web site hit counter Death Wears a Mask - Ebooks PDF Online
Hot Best Seller

Death Wears a Mask

Availability: Ready to download

The Mephistolean Mr. Harvey Tuke makes his second appearance in our Murder Revisited series, and an unusually rewarding encore it is. Mr. Tuke, who loathes the country, settles down to a long week-end in the hamlet of Steeple Mardyke with unconcealed boredom and distaste. His misgivings are confirmed at once when he is drafted into service as an umpire in a black-out drill The Mephistolean Mr. Harvey Tuke makes his second appearance in our Murder Revisited series, and an unusually rewarding encore it is. Mr. Tuke, who loathes the country, settles down to a long week-end in the hamlet of Steeple Mardyke with unconcealed boredom and distaste. His misgivings are confirmed at once when he is drafted into service as an umpire in a black-out drill. During the course of these patriotic and precautionary manoeuvers, Mr. Tuke finds that there is something far more distasteful than country life : i.e. country death. Murder methods vary widely, but Mr. Tuke was wrong in supposing himself familiar with them all. The bleeding and broken body of Norman Sleight, trampled to death by a herd of deliberately stampeded horses, signalized something new and particularly evil in his experience. This grisly prologue to a country weekend transforms Mr Tuke from an official observer to an observant official, and during the ensuing days he is at his satanic best, his razor-sharp mind and unerringly tactless tongue combining to speed the progress of his relentless investigation.


Compare

The Mephistolean Mr. Harvey Tuke makes his second appearance in our Murder Revisited series, and an unusually rewarding encore it is. Mr. Tuke, who loathes the country, settles down to a long week-end in the hamlet of Steeple Mardyke with unconcealed boredom and distaste. His misgivings are confirmed at once when he is drafted into service as an umpire in a black-out drill The Mephistolean Mr. Harvey Tuke makes his second appearance in our Murder Revisited series, and an unusually rewarding encore it is. Mr. Tuke, who loathes the country, settles down to a long week-end in the hamlet of Steeple Mardyke with unconcealed boredom and distaste. His misgivings are confirmed at once when he is drafted into service as an umpire in a black-out drill. During the course of these patriotic and precautionary manoeuvers, Mr. Tuke finds that there is something far more distasteful than country life : i.e. country death. Murder methods vary widely, but Mr. Tuke was wrong in supposing himself familiar with them all. The bleeding and broken body of Norman Sleight, trampled to death by a herd of deliberately stampeded horses, signalized something new and particularly evil in his experience. This grisly prologue to a country weekend transforms Mr Tuke from an official observer to an observant official, and during the ensuing days he is at his satanic best, his razor-sharp mind and unerringly tactless tongue combining to speed the progress of his relentless investigation.

6 review for Death Wears a Mask

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ann

    Harvey Tuke, lawyer in the Department of Public Prosecution, unwillingly participates in an air-raid preparedness exercise in the blackout, bullied into submission by his hostess in the sleepy village of Steeple Mardyke. But an actual casualty takes place : one of the gentry is trampled to death by a group of runaway horses that were intentionally frightened. A tragic accident? Perhaps not - there were various movements and voices heard during the pitch-black night that seem to indicate that per Harvey Tuke, lawyer in the Department of Public Prosecution, unwillingly participates in an air-raid preparedness exercise in the blackout, bullied into submission by his hostess in the sleepy village of Steeple Mardyke. But an actual casualty takes place : one of the gentry is trampled to death by a group of runaway horses that were intentionally frightened. A tragic accident? Perhaps not - there were various movements and voices heard during the pitch-black night that seem to indicate that perhaps someone had engineered things for just this outcome. So Harvey Tuke starts investigating everyone who was about on that fateful night, and soon realizes that this case may have its roots in the war of 1914. (Although there is no official mention of it, it appears that this book takes place in 1939 or thereabouts.) Using both his inborn intelligence and his contacts in the world of law enforcement and the upper crust of England, he manages to connect the dots. I enjoyed the mystery because Harvey Tuke is an interesting character. He is an urbane francophile with epicurian tastes, who can be quite impertinent when it suits him, and somehow gets away with it. His boss, the deceptively sleepy Sir Bruton, is a fun counterweight to Tuke's elegance.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Karen

  3. 5 out of 5

    James

  4. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

  5. 5 out of 5

    rêveur d'art

  6. 5 out of 5

    KJK

Add a review

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

Loading...
We use cookies to give you the best online experience. By using our website you agree to our use of cookies in accordance with our cookie policy.