argue any book by someone who runs a business is a bit of its marketing. That's probably true, but it is even more so with this book. It is just so much about the BrewDog brand. Buying this book is like buying a piece of advertising. And isn't BrewDog a very self-satisfied brand. Like any branding it is all about making you think BrewDog is something different and special, and influencing you to go out and buy their product. BrewDog really does sound different from many other businesses, but in the end it is obsessed with selling its product and growing. So it's not that different - and honestly not really that Punk. Four stars for the content. Three for the style, although you may like it more than that. Two stars for the blatant use of the book as an advert for BrewDog. Averages out at 3 stars. On the other hand 5 stars from a business perspective on a brillant piece of branding - but that's not really rating the book!

  2. 4 out of 5

    Tarmo Tali

    It's probably new word record on bragging/advice ratio. Lots of new wave startup "fuck oldschool" type of rhetoric that uses dramatic language to present "revolutionary" management principles what were tad mainstream back the Andy Grove founded Intel. It's probably new word record on bragging/advice ratio. Lots of new wave startup "fuck oldschool" type of rhetoric that uses dramatic language to present "revolutionary" management principles what were tad mainstream back the Andy Grove founded Intel.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Richard Gombert

    A good book. Well worth the read. I would be interested to see what the author thinks of this in 20 years, 50 years as his company goes from being a fast growing start-up to being a venerable institution. I found these comments of particular note: Pg. 27: "The whole gap-in-the-market approach is an outdated fallacy that should be burnt and banished from history." Pg. 31: "Planning is merely glorified guesswork. Long-term planning is a vain, self-indulgent fantasy. Don't waste your time." Pg. 33: "Don A good book. Well worth the read. I would be interested to see what the author thinks of this in 20 years, 50 years as his company goes from being a fast growing start-up to being a venerable institution. I found these comments of particular note: Pg. 27: "The whole gap-in-the-market approach is an outdated fallacy that should be burnt and banished from history." Pg. 31: "Planning is merely glorified guesswork. Long-term planning is a vain, self-indulgent fantasy. Don't waste your time." Pg. 33: "Don't outsource stuff like a hammerhead, and don't pay people with money you don't have. Not having cash to pay folks is a blessing in disguise. External people don;t care about your business as much as yoy do, and the sure as hell don't understand it like you do. So do stuff yourselves. Consultants, marketing agencies, recruitment firms are all just unnecessary garbage that poisons the spirit and the finances of any start-up." Pg. 37: "Conventional models of selling should be consigned to a marketing museum, which would close down after six months, as the paying public have got better things to do with their hard-earned cash. The way you act, function and communicate as a business has a direct bearing on how you are perceived, and in turn on your sales. Everything you do is sales and all of your employees are selling all the time. Act accordingly." Pg. 87: "Your price-cutting habit will rapidly spiral out of control. Cut costs make it cheaper, cut costs, make it cheaper. You'll be trying to save money on production. Reducing the quality of your product, cutting corners, until you'll eventually be cutting your own business's throat. Pg. 103: "For today's business marketing is everything. Everything you and your business does is marketing. Modern brands don't belong to companies, they belong to the customer. And marketing dialogue is a two -way street, with customers actively engaged in shaping your brand." Pg. 113: "The bottom line is that unless you actually do something that is worth talking about, it does not matter how much of a budget you have, no one is going to talk about what you are doing." Pg. 170: "The only thing you learn in an interview is how good that person is at doing interviews." Pg. 229: "You can build a much stronger bond with someone in a thirty-minute face-to-face meeting, than you can in twelve months of emails." Pg. 250: "Put your team first."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Nurtan Meral

    James Watt is a genius. He took my time and money to advertise his company and brand. I have to listen his advices.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Eli Hornyak

    Good motivational book for someone that wants to start a business

  6. 4 out of 5

    Jtc911

    One of those books that says a lot without saying much at all. Would have been interesting to hear the other founder's perspective on things too as I suspect James is the one with the big ego. Hats off to them both for building a successful business but it's a shame they didn't really share anything of value. Few interesting stories and trotted out much of the same business catchphrases as other books. The tone and language was almost a caricature of itself and felt forced and contrived. Do peop One of those books that says a lot without saying much at all. Would have been interesting to hear the other founder's perspective on things too as I suspect James is the one with the big ego. Hats off to them both for building a successful business but it's a shame they didn't really share anything of value. Few interesting stories and trotted out much of the same business catchphrases as other books. The tone and language was almost a caricature of itself and felt forced and contrived. Do people really talk and behave like that in real life? There are much better books out there on entrepreneurship.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Ramon van Dam

    This is an interesting one, since it will probably divide readers depending heavily on their goal for going through this book. If you are a fan of BrewDog and know what James Watt is like, then this will be familiar and maybe only slightly annoying at times. However, if you simply picked this as a random book with tips for starting a modern business I'm not sure if I could recommend it. I can easily imagine the writing style being off-putting and the tips being a bit too revolutionary. As a shareh This is an interesting one, since it will probably divide readers depending heavily on their goal for going through this book. If you are a fan of BrewDog and know what James Watt is like, then this will be familiar and maybe only slightly annoying at times. However, if you simply picked this as a random book with tips for starting a modern business I'm not sure if I could recommend it. I can easily imagine the writing style being off-putting and the tips being a bit too revolutionary. As a shareholder of BrewDog through the Equity For Punks program I have been surprised many times by the decisions they've made (both positive and negative), and this actually explains a lot. I feel like I've gotten to know James and Martin a bit with the BrewDogs TV show, but many sections in this book have finally shown me how James really works and thinks. Recommended for anybody that's interested in BrewDog or craft beer in general. If you mainly want to learn about setting up your start-up it's more difficult to predict whether or not this is the book for you.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Tuuli

    Dnf @50%: perhaps the most obnoxious, self-congratulatory mess I have ever read. I cannot for the life of me fathom how and why you would think it's a good idea to call everyone else fucking morons every other page, offer no concrete advice (except how you and your company are the best at everything and super punk and cool and edgy, and all your marketing plunders were actually just really intelligent, punky risks) and then think your book is a fucking masterpiece. I really really wanted to fini Dnf @50%: perhaps the most obnoxious, self-congratulatory mess I have ever read. I cannot for the life of me fathom how and why you would think it's a good idea to call everyone else fucking morons every other page, offer no concrete advice (except how you and your company are the best at everything and super punk and cool and edgy, and all your marketing plunders were actually just really intelligent, punky risks) and then think your book is a fucking masterpiece. I really really wanted to finish this one, because I'm interested in Brewdog and business, and I was genuinely interested in 'how they did it', but I couldn't force myself to waste any more time with this. Somebody, please let me know if it greatly improves at section D, I think I'll get rid of my copy somehow, somewhere. Also, they quote famous people and call them all 'revolutionary punk', 'original punk', 'rock star punk' and so on. As if it couldn't get any more obnoxious.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Siarhei Krukau

    Too much words, too little sense. The book is permeated with ego and sense of uniqueness. Looks like it's just another piece of their PR. Too much words, too little sense. The book is permeated with ego and sense of uniqueness. Looks like it's just another piece of their PR.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Marr Math

    PR piece, respect what he's accomplished and some of the beers. Not much going on between the pages PR piece, respect what he's accomplished and some of the beers. Not much going on between the pages

  11. 5 out of 5

    Chris

    Busines for Punks is a frustrating read. Whether you enjoy it or not really depends what you are looking for going in. For me, I read the book because I enjoy business books to gain an insight into how different businesses operate (good or bad, it’s interesting for me to see what they do) and Brewdog is a company that I think is really interesting, particularly around their people development practices so for me there were things here for me to enjoy. However the book is written as a guide for ent Busines for Punks is a frustrating read. Whether you enjoy it or not really depends what you are looking for going in. For me, I read the book because I enjoy business books to gain an insight into how different businesses operate (good or bad, it’s interesting for me to see what they do) and Brewdog is a company that I think is really interesting, particularly around their people development practices so for me there were things here for me to enjoy. However the book is written as a guide for entrepreneurs and if you’re looking for advice for starting a new business you might not find this so practical. There’s a lot of advice in the mold of ‘Screw the old school rules’, some of which sounds innovative, most sound really impractical for most. James Watt’s writing style is very abrasive with an over reliance of metaphor, sometimes stringing three or four in a row leaving the reader screaming ‘Get on with it’. The book, it seems, is written for an American audience and given that the author is from the north-east of Scotland it’s really strange seeing words like ‘Diaper’ being used. Overall the book is interesting enough, certainly Brewdog is an incredibly innovative company and this book talks about some of these innovations, I would have liked to have gotten more into the decision making processes though. The way it’s presented definitely makes it seem like the author has never made a mistake in his career, for business book, I find it’s usually the most interesting to learn how organizations learned and recovered from things that went wrong. Also in one of the first sections in the book, Watt advises the reader that listening to advice is for chumps which is honestly terrible advice. Great leaders surround themselves with smart people and listen to their council. If you want a great example of a leader who doesn’t listen to advice there’s an orange one who was recently evicted from the White House. So ultimately I would recommend reading the book, there are useful nuggets of info here and it is a fast read. Certainly if you are just interested in the Brewdog brand it’s a really good look behind the curtains.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Manuel Palacios

    The passion in this book is contagious, but most of the information is actually the kind of one you find in most of business books and I would have liked to get more insights regarding the beer craft itself. There is a strong highlight though in the importance of brand and mission that is probably not stressed enough in the actual business books and that is the cornerstone of success and freshness. Good reading.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Heather

    Felt like I should have read this prior to starting a business. Have instead got around to reading it about 8 months in and am heartened to find our ethos and work approach is pretty much in line with Brewdog's. Whether that works or not, who knows. But anyway, good book on business and throwing the rule book out the window. Plus, beer. Felt like I should have read this prior to starting a business. Have instead got around to reading it about 8 months in and am heartened to find our ethos and work approach is pretty much in line with Brewdog's. Whether that works or not, who knows. But anyway, good book on business and throwing the rule book out the window. Plus, beer.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Dan White

    If you’re looking for any insight in business or just on the craft beer industry this is not the book for you. Instead you’ll find lots of bragging interspersed with the odd Kurt Cobain quote and lots of buzz words that essentially translate too “be more punk”, and ultimately one must question the punk credentials of an author that brags about being a millionaire on the first page.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Simon Clode

    As a lot of critical reviews have already said, many existing corporate ideas rebadged as radical or punk. No problem in itself, especially in the short bursts BrewDog's PR presents itself but a whole book of it is impossible to enjoy. As a lot of critical reviews have already said, many existing corporate ideas rebadged as radical or punk. No problem in itself, especially in the short bursts BrewDog's PR presents itself but a whole book of it is impossible to enjoy.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Mr.

    Part of the marketing campaign of Brewdog Brewery

  17. 5 out of 5

    Mitch Romig

    A string of catchphrases telling you not to believe in catchphrases.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Jenni

    Ultimate book of business braggery if you ask me. A couple interesting chapters, but the rest was skin-deep pseudo-brand-marketing.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stella Kechedzhi

    In terms of valuable and semi-unique insights, this book should’ve been an article. The rest is a quite arrogant pile of metaphors repeating the same over and over again.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Thomas

    Couldn't finish this. Too many buzz words and the authors saying how great they are at everything. Couldn't finish this. Too many buzz words and the authors saying how great they are at everything.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Brew Schmuck

    Business for the Posh and the Beautiful. Obviously the book is pretty pointless business advice branded as "anarchy, irreverence and quirkiness" (that phrase is repeated like a gazillion times). Which means, yeah you guessed it, it is filled with a lot of buzz words and not a lot of substance. Don't get me wrong the advice is solid, it's just generic and honestly - has been common knowledge for the past decade. What the book does is serve as a good piece to Brewdog's branding puzzle of "anarchy, Business for the Posh and the Beautiful. Obviously the book is pretty pointless business advice branded as "anarchy, irreverence and quirkiness" (that phrase is repeated like a gazillion times). Which means, yeah you guessed it, it is filled with a lot of buzz words and not a lot of substance. Don't get me wrong the advice is solid, it's just generic and honestly - has been common knowledge for the past decade. What the book does is serve as a good piece to Brewdog's branding puzzle of "anarchy, irreverence and quirkiness". And it hilariously fails in front of anyone interested in craft beer history and culture. The book starts with the fable of James and Martin being clueless and jumping head on into brewing and the craft beer business after a beer critic or something tries their beer and tells them to go for it. According to the records Brewdog was started in 2007. Well Martin, as many of us know, was a brewing superstar at this point. Martin is the guy who came up with Jaipur at Thornbridge - their flagship beer. Thornbridge for the uninitiated was the leading craft brewery before Brewdog came around. That happened in 2005. Not so inexperienced and "punk" were we? Starting with this blatant dishonesty just to make yourself look hip and cool is the recipe for looking like a loser. Not that the use of "punk" in the same sentence with "business" did not achieve that anyway. The book bastardizes the word punk to the point of vomit. Towards its end it even claims punk is about individuals fighting the establishment. Putting aside the history of punk as a collective movement against cronies, businessmen, such as James, who package, brand and ship the culture as a hot, steaming pile of poo, and the state, which together form Voltron (the establishment) lets look further into the "punkiness" of Brewdog. According to James holding a business meeting while swimming with killer whales was so punk. Except it isn't. It's posh as fuck James. Almost as posh as fabricating your company's story to sell fabricated beer culture. Because if the foundations are false everything else becomes false too. By the end of the book you easily figure that James is a poor man's Malcolm Mclaren just without the understanding of punk culture. Because Malcolm packaged it and sold it for money, but at least he didn't go on yachts and call it being punk. Now on the way it's written - the structure is wonky at best. One of two things happened (probably both, but whatever). Either the editor was hungover and was lazy to edit or James was hungover and was lazy to structure. Enormous chunks of the book seem to have been written at random times with no regard for continuity. The majority of it is James repeating the same thing like a mad man. If the book is 246 pages, the unique ideas are probably 30. Everything else is repetition. I do appreciate the self awareness of the book ending on "don't take this advice". It is too late mate, I took that advice in grade 9 IGCSE Business class. That's how unique and "anti establishment" it is. At moments James rambles on how cool and unique he is so much, in hope of making you believe him, that you start wondering if he isn't too far gone in the pose he is striking. The fact the book is just a mix of employer and general branding while advocating how much James cares about his marketing is hilarious, because he couldn't give two shits to read it at least once, omit all the repetitions and actually write a properly structured whole book. All in all Brewdog appears to be an Apple, if Steve Jobs had less the vision and double the tendency to fabricate narratives. We got James Watt trying to be a Steve Jobs, while apparently lacking the obsession and attention to detail. And we got Martin Dickie, the Steve Wozniack, who's talent is so great he just needs someone to take care of publicity. And no matter how full of shit that guy is in the case of Brewdog, the product is so good it carries itself on its own. Come to think of it, James Watt has been perfectly depicted in media already. He's Erlich Bachman from HBO's Silicon Valley.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Stochita Radu

    Damn, mate. I wish I would be able to rate this book 3.5/5, but unfortunately I can not, so here I am, giving four stars to this. Easy to read. Giving the motivational feeling at the end of the day and probably the courage for many people. I guess it achieves what it wants. It was never meant to be a manual on how to start a business or an NGO, but rather just a book from which one could get some inspiration during a cigarette break. Funny enough, even the author says at the end to do whatever we Damn, mate. I wish I would be able to rate this book 3.5/5, but unfortunately I can not, so here I am, giving four stars to this. Easy to read. Giving the motivational feeling at the end of the day and probably the courage for many people. I guess it achieves what it wants. It was never meant to be a manual on how to start a business or an NGO, but rather just a book from which one could get some inspiration during a cigarette break. Funny enough, even the author says at the end to do whatever we would like with this book and never listen to any piece of advice. This should be taken for what it exactly is. If you are looking for more clear ways of improving you start-ups' finances, I guess, mate, you are in the wrong. Or maybe not, maybe this book could help you open your eyes and take some risk after you were busy sticking to the conformist rules that an old-tailored business school has given you. If you are looking for some ways of optimising your business that you could apply straight-forward, maybe it is not for you. Or maybe it is, fella, as it might give you the courage needed to step out of the comfort-zone and try to do things differently. Amazing or not, those guys have created a crafting beer brand based on a revolutionary rhetoric, doing something that was not advised by anyone. They did it their own way, putting a tank in front of the Government, putting the fans to create their own beers and the list can go on... Maybe if you are looking for something very specific in business, maybe you should give at first this book a try, in order to give you a foundation stone of what risks mean and how to better use what is around you. Fuck conformism, in a nutshell, do your own stuff and live up to it. Enjoy it!

  23. 4 out of 5

    Rissa

    First up - huge kudos to James for building his beer empire, and for his drive and energy. He’s achieved big things... but I am not a fan of this book. James has a bombastic style that is initially rousing and motivational but swiftly becomes tired and then annoying. His style is like that of the loudest kid in the classroom. As you flick through fairly generic tips found in any beginners guide to business, you’re left wanting more information on exactly how to achieve these things and less hype First up - huge kudos to James for building his beer empire, and for his drive and energy. He’s achieved big things... but I am not a fan of this book. James has a bombastic style that is initially rousing and motivational but swiftly becomes tired and then annoying. His style is like that of the loudest kid in the classroom. As you flick through fairly generic tips found in any beginners guide to business, you’re left wanting more information on exactly how to achieve these things and less hype about how Brewdog already achieved them. It quickly becomes apparent this is an extended marketing piece for Brewdog and not an entrepreneurs’ handbook. To be fair - at the highest level possible it does serve as a checklist of things to look into further, but there are books out there that go into the necessary detail without the waffle. It is sometimes repetitive and a little laboured despite trying to be to the point. It does also reinforce the cultish powers of the post millennial brand - how personality can help you build the community your business will thrive on... depending on your sector. Finally - I wasn’t a fan of some of the gendered language - b***h and m**********r. Several throwaway phrases no doubt meant in a harmless ‘punk’ way but which really annoyed me. As a female entrepreneur I get that most people might not notice, but I can do without it. Ultimately, you could give it a go if you’re brand new to entrepreneurship and intended to read a lot of other books as well. If you have business experience, don’t bother.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    While I expected this book to be more about getting a microbrewery off the ground, it is much more about using a guerrilla style to start up a business. Watt uses his experience and preaches it as doctrine, but also advises to ignore any advice that anyone offers, even him. Much of the advice that Watt offers will not be found in other books, and is very much the opposing perspective to that offered in the vast majority of business books, which would be why it is worth reading. Brewdog has been While I expected this book to be more about getting a microbrewery off the ground, it is much more about using a guerrilla style to start up a business. Watt uses his experience and preaches it as doctrine, but also advises to ignore any advice that anyone offers, even him. Much of the advice that Watt offers will not be found in other books, and is very much the opposing perspective to that offered in the vast majority of business books, which would be why it is worth reading. Brewdog has been incredibly successful at letting the viral nature of the internet bear much of its marketing burden, and as a reader we are given insight into the how and why it is successful, without a doubt these are the most valuable sections.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lukas

    This book reads like pretentious bull****. It's full of you standard business/entrepreneur advise you can google, written in edgy language, except the guy is too old to be edgy anymore. But if you find traditional business advise bull****, try reading this, it's the same but you won't feel square following it, I guess. One exception is (ironically) the chapter on company culture. I believe Brewdog probably has strong and authentic culture, the guy build it and it contains specific advise I haven't This book reads like pretentious bull****. It's full of you standard business/entrepreneur advise you can google, written in edgy language, except the guy is too old to be edgy anymore. But if you find traditional business advise bull****, try reading this, it's the same but you won't feel square following it, I guess. One exception is (ironically) the chapter on company culture. I believe Brewdog probably has strong and authentic culture, the guy build it and it contains specific advise I haven't read on the internet before. I believe the reason is the guy wrote this firstly as marketing leaflet, educating people was secondary. Fair enough. +1 star for containing interesting tit bits about Brewdog history. I would read a book on it, written by somebody else.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Sergiu Gulunga

    I got used to the aggressive, a little arrogant, but passionate and inspirational way of writing after the first 30-40 pages. The author keeps you connected to the subject with a lot of examples from the well known BrewDog brewery. The nonconformist pieces of advice makes you want to start your own business the next day you finish the book. The book is not only about motivational speech and definitely not about common "how to have the best business" ideas or advice. James Watt introduces the rea I got used to the aggressive, a little arrogant, but passionate and inspirational way of writing after the first 30-40 pages. The author keeps you connected to the subject with a lot of examples from the well known BrewDog brewery. The nonconformist pieces of advice makes you want to start your own business the next day you finish the book. The book is not only about motivational speech and definitely not about common "how to have the best business" ideas or advice. James Watt introduces the reader into the basics of how to run a start-up business: finance, organizational culture, cash flow, employees, marketing, negotiation, etc.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Stefan Maxwell

    This is good. Very good. At first, I had thought the book was getting into material better covered through textbooks, but as it turns out this is a one-stop shop for running a business in an intelligent way. It is clear that James has read up on, and put into action, the topics this book covers. If you want to know how a business works, this book is for you. If you want to improve how your business is working, this book is for you. If you are embarking on your first start-up, this book is for you. This is good. Very good. At first, I had thought the book was getting into material better covered through textbooks, but as it turns out this is a one-stop shop for running a business in an intelligent way. It is clear that James has read up on, and put into action, the topics this book covers. If you want to know how a business works, this book is for you. If you want to improve how your business is working, this book is for you. If you are embarking on your first start-up, this book is for you. What I am saying is, it is highly likely that this book is for you.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Henrique

    Interesting and motivating, though I believe that the lessons aren't for everyone. The founders of Brewdog certainly have lots of the aggressive traits of successful business owners, but the attitude isn't one that fits every personality, and that doesn't mean other styles can't be successful (as they make you believe when you read the book). Worth the read, especially if you want to build your own business and love beer and punk rock! Interesting and motivating, though I believe that the lessons aren't for everyone. The founders of Brewdog certainly have lots of the aggressive traits of successful business owners, but the attitude isn't one that fits every personality, and that doesn't mean other styles can't be successful (as they make you believe when you read the book). Worth the read, especially if you want to build your own business and love beer and punk rock!

  29. 4 out of 5

    Anton

    James shares quite a few of his ideas that seem to go against the flow with many other business-related books. It is always great to learn first hand from someone who has just gone through the process himself and James shares loads of very useful practical tips that might be helpful to those starting and scaling their businesses. This applies to businesses beyond the food and beverage industry. Recommend!

  30. 4 out of 5

    Roman Méndez

    A great example of how the internet's "fight the establishment and old way of doing business" moto of the early 2000s also worked for a craft beer company. Brewdog was born during the early days of companies like Facebook, Spotify, Netflix, Twitter, among many others that made it seem like anything was possible if you just went for it. This book talks a lot about the kind of mindset that made this new landscape very fruitful for the underdog. A great example of how the internet's "fight the establishment and old way of doing business" moto of the early 2000s also worked for a craft beer company. Brewdog was born during the early days of companies like Facebook, Spotify, Netflix, Twitter, among many others that made it seem like anything was possible if you just went for it. This book talks a lot about the kind of mindset that made this new landscape very fruitful for the underdog.

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