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The groundbreaking series from Grant Morrison that led American comics in a wholly unexpected direction. Originally conceived in the 1960s by the visionary team of writer Arnold Drake and artist Bruno Premiani, the Doom Patrol was reborn a generation later through Grant Morrison’s singular imagination. Though they are super-powered beings, and though their foes are bent on The groundbreaking series from Grant Morrison that led American comics in a wholly unexpected direction. Originally conceived in the 1960s by the visionary team of writer Arnold Drake and artist Bruno Premiani, the Doom Patrol was reborn a generation later through Grant Morrison’s singular imagination. Though they are super-powered beings, and though their foes are bent on world domination, convention ends there. Shunned as freaks and outcasts, and tempered by loss and insanity, this band of misfits faces threats so mystifying in nature and so corrupted in motive that reality itself threatens to fall apart around them—but it’s still all in a day’s work for the Doom Patrol. Written by Grant Morrison and featuring art by Richard Case, John Nyberg, Doug Braithwaite, Scott Hanna and Carlos Garzón, Doom Patrol: Book One collects issues #19-34 and includes introductions by Morrison and editor Tom Peyer.


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The groundbreaking series from Grant Morrison that led American comics in a wholly unexpected direction. Originally conceived in the 1960s by the visionary team of writer Arnold Drake and artist Bruno Premiani, the Doom Patrol was reborn a generation later through Grant Morrison’s singular imagination. Though they are super-powered beings, and though their foes are bent on The groundbreaking series from Grant Morrison that led American comics in a wholly unexpected direction. Originally conceived in the 1960s by the visionary team of writer Arnold Drake and artist Bruno Premiani, the Doom Patrol was reborn a generation later through Grant Morrison’s singular imagination. Though they are super-powered beings, and though their foes are bent on world domination, convention ends there. Shunned as freaks and outcasts, and tempered by loss and insanity, this band of misfits faces threats so mystifying in nature and so corrupted in motive that reality itself threatens to fall apart around them—but it’s still all in a day’s work for the Doom Patrol. Written by Grant Morrison and featuring art by Richard Case, John Nyberg, Doug Braithwaite, Scott Hanna and Carlos Garzón, Doom Patrol: Book One collects issues #19-34 and includes introductions by Morrison and editor Tom Peyer.

30 review for Doom Patrol: Book One

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    In the forword, it asks the reader if they enjoy the bizarre, and if so, then this is the superhero comic that they've been waiting for. <--paraphrasing, not quoting It was in that moment that I knew this wasn't the superhero comic for me. And, honestly, I probably should have just shut it down and called it a day, at that point. I mean, Grant Morrison himself was basically warning me off of his own work. He didn't write this for the vanilla audience. <--I am so vanilla I come in a tiny bottle fo In the forword, it asks the reader if they enjoy the bizarre, and if so, then this is the superhero comic that they've been waiting for. <--paraphrasing, not quoting It was in that moment that I knew this wasn't the superhero comic for me. And, honestly, I probably should have just shut it down and called it a day, at that point. I mean, Grant Morrison himself was basically warning me off of his own work. He didn't write this for the vanilla audience. <--I am so vanilla I come in a tiny bottle found in the baking aisle. Morrison writes for the odd. And I mean that in the most complimentary way possible. I'm not (and probably never will be) in the eclectic group that gets this sort of thing. To me, it's gibberish with pictures. That doesn't mean I think this is stupid, but it does mean that I don't really enjoy it. I thought it was a cool concept to have this damaged, weird, disgruntled group of superheroes - whose powers were more curse than blessing. But after a few issues, the nonsensical, sing-songy, lunatic atmosphere of the whole thing started wearing on my nerves. I just... Well, I didn't want to pick it up anymore because I didn't want to have to make my tiny brain translate the Morrisonesque lunacy. Doom Partol, or at least this version of them, is written for a specific audience. And while I can appreciate it, it's just not my cuppa.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Robert

    As the parent of a 3 year old I feel uniquely qualified to review this book in this way at this moment in time. 🎵 DOOM PATROL! DOOM PATROL! We’ll be there on the double Whenever there’s a problem ‘Round the DCEU Caulder and his team of freaks Will come and bewilder you CLIFF! JANE! DOROTHY! STEVE REBIS! JOSH! RHEA! Yeah! They’re on the way! DOOM PATROL! DOOM PATROL! No threat’s too big, No curse is too small, DOOM PATROL, we’re on a roll So here we go, DOOM PATROL 🎶 (On a serious note, I’m so glad I didn’t As the parent of a 3 year old I feel uniquely qualified to review this book in this way at this moment in time. 🎵 DOOM PATROL! DOOM PATROL! We’ll be there on the double Whenever there’s a problem ‘Round the DCEU Caulder and his team of freaks Will come and bewilder you CLIFF! JANE! DOROTHY! STEVE REBIS! JOSH! RHEA! Yeah! They’re on the way! DOOM PATROL! DOOM PATROL! No threat’s too big, No curse is too small, DOOM PATROL, we’re on a roll So here we go, DOOM PATROL 🎶 (On a serious note, I’m so glad I didn’t encounter this until middle age, I was weird enough already back in the ‘80s. Had I read this I’d have likely strapped garden shears to my hands and run around town attempting to speak only in anagrams...)

  3. 5 out of 5

    Garrett

    What the hell did I just read? This is some of the most bizarre, weirdest comics I have ever read and that is saying a lot especially because I am not a stranger to Grant Morrison's works. I've read his run on Batman and some of his other Vertigo titles and mini-series he has written in the past, but this is just balls to the wall batshit flippin' crazy! Scissormen that can cut you out of reality, parallel dimensions and paradoxes, and people with some of the strangest super powers imaginable! t What the hell did I just read? This is some of the most bizarre, weirdest comics I have ever read and that is saying a lot especially because I am not a stranger to Grant Morrison's works. I've read his run on Batman and some of his other Vertigo titles and mini-series he has written in the past, but this is just balls to the wall batshit flippin' crazy! Scissormen that can cut you out of reality, parallel dimensions and paradoxes, and people with some of the strangest super powers imaginable! this book has all kinds of weird and psychedelic stuff. And it also happens to be some of the best drawn comics I have ever seen. It features art from Richard Case and a number of other artists and it's just wonderful to look at. it's like Dr. Strange meets the X-Men with bits of Neil Gaiman's Sandman thrown in there as well.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Chris Lemmerman

    A brain placed inside an unfeeling robotic body. A man forced to share his body with a creature from a negative dimension. A woman with split personalities, each with their own metahuman power. And a manipulative bastard in a wheelchair who guides them all. They are the Doom Patrol, and when the world gets strange, these strange heroes step up to keep us safe from things you can’t even imagine. Grant Morrison’s a nut. If you’ve read any of his stuff before, you know that’s true. But back before h A brain placed inside an unfeeling robotic body. A man forced to share his body with a creature from a negative dimension. A woman with split personalities, each with their own metahuman power. And a manipulative bastard in a wheelchair who guides them all. They are the Doom Patrol, and when the world gets strange, these strange heroes step up to keep us safe from things you can’t even imagine. Grant Morrison’s a nut. If you’ve read any of his stuff before, you know that’s true. But back before he was a household name, he took over a little book called Doom Patrol and wrote a run of comics that have gone down in history as some of the weirdest and most out-there books ever to be published. I’ve read some Grant Morrison, from the easily understood to the totally incomprehensible, so I thought I’d be prepared for this. Boy, was I wrong. Things start off fairly tame, with Crawling From The Wreckage, a four part story that has Morrison pick up the pieces of the previous writer’s run on the book as he assembles his team, introduces some new characters, and gets the ball rolling on the weirdness with the arrival of the Scissormen, creepy monsters from an imaginary reality that is trying to force itself into existence. God, the sentences that this book is making me write. This arc is a solid introduction, although it did remind me of Alan Moore’s Swamp Thing in that Morrison’s building on things from before that we’re not privy to; I don’t know a lot about Invasion!, but it seems kind of important here. Then we just dive right off the cliff of insanity as the Doom Patrol battle a being that could possibly be God, could possibly be Jack The Ripper, or both, or neither. It’s not exactly high concept stuff, but the vagueness and subtleties of Morrison’s writing makes you question literally everything you see in his comics – you can’t trust anything you read at all. The focus shifts to Joshua Clay and Dorothy Spinner for an issue then, as they cope with the disappearance of the Patrol and end up fighting Dorothy’s imaginary friends. This little one-and-done reminds us that the Doom Patrol are part of the same world as the Justice League, even indirectly, and that’s almost as worrying as if they were the only heroes on the planet – if these guys are saving us from threats like this, then would the Justice League even stand a chance? For those of you who have been reading Gerard Way’s Doom Patrol, you’ll be familiar with the villain of the next four issues – Mister Nobody and the Brotherhood of Dada attempt to destroy the world using a painting that eats people, only to run afoul of the Fifth Horseman of the Apocalypse. It doesn’t get any more surreal than this (he says, not having finished the run yet and fully prepared to eat his words). The Doom Patrol are almost incidental in this arc, and there’s a certain irony seeing two Justice Leagues standing around unable to do anything about the painting or even aware of the danger it poses. We then get a deep dive into Crazy Jane’s split psyche as Robotman attempts to bring her back to the land of the living with some very interesting imagery, before the Doom Patrol are swept up into a battle against the Cult Of The Unwritten Book to save all of existence from the Anti-God. This is where things get really weird (as if they weren’t already) with Morrison throwing out super odd concepts in nearly every panel and never explaining any of them. It reminds me of the old Milestone Xombi book; you just have to accept the weird and get on with it. Oh, and the final issue has Robotman’s body achieve sentience and then fight The Brain and Monsieur Mallah while Cliff’s brain sits in a jar on the side and talks to itself in one of the most absurdly wonderful single issue tales I’ve ever read. You just can’t make this stuff up (but Grant Morrison sure can). The majority of these issues are pencilled by Richard Case, in what seems like an 80s DC house-style. But honestly, that just makes things even more creepy. If you had weird panel arrangements or out-there art styles like Dave McKean or something on this kind of book, it might be a little less creepy – seeing the weirdness drawn as if it’s just an everyday occurrence heightens the impact considerably, despite what you might think. There are fill-in issues by Doug Braithwaite, but he’s nowhere near his current style at this point, so it’s easy to mistake him for Case if you’re not looking closely. I went into this volume thinking I’d get totally confused, but despite all of the insanity and strange concepts that Morrison chucks at the reader, it’s actually not that hard to follow what’s going on. Some of the nuances or the references that he’s drawing on to tell his story may have been lost, but that didn’t stop me from really enjoying all of this. The Doom Patrol and their adventures aren’t for the faint of heart, but if you like your stories completely balls to the wall insane, you’re in the right place.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lashaan Balasingam (Bookidote)

    You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. What happens when you let the legendary Grant Morrison loose on a series meant to have eccentric ideas within a superhero universe? You can find that out in Grant Morrison’s reboot of The Doom Patrol. With some of the weirdest heroes and villains in the superhero game, this comic book series has truly embraced its identity thanks to Grant Morrison’s vision for it as he reevaluated it throughout his comic book run and gave it a distinctive level You can find my review on my blog by clicking here. What happens when you let the legendary Grant Morrison loose on a series meant to have eccentric ideas within a superhero universe? You can find that out in Grant Morrison’s reboot of The Doom Patrol. With some of the weirdest heroes and villains in the superhero game, this comic book series has truly embraced its identity thanks to Grant Morrison’s vision for it as he reevaluated it throughout his comic book run and gave it a distinctive level of absurdity that is unprecedented in the genre. While these heroes are integrated within the DC Universe, their world alone is drenched in senseless madness that puts heroes like Robotman, Negative Man and Crazy Jane at the heart of all the action. Reality is intangible and throughout their adventures, you are constantly bombarded with psychedelic and illusional events that make you question your own sanity. This is an experience in its own that only someone like Grant Morrison could have devised. What is Doom Patrol (Book One) about? Collecting issues #19-34 that marks the debut of Grant Morrison’s reboot of this series originally created by the visionary team of writer Arnold Drake and artist Bruno Premiani back in the 1960s, the story follows a team of misfits who face threats that are beyond our wildest imagination while struggling with their own personal issues that shun them as freaks and outcasts. Known as the “World’s Strangest Heroes”, Grant Morrison looks to infuse these heroes with a singular dose of absurdity and get these heroes to earn their title without anyone being able to contest it. These first adventures thus introduce fans to the members of the Doom Patrol as well as some of the strangest villains bent on world domination who force our peculiar superpowered heroes into teaming up and trying to save the day. If there’s one thing that is obvious is that Grant Morrison must have felt amazing writing this series since this is undeniably his kind of creative territory. Stories like these are what allows him to flex his visionary muscles as every other writer out there lamentably look away in shame at their inability to turn heroes like the Doom Patrol into relevant characters. In the first issues of his run, Grant Morrison doesn’t shy away from exploring some of the most bizarre concepts as he plunges deep into dadaism and surrealism without caring one bit about the reader’s comprehension of the events unfolding. A lot of dialogues are impossible to decorticate and promote carelessness to the narrative as the attention is rather put in the development of chemistry between characters rather than the manifestation of events. In fact, it’s the internal and psychological struggles of these heroes that remain the focus of this story as their outlying characteristics are converted into special abilities that are used to combat evil and serve as their entry point into a band that ultimately helps them slowly discover a feeling of belonging within this world. If the narrative alone explores insanity in unimaginable ways, the artwork comes complement Grant Morrison’s vision with multiple artists who bring horrid and mystifying heroes villains to life only to further torment the readers’ understanding of this surreal universe. There isn’t a single moment that isn’t filled with crazy ideas that jump out of the pages of this comic book story as the colours greatly amplify the dream-like occurrences and add an unexplainable vividness to what can ultimately be considered nightmares. The artwork also does a wonderful job in capturing the tormented spirit of our heroes as they each live with defeat and try to compensate as best as they can in order to feel alive in the world. The Doom Patrol is indeed the lifeboat that allows them to find a purpose to their confused lives and hide it all within a superhero facade while they are not necessarily heroes. Doom Patrol (Book One) is a creatively surreal story that follows a band of misfits who strive to save the world despite their personal struggles tempered by loss and insanity. Yours truly, Lashaan | Blogger and Book Reviewer Official blog: https://bookidote.com/

  6. 5 out of 5

    Joshua Adam Bain

    A year or so ago I tried giving this run a go. I got 4 issues in and I had to put it down. Grant Morrison was just fucking with my head. All that mumbo jumbo just didn't connect with me and overall it was just a bit too weird for me to sink my teeth into. After loving the Doom Patrol show so much I thought I would try again. And hot diggidy dog did I enjoy it! What changed? Maybe it was reading Grants run on Animal Man that made me appreciate his out of the box thinking? Or maybe I just enjoyed A year or so ago I tried giving this run a go. I got 4 issues in and I had to put it down. Grant Morrison was just fucking with my head. All that mumbo jumbo just didn't connect with me and overall it was just a bit too weird for me to sink my teeth into. After loving the Doom Patrol show so much I thought I would try again. And hot diggidy dog did I enjoy it! What changed? Maybe it was reading Grants run on Animal Man that made me appreciate his out of the box thinking? Or maybe I just enjoyed seeing more of the characters from the show (which if your not watching, you need to check it out. Really really good, quirky greatness). The stories are bonkers, and the art by Richard Case is top notch. Overall if your into the weirder side of comics this is a no brainer!!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Nick D

    What a delightfully odd book. This is the first Grant Morrison book I've read with his patent lunacy that I've actually enjoyed. A bizarre cast of characters: Cliff Steele aka Robot Man, a full-body amputee whose brain survives in a robot body; Crazy Jane, a woman in countless personalities, each with their own superpower; Rebis, the Negative Man, a bandaged entity composed of a black woman and white man filled with the Negative Spirit; Joshua, a former member of the Doom Patrol that doesn't like What a delightfully odd book. This is the first Grant Morrison book I've read with his patent lunacy that I've actually enjoyed. A bizarre cast of characters: Cliff Steele aka Robot Man, a full-body amputee whose brain survives in a robot body; Crazy Jane, a woman in countless personalities, each with their own superpower; Rebis, the Negative Man, a bandaged entity composed of a black woman and white man filled with the Negative Spirit; Joshua, a former member of the Doom Patrol that doesn't like using his powers anymore and just acts as the team doctor; Dorothy Spinner, a young girl with the face of a monkey with serious telepathic abilities; and Professor Caulder, the man behind the Doom Patrol. Together, they face off against absurd threats: The Scissormen, dimensional beings that literally cut people out of reality; Red Jack, a dimensional being that sometimes enters our world to kill people (he was Jack the Ripper) and collect butterflies; the Brotherhood of Dada, composed of leader Mr. Nobody, who can sap the sanity from people; Sleepwalk, who has immense power but only when sleeping; Frenzy, an illiterate man who can become a cyclone; the Fog, who can turn into mist and absorb people, but the people remain able to think and speak when they become part of him so he goes crazy; and Quiz, a germaphobe that has every superpower you HAVEN'T thought of yet. The Brotherhood traps the city of Paris inside a painting. After them, a John Constantine stand-in named Willoughby Kipling recruits the Doom Patrol to save the world from a fanatical religious cult seeking to unleash the Anti-God.

  8. 5 out of 5

    RG

    This was typical Morrison with his weird wacky and crazy Doom Patrol run. Superheros with a wacky twist. Philosophy, comedy, action, literature/arts and more. If you want something covered this probably has it. Not straight forward and it wont make sense for a while, however it still made sense and was a good read. If you've never read a Doom Patrol novel before I'd recommend starting here. I unfortunately started a little later and it didnt make much sense. Here it does in a Morrison type of wa This was typical Morrison with his weird wacky and crazy Doom Patrol run. Superheros with a wacky twist. Philosophy, comedy, action, literature/arts and more. If you want something covered this probably has it. Not straight forward and it wont make sense for a while, however it still made sense and was a good read. If you've never read a Doom Patrol novel before I'd recommend starting here. I unfortunately started a little later and it didnt make much sense. Here it does in a Morrison type of way.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Jesús

    Grant Morrison is a writer who throws every idea he has at the same wall, hoping that something will stick. Usually something does, and in this book Morrison has more hits than misses. It’s clever, wry, and beautifully drawn.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Dave

    Weird. Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol was a surreal and acid fueled trip enhanced by the blocky and perfectly odd art by Richard Case featuring memorable villains like the scissorkmen, Red Jack, Mr. Nobody, and among my favorite the Pale Police who can only speak in anagrams. Long time villains the Brain and Mallah even make an appearance in the last story of the collection with the breakout star being Crazy Jane, who has not only multiple personalities, but super powers to go with each one. It Weird. Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol was a surreal and acid fueled trip enhanced by the blocky and perfectly odd art by Richard Case featuring memorable villains like the scissorkmen, Red Jack, Mr. Nobody, and among my favorite the Pale Police who can only speak in anagrams. Long time villains the Brain and Mallah even make an appearance in the last story of the collection with the breakout star being Crazy Jane, who has not only multiple personalities, but super powers to go with each one. It all brought back memories to me when issue #19 of the series hit the new comic racks and the book just skyrocketed from there with Morrison's perfect blending of the absurd and bizarre with this team of misfits. Wonderful stuff!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Dylan

    DNF @ 52% Really wanted to like this one, but while I enjoyed the first volume a fair bit, the second volume has been confusing to the point where it's unenjoyable. Add to that the fact that I only like a couple of the characters and I just don't see the point in carrying on with this one. DNF @ 52% Really wanted to like this one, but while I enjoyed the first volume a fair bit, the second volume has been confusing to the point where it's unenjoyable. Add to that the fact that I only like a couple of the characters and I just don't see the point in carrying on with this one.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Kathleen

    As villains, the Brotherhood of Dada putting Paris in a painting perfectly encapsulates the sort of surrealism that makes Doom Patrol so good. A classic, Bill Watterson-esque trip through different schools of art and levels of the painting as the Doom Patrol battles not only the Brotherhood but one of the four horsemen of the apocalypse. Meanwhile, Superman and the rest of the Justice League are left in the role of the depicted observers, looking at the painting. It's just plain fun. There are a As villains, the Brotherhood of Dada putting Paris in a painting perfectly encapsulates the sort of surrealism that makes Doom Patrol so good. A classic, Bill Watterson-esque trip through different schools of art and levels of the painting as the Doom Patrol battles not only the Brotherhood but one of the four horsemen of the apocalypse. Meanwhile, Superman and the rest of the Justice League are left in the role of the depicted observers, looking at the painting. It's just plain fun. There are a few stories in this collection that don't make the weird work quite as well. For instance, why would Robot Man's body be able to attain independent thought? It doesn't have an operating system independent of Cliff's brain. If it's incapable of thought, being just a body, it shouldn't be able to make advanced plans to explode the way it does. I get that the writers wanted to be rid of the new robot body and the possibilities it presented, but that short story was bizarre and not in a particularly well thought out way. I'm sure I'm not the first to notice. Still, I love the themes of stories coming to life, art consuming reality, and the thin lines between madness and sanity. Doom Patrol is a good read, and I highly recommend it for fans of the weird.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Joshua

    Love is lovelier the second time around and damn this book is somehow even better. Having read this once before I knew already the level of...oddity it possesses, also known as "Morrisonesque" because damn if he doesn't demonstrate his understanding of the arcane and marvelous. Doom Patrol is nothing like anything the reader is likely to experience, and that's by design. These characters experience mania and esoteric threats that are nothing like an average comic-book hero, and Marrison balances Love is lovelier the second time around and damn this book is somehow even better. Having read this once before I knew already the level of...oddity it possesses, also known as "Morrisonesque" because damn if he doesn't demonstrate his understanding of the arcane and marvelous. Doom Patrol is nothing like anything the reader is likely to experience, and that's by design. These characters experience mania and esoteric threats that are nothing like an average comic-book hero, and Marrison balances this oddity by giving the characters a depth and realness that keep the reader grounded. The stories in this first book are weird and strange and wonderful and they remind me that Doom Patrol is a book that I will pick up again and again because, no matter how many times I read the stories of Mr. Nobody, Crazy Jane, the scissor-men, or even of poor, resilient RobotMan Cliff Steele I know that I'm going to be entertained and find something to marvel at.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Cale

    I'd recently read 19-25 in a previous collection, so I just read the remaining after glancing through the first half. The first half I rated 3 stars, but this back half I'd give 5 stars, so the title gets averaged down. There is some amazing crazy stuff here. The first incarnation of the DaDa squad, and the Painting that ate Paris is just a machine gun of insane ideas in an entertaining story form (the cameo of JLA at their most befuddled is a nice touch). The exploration inside Crazy Jane's mind I'd recently read 19-25 in a previous collection, so I just read the remaining after glancing through the first half. The first half I rated 3 stars, but this back half I'd give 5 stars, so the title gets averaged down. There is some amazing crazy stuff here. The first incarnation of the DaDa squad, and the Painting that ate Paris is just a machine gun of insane ideas in an entertaining story form (the cameo of JLA at their most befuddled is a nice touch). The exploration inside Crazy Jane's mind is a fascinating story that deals with mental illness in an interesting way, and also touches on abuse in a manner that feels way ahead of its time. The Cult of the Unwritten Book is another fountain of insanity in story form, and Willoughby Kipling is John Constantine under another name basically. The stories are radically off-kilter, occasionally hilarious and always challenging in the best way. I can see why this is a milestone series and made Morrison's reputation.

  15. 5 out of 5

    Kevin Smythe

    This book makes me wish there were more words for "weird." Some of the weird of the book, I loved. Some of the weird was incomprehensible. The book finished with the perfect kind of weird. This book makes me wish there were more words for "weird." Some of the weird of the book, I loved. Some of the weird was incomprehensible. The book finished with the perfect kind of weird.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Kirk

    I picked up a few issues of the Morrison run at a thrift store a few years back, and for the life of me I don’t know why I didn’t seek out the full run earlier. Fast forward to a few weeks ago. I started cold-exposure therapy. I started digging into psychedelic philosophies I read in my late teens and early twenties. Who shows up in my YouTube feed but Grant Morrison. In the video he spoke about meeting aliens, chaos magic, and how his writing had become massive sigils, altering his reality. He I picked up a few issues of the Morrison run at a thrift store a few years back, and for the life of me I don’t know why I didn’t seek out the full run earlier. Fast forward to a few weeks ago. I started cold-exposure therapy. I started digging into psychedelic philosophies I read in my late teens and early twenties. Who shows up in my YouTube feed but Grant Morrison. In the video he spoke about meeting aliens, chaos magic, and how his writing had become massive sigils, altering his reality. He led me back to R Anton Wilson. Then earlier this week I found out kindle unlimited had merged with Comixology. Doom Patrol and The Invisibles are all free on there. So here I am. It is like all of the paths I half walked my entire life are merging so I can complete the journey. The first thing that struck me was the fact that in comics such as this (there’s also a great thought battle in Sandman, when Morpheus has to get his helm back) reason becomes force. I am amazed by how seamless Morrison’s transition into this new form of heroism is in virtually every issue. You can almost tell the comics are thought puzzles Morrison created for himself. He gets his heroes into these impossible messes, and then has to think them out of it. As a writer, I have to say it is one of the best exercises out there. Write yourself into a veritable corner, and then dig yourself out. The next thing that struck me were these new archetypes Morrison had developed (the anti-person, the super absurdists) We see these in other works from this time period as well, like Moore’s material. I have heard there is a bit of tension between these two authors due to similarities in their stories. I think these two are on a similar wavelength, a wavelength apart from most others. Like they are attuned to a different frequency than most and as such they pick up on similar “transmissions,” or something. Seems like the psychedelic philosophers operate on this frequency as well. I used to get bummed when I read Morrison and Moore’s work because I always found that they’d thought of good ideas years ago that I thought I had come up with. Now I like the challenge their works present me with. Human creativity and thought will be more and more likely to reach similar conclusions as more and more time goes by. So as artists we have to strive to think outside of the box. Morrison is a visionary. He thought way outside of the box. His ideas have influenced other artists, and today it is no surprise that folks who have read very little Morrison still come up with ideas reminiscent of his. I have read a little, but it is still a bit surreal to see so much of his influence in my work, especially when it is work I had not read until the last few days. I’m hoping it means I’m just starting to tap into the frequency that dude has been tuning into for the past 30 years or so.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo

    Grant Morrison can be very hit or miss for me, this was definitely a hit. A surealist take on the usually boring and predictable superhero genre. For all the times I've read that "so and so deconstructs the superhero genre" this is the one time where it is actually true. These guys are "super" because they have extraordinary powers, but these powers are what makes them incredibly flawed. It says a lot that the most relatable character is a robot with a transplanted brain. With its non-linear narrati Grant Morrison can be very hit or miss for me, this was definitely a hit. A surealist take on the usually boring and predictable superhero genre. For all the times I've read that "so and so deconstructs the superhero genre" this is the one time where it is actually true. These guys are "super" because they have extraordinary powers, but these powers are what makes them incredibly flawed. It says a lot that the most relatable character is a robot with a transplanted brain. With its non-linear narrative Morrison embraces the absurd and takes this eccentric team to places superhero comics usually don't go and this is a 30 year old series. I can't imagine what it would have been like reading this back in the day, pre-Vertigo. Anyone that likes surrealism, the absurd and clever comics needs to give this a chance. Even if like me, you're not the greates Grant Morrison fan.

  18. 4 out of 5

    B. Jay

    It was the late nineties when a coworkers lent me this collection of books and blew my mind. Morrison has a way of taking the hokiest of comic book tropes and merging them with literate metaphors. One is never sure how seriously to take the Doom Patrol, and this run of the book launches that confusion into higher planes of existence. I recommend Morrison’s entire run on DP, and if you hunger for more weirdness, check out The Invisibles, where he really kicks the surreal engine into high cosmic g It was the late nineties when a coworkers lent me this collection of books and blew my mind. Morrison has a way of taking the hokiest of comic book tropes and merging them with literate metaphors. One is never sure how seriously to take the Doom Patrol, and this run of the book launches that confusion into higher planes of existence. I recommend Morrison’s entire run on DP, and if you hunger for more weirdness, check out The Invisibles, where he really kicks the surreal engine into high cosmic gear.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Zachary Brown

    SPOILERS (only some tho) These comics are so phenomenally strange they rock the mind to its foundations. The art is dark in that superb late '80s style (i dunno art descriptions). I love this stuff I mean they fight a guy who thinks he's Jack the Ripper and God and at one point a painting eats Paris and only by the power of dada is the universe saved from the fifth horseman of the apocalypse who is powered by the history of artistic ideas. THE GOOFS, man. I rate this one lovely, absolutely lovely SPOILERS (only some tho) These comics are so phenomenally strange they rock the mind to its foundations. The art is dark in that superb late '80s style (i dunno art descriptions). I love this stuff I mean they fight a guy who thinks he's Jack the Ripper and God and at one point a painting eats Paris and only by the power of dada is the universe saved from the fifth horseman of the apocalypse who is powered by the history of artistic ideas. THE GOOFS, man. I rate this one lovely, absolutely lovely.

  20. 5 out of 5

    Jason

    I liked the zaniness but some of the continuity stuff and arc resolutions left me a little wanting. Maybe because it's a product of its time and doesn't hold up as well? Maybe it's Morrison's meta stylings? I liked the zaniness but some of the continuity stuff and arc resolutions left me a little wanting. Maybe because it's a product of its time and doesn't hold up as well? Maybe it's Morrison's meta stylings?

  21. 5 out of 5

    Snem

    I like a group of weird damaged superheroes. Very beautifully drawn. It gets stranger with every page. I really couldn’t tell you much with regards to plot, it’s so insane. I believe this is a tv series or movie, so perhaps give that a try. I recommend this if you like comics and graphic novels with odd superheroes.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Dan

    4.5 Weird, bizarre, and thoughtful in a good way.

  23. 4 out of 5

    Victor The Reader

    DC’s answer to the X-Men offers less action, but makes it up with an enormously quirky and mind boggling adventure with its mentally damaged group of supers. A- (91%/Excellent)

  24. 5 out of 5

    Jess

    Fantastic series. I can't wait to read the next books in the series. Fantastic series. I can't wait to read the next books in the series.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

    I’m still not sure if I’m a fan of Morrison. And this book is the perfect example. There were a couple of story arcs that were -incredible-, easily 5-stars. But there were just as many arcs that were just way too weird for my liking. That doesn’t make them bad, just not necessarily for me.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Michael

    The Doom Patrol slowed my pace, but they are weird and good, demonstrating how important fiction can be by transporting the reader to a strange reality where logic, as we know it, isn't primary. The Doom Patrol slowed my pace, but they are weird and good, demonstrating how important fiction can be by transporting the reader to a strange reality where logic, as we know it, isn't primary.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Timothy

    What a wild and crazy ride. The beginning's a bit slow what with it having to go through the motions of setting up the team, but given the unorthodox nature of the cast it's still interesting to get the rundown on each of them. Once the pieces are in motion though and the eccentric threats get set in motion, things get fun fast. I really loved both the Orqwith and Brotherhood of Dada storylines, both bizarre with unique and memorable villains. The other storylines in between are fun as well, and What a wild and crazy ride. The beginning's a bit slow what with it having to go through the motions of setting up the team, but given the unorthodox nature of the cast it's still interesting to get the rundown on each of them. Once the pieces are in motion though and the eccentric threats get set in motion, things get fun fast. I really loved both the Orqwith and Brotherhood of Dada storylines, both bizarre with unique and memorable villains. The other storylines in between are fun as well, and some of the later issues delving into the individual characters (i.e. the one focusing on Crazy Jane further into the book) do a great job of making the cast likable. Having read a fair bit of Grant Morrison's more recent work, it's interesting to see some of the seeds for his now-stock themes and ideas peaking through his work even back with this. It feels like one of the best fits for his work though: With this ragtag group of down-on-their-luck superheroes fighting weird threats to reality he's free to unleash all of his unorthodox writing - his obsession with other cultures, the occult, conspiracy theories, all that kind of stuff - while still having the boundary of telling a superhero team narrative. Some of his other works that don't have such boundaries go a bit off the rails while some of his more takes on established superheroes are quite fun in their outlandishness but may not necessarily fit quite right with the heroes. At any rate, I'll definitely keep reading the rest of his Doom Patrol run, because I loved this.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Alex Melnick

    Clever, odd adventures of a group of disturbed superheroes. I enjoyed it, but didn't feel it lived up to the hype, or maybe I didn't sufficiently appreciate how original it seemed 30 years ago. Two specific problems dropped my rating sharply: 1. The labelling of this as "Book One" is misleading. It's the start of Morrison's run on an existing title, and nearly all the characters have history. I had to spend a lot of time on the DC Wiki to make sense of things. A good introduction with a "Who's Who Clever, odd adventures of a group of disturbed superheroes. I enjoyed it, but didn't feel it lived up to the hype, or maybe I didn't sufficiently appreciate how original it seemed 30 years ago. Two specific problems dropped my rating sharply: 1. The labelling of this as "Book One" is misleading. It's the start of Morrison's run on an existing title, and nearly all the characters have history. I had to spend a lot of time on the DC Wiki to make sense of things. A good introduction with a "Who's Who" and a "Previously in..." would have made a huge difference. 2. Apparently, Morrison was denied permission to use John Constantine. Willoughby Kipling is such a poor imitation Constantine that virtually every panel he's in is painful.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jordan Peacock

    The 'Going Underground' issue is near-perfect. The 'Going Underground' issue is near-perfect.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Chad

    I read some of the Morrison/Case run of Doom Patrol back when it was new, and it fascinated me. It was around the time of the Shadow Cabinet storyline. I vividly (and maybe accurately) recall one of my all-time favorite bits of dialog from comics: Fortune Teller - You have a very long life line. It goes all the way around. Crazy Jane - That's a seam. I'm wearing gloves. That day, "Negative Man" (or, at that time, probably "Negative Hermaphrodite") became one of my all-time favorite superheroes. The I read some of the Morrison/Case run of Doom Patrol back when it was new, and it fascinated me. It was around the time of the Shadow Cabinet storyline. I vividly (and maybe accurately) recall one of my all-time favorite bits of dialog from comics: Fortune Teller - You have a very long life line. It goes all the way around. Crazy Jane - That's a seam. I'm wearing gloves. That day, "Negative Man" (or, at that time, probably "Negative Hermaphrodite") became one of my all-time favorite superheroes. The enigmas that spilled out of Negative Person's bandage-swaddled mouth were amazing, the casual manner of floating just above the ground instead of walking was great, and the whole sense of bizarre atmosphere that infused the story set my imagination a-tingle. I thought it was probably just a particularly weird plot arc, and sadly I did not get to read more than a few issues before losing track of it. Years later, I learned that kind of bizarreness was "normal" for Grant Morrison's Doom Patrol stories. A couple decades after that Shadow Cabinet story, I found out Doom Patrol got rebooted, so I started reading it. Different writer, different artist, different feel. It was nowhere near as intriguing as I remembered. I dropped it after a few issues. It did not really leave an impression. I finally got around to ordering the first collected volume of the Morrison/Case run (Case didn't illustrate all the Morrison issues, apparently, but at least most of them), and this time Doom Patrol did not disappoint. I'm pretty sure I never read any of the issues collected in this volume, but it's excellent. It ended on a hilarious note, left me with a smile on my face and an urge to write this review. I await the next volume on the edge of my seat; I'll order it shortly. If you're the kind of person who likes stories written to comfort the disturbed and (most importantly and dramatically) disturb the comfortable, get this book.

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