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RIP Jim Crow; Fighting Racism through Higher Education Policy, Curriculum, and Cultural Interventions

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Together we can build enough momentum to see Jim Crow lying silent and still in his grave. This book shouts out ways that we can and must respond to the sickening accumulation of racially inspired and systemically sanctioned deaths. Today, we remember the passing of young, Black Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. In responding to this event, we are determined to dismantl Together we can build enough momentum to see Jim Crow lying silent and still in his grave. This book shouts out ways that we can and must respond to the sickening accumulation of racially inspired and systemically sanctioned deaths. Today, we remember the passing of young, Black Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. In responding to this event, we are determined to dismantle the alexithymia (indifference to the suffering of others) that pervades our campuses. It is nothing less than a by-product of racism protected by the illusion of democracy. RIP Jim Crow contains three sections: (1) Antiracist Theory and Policy; (2) Antiracist Administration, Curriculum, and Pedagogy; and (3) Antiracist Cultural Interventions. Each of the 31 chapters contributes to the normalization of anti-racist policy within academic institutions, antiracist discourse within academic cultures, and institutional praxis that upholds speaking out against racist activity. The hope is that this book will also reduce racism in the broader world through academic relationships with community partners.


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Together we can build enough momentum to see Jim Crow lying silent and still in his grave. This book shouts out ways that we can and must respond to the sickening accumulation of racially inspired and systemically sanctioned deaths. Today, we remember the passing of young, Black Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. In responding to this event, we are determined to dismantl Together we can build enough momentum to see Jim Crow lying silent and still in his grave. This book shouts out ways that we can and must respond to the sickening accumulation of racially inspired and systemically sanctioned deaths. Today, we remember the passing of young, Black Michael Brown in Ferguson, Missouri. In responding to this event, we are determined to dismantle the alexithymia (indifference to the suffering of others) that pervades our campuses. It is nothing less than a by-product of racism protected by the illusion of democracy. RIP Jim Crow contains three sections: (1) Antiracist Theory and Policy; (2) Antiracist Administration, Curriculum, and Pedagogy; and (3) Antiracist Cultural Interventions. Each of the 31 chapters contributes to the normalization of anti-racist policy within academic institutions, antiracist discourse within academic cultures, and institutional praxis that upholds speaking out against racist activity. The hope is that this book will also reduce racism in the broader world through academic relationships with community partners.

11 review for RIP Jim Crow; Fighting Racism through Higher Education Policy, Curriculum, and Cultural Interventions

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nadine X

    Based on the title alone, one would expect this book to cover how educators can address and combat racism in higher education using three primary mechanisms – higher education policy, curriculum, and cultural interventions. Instead, this book focuses mostly on pedagogy and cultural interventions as told through a series of auto ethnographic essays that highlight experiences of marginalization, oppression, survival, and hope. Also included are a several case studies on pedagogical exercises and r Based on the title alone, one would expect this book to cover how educators can address and combat racism in higher education using three primary mechanisms – higher education policy, curriculum, and cultural interventions. Instead, this book focuses mostly on pedagogy and cultural interventions as told through a series of auto ethnographic essays that highlight experiences of marginalization, oppression, survival, and hope. Also included are a several case studies on pedagogical exercises and reflection that can be used and adapted by college educators. The majority of the book, however, is split between pedagogical approaches and cultural interventions that promote social justice, interrupt white supremacy, and address barriers to equity and inclusion. For college professors, this is a very practical resource of different types of critical pedagogy that can be tailored for different topics and students. Chapters such as Affolter’s “There’s a Black Kid in the Classroom and I Don’t Want to Piss Him Off” and Reilly’s “Bridges of Accessibility: Signature Pedagogies in Graduate Education”, provide pragmatic and we well considered lesson plans and guides for how to address particular cultural challenges and gaps that exist in many college classrooms. For those looking for actual evidence and rigor regarding pedagogical practice, the is considerable range in the amount of in-depth discussion and reflexivity given to those areas. Some chapters such as about design, implementation, and effect on learning. There are some chapters that cover that better than others, like Lisa Brown’s “Spiral Dynamic theory as an Instrument for Praxis” chapter or Martha Brown and Traci Baxley’s Transforming Whiteness in Teacher Education, but I would argue that regardless of the attention to rigor or impact, for a savvy and experimental critical educators, there’s a lot here to play with and test out. The last third of the book focuses on cultural interventions to disrupt racism. Here the book shines, vacillating between an extensive extant review of the literature on cultural bias and barriers embedded within higher education to actual strategies that educators can use in and outside of the classroom to disrupt and challenge privilege while supporting activism, self-care, and accountability. And there is much more, addressing intercultural programming, diversity training, and even how institutions view the data and “evidence” related to racism and marginalization. The leap from pedagogy to cultural intervention to methods and ontology may be a bit jarring for some readers, and at times I found myself wondering who exactly this book was written for- general college faculty? Multicultural administrators? teacher educators? It’s not always clear. But overall, what is very clear is that this book is meant to arm those who care about social justice and addressing racism in higher education with knowledge and strategies for practical use.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Mills College Library

    378.19829 R588 2016

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rolf

  4. 5 out of 5

    Brenda Shannon

  5. 4 out of 5

    Jenn Kelley

  6. 4 out of 5

    Sarah Gordon

  7. 5 out of 5

    Meg E. Evans

  8. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Franco Cipriani

  9. 5 out of 5

    Dee Em

  10. 4 out of 5

    Christopher Sibley

  11. 5 out of 5

    Erin Murrock

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