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The world’s most famous travelling reporter heads for Russia. Accompanied by his dog Snowy, Tintin leaves Brussels to go undercover in Soviet Russia. His attempts to research his story are put to the test by the Bolsheviks and Moscow’s secret police . . . Join the most iconic character in comics as he embarks on an extraordinary adventure spanning historical and politica The world’s most famous travelling reporter heads for Russia. Accompanied by his dog Snowy, Tintin leaves Brussels to go undercover in Soviet Russia. His attempts to research his story are put to the test by the Bolsheviks and Moscow’s secret police . . . Join the most iconic character in comics as he embarks on an extraordinary adventure spanning historical and political events, and thrilling mysteries. Still selling over 100,000 copies every year in the UK and having been adapted for the silver screen by Steven Spielberg and Peter Jackson. The Adventures of Tintin continue to charm more than 80 years after they first found their way into publication. Since then an estimated 230 million copies have been sold, proving that comic books have the same power to entertain children and adults in the 21st century as they did in the early 20th. Tintin in the Land of the Soviets remains the only adventure not to have had its artwork coloured. Georges Prosper Remi, known by the pen name Hergé was a Belgian cartoonist. He is best known for creating The Adventures of Tintin, the series of comic albums which are considered one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. He was also responsible for two other well-known series, Quick & Flupke (1930–40) and Jo, Zette and Jocko (1936–57). His works were executed in his distinct ligne claire drawing style. Hergé created The Adventures of Tintin in 1929 at the advice of its editor Norbert Wallez. Revolving around the actions of boy reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, the series' early installments – Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, Tintin in the Congo, and Tintin in America – were designed for children. Hergé - creator of the characters Tintin, Captain Haddock and Professor Calculus - was an extremely successful author. Sales of Tintin books had surpassed 10 million copies worldwide. On 27 June 1962, for the occasion of Canada-Belgium week, Radio-Canada broadcast an interview with Hergé conducted by Judith Jasmin, recorded in the garden of the cartoonist's house in Céroux-Mousty. The interview shows Hergé discussing the beginning of his artistic career, Tintin's popularity with children and comic strip translations...


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The world’s most famous travelling reporter heads for Russia. Accompanied by his dog Snowy, Tintin leaves Brussels to go undercover in Soviet Russia. His attempts to research his story are put to the test by the Bolsheviks and Moscow’s secret police . . . Join the most iconic character in comics as he embarks on an extraordinary adventure spanning historical and politica The world’s most famous travelling reporter heads for Russia. Accompanied by his dog Snowy, Tintin leaves Brussels to go undercover in Soviet Russia. His attempts to research his story are put to the test by the Bolsheviks and Moscow’s secret police . . . Join the most iconic character in comics as he embarks on an extraordinary adventure spanning historical and political events, and thrilling mysteries. Still selling over 100,000 copies every year in the UK and having been adapted for the silver screen by Steven Spielberg and Peter Jackson. The Adventures of Tintin continue to charm more than 80 years after they first found their way into publication. Since then an estimated 230 million copies have been sold, proving that comic books have the same power to entertain children and adults in the 21st century as they did in the early 20th. Tintin in the Land of the Soviets remains the only adventure not to have had its artwork coloured. Georges Prosper Remi, known by the pen name Hergé was a Belgian cartoonist. He is best known for creating The Adventures of Tintin, the series of comic albums which are considered one of the most popular European comics of the 20th century. He was also responsible for two other well-known series, Quick & Flupke (1930–40) and Jo, Zette and Jocko (1936–57). His works were executed in his distinct ligne claire drawing style. Hergé created The Adventures of Tintin in 1929 at the advice of its editor Norbert Wallez. Revolving around the actions of boy reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, the series' early installments – Tintin in the Land of the Soviets, Tintin in the Congo, and Tintin in America – were designed for children. Hergé - creator of the characters Tintin, Captain Haddock and Professor Calculus - was an extremely successful author. Sales of Tintin books had surpassed 10 million copies worldwide. On 27 June 1962, for the occasion of Canada-Belgium week, Radio-Canada broadcast an interview with Hergé conducted by Judith Jasmin, recorded in the garden of the cartoonist's house in Céroux-Mousty. The interview shows Hergé discussing the beginning of his artistic career, Tintin's popularity with children and comic strip translations...

30 review for The Adventures of Tintin: "Tintin in the Land of the Soviets".: Original Tintin comic book in Black and White

  1. 5 out of 5

    Ahmad Sharabiani

    Tintin au pays des Soviets = Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Tintin, #1), Hergé Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (French: Tintin au pays des Soviets) is the first volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who are sent to the Soviet Union to report on the policies of Joseph Stalin's Bolshevik government. Tintin's intent to expose the regime's secrets prompts agents from the Soviet secre Tintin au pays des Soviets = Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (Tintin, #1), Hergé Tintin in the Land of the Soviets (French: Tintin au pays des Soviets) is the first volume of The Adventures of Tintin, the comics series by Belgian cartoonist Hergé. The story tells of young Belgian reporter Tintin and his dog Snowy, who are sent to the Soviet Union to report on the policies of Joseph Stalin's Bolshevik government. Tintin's intent to expose the regime's secrets prompts agents from the Soviet secret police, the OGPU, to hunt him down with the intent to kill. Hergé continued The Adventures of Tintin with Tintin in the Congo, and the series became a defining part of the Franco-Belgian comics tradition. تاریخ نخستین خوانش: دهم ماه آوریل سال 2005 میلادی عنوان: فرار از شوروی از ماجراهای تن تن خبرنگار جوان و میلو جلد نخست #1؛ نویسنده: هرژه؛ تهران، نشر رایحه اندیشه، چاپ سوم 1383؛ در 64 ص؛ شابک: 9647706154؛ موضوع: داستانهای فکاهی مصور؛ قرن 20 م هرژه در این ماجرای تن‌تن در سرزمین شوراها، با نگاهی انتقادی به اتحاد جماهیر شوروی، ادعای کمونیستها را مبنی بر جهش اقتصادی شوروی به سخره میگیرد. ا. شربیانی

  2. 4 out of 5

    Dirk Grobbelaar

    Despite suffering from a lack of any cohesive plot, poor art (compared to later entries) and political naiveté, Tintin in the land of the Soviets is still a worthwhile read for Tintin completists. Even so, it’s not a book I would ever recommend to first time Tintin readers. It is worlds away from the genius of later entries. I would suggest reading it along with a companion work like Tintin: Herge and His Creation, which explains the troubled publication history and the influences prevalent in t Despite suffering from a lack of any cohesive plot, poor art (compared to later entries) and political naiveté, Tintin in the land of the Soviets is still a worthwhile read for Tintin completists. Even so, it’s not a book I would ever recommend to first time Tintin readers. It is worlds away from the genius of later entries. I would suggest reading it along with a companion work like Tintin: Herge and His Creation, which explains the troubled publication history and the influences prevalent in the author’s life at the time. What we have here is a young artist only discovering his craft, and with no clear direction in which to steer it yet. There are some bright moments that foreshadow the great things ahead, and the hokey situation comedy even makes for one or two smiles, even though it is clearly more suited to a Roadrunner cartoon than a Tintin story. I love the Tintin books, but I can hardly give this more than three stars, since that would diminish the significance of the true five star entries.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Poonam

    3.5 stars Originally written in French, I read the English version. I have seen the movie and heard a lot about the comics but never read one. And I think if you haven't read Tintin, this book is a perfect way to start, it being an introduction to Tintin, his dog snowy and their adventure!! Being the first book in the series I was lucky enough to get the beautiful colored edition which added to the pleasure of reading this. One thing hit me squarely after finishing this is how it portrays communism 3.5 stars Originally written in French, I read the English version. I have seen the movie and heard a lot about the comics but never read one. And I think if you haven't read Tintin, this book is a perfect way to start, it being an introduction to Tintin, his dog snowy and their adventure!! Being the first book in the series I was lucky enough to get the beautiful colored edition which added to the pleasure of reading this. One thing hit me squarely after finishing this is how it portrays communism as an evil force and Russians as the balant villains. Well, this was first published in 1930, right around when Russian revolution had taken place and formation of Soviet of Russia was on it's initial stages. So maybe this is a general idea of what people around the world felt of what is happening in Russia. This part has to be read with a grain of salt. What I most enjoyed in this book was the thoughts of Snowy and the conversations that Tintin has with Snowy. For me snowy was the most fun to read and I actually had some laugh out loud moments on reading Snowy's thoughts.

  4. 4 out of 5

    J.G. Keely

    It can be an odd experience to look at the early work of an author (and artist) who later proves to be innovative and masterful. The work here is sou rough, the plotting so silly, and the characters unrecognizable to fans of the later series. But then, no artist emerges into the world fully formed, and even Moebius had his awkward stage. In this fisrt story, Tintin himself is less the clever, charming figure of the later books. Much like Mickey Mouse in Steamboat Willie, the character starts off It can be an odd experience to look at the early work of an author (and artist) who later proves to be innovative and masterful. The work here is sou rough, the plotting so silly, and the characters unrecognizable to fans of the later series. But then, no artist emerges into the world fully formed, and even Moebius had his awkward stage. In this fisrt story, Tintin himself is less the clever, charming figure of the later books. Much like Mickey Mouse in Steamboat Willie, the character starts off as an unpleasant prankster eager to fight anyone he meets. The story, itself is very goofy and cartoony, full of pratfalls, one-liners, fights, and spectacular crashes. Guns and bombs are not frightening things, but tools of slapstick. The book also has none of the painstaking research which marked Herge's later work. His depiction of Russia is simple propaganda with the Soviets as overblown villains. There is no attempt to look at any real cultural differences. However, there are some glimmers of possibility here. The clean lines and motive sense of gesture is present, and the influence of American cartoonists like McCay and McManus are very clear. But anyone looking for a genuine Tintin story is not going to get one, here. The only reason to read this volume is for completeness' sake, for those who are curious to see the sketchy, awkward beginnings of a series that became a worldwide phenomenon. My Suggested Reading In Comics

  5. 4 out of 5

    Nandakishore Varma

    OMG! I never knew Tintin was such a right-wing fanatic! No wonder this book was never published in India!

  6. 4 out of 5

    Luís

    The reference for any tintinophile is an adventure in the land of the Soviets! We find there not only the first journalistic adventures of Tintin and his four-legged companion, Snowy but besides, all the ingredients of the hero's future adventures are already found here: the hero's inscription in his time and in the face of the contradictions of his time, endless stunts, misunderstandings, "evil villains" ... Here we are touching the essence of Tintin's character. Consequently, the whole is obvio The reference for any tintinophile is an adventure in the land of the Soviets! We find there not only the first journalistic adventures of Tintin and his four-legged companion, Snowy but besides, all the ingredients of the hero's future adventures are already found here: the hero's inscription in his time and in the face of the contradictions of his time, endless stunts, misunderstandings, "evil villains" ... Here we are touching the essence of Tintin's character. Consequently, the whole is obviously longer than any other album in the series, but impossible to get bored, so much over the pages the actions are linked via situations that can be found with pleasure in many of the volumes. Following. Personally, this old-fashioned Tintin, I want more! Of course, the still rough drawing and the choice to keep the black and white may put off some, but, for me, this drives, on the contrary, the desire to discover again and again the origins of the character of Tintin. A book to collect!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Deborah

    I was thrilled to discover this illustrated book at the Internet Archive. While I grew up reading Tintin (and the Asterix and Obelix series), I never could find this first adventure of Tintin that was originally published in 1929 to 1930. Tintin and Snowy are more crudely drawn in this anti-communist satire. Although ridiculous with all that transpires in the Soviet Union and rife with errors, Herge's trademark humor still lives on in the boy reporter and his faithful dog companion. While travel I was thrilled to discover this illustrated book at the Internet Archive. While I grew up reading Tintin (and the Asterix and Obelix series), I never could find this first adventure of Tintin that was originally published in 1929 to 1930. Tintin and Snowy are more crudely drawn in this anti-communist satire. Although ridiculous with all that transpires in the Soviet Union and rife with errors, Herge's trademark humor still lives on in the boy reporter and his faithful dog companion. While traveling to the Moscow to report on its conditions, Tintin's train is blown up. He is pursued by OGPU agents, is continually arrested and escaping, and infiltrates the Red Army while being exposed to Soviet propaganda and hardships. I gave it 4 stars, because of how strongly and fondly my childhood memories were revived and for making me laugh out loud.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Jon Nakapalau

    Written in 1929 this Tintin adventure gives us a glimpse into the recent Bolshevik revolution in Russia. As such it is a very important document that will be enjoyed by those who are interested in the history of modern Russia.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jazzy Lemon

    The first of Hergé's Tintin books, and though it lacks the charm of the later ones, it's still a sweet read. The first of Hergé's Tintin books, and though it lacks the charm of the later ones, it's still a sweet read.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Piyangie

    The unforgettable Tintin and Snowy were created by Herge with the first adventure of the Tintin in Tintin in the Land of the Soviets. The creativeness of this comic series is quite admirable, as we have come to know. But this is the first in the series, so we have to excuse and overlook inherent flaws a first work may have. We know that the series produced some great stories later on and introduced many unforgettable characters. For a start, we have only Tintin and Snowy in this adventure, and t The unforgettable Tintin and Snowy were created by Herge with the first adventure of the Tintin in Tintin in the Land of the Soviets. The creativeness of this comic series is quite admirable, as we have come to know. But this is the first in the series, so we have to excuse and overlook inherent flaws a first work may have. We know that the series produced some great stories later on and introduced many unforgettable characters. For a start, we have only Tintin and Snowy in this adventure, and they are sent to Moscow to report on the Bolshevik government. The story colourfully portrays Tintin's adventures there and the mishaps and perils he faces. However, there is no proper plot; and the story is thematically naive. The adventures felt all over the place. It was more of an effort to comically mock the Bolshevik government. All in all, not a good one in the series, but it is alright for a first.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Surabhila

    A lookalike-cousin-prick masquerading in Russia as the real Tintin! Didn't know a so much loved character was so badly presented in its debut!...and that its launch was part of an ugly propaganda! Tintin in the Land of Soviets appeared first in the The Little Twentieth, a children's supplement of a conservative and fascist Belgium-based newspaper, The Twentieth Century, for which Herge (Georges Reni) worked as an illustrator. In the disguise of reporting current affairs to the young readers thro A lookalike-cousin-prick masquerading in Russia as the real Tintin! Didn't know a so much loved character was so badly presented in its debut!...and that its launch was part of an ugly propaganda! Tintin in the Land of Soviets appeared first in the The Little Twentieth, a children's supplement of a conservative and fascist Belgium-based newspaper, The Twentieth Century, for which Herge (Georges Reni) worked as an illustrator. In the disguise of reporting current affairs to the young readers through Tintin the reporter, the newspaper's editor, Norbert Wallez's main agenda was to propagate the anti-communist and right-oriented sentiments, which were strongly prevalent during 1930s in the Europe, among children. Also, here Herge simply regurgitated several parts in Joseph Douillet's Moscow Unmasked without much fact-checking, unlike his future works which were much acclaimed for the detailing and the amount of research.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kimia carstairs

    I'm 16 but still a child :)) I love this series I love Tintin and his smart dog.I love every single thing about this series I'm 16 but still a child :)) I love this series I love Tintin and his smart dog.I love every single thing about this series

  13. 5 out of 5

    Dr Rashmit Mishra

    Re - read this today and i gotta say i still like it , ofcourse having been first published during the 1930s the book has it's fair share of problem like the whole Soviet propaganda and being focussed more on a goofy take on adventures of tintin rather than the later days mystery / detective style . To be fair the Comic hasn't aged well at all and yet , there's something about Tintin that i really like ,the adventure of Tintin is especially fun as no matter how many tough corners Tintin found hi Re - read this today and i gotta say i still like it , ofcourse having been first published during the 1930s the book has it's fair share of problem like the whole Soviet propaganda and being focussed more on a goofy take on adventures of tintin rather than the later days mystery / detective style . To be fair the Comic hasn't aged well at all and yet , there's something about Tintin that i really like ,the adventure of Tintin is especially fun as no matter how many tough corners Tintin found himself in , the Duo of Tintin and Snowy always found a way out only to be trapped in another . Granted there's not much in terms of art and sure in this day and age this kind of story won't capture one's imagination but thinking the story to be one set in 30s and still finding it amusing is a Achievement well worth recognition , ergo 4 stars

  14. 4 out of 5

    Tristan

    I'm revisiting this classic series in Franco-Belgian comics. Among Belgians, Tintin is something of a national symbol, almost a source of pride. In a country this small and inconsequential on the world stage, one has to savour his nation's small victories, in whichever field they may transpire. Anyway, as a result, it hardly was possible to get away from the character in one's youth. Luckily, I was -and still am -rather fond of the series. Tintin in the Land of the Soviets , the first instalment I'm revisiting this classic series in Franco-Belgian comics. Among Belgians, Tintin is something of a national symbol, almost a source of pride. In a country this small and inconsequential on the world stage, one has to savour his nation's small victories, in whichever field they may transpire. Anyway, as a result, it hardly was possible to get away from the character in one's youth. Luckily, I was -and still am -rather fond of the series. Tintin in the Land of the Soviets , the first instalment, is very early, very - oh so very - rough Hergé. Apart from the look,Tintin bears little resemblance to how he is characterised in subsequent stories. He's more of a rascal here, even a bully. In essence, it's pure slapstick. It's also quite progagandistic in nature, as all the Russians are portrayed as villains and communism receives a fair bit of critique. I guess this is forgiveable, since little was known about the communist regime at that time (1930). Uncertainty breeds fear and hostility, after all. It doesn't dominate the narrative, though. It consistently remains very light, escapist fare. As an introduction to the splendour that is Tintin, I'd recommend looking elsewhere. It's amusing and informative to see the early germs of things, but the gold lies in what comes after this one. Skipping it will bring you no great shame.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maria Carmo

    This Tin-tin adventure is quite comic, albeit the exaggerated picture about the Soviets - like a caricature of sorts! In fact, I did not know this had been the first of the series, so I assumed it was Tin-tin in Congo - less fun... I loved reading this book and had a lot of fun with Tin-tin and Milu's fights and adventures... Maria Carmo, Lisbon, 2 January 2015. This Tin-tin adventure is quite comic, albeit the exaggerated picture about the Soviets - like a caricature of sorts! In fact, I did not know this had been the first of the series, so I assumed it was Tin-tin in Congo - less fun... I loved reading this book and had a lot of fun with Tin-tin and Milu's fights and adventures... Maria Carmo, Lisbon, 2 January 2015.

  16. 4 out of 5

    Ghazaal B.

    Ran into this completely by accident in a bilingual bookstore in Tehran. Pretty amazing piece. :)

  17. 5 out of 5

    Harry Whitewolf

    Unlike Asterix, which has been a lifelong obsession where I own every book and read them all again and again pretty regularly, Tintin has always played second-fiddle. I’m a fan, but I’m not obsessed. Seeing as I’m finally pulling myself out of poverty and I can find an extra tenner each month now, I thought it was about high time that I completed my reading of all the Tintin books, and read them in order. I own around seven Tintin books, so I’ve got a fair few to buy. And I read more than half o Unlike Asterix, which has been a lifelong obsession where I own every book and read them all again and again pretty regularly, Tintin has always played second-fiddle. I’m a fan, but I’m not obsessed. Seeing as I’m finally pulling myself out of poverty and I can find an extra tenner each month now, I thought it was about high time that I completed my reading of all the Tintin books, and read them in order. I own around seven Tintin books, so I’ve got a fair few to buy. And I read more than half of the series back as a kid. But now’s the time to approach the series properly. That means starting with the two books that weren’t in publication for some time. The two that appeared as newspaper comic strips before the book series came into being. The two that are, let’s face it, the worst. My review of Herge’s controversial second story Tintin in the Congo is to come, but let’s start with the first appearance of our beloved Belgian reporter and his trustworthy dog Snowy: Tintin in the Land of the Soviets. Seeing as this 1929 strip was initially published as a weekly series, I can somewhat excuse the lack of story. Tintin goes to the communist Soviet Union to uncover the lies it is telling the world about its politics, wealth, and conditions. When these elements come into the tale, they’re the best bits of the book. For instance, we see a propagandist Russian showing off the country’s industrial factories to some foreign communists, as they ooh and ahh at the progress that’s being made. They look at the factory with its smoke emitting from the chimneys and its loud clang of industrial tool sounds, while Tintin sneaks into the factory and discovers it’s nothing more than a bloke with a fire and some pots and pans. But these gem moments are far and few between. The rest is a mix of slapstick comedy and unrelated events that are pretty boring. And in some ways, this story was a piece of propaganda in itself. Herge had no experience of drawing when he began the Tintin strip. And as an illustrator myself, what I found most interesting about Tintin in the Land of the Soviets was seeing how Herge developed his style. The drawings in this book are pretty awful and resemble little of the look of the later strips. I know Herge was just starting out and he would have been working to tight deadlines, but honestly, looking at some of the pics and details or lack of details in these ugly black-and-white drawings made me say out loud, “What was he thinking?” But the more I read, the more I noticed how his style was gradually improving. After all, this strip was created over the space of about a year. By the end, Herge’s drawings of things like trains and cars is actually very good, even if the characters and the rest still need work. But how he made the leap from this book to the expert illustration techniques used in Tintin in America, within a couple of years, I just don’t know. If you’re a devoted fan of Tintin, this is a book you must read. And if you want to see how the Soviet Union was portrayed in the press in the 1920s, this book is a good starting point. But other than that, this Tintin is more like a Nitnit.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Martyn

    This was so horrible that I'm worried that my review will sound like the typical 'looking at the past through a modern lens' type of thing, which I can’t stand. I hope my reaction is not based in the clumsy political propaganda that the book exhibits, that is obviously one of the reasons for the book being written in the first place (it was commissioned for the purpose of distorting the negativity of life in Soviet Russia). Nor, I hope, is it based in the poor humor – I get that language, humor a This was so horrible that I'm worried that my review will sound like the typical 'looking at the past through a modern lens' type of thing, which I can’t stand. I hope my reaction is not based in the clumsy political propaganda that the book exhibits, that is obviously one of the reasons for the book being written in the first place (it was commissioned for the purpose of distorting the negativity of life in Soviet Russia). Nor, I hope, is it based in the poor humor – I get that language, humor and audience expectations were much different back then. I think that there are enough clunky moments in this book and things that should not have gotten past an editor in any age, that it is possible to criticize it for being a rush job and for being crap to the point of stupidity and not fall pray to simply misunderstanding the age that the book was written in. For one example (out of many) look to the scene early on where Tintin makes a car that will ride on train tracks out of a bunch of scrap metal that just happens to be waiting by the track, he’s a genius crows Snowy. Only he isn’t because later in the book Tintin takes a whole motor car apart only to find that the problem is a flat tire, Snowy points out ironically that “you’re not much of a mechanic Tintin” when he can't get the parts back into the car again. Wait a second here. I thought this was some weird early nineteen hundreds joke at first but no, not twenty pages later and Tintin is making a rotor blade for his crashed plane out of a tree that he’s cut down with a penknife – back to being a genius again! This sort of thing makes me quite distraught. After I read it I found out that Herge himself hated the first two Tintin stories and tried to have them written out of his personal history. He succeeded for a long time with this one, managing to prevent its printing for years. He also had no intention of using Tintin again, he never thought that the character would become so popular, and so he dashed this off without a second thought. These facts alone tell me that it's ok to dislike this book. It really has very little to do with the later Tintin stories (thankfully) and so can be treated as a weird first step for an author who didn’t know what fate had in store.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Battameez

    3.5 stars I know these books are quite colonial, racist and derogatory. But, these are the very first French comics I fell in love with as a teen, so it does have sentimental value. Going back to Tintin, I've realised quite disconcertingly that all I feel is annoyance for Tintin. I'm a forlorn mother, thinking, "No Tintin, you cannot blow up shit in another country and avoid prosecution" "No, that's not how gravity works" "What are you doing ramming full speed into a train HAVE YOU NO BRAINS, TH 3.5 stars I know these books are quite colonial, racist and derogatory. But, these are the very first French comics I fell in love with as a teen, so it does have sentimental value. Going back to Tintin, I've realised quite disconcertingly that all I feel is annoyance for Tintin. I'm a forlorn mother, thinking, "No Tintin, you cannot blow up shit in another country and avoid prosecution" "No, that's not how gravity works" "What are you doing ramming full speed into a train HAVE YOU NO BRAINS, THINK OF SNOWY/MILOU AT LEAST" "Calling people "savages" in their own country is just bad manners" "You're a piece of shit, at least Captain Braddock will show up in the next book". This book just has pure sentimental value for me, and a whole lot of nonsensical plothole funtimes.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Sara Bakhshi

    What did I just do with my time?:))) If it wasn't for the book club I wouldn't finish it. What did I just do with my time?:))) If it wasn't for the book club I wouldn't finish it.

  21. 5 out of 5

    M.

    Thank goodness Tintin improved from here! The fact that the artwork is far more rudimentary than the later works is easily forgiven. I actually enjoyed the much more classic Krazy Kat-esque traditional large panel, less detailed black and white work. What I couldn't forgive was the nonsensical procession of the story telling. The traditional world traveling adventure story is always heavily laden with perils which seem impossible to prevail upon, but this story doesn't even line up with itself log Thank goodness Tintin improved from here! The fact that the artwork is far more rudimentary than the later works is easily forgiven. I actually enjoyed the much more classic Krazy Kat-esque traditional large panel, less detailed black and white work. What I couldn't forgive was the nonsensical procession of the story telling. The traditional world traveling adventure story is always heavily laden with perils which seem impossible to prevail upon, but this story doesn't even line up with itself logically. Tintin is about to be murdered by a communist spy who has him chained up when a tiger jumped into the scene without warning. The spy faints, the tiger is scared away, and when the spy recovers consciousness he decides to leave Tintin to starve to death in isolation. I have no idea why any of these things would happen in this order, but such is the nature of this story. This book is also a very intentional expose on the failures of communism in the USSR between the World Wars. That doesn't take away from the story, but it is fascinating as a bit of a history lesson, both for the details included and as a piece of overt propaganda. Thankfully, Tintin grew toward coherent mysteries and adventures with more logical plotting and less random strokes of luck. Tintin still gets out of incredible scrapes in the most unlikely ways, but it doesn't happen in a way which distracts from the story. If this was how Tintin stayed, I probably wouldn't feel the desire to reread them.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Magnus Meling

    Tintin is a fucked up dude. He doesn´t give a shit. He just crashes vehicles, beats up public officials and fights a polar bear like it´s nothing. I don´t know if it´s badass or just being an asshole. I think he is kind of a dickhead in this comic strip. But the entertainment value here is crazy good. There are things happening on every page and I was never bored while reading it. There are some very outdated racist caricatures of Asians, russians and some very stereotypical germans, and I know Tintin is a fucked up dude. He doesn´t give a shit. He just crashes vehicles, beats up public officials and fights a polar bear like it´s nothing. I don´t know if it´s badass or just being an asshole. I think he is kind of a dickhead in this comic strip. But the entertainment value here is crazy good. There are things happening on every page and I was never bored while reading it. There are some very outdated racist caricatures of Asians, russians and some very stereotypical germans, and I know this is something Tintin has been criticized for many years. Still, it´s very cool to see Tintins origins, where he started and it will be interesting to read more where the series have gone.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Patrick Fisackerly

    Unlike the other Tintin books, this was written in daily (or possibly weekly?) installments and not as a "graphic novel" (for lack of a better term). And it reads that way - it's incredibly episodic and repetitive (how many times will Tintin dress up as the bad guys to fool them? A lot), but it's cute and there are glimpses of the kind of humor for which the series would later come to be known. Not a great book, but cute for what it is. Unlike the other Tintin books, this was written in daily (or possibly weekly?) installments and not as a "graphic novel" (for lack of a better term). And it reads that way - it's incredibly episodic and repetitive (how many times will Tintin dress up as the bad guys to fool them? A lot), but it's cute and there are glimpses of the kind of humor for which the series would later come to be known. Not a great book, but cute for what it is.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Tintin

    What a mess! My early work is so embarassing!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Lou

    All Tin-Tin's adventures are great fun. I read them all in my early teenage years and had such a great time with them. Fast and fun is exactly what they are. Love them! All Tin-Tin's adventures are great fun. I read them all in my early teenage years and had such a great time with them. Fast and fun is exactly what they are. Love them!

  26. 5 out of 5

    Namitha Varma

    An extremely silly book. I'm glad I didn't read this the first time I began Tintin, or I'd have considered the whole series silly. The amount of things that turn up at Tintin's convenience is just ridiculous - the diving suit, the pilot's uniform, the abandoned car... and one can never decide whether Tintin is a genius or a fool. One time he makes a motor vehicle out of abandoned parts, another time he dismantles a car and doesn't know how to fix it, and yet another time he's made a working prop An extremely silly book. I'm glad I didn't read this the first time I began Tintin, or I'd have considered the whole series silly. The amount of things that turn up at Tintin's convenience is just ridiculous - the diving suit, the pilot's uniform, the abandoned car... and one can never decide whether Tintin is a genius or a fool. One time he makes a motor vehicle out of abandoned parts, another time he dismantles a car and doesn't know how to fix it, and yet another time he's made a working propeller for a chopper after felling and carving a tree from scratch. Of course, the fact that whole thing is an anti-communist propaganda just adds to the silliness of this work.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Gina

    This very early Tintin is all black and white line drawings. The art is quite expressive and there is a lot of physical comedy. This is sort of the Three Stooges Tintin, I think. The story is even more ridiculous than in later Tintin adventures and while Tintin shows signs of the sanctimonious little guy he becomes later, he's actually a bit of a jerk. I think this is a must for any Tintin fan, if only for historical interest. This very early Tintin is all black and white line drawings. The art is quite expressive and there is a lot of physical comedy. This is sort of the Three Stooges Tintin, I think. The story is even more ridiculous than in later Tintin adventures and while Tintin shows signs of the sanctimonious little guy he becomes later, he's actually a bit of a jerk. I think this is a must for any Tintin fan, if only for historical interest.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Natalie

    I am a huge Tintin fan. I love the adventure, the humor, and of course, Snowy. This one was not my favorite. It had humor and I love the interplay between Tintin and Snowy, but I thought it ended abruptly. The story wasn't as well done as some of the later ones. This is the very first one in the series so that is probably why. Still, I was glad to read this. Tintin rocks! I am a huge Tintin fan. I love the adventure, the humor, and of course, Snowy. This one was not my favorite. It had humor and I love the interplay between Tintin and Snowy, but I thought it ended abruptly. The story wasn't as well done as some of the later ones. This is the very first one in the series so that is probably why. Still, I was glad to read this. Tintin rocks!

  29. 5 out of 5

    Pramod

    crude black and white cartoon from 1920s but nevertheless same fun

  30. 5 out of 5

    Saman

    I have always been a fan of Tintin, through other medias, but this is the first time I came into contact with the original work of Hergé. Tintin in the Land of the Soviets is clearly the first in the series, and it is notable how the characterization of Tintin in the beginning is so different compared to the persona that the world know of today. However, Tintin still has some of his charm, and it was really interesting to explore the beginning of the author's development of the epic adventures o I have always been a fan of Tintin, through other medias, but this is the first time I came into contact with the original work of Hergé. Tintin in the Land of the Soviets is clearly the first in the series, and it is notable how the characterization of Tintin in the beginning is so different compared to the persona that the world know of today. However, Tintin still has some of his charm, and it was really interesting to explore the beginning of the author's development of the epic adventures of Tintin and Snowy. This first installment is filled with a lot (!) of physical comedy, abrupt changes, several plot holes and propaganda. Worth mentioning that there is plenty missing to make this story special. It was both adept and witty, but many times also naive and insular. The artwork looks cool, especially in black and white, and I really look forward to further delve into Hergé's work of the adventures of Tintin.

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