web site hit counter Ambition - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Ambition

Availability: Ready to download

In the thirty-sixth century humanity has conquered the galaxy and colonized countless star systems. The Galactic Empire, modeled along Prussian lines, and the democratic Free Planets Alliance are at war, and the fate of every human being in the universe hangs in the balance. This classic Japanese space opera, adapted into a legendary anime, is finally available in English In the thirty-sixth century humanity has conquered the galaxy and colonized countless star systems. The Galactic Empire, modeled along Prussian lines, and the democratic Free Planets Alliance are at war, and the fate of every human being in the universe hangs in the balance. This classic Japanese space opera, adapted into a legendary anime, is finally available in English for the first time. After a coup d'etat erupts in the Free Planets Alliance, military strategist Yang Wen-li is ordered to use his tactical wizardry put down the rebellion, but the ringleader holding the capital is someone he had once trusted deeply. Meanwhile in the Empire, Reinhard will soon face a new trial as in the wake of the Emperor's death he stands amidst an intensifying power struggle among the aristocracy. The unbeatable magician and the unstoppable genius: the decisions these heroes make will send shockwaves across the galaxy.


Compare

In the thirty-sixth century humanity has conquered the galaxy and colonized countless star systems. The Galactic Empire, modeled along Prussian lines, and the democratic Free Planets Alliance are at war, and the fate of every human being in the universe hangs in the balance. This classic Japanese space opera, adapted into a legendary anime, is finally available in English In the thirty-sixth century humanity has conquered the galaxy and colonized countless star systems. The Galactic Empire, modeled along Prussian lines, and the democratic Free Planets Alliance are at war, and the fate of every human being in the universe hangs in the balance. This classic Japanese space opera, adapted into a legendary anime, is finally available in English for the first time. After a coup d'etat erupts in the Free Planets Alliance, military strategist Yang Wen-li is ordered to use his tactical wizardry put down the rebellion, but the ringleader holding the capital is someone he had once trusted deeply. Meanwhile in the Empire, Reinhard will soon face a new trial as in the wake of the Emperor's death he stands amidst an intensifying power struggle among the aristocracy. The unbeatable magician and the unstoppable genius: the decisions these heroes make will send shockwaves across the galaxy.

30 review for Ambition

  1. 4 out of 5

    SR

    Like, yes, these are space opera light novel pulp, and the writing varies from lilac to eggplant in its degree of purple, but GOD THEY'RE SO GOOD. Ridiculous scale - dozens of thousands of ships per side per battle (it is notable when Yang orders ONLY 800), billions of tons of weaponry, millions of personnel - and yet the humanity of the lead characters is never in question. For Yang, because he's a grumpy statistician; for von Lohengramm, because he is so MESSILY early 20s. He and Kircheis brea Like, yes, these are space opera light novel pulp, and the writing varies from lilac to eggplant in its degree of purple, but GOD THEY'RE SO GOOD. Ridiculous scale - dozens of thousands of ships per side per battle (it is notable when Yang orders ONLY 800), billions of tons of weaponry, millions of personnel - and yet the humanity of the lead characters is never in question. For Yang, because he's a grumpy statistician; for von Lohengramm, because he is so MESSILY early 20s. He and Kircheis break up; it's awful, and both are too boneheaded and 20 to reconcile, and ugh these little Space Reich boyfriends have no right to upset me like this. Still mad the books feature precisely four women with names, but willing to overlook it for the pulp factor - I am fully reading these for galactic intrigues and lots of pretty space war. Plus, I mean, context of a Japanese man writing in 1983 for sci-fi fans... most of the progressiveness in the English-language specfic publishing scene at that point was like "women can enjoy having sex" and "yes we acknowledge that Le Guin and Butler and Willis are writing circles around 97% of genre fiction". (knock wood) Anyway this was a ton of fun and analyzing power structures in this framework is fascinating.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Kristalia

    Final rating: 4.25/5 stars This one should have been dubbed "Legend of Galactic heroes: Civil War" because that's all it was about. On both sides, while Phezzan is drinking in happiness because they are all killing each other in the meantime. Nevermind that, the story in this one was quite simple: instead of three big battles like in the first book, it was about civil war breaking out in Galactic Empire because the old emperor died, and then Reinhard figured out something: if they are having civil Final rating: 4.25/5 stars This one should have been dubbed "Legend of Galactic heroes: Civil War" because that's all it was about. On both sides, while Phezzan is drinking in happiness because they are all killing each other in the meantime. Nevermind that, the story in this one was quite simple: instead of three big battles like in the first book, it was about civil war breaking out in Galactic Empire because the old emperor died, and then Reinhard figured out something: if they are having civil war, why not make Free Planets Alliance have one as well? Put one Arthur Lynch with a very big grudge against Yang Wen-li, and you have the perfect formula for screwing things up. And then there is the problem with Reinhard and the people whose advices he should he should considering, those being you know... only those two: Kircheis and von Oberstein. But both of them disagree on both of those things so it makes even more things difficult. And omg, Kircheis. To be honest, no one can replace him. In the meantime, new cast is introduced, some have bigger roles, some develop further, some remain childish (come on Yang, seriously - even the book said so!). Overall, not really fast paced like the first book, but i did have one problem... with writing. Maybe i havent noticed in the first book, but I did notice in the second. While it's appreciated to have character traits (like appearance, mostly) described, one still shouldn't go overboard. (Yes, we know Kircheis has red hair, bloody red hair, he is a red haired guy and yes, we know Reuentahl has heterochromia, there is really no need to repeat that more than 3 times.) That's a common mistake and annoyance found in fanfiction writers or the new writers, but i know it will get better for sure. In the end, everything else is spot on! Perfect. I loved it. And then there was that particular scene in the last chapter... what a game changer... Ofc, adaptations can't always make a good job at adapting something in the thoughts are not integrated in the visuals too. Watching that scene in the finale in adaptation and reading about it were completely different shocks. There was also that arena scene... and now i am hella said. That being said, no one is safe in this series. No one. Also, Julian is the best. Bless Julian and his bloodlust when it comes to people threatening his adopted parent. “I knew it!” he said suddenly. “This is it!” The young, dark-haired commander leapt up and shouted, tossed the report up toward the ceiling, grabbed both hands of a dumbfounded Julian, and started dancing around the room with him. As Julian was being slung this way and that, he had a sudden realization and cried out in a loud voice, “Excellency! We can win this, can’t we? We can win this!” “You bet we can win it! ‘Yang Wen-li doesn’t fight hopeless battles!’ Isn’t that right?” That was when he heard the sound of someone clearing his throat. Yang stopped dancing and looked toward where the sound had come from. Three people—von Schönkopf, Frederica Greenhill, and Fischer—were staring at their commander. Yang let go of Julian’s hands and reached up to straighten his disheveled hair—at some point, his beret had gone flying off as well. “Good news,” he said. “The plan is decided. It’s looking like we’re gonna be able to win this somehow.” And Mittermeier and Reuentahl, bless them both. They are just damn great. And yes, there are actual relevant female characters here: Hildegard, Frederica and Annerose all have roles, but do i even have to say that Frederica is the best one around? In any case, this series is worth it - please read it in the honor of our lord and savior, Yang Wen-li who shares the same birthday as me.

  3. 5 out of 5

    Michael Campbell

    These books are incredibly brilliant about painting historical and political themes in a space opera setting. In this book, we have two separate common occurrences in history taking place. On the side of the democratic republic that is the Free Planet's Alliance, members of the military get fed up with the corruption in the government and stage a coup to take over and fix things the way they think is best. On the other side of the galaxy, our despotic feudal type society experiences it's own uphea These books are incredibly brilliant about painting historical and political themes in a space opera setting. In this book, we have two separate common occurrences in history taking place. On the side of the democratic republic that is the Free Planet's Alliance, members of the military get fed up with the corruption in the government and stage a coup to take over and fix things the way they think is best. On the other side of the galaxy, our despotic feudal type society experiences it's own upheaval. The negative consequences of that type of government are shown in a stark light, with the madness and lack of mental fortitude that comes from generations of inbreeding and privilege. Our two main protagonist's develop further, in some good ways and in some bad ways. They both begin to understand the way the universe works more, and they both further their own individual desires. I love the style of writing and how it makes me feel like I'm reading a 19th century novel. It's very detail heavy which might seem tedious to some, but I'm so in love with the whole concept that I just soak it all up. I also hope they make more of the audiobooks, because I'm really enjoying Tim Gerard Reynolds narration!

  4. 4 out of 5

    Ryan Wolf

    Well, that certainly got grimmer than the first one. Who knew that war would be such a bummer?

  5. 4 out of 5

    Philipp

    (Longer review of #1 here) Straightforward follow-up to the first one, no surprises, no change in POV or anything. Just like the first one it's plans vs. reality, but the first half of this one has more politics than space battles, that was fun. The other nice thing is that slowly, the two main protagonists are starting to fall apart: Yang Wen-li starts to drink too much, Lohengramm starts to abandon his values. Since this is 10 books the author doesn't go too far, but the seed is there. Sometimes (Longer review of #1 here) Straightforward follow-up to the first one, no surprises, no change in POV or anything. Just like the first one it's plans vs. reality, but the first half of this one has more politics than space battles, that was fun. The other nice thing is that slowly, the two main protagonists are starting to fall apart: Yang Wen-li starts to drink too much, Lohengramm starts to abandon his values. Since this is 10 books the author doesn't go too far, but the seed is there. Sometimes the writing is awkward, which certainly isn't the fault of the translator, here's an example (the context is that Hilda has surprisingly offered her house's allegiance) “Hilda!” her father gasped, but she just kept calmly adding sugar and cream to her coffee. She was confident her body was not predisposed toward weight gain. That last sentence is like a machine selling cat food in an asteroid belt: it has no business being there. The other problem is that sometimes it's too easy: the protagonists' plans are usually good, but their opponents' plans are either nonexistent or plain stupid, and the downfall of all opponents here is not due to good planning, but due to arrogance. Anyway, if you liked the first one, then you'd like this one too!

  6. 5 out of 5

    Ian

    ok. motherf*ckers are at full blown war. innocent people murdered. scratch that. innocent people are allowed to be murdered to prove a point. and the homie. always trust the homie. because when turn on your number one. well sh*t. that's when keeping it real goes wrong. ok. motherf*ckers are at full blown war. innocent people murdered. scratch that. innocent people are allowed to be murdered to prove a point. and the homie. always trust the homie. because when turn on your number one. well sh*t. that's when keeping it real goes wrong.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Matt Ely

    I read the first one of these books three years ago. But it didn't take long to get back in the swing of things with volume two. The issue that became increasingly apparent is that only two characters matter and one of them is never wrong. Both of them are interesting. One is wrong in substantial ways letting the ends justify the means, one is so openly apathetic about the ends that he just does the right and proper thing with the means. As a reader, you're supposed to be compelled by both but f I read the first one of these books three years ago. But it didn't take long to get back in the swing of things with volume two. The issue that became increasingly apparent is that only two characters matter and one of them is never wrong. Both of them are interesting. One is wrong in substantial ways letting the ends justify the means, one is so openly apathetic about the ends that he just does the right and proper thing with the means. As a reader, you're supposed to be compelled by both but find one more admirable. My issues with the book are mostly issues with sci-fi generally. Lots of important Capitalized Terms and Ideas that that people discuss in vaunted terms. Lots of people who are the best in the galaxy at something and also being space admirals before their 21st birthday. The old people are Scheming. And the young people are Righteous. The scale of the conflicts described is amplified one hundred times over to make them seem more interesting and important than the descriptions of those conflicts can (e.g. "they launched a skirmishing fleet of 16,000 battleships"). There are two things that kept me reading the book. Despite how brazen the author is in insisting on Yang Wen-li's likability, he is pretty likable. And his dialogue strikes a different chord than most of the cast. The second, and more substantial, thing is reading the book as a historical document. While sci-fi always projects into the future, it does so as a way of engaging with contemporary ideas. It's sometimes a more interesting exercise to read the idea behind the book and try to infer the author's influences. Is this really about the Prussian Wars as he said? How much of it was informed by the rise of totalitarianism in interwar Japan? Or the position of Japan as buffer between the powers in the Cold War? Seeing how this specific author used this narrative to engage with many sides of many historical conflicts and trying to come to his own conclusions is a fun exercise. The book reads quickly. While the language is often overly hyperbolic and most characters blend together, the plot clips along enough that you can skim intermittently and still have a good time. I don't know if I'll read all ten of these suckers, but I probably have at least one more in me.

  8. 5 out of 5

    DarkChaplain

    Review also published here I really loved the first Legend of the Galactic Heroes book, as should have been apparent from the review a couple of months back. Ambition continues on from where Dawn left off. Admiral Yang Wen-li is in control of Iserlohn Fortress while Imperial Marshal Reinhard von Lohengramm is furthering his political and militaristic career by forcing the monarchy of the Galactic Empire into a corner. Everything seems like a natural extension of the first novel, whether i Review also published here I really loved the first Legend of the Galactic Heroes book, as should have been apparent from the review a couple of months back. Ambition continues on from where Dawn left off. Admiral Yang Wen-li is in control of Iserlohn Fortress while Imperial Marshal Reinhard von Lohengramm is furthering his political and militaristic career by forcing the monarchy of the Galactic Empire into a corner. Everything seems like a natural extension of the first novel, whether it be plot or characters, and as a result, my love for the series has only been growing over the course of volume two. Unlike the previous installment, this one does not focus on big clashes between Free Planets Alliance and Galactic Empire. Instead, both are dealing with internal conflicts; while Reinhard is working on purging the aristocracy by branding them "Brigands and Usurpers", a coup d'etat keeps Yang and his allies busy around capital world Heinessen. This might mean that both plotlines are somewhat isolated, but also allows for both Yang and Reinhard to grow individually, within their own environments, without constantly banging heads in mighty space battles. On top of that, it gives more attention to the workings of their respective societies, and once again shows that, while on the surface very different, Alliance and Empire are becoming eerily similar. The title, Ambition, is rather fitting in my opinion. It highlights the discrepancy between Reinhard and Yang, in that the former desires full control of the Empire and tearing down the aristocracy, while Yang shies away from praise and would prefer a quiet life in some backwater. It also points at various other characters throughout who wish for promotion or try to maintain their level of power to the detriment of all else. A lot of the book spins around ambitions, power and self-deceptions on part of the players, which makes it a thematically consistent read. While most of the origin stories and anecdotes of the protagonists were taken care of in Dawn already, there are still some small scenes here and there that flesh out various characters, including Siegfried Kircheis, Reinhard's right hand man and dearest friend. These scenes were touching and evocative, and contributed a lot to understanding of Reinhard and co. On Yang's side, more attention was given to Julian, who accompanies his patron throughout the novel, rather than being left at home on Heinessen. He is developing into a compelling character who propells Yang to new heights by his actions and attitudes. Those are just two examples of characters with renewed spotlighting, but there is a whole bunch of them in this book. If there's one thing Tanaka excells at, it is developing natural, likeable, competent characters who not only drive the plot forward but also offer insights and questions to the reader. But Ambition is also about space battles, military action and conspiracies, all of which I felt were nicely executed and provided a good amount of challenge for the characters. While Reinhard seemed for the most part ahead of the aristocracy's game, passing the trouble on to his subordinates, Yang had to deal with a lot of problems head on. Like in Dawn, there were opportunities for most of his senior staff to prove their worth, whether it be Frederica Greenhill or Walter von Schönkopf. The author somehow manages to keep all these characters relevant to the overall story while building them up for future events that might move them closer to the center. The battles themselves felt well executed, and even featured a big ground assault on a space fortress, which introduced an extremely violent but somehow still appealing character in Senior Admiral Ofresser. While rather bloody compared to the rest of the book, the chapter dealing with him and the battle was highly exciting and a great change of pace from massed fleet maneuvers and politics. That doesn't mean that the space battles were dull, however. In fact, they were extensive, clever and at times even saddening. It was a great mix of different pieces of action with introspection and, at least on Yang's side, a bit of a negative look on warfare as a waste of lives. That kind of political and societal commentary flows through the book, like it did in Dawn already. It may seem odd that a title such as Legend of the Galactic Heroes appears to have so much bad to say about war, politics and power, but then, I think that is kind of the point. Tanaka didn't seem to write a story about glorious leaders of war, but relatable characters caught up in the gears of history as they turn inevitably towards a cataclysm that will shake the galaxy to the core. While he praises tactical genius, he also makes the reader aware of the great weight of responsibility on the generals' soldiers, and the guilt an expedient solution might produce. There is a sense of tragedy in a lot of events sketched by the book, and I cannot help but appreciate it. If there is anything to take away from the end of Ambition, it is that this series is just getting started. Big changes are occuring in both factions, and even within them. Strings are being pulled behind the scenes, and both Yang and Reinhard are left on shaky ground after sudden realizations hit them. Future novels, the third of which will be released in the coming winter (I already preordered it, too!), will be heavily influenced by the events of this second volume. It is a turning point with far reaching consequences - and I cannot wait to read what happens next.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Cindee

    I loved this book so much it is the best Space Opera I have ever read such a great political drama that was always interesting never a dull moment. I loved the characters so much they were all told in a wonderfully detailed way especially Reinhard his group and Yang and his group. There is so much nuanced and wonderfully well developed characters that go through so much many parts especially at the end are so painful to read. I like how ambitious many of the characters are I like like how that a I loved this book so much it is the best Space Opera I have ever read such a great political drama that was always interesting never a dull moment. I loved the characters so much they were all told in a wonderfully detailed way especially Reinhard his group and Yang and his group. There is so much nuanced and wonderfully well developed characters that go through so much many parts especially at the end are so painful to read. I like how ambitious many of the characters are I like like how that ambition is a double edged sword that does not always go well in the end. I loved the plot it mainly was about two different civil wars from each side of the book with many painful and world altering consequences on each side. So overall i loved this volume of Legend of the Galactic Heroes and I will be reading more soon.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Rajkumar Pagey

    Two civil wars, so much political intrigue, so many deaths, so much plotting and scheming. The book was so good. Perfect follow-up to book 1.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Madeleine

    Very much like the first novel in this series, it earns an additional star point just because of the stunning narration from Tim Gerard Reynolds. His voice talent soars above the generic, overly-linear, and wholly prosaic prose which, in my opinion, runs the risk of undermining this entire literary endeavour. There is a good story here and fascinating characters taboot, but the writing style is so cut-and-dry that it doesn't necessarily make for a pleasurable reading experience. You just sort of Very much like the first novel in this series, it earns an additional star point just because of the stunning narration from Tim Gerard Reynolds. His voice talent soars above the generic, overly-linear, and wholly prosaic prose which, in my opinion, runs the risk of undermining this entire literary endeavour. There is a good story here and fascinating characters taboot, but the writing style is so cut-and-dry that it doesn't necessarily make for a pleasurable reading experience. You just sort of zip through wondering if you're ever going to hit the fun part...or at the end. As long as Reynolds is here to narrate, I'm here to listen, because only his talent for accents and character voices makes this book more interesting than it really is.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Maverynthia

    Pretty good, marred only a little by Viz's changes to modernize it. Since this is the second book, it continues the story of the first book. All I can say is that for one part of the story near the end, it just seems to go a bit too fast on what happens. The anime does this too however. Also I don't get why nobody is blaming Oberstein for anything since he's the one that came up with everything. Seriously he look too suspicious here. However if you are good you can pick up the foreshadowing of wh Pretty good, marred only a little by Viz's changes to modernize it. Since this is the second book, it continues the story of the first book. All I can say is that for one part of the story near the end, it just seems to go a bit too fast on what happens. The anime does this too however. Also I don't get why nobody is blaming Oberstein for anything since he's the one that came up with everything. Seriously he look too suspicious here. However if you are good you can pick up the foreshadowing of what's to come.

  13. 5 out of 5

    AB

    After spending a significant portion of the first novel dealing with world-building and establishing characters and situations, the second novel of the Legend of the Galactic Heroes is a stronger, more confident affair both in writing and translation. On the translation side, the characters feel more expressive, and the book reads less like a history book of the future and more like a novel, which is a good thing. The 'dry' tone of the first novel's translation is much less evident here, giving u After spending a significant portion of the first novel dealing with world-building and establishing characters and situations, the second novel of the Legend of the Galactic Heroes is a stronger, more confident affair both in writing and translation. On the translation side, the characters feel more expressive, and the book reads less like a history book of the future and more like a novel, which is a good thing. The 'dry' tone of the first novel's translation is much less evident here, giving us characters that shine through, particularly Yang Wenli (but then again I'm already a Yang fan). While the first novel got too bogged down on details, this second book is purely focused on the present, looking at the outcome of the disastrous Alliance invasion of the Empire, and how this has the unintended consequence of a military coup in the Alliance capital. In the meantime, Reinhard ascends to supreme power while facing the only obstacle left in the Empire: the established aristrocrats he so hates. In this novel the Alliance and Empire sides are much more separate as they are each dealing with internal affairs, but still links exist between both stories. There are victories great and small for all the major characters as well as some unexpected setbacks, keeping the story fresh (unless, of course, you watched the anime). For anime watchers, not a lot is new here, although fan-favourite Dusty Attenborough does show up, but very much in the background. The book covers the second half of season 1 of the anime. tl;dr a worthy second volume that renewed my faith in the novel series.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Kaoru

    If Tolstoy had been Edgar Rice Burroughs, then this is what "War and Peace" most likely would have been like. Still quite epic in scope and execution, but a little stiff on the prose side. Or is the translator to be blamed here? Whatever the cause, with the second book in the series it doesn't bother me much anymore. Either that or I just succumbed to it by this point. Besides, it does provide for some unintentionally funny moments here and there. For instance, there's a section in one of the ea If Tolstoy had been Edgar Rice Burroughs, then this is what "War and Peace" most likely would have been like. Still quite epic in scope and execution, but a little stiff on the prose side. Or is the translator to be blamed here? Whatever the cause, with the second book in the series it doesn't bother me much anymore. Either that or I just succumbed to it by this point. Besides, it does provide for some unintentionally funny moments here and there. For instance, there's a section in one of the earlier chapters in which a group of characters gets introduced with descriptions that read like a bishonen parade pulled from the deepest depths of fanfiction.net, and it's absolutely hilarious. It may not be particularly deep, it's very likely that the anime adaptation is actually better (because there is some good potential in this story and the characters, no doubt about it) - but it is a neat 'n rompy space opera. A space opera that with its depiction of a fascist society and coup d'états might get a little bit too real sometimes (I happened to read this in 2020, between the days of the storming of the Capitol and Biden's inauguration), but as we know: Life imitates art and vice versa and we all have to deal with it sometimes, don't we?

  15. 5 out of 5

    Taylor

    Another enjoyable entry... I continue to think highly of the original anime adaptation of this story in the way it managed to capture and enhance the emotional character matters put in the book. The book of course had me reliving all these moments almost identically. I wonder if the anime influenced the translation.. Hmm. Anyways, natural progression from the previous entry. A little more interesting as the side characters start coming more to the forefront in their actions.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Charles

    An excellent book. This book focuses more on civil wars in the Free Planets Alliance and The Empire, and far less on the ideological clashes between them. In addition to the great SF, I found a lot of parallel with modern day politics. This was certainly present in the first book as well, but not to the same degree as in the second, especially towards the end.

  17. 4 out of 5

    xebec

    caveat, I am reading in translation, but that said would not recommend books over the (old) anime, idt you really gain anything from the prose and the adaptation is faithful. this series is always like 48% dumb/funny, 48% dry, 4% way too real and surprisingly moving, and it's that 4% that gets you. caveat, I am reading in translation, but that said would not recommend books over the (old) anime, idt you really gain anything from the prose and the adaptation is faithful. this series is always like 48% dumb/funny, 48% dry, 4% way too real and surprisingly moving, and it's that 4% that gets you.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Kosh

    I've never watched the anime series, but I was curious about these stories, so when they were translated I've immediately bought the whole series. So far, so good! If you love old-fashioned military science fiction you'll love the books. I've never watched the anime series, but I was curious about these stories, so when they were translated I've immediately bought the whole series. So far, so good! If you love old-fashioned military science fiction you'll love the books.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Naru Davis

    Awesome The feeling of this story is so sound, and the characters feel so real to me that I can’t help but care deeply for them so, if anything happens to them, it gets me. Third book, there I go.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Alana McCool

    I enjoy this volume the same the first. There is tragedy here but there is always tragedy in war. It is really nice for read about smart people who you know are smart because they do smart things, not because they have some hidden genius inside the author tell you.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Silvio Pellas

    Not as gripping Author has somewhat of a dry style which makes it difficult to be pulled into the book. Story is still interesting.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Erlend Bergsagel

    A lot has happened in the universe since the last book. A different but enjoyable read. Not so much space opera this time but politics and intrigues

  23. 5 out of 5

    Larry Young

    Oh the realpolitik is real.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Joseph

    This is the biased review by a fan of the LoGH anime series. You have been warned. While I found the first book in the the LoGH series enjoyable, the second volume, Ambition, is an improvement on multiple fronts. By virtue of being a continuation of an existing story, the book was not bogged down by excessive world building or the lengthy history lesson that started volume 1. The net result was a quicker pace and more "real" plot surrounding the primary characters. In addition to maintaining the la This is the biased review by a fan of the LoGH anime series. You have been warned. While I found the first book in the the LoGH series enjoyable, the second volume, Ambition, is an improvement on multiple fronts. By virtue of being a continuation of an existing story, the book was not bogged down by excessive world building or the lengthy history lesson that started volume 1. The net result was a quicker pace and more "real" plot surrounding the primary characters. In addition to maintaining the large cast from Dawn, the second book piles on even more new faces. This abundance of characters could be a problem for readers who are not already familiar with the LoGH universe. Even with my own familiarity of the series, I needed to look up some of the more obscure characters, ships, and locations. While LoGH has many excellent characters, I feel that the plot tends to supersede character development. Thankfully, as the story progresses, characters that are introduced with no more than a name and title are slowly given definition. Perhaps Yoshiki Tanaka was still discovering the characters for himself. I'm hopeful that by the time the series ends, the characters will have gained the same well-rendered definition of their anime counterparts. LoGH doesn't have many important female characters, but Ambition takes a step in the right direction by focusing a little more on the few that it does have. I've wondered before whether, if the book were being written now, it would feature more women in officer-level roles. Since the story has a huge cast already, it'd only be fair to give a few of them (Dusty Attemborough?) the Starbuck treatment. Ambition holds true to its predecessor's formula: brilliant officers expertly plan and execute military tactics while foolhardy enemies bumble about and are destroyed. The story is all the more engrossing when genuinely competent opponents clash. Like a Sherlock mystery, It's a predictable formula that I enjoy, even if the framework is known. Ambition covers some of the darker themes in LoGH as both Yang and Reinhard deal with the conflict between their personal goals and ideals. While Yang believes firmly in democratic governance, he can see better than most just how easily the citizenry are being manipulated. Even he has to admit to Julian that there are moments of frustration with the system he supports. Reinhard, on the other hand, has the more personal and tortured conflict between fairly leading his growing collection of talented admirals and maintaining his uniquely close friendship with Kircheis. I enjoyed the contrast between the two characters' choices - and the vastly divergent outcomes as a result. The book offers a good space for both sides of the conflict to change and grow before they inevitably clash again in volume 3. I can't wait!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Shelly

    3.5 stars for the end because there was actually some interested character interaction & some tense scenes - and TGR did some great narration as always. Overall a 3, though, as there was nothing compelling about the narrative. The events had no impact, and honestly, I've already forgotten most of what happened apart from the ending. I most likely won't be continuing this series. 3.5 stars for the end because there was actually some interested character interaction & some tense scenes - and TGR did some great narration as always. Overall a 3, though, as there was nothing compelling about the narrative. The events had no impact, and honestly, I've already forgotten most of what happened apart from the ending. I most likely won't be continuing this series.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Miguel

    "What is despotism? Isn't it when governing officials not chosen by the citizenry rob the people of their freedom and try to control them through force and violence? That is, in sum, exactly the thing that you all have done here on Heinessen." Ambition continues the tradition of Tanaka's series of deftly written political intrigue/war novels. This second volume covers a significant amount of plot and moves forward at a blistering pace. Pacing, in fact, is a strength of both this and the prior nov "What is despotism? Isn't it when governing officials not chosen by the citizenry rob the people of their freedom and try to control them through force and violence? That is, in sum, exactly the thing that you all have done here on Heinessen." Ambition continues the tradition of Tanaka's series of deftly written political intrigue/war novels. This second volume covers a significant amount of plot and moves forward at a blistering pace. Pacing, in fact, is a strength of both this and the prior novel. Yang and Reinhard have almost no interaction in this novel, but are both have wonderful character moments that deepen their development. This novel chronicles periods of civil war for both the Galactic Empire and the Free Planets Alliance. Internal strife gives Reinhard the perfect opportunity to advance his ambition while having to make unexpected sacrifices. Yang, on the other hand, solidifies his political conviction and leaves opportunities on the table — a perfect foil for Reinhard. Tanaka makes clear that in this series nothing is set in stone. Fortunes rise and fall, characters live and die, and all of the possibilities that make similar novels so tense are also fully present here. The series is far from its conclusion, but still manages to establish strong stakes and give weight to each individual plotline.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Sheldon Wiebe

    Solid space opera in the E.E. 'Doc' Smith/Erik Frank Russell mold from Japanese author, Yoshika Tanaka - it's got Smith's scope and Russell's intelligent, ultra-competent main characters. Both military geniuses - the Galactic empire's Reinhard von Lohengramm and the Free Planets Alliance's Wang Wen-li have had to put down civil wars in their respective interstellar nations (one of which was actually fomented by the genius on the other side). Between strategy and tactics and character, Tanaka has d Solid space opera in the E.E. 'Doc' Smith/Erik Frank Russell mold from Japanese author, Yoshika Tanaka - it's got Smith's scope and Russell's intelligent, ultra-competent main characters. Both military geniuses - the Galactic empire's Reinhard von Lohengramm and the Free Planets Alliance's Wang Wen-li have had to put down civil wars in their respective interstellar nations (one of which was actually fomented by the genius on the other side). Between strategy and tactics and character, Tanaka has developed quite the epic tale. I don't read Japanese so I can't say how much of the matter-of-factly elegant prose is him and how much is owed to translator Daniel Huddleston, but this is a smooth read that requires the reader to pay attention to detail, without making it feel like a hardship. By the novel's conclusion, Book Three: Endurance, has been nicely set up with one genius ascending to an even greater level of power and the other being thought of as dangerous by his own side. It's a good thing Endurance comes out this winter. I hate waiting!

  28. 4 out of 5

    David Holmes

    In spite of my huge disappointment with Dawn, I decided to plod on with book two. I wouldn't normally read a sequel to a book that I gave two stars, but my great love of the anime compelled me to stick with it. I feel basically the same way about Ambition. It's still a good story and still hindered by mediocre storytelling. "Tell, don't show" could be Yoshiki Tanaka's motto. The writing completely fails to put me in the shoes of the characters, and completely fails to capture the drama of the plot In spite of my huge disappointment with Dawn, I decided to plod on with book two. I wouldn't normally read a sequel to a book that I gave two stars, but my great love of the anime compelled me to stick with it. I feel basically the same way about Ambition. It's still a good story and still hindered by mediocre storytelling. "Tell, don't show" could be Yoshiki Tanaka's motto. The writing completely fails to put me in the shoes of the characters, and completely fails to capture the drama of the plot. I've noticed that other reviewers keep praising the audiobook narration. I read the Kindle version, and I wonder if maybe this story (as written) is just better suited to other media. The anime certainly works better, so it wouldn't surprise me if the audiobook version works better too. Unfortunately I don't think I'm curious enough to try that for the third book. I might as well just re-watch the anime instead.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Gedvondur

    Should be more like 2.5 stars, honestly. To me, 3 stars is a *good* book, four is outstanding and five is must-read. The second book in the Legend of Galactic Heroes is much like the first, with overly dramatic anime-motivations and simplistic problems solved with only slightly more thought. If you are a fan of anime or a Japanophile, this might be a good book for you. If you are a sci-fi reader...well not so much, really. The technology and science are essentially non-existent and there are a lo Should be more like 2.5 stars, honestly. To me, 3 stars is a *good* book, four is outstanding and five is must-read. The second book in the Legend of Galactic Heroes is much like the first, with overly dramatic anime-motivations and simplistic problems solved with only slightly more thought. If you are a fan of anime or a Japanophile, this might be a good book for you. If you are a sci-fi reader...well not so much, really. The technology and science are essentially non-existent and there are a lot of technologies that seem to exist just to make certain scenes/practices work. Like Steffl particles so that they have to resort to hand to hand. In space. Yup. Anyway, not a bad book, but honestly there is better reading out there.

  30. 5 out of 5

    John

    I really appreciate how, so far, each volume in this series is a self-contained story while also furthering the overall plot. Everything I wrote about the first volume applies to this one as well: military space opera based on historical tropes with an anime sensibility in terms of younger main characters. I really hope that this ten volume series is completely translated and that we aren't left hanging. I really appreciate how, so far, each volume in this series is a self-contained story while also furthering the overall plot. Everything I wrote about the first volume applies to this one as well: military space opera based on historical tropes with an anime sensibility in terms of younger main characters. I really hope that this ten volume series is completely translated and that we aren't left hanging.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.