web site hit counter For the Love of Money: A Memoir - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

For the Love of Money: A Memoir

Availability: Ready to download

“Part coming-of-age story, part recovery memoir, and part exposé of a rotten, money-drenched Wall Street culture” (Salon), Sam Polk’s unflinching account chronicles his fight to overcome the ghosts of his past—and the radical new way he now defines success. At just thirty years old, Sam Polk was a senior trader for one of the biggest hedge funds on Wall Street, on the verge “Part coming-of-age story, part recovery memoir, and part exposé of a rotten, money-drenched Wall Street culture” (Salon), Sam Polk’s unflinching account chronicles his fight to overcome the ghosts of his past—and the radical new way he now defines success. At just thirty years old, Sam Polk was a senior trader for one of the biggest hedge funds on Wall Street, on the verge of making it to the very top. When he was offered an annual bonus of $3.75 million, he grew angry because it was not enough. It was then he knew he had lost himself in his obsessive pursuit of money. And he had come to loathe the culture—the shallowness, the sexism, the crude machismo—and Wall Street’s use of wealth as the sole measure of a person’s worth. He decided to walk away from it all. For Polk, becoming a Wall Street trader was the fulfillment of his dreams. But in reality it was just the culmination of a life of addictive and self-destructive behaviors, from overeating, to bulimia, to alcohol and drug abuse. His obsessive pursuit of money papered over years of insecurity and emotional abuse. Making money was just the latest attempt to fill the void left by his narcissistic and emotionally unavailable father. “Vivid, picaresque...riveting” (NewYorker.com), For the Love of Money brings you into the rarefied world of Wall Street trading floors, capturing the modern frustrations of young graduates drawn to Wall Street. Polk’s “raw, honest and intimate take on one man’s journey in and out of the business…really gives readers something to think about” (CNBC.com). It is “compellingly written...unflinchingly honest...about the inner journey Polk undertakes to redefine success” (Forbes).


Compare

“Part coming-of-age story, part recovery memoir, and part exposé of a rotten, money-drenched Wall Street culture” (Salon), Sam Polk’s unflinching account chronicles his fight to overcome the ghosts of his past—and the radical new way he now defines success. At just thirty years old, Sam Polk was a senior trader for one of the biggest hedge funds on Wall Street, on the verge “Part coming-of-age story, part recovery memoir, and part exposé of a rotten, money-drenched Wall Street culture” (Salon), Sam Polk’s unflinching account chronicles his fight to overcome the ghosts of his past—and the radical new way he now defines success. At just thirty years old, Sam Polk was a senior trader for one of the biggest hedge funds on Wall Street, on the verge of making it to the very top. When he was offered an annual bonus of $3.75 million, he grew angry because it was not enough. It was then he knew he had lost himself in his obsessive pursuit of money. And he had come to loathe the culture—the shallowness, the sexism, the crude machismo—and Wall Street’s use of wealth as the sole measure of a person’s worth. He decided to walk away from it all. For Polk, becoming a Wall Street trader was the fulfillment of his dreams. But in reality it was just the culmination of a life of addictive and self-destructive behaviors, from overeating, to bulimia, to alcohol and drug abuse. His obsessive pursuit of money papered over years of insecurity and emotional abuse. Making money was just the latest attempt to fill the void left by his narcissistic and emotionally unavailable father. “Vivid, picaresque...riveting” (NewYorker.com), For the Love of Money brings you into the rarefied world of Wall Street trading floors, capturing the modern frustrations of young graduates drawn to Wall Street. Polk’s “raw, honest and intimate take on one man’s journey in and out of the business…really gives readers something to think about” (CNBC.com). It is “compellingly written...unflinchingly honest...about the inner journey Polk undertakes to redefine success” (Forbes).

30 review for For the Love of Money: A Memoir

  1. 4 out of 5

    abby

    It took thirty years for Sam Polk to learn a valuable lesson: there's never *enough* to fill the void. Never enough money, never enough sex, never enough praise, never enough accomplishments. If you have a hole inside, nothing on the outside call fill it. Not that Polk didn't spend about a decade trying. After graduating Columbia, he rose up the ranks of investment banking. But there was always something just out of his reach. One year he earned a bonus of nearly 4 million dollars, but his old i It took thirty years for Sam Polk to learn a valuable lesson: there's never *enough* to fill the void. Never enough money, never enough sex, never enough praise, never enough accomplishments. If you have a hole inside, nothing on the outside call fill it. Not that Polk didn't spend about a decade trying. After graduating Columbia, he rose up the ranks of investment banking. But there was always something just out of his reach. One year he earned a bonus of nearly 4 million dollars, but his old insecurities of being undervalued and unappreciated resurfaced, causing him to fly into a rage. He'd hit his breaking point. How did he get to the point where 4 million dollars wassn't *enough*? After dedicating his entire adult life to the mass accumulation of wealth, Polk decided to make a change. This is an honest, naked memoir, which, despite the title, is more about Polk as a human being rather than a larger statement on greed and Wall Street. There were times I wanted to hug Polk and times I wanted to throttle him. Mostly, I just felt sorry for him. I don't think I'll ever forget the passage about the death of his poor childhood dog, OJ. Polk is a classic addictive personality, and I'm not convinced he has the greatest perspective on it. He blames his excesses on both his father and the Wall Street "culture," but I think a lot of it is just him. While Polk tries to get a grip on his demon with the help of a "spiritualist" whose sole "credentials" are a Native American heritage, I would strongly recommend a licensed therapist to those who find themselves in similar shoes. I'm disappointed this book isn't as much about economics and Wall Street as I'd assumed, but Polk makes his life a compelling story. * Thank you to both the publisher and NetGalley for granting me access to this title

  2. 4 out of 5

    Bill Yeadon

    Couldn't make up my mind on this book. The first half of the book was so depressing that I didn't think I would finish. This is the true story of a fat kid who was bullied as a kid, was verbally abused by his father, was an alcoholic and a drug addict, and addicted to porn all before age 21. Even after all this he made it to the top of Wall Street and was a multi millionaire by 25. Even with this and a beautiful popular girlfriend he was still miserable. Fortunately he finally realized that money w Couldn't make up my mind on this book. The first half of the book was so depressing that I didn't think I would finish. This is the true story of a fat kid who was bullied as a kid, was verbally abused by his father, was an alcoholic and a drug addict, and addicted to porn all before age 21. Even after all this he made it to the top of Wall Street and was a multi millionaire by 25. Even with this and a beautiful popular girlfriend he was still miserable. Fortunately he finally realized that money would not make him happy. I feel like I have heard this before, but it is true. He finally left Wall Street, found his true love, and started a charity organization. Even so I don't think this will ever be made into a Disney movie. Overall an interesting book, but not a happy beach read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Linda

    Could not put it down! Up all night reading, teared up a few times. This is a story of self-growth and redemption by a painfully honest man. He overcame childhood traumas and multiple addictions with great effort, and finally discovered his true self. Excellent writer with vivid imagery, very informative and interesting.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Margie Dewind

    This book kept my attention but I'm bothered that the author exposed his family members' dirty laundry and that he seems to think that "seeing the light" when he was 30 excused his extreme jerkiness up until that point in his life.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Deidre

    An interesting look at the hedge fund world from an outsider perspective. While this was less of an analysis of the industry itself and more of a personal memoir of someone who doesn't fit the typical trader perspective, it's unflinching honest and heart made it a compelling read. The book was a little unevenly paced spending more time on the author's childhood than his years in high finance but other books have already provided a window into that world. It's sad to be that so often ambition see An interesting look at the hedge fund world from an outsider perspective. While this was less of an analysis of the industry itself and more of a personal memoir of someone who doesn't fit the typical trader perspective, it's unflinching honest and heart made it a compelling read. The book was a little unevenly paced spending more time on the author's childhood than his years in high finance but other books have already provided a window into that world. It's sad to be that so often ambition seems to be a binary choice, either devote every last bit of yourself to a job and never think of yourself or drop out completely and strike out on your own. I'm hopeful that as our culture continues to evolve, we will find more workplaces that embrace a balanced ideal. Those workplaces however, will likely not be in finance. Given the trends in automated trading it will be interesting to see what the future holds for finance and those who have empathy and emotion might actually be better placed for a world in which computers have a greater role.

  6. 4 out of 5

    Nic Keep

    Great memoir, from a guy who left Millions to become a social entrepreneur.

  7. 5 out of 5

    Rachita

    "From Wall Street trader to social entrepreneur, sinner to saint" Sam Polk in this fascinating memoir of his, writes about all the ups and downs, achievements, losses, disappointments, mistakes, and the lessons he learned through them in 30 years of his life. From this book we can learn how what we experience as a child can affect us so much as an adult. He spent most of his life trying to make his dad trust him and be proud of him, but after failing each and every time, he realized it was him wh "From Wall Street trader to social entrepreneur, sinner to saint" Sam Polk in this fascinating memoir of his, writes about all the ups and downs, achievements, losses, disappointments, mistakes, and the lessons he learned through them in 30 years of his life. From this book we can learn how what we experience as a child can affect us so much as an adult. He spent most of his life trying to make his dad trust him and be proud of him, but after failing each and every time, he realized it was him who was not enough. So, to fill the empty void that was inside him, he turned to money, food and drugs. Nothing seemed to work; the more he earned, the more greed he felt. In the end, he understood, the problem wasn't him, so he let his dad and his ego go. Of course there is no happy ending, but he finally got to do all the things he had wanted to do, he finally didn't have to wake up every morning through alarm and do the things he didn't enjoy doing. This book is great in so many ways. He was emotionally affected by his rough childhood which led him to do some things he isn't proud of. I admire how he admitted all of the "not so good" things that he did. It isn't easy to take the blame for the mistakes you make. I am glad he found a father figure like Marshall to be there when his actual father wasn't. A couple of things he included that I liked: -"Earthquakes aren't scary because the ground shakes a lot; they're scary because the ground shakes at all." -"Poor families in America often live in food deserts; they might skip one meal but eat KFC at the next because that's all that's available, which is part of why the poorest Americans are the most obese."

  8. 4 out of 5

    Paul

    I borrowed this book (thankfully didn't pay for it) based on the reviews and my interest in finance. I hoped it would be along the lines of Michael Lewis' books, but instead it seems to be a rather boring autobiography. The first half of the book barely mentions finance as it takes you through the author's extremely depressing childhood (struggling with domestic violence, being an identical twin, not being the 'right' weight etc). If you like reading about the lives of individual traders and thei I borrowed this book (thankfully didn't pay for it) based on the reviews and my interest in finance. I hoped it would be along the lines of Michael Lewis' books, but instead it seems to be a rather boring autobiography. The first half of the book barely mentions finance as it takes you through the author's extremely depressing childhood (struggling with domestic violence, being an identical twin, not being the 'right' weight etc). If you like reading about the lives of individual traders and their entire backstory, then this might be a good book for you. If you want to read about trading, Wall Street, the financial markets etc. -even from the perspective of just one person - there are far better books out there.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Gail O'Connor

    I have always found that in all my reading there was at least one character that I could find redeeming. I couldn't find one in this book. This was fast reading, but I was filled with such disgust for Mr. Polk. Obviously, he never read memoirs such as Glass Castle or any number of books where people had such tragic lives. I know people that grew up in foster homes and had horrible experiences. "Woe is me" got quite boring. I just wanted to scream at him to "GROW UP!" I have no compassion for thi I have always found that in all my reading there was at least one character that I could find redeeming. I couldn't find one in this book. This was fast reading, but I was filled with such disgust for Mr. Polk. Obviously, he never read memoirs such as Glass Castle or any number of books where people had such tragic lives. I know people that grew up in foster homes and had horrible experiences. "Woe is me" got quite boring. I just wanted to scream at him to "GROW UP!" I have no compassion for this author at all.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Kelley Skeie

    Great Memoir I couldn't put it down. This book is so inspiring, and makes you think about what your greater purpose is.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Syuhada

    The story won’t be as boring as the title. At first, i wanted to read this book to get some information or valuable tips and tricks of the trading life, but it turns out to be an inspiring book. I like the flow of the story, from the moment he was a kid until he was a success man now. How he went through tough phases of life, loss at the peak of his success, it was overall a nice read.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Smiley938

    Interesting tale Polk has spun to feel better about his life. It seems like he changed his career, not because he genuinely had a change of heart, but because he had a tantrum after getting his $8 million dollar bonus rejected and couldn't back down without losing his pride. Despite Polk repeatedly saying he grew up with his family living paycheck to paycheck, he is flabbergasted when he finally sees real poverty. I could have guessed he was exaggerating when he mentioned growing up with a Guate Interesting tale Polk has spun to feel better about his life. It seems like he changed his career, not because he genuinely had a change of heart, but because he had a tantrum after getting his $8 million dollar bonus rejected and couldn't back down without losing his pride. Despite Polk repeatedly saying he grew up with his family living paycheck to paycheck, he is flabbergasted when he finally sees real poverty. I could have guessed he was exaggerating when he mentioned growing up with a Guatemalan nanny and summer camp excursions. I imagine most of the positive reviews are from (1) existing rich ppl who think that reading this will somehow improve their own character without actually having to improve their character, and (2) people who are desperately jealous of Wall Street bros but know they never will be one so they want to feel good about the fact they'll never be one. For the rest of us, we shouldn't be so easily fooled. Someone who managed to become so successful so fast on Wall Street does not get there by being a good person, no matter how much he tries to convince himself he's "different." Definitely possible for ppl to change, but none of his memoir sounds genuine.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Niniane Wang

    Instead of giving book deals to another privileged white guy who felt entitled to make $8M per year, I would like to see books from other races, genders, etc. The storytelling is good. It paints a hero’s journey. But you get the sense that the narrative was sculpted by selecting facts to fit. E.g. Sam says he quit his job out of a principled stand against greed... but what happened was he asked for a larger bonus and was told no and given pressure to resign. He paints a story of how he had grown Instead of giving book deals to another privileged white guy who felt entitled to make $8M per year, I would like to see books from other races, genders, etc. The storytelling is good. It paints a hero’s journey. But you get the sense that the narrative was sculpted by selecting facts to fit. E.g. Sam says he quit his job out of a principled stand against greed... but what happened was he asked for a larger bonus and was told no and given pressure to resign. He paints a story of how he had grown so much as a person by that point but he starts out the book by saying how envious he was of his coworker Derek right before he quit his job. Also the book is 90% about his love for one woman for years and years, and then abruptly he fell out of love with no indication why. Was it really due to his maturation?

  14. 5 out of 5

    Ruby

    I thoroughly enjoyed this man's coming of age. I was half expecting the book to be really corny, but it wasn't. It was gritty and I ended up feeling quite a lot of respect for Sam by the end. Nice one, Sam. Hope you write more.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Ary Chest

    Entertaining, witty, and jam-packed with great stories. This memoir was more dramatic than most novels. Each story in his life tied in well with each other, making for an easy and intelligent read. A great look into the world of Wall Street and what it takes to make it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Janiffer Frazier

    Fluid reading…finished in 2 days

  17. 5 out of 5

    Fattah Fathun Karim

    Loved it. Sam Polk has a life that could be made into a movie and i bet it would be no less than a box-office hit, if directed by the right hands. Reading sam's memoir, i found it little ironical that it matched somewhat with the life of a fictional character bojack horseman that i've just started watching and currently on in season 2. The writer, like bojack, is a person who had a tough childhood with abusive parents who treated their children like shit. The hostile family environment shaped th Loved it. Sam Polk has a life that could be made into a movie and i bet it would be no less than a box-office hit, if directed by the right hands. Reading sam's memoir, i found it little ironical that it matched somewhat with the life of a fictional character bojack horseman that i've just started watching and currently on in season 2. The writer, like bojack, is a person who had a tough childhood with abusive parents who treated their children like shit. The hostile family environment shaped their attitudes and cravings to a lot which reflected as soon as they started to grow up. But nonetheless, it also taught them to become a fighter, to take up challenges when they knew that they had to earn their position in their family and in the society. Bojack was seen to become a narcissistic TV star who was highly self-oriented having zero regards for other people but himself. He craved love, affection and appreciation from others which he never found in his childhood. Same was for Sam Polk. He too wanted those, the lack of which used to make him suffer highly. Drinking and doing drugs was one of the many obstacles that had impeded both of their careers and relationships. Both had the taste of richness but couldn't think a better way to spend them, instead of spending them lavishly on things that didn't serve a purpose. The lack of purpose roots in their ultimate depression. But i got to know the ultimate fate of sam polk unlike what happened with bojack ( hadn't finished the seires yet ). I can't still believe that a ficitonal character that i like so much would have a real life counterpart. Reading sam's memoir one can easily come to a conclusion that the guy might be a douche, treating his fellowmen in this kind of manner, using them for his personal entertainment mostly. But reading the full would portray a different picture, a guy desperate to create his position of his own and leaving no stones unturned to achieve them. This is a phase where people become quite self-obsessed. He too was a mortal man. His position could clearly be justified considering the hostility he had to got through all through his life. A certain incident sets him back a thousands step and he crawls back to the front again. This shows how big a fighter he is. This vigour, the courage and the talent brought him success in wall street, made him into a millionaire. Soon he realised that the money didn't bring him happiness. He was done for the time. He needed a break from the artificial life of wall street which was covered with fake smiles, fake relations, mysogyny, anxieties and above all, a life without a satisfying purpose. He wanted to amend his old relationships and do something positive in life that would bring his purpose to create positive social impact into life. He later inveneted groceryships and everytable which he did completey out of his conscience to contribute to the society, help others ( not just yourself ) and feel good through them. Sam is a man of word, which i like about him the most. He has a superpower of controlling his impulses and follow his plans thoroughly. It takes high will power to leave drugs, alcohol , porn, addiction of any kind and focus on the important aspects of life, like work and relationships. This is what i like about him the most and would definitely like to be such productive. It feels so good that he could finally saw what a nagative impact his dad on him and his siblings, and gradually detoxified himself from his father's negative influences while reuniting with his mom and his siblings, caring for their future and enjoying family times together , in absence of their abusive dad. Parents are indeed a crucial factor for their child's future. That's why he says, he will now focus on being the perfect dad he never had but seeked in other people like his mentor and friend Marshsall. He vows to raise his kids the perfect way so that they pass on the positive influence on their next generations.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Bridgid

    A fascinating read A few of my favorite insights: P172 Talking to his therapist, Linda, “Fantasies come from a wound. If you feel powerless, you’ll create a fantasy where you have absolute power. What you really need is not to achieve the fantasy, but to heal the wound.” P212 He discusses his porn addiction, how he came to realize it influenced his view of and treatment of women; parents, talk to your kids about sex!!!! P215 “Porn wasn’t just teaching me how to treat some women; it was teaching me A fascinating read A few of my favorite insights: P172 Talking to his therapist, Linda, “Fantasies come from a wound. If you feel powerless, you’ll create a fantasy where you have absolute power. What you really need is not to achieve the fantasy, but to heal the wound.” P212 He discusses his porn addiction, how he came to realize it influenced his view of and treatment of women; parents, talk to your kids about sex!!!! P215 “Porn wasn’t just teaching me how to treat some women; it was teaching me how to treat all women. That’s when I realized that porn wasn’t about sex - it was about power. Porn was teaching me that women were there to be used by me, whenever I wanted. I had thought porn was about sex and arousal, but now I saw it was about denigration.” After the bailouts in 2008: “I empathized with the frustration of traders who’d been profitable that year. They’d made a ton of money for their firms. On the other hand, given that if the government hadn’t stepped in they’d be bankrupt, it seemed hard to justify a big bonus. But traders were furious. These were guys whose faces would turn purple talking about the sense of entitlement of union workers who demanded pension payments even when their employers were struggling. But it was when I heard guys who had lost money complaining about their bonuses that I started to see the truth about Wall Street. Wall Street wasn’t a talent based meritocracy - it was more like an addiction. Doing whatever you had to do - rationalizing, lying - to get the money to fill that empty hole inside.”

  19. 5 out of 5

    Patti

    The story of Sam Polk's upbringing amongst a dysfunctional family that results in destructive actions in his teens (anger, bulimia), college (drugs, alcohol), and as a quick rising star on Wall Street is an entertaining, quick read with insight into the lure of money, power, and prestige for our millennials. I respect the author for the difficult task of opening up to share his deepest feelings and the issues that have shaped his life. I understand his decision to leave the high powered greed of The story of Sam Polk's upbringing amongst a dysfunctional family that results in destructive actions in his teens (anger, bulimia), college (drugs, alcohol), and as a quick rising star on Wall Street is an entertaining, quick read with insight into the lure of money, power, and prestige for our millennials. I respect the author for the difficult task of opening up to share his deepest feelings and the issues that have shaped his life. I understand his decision to leave the high powered greed of Wall Street. However, throughout the book, I was aware that he presents only his side of the story and his side is quite narcisstic in the fact that he seems to want his world to spin according to his wishes and desires. An example would be that he thinks his father should have compensated his mother more when they divorced since he later becomes a millionaire. While it is clear he has great anger toward his father, he really doesn't know the relationship between his parents and it is not for him to question the court's decisions about the splitting of assets. Who knew his father would LATER (and after a second marriage) become a millionaire? Another example is his "holier than thou" realization that the greed of Wall Street is not for him. Well, that is easy to say once you have made your millions and can comfortably leave your job and "do good". We all reach a point in our lives when we question the validity of the road we have taken. We all have to make the decision to be moral and good. It is when we mature into caring, contributing members of society that we truly make a difference. I look forward to seeing what Sam Polk is able to do in the next 30 years. I hope to see another memoir that shows us what this second act looks like.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Tracy Stanley

    I found this book on my bookshelf recently while re-organizing and I have no idea where I got it (probably a library sale or a garage sale). I looked at the summary inside the book and I wasn't sure I would like it - about Wall Street traders and greed. But it was also about the startling realization this one man (Sam Polk) came to when he realized how sucked in he was - and no matter how much money he made, he needed more. And the interesting and powerful way money is just like other addictions I found this book on my bookshelf recently while re-organizing and I have no idea where I got it (probably a library sale or a garage sale). I looked at the summary inside the book and I wasn't sure I would like it - about Wall Street traders and greed. But it was also about the startling realization this one man (Sam Polk) came to when he realized how sucked in he was - and no matter how much money he made, he needed more. And the interesting and powerful way money is just like other addictions and the family history that led him to this addiction. It was a very different book from my recent reads but I really did enjoy it. What I didn't like about the book was the technical jargon about trading stocks/bonds, etc. Although I learned things about that world that I didn't know. I also worked for Bank of America at the same time Sam Polk did, so that was sortof interesting to think of what was going on while I was sitting at my little cubicle in Albany.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Agustya Matheth

    It's a pretty intimate book, describing what shaped Polk's journey into the heart of Wall Street. He describes what he calls a "wealth addiction" and how it afflicts many of those at the center of the markets that control people's lives around the world. Polk reveals how pulling a 9 million dollar bonus wasn't enough for him (actually angering him), and how a vast majority of traders felt they were underpaid. The book serves as a reminder that there are pursuits more fulfilling than the accumula It's a pretty intimate book, describing what shaped Polk's journey into the heart of Wall Street. He describes what he calls a "wealth addiction" and how it afflicts many of those at the center of the markets that control people's lives around the world. Polk reveals how pulling a 9 million dollar bonus wasn't enough for him (actually angering him), and how a vast majority of traders felt they were underpaid. The book serves as a reminder that there are pursuits more fulfilling than the accumulation of material things.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Suzanne

    An easy to read book about how the author overcomes growing up in a dysfunctional family while operating in a high-profile, stressful occupation and also getting a handle on his relationships with women. I enjoyed learning about his life on Wall Street and the reasons he gave it all up. I was also amazed and happy that both he and his twin brother overcame alcoholism and/or addictions without the aid of AA.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Monical

    Short memoir from a reformed investment banker. The author reveals a lot of personal information as he acquires insight about his family and his life. Not for everyone, but I thought it was a good book.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Mike Haefeli

    I originally was interested in this book because I thought it would be similar to The Snowball ( A Warren Buffet biography). Sam Polk is no Warren Buffet. He is talented and blessed with great opportunities, but consistently his own worst enemy. From drugs and alcohol to struggling with sobriety, uninspiring relationships and wasting love, less than model family behaviors, to making more money than he knows what to do with and quitting that job to find happiness. Sam hits rock bottom many times I originally was interested in this book because I thought it would be similar to The Snowball ( A Warren Buffet biography). Sam Polk is no Warren Buffet. He is talented and blessed with great opportunities, but consistently his own worst enemy. From drugs and alcohol to struggling with sobriety, uninspiring relationships and wasting love, less than model family behaviors, to making more money than he knows what to do with and quitting that job to find happiness. Sam hits rock bottom many times before he finally lives up to his potential.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This memoir is very raw and almost impossible to put down. However, it was less about Wall Street than I initially thought it would be. The fact that he got sober before he started working in finance changed my perspective on what I though this book would be about.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Elizabeth

    I just couldn't get past all the fbombs on this one. He's a great writer and though I have a pretty high threshold for language, I finally had to set it down.

  27. 5 out of 5

    Hattie

    Read the whole memoir in a single day. This book is an absolute page turner. Polk leaves no facet of his life untouched, further drawing the reader in and forcing them to face their own realities.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Marissa Getts

    Amazing book. It's rare that you see an author be so candid about their weaknesses.

  29. 5 out of 5

    Valerie

    Reads like a piece of fiction

  30. 5 out of 5

    Huy Pham

    A brave and honest account of a Wall Street trader. A highly interesting read.

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.