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The Vision wants to be human, and what's more human than family? So he heads back to the beginning, to the laboratory where Ultron created him and molded him into a weapon. The place where he first rebelled against his given destiny and imagined that he could be more -that he could be a man. There, he builds them. A wife, Virginia. Two teenage twins, Viv and Vin. They look The Vision wants to be human, and what's more human than family? So he heads back to the beginning, to the laboratory where Ultron created him and molded him into a weapon. The place where he first rebelled against his given destiny and imagined that he could be more -that he could be a man. There, he builds them. A wife, Virginia. Two teenage twins, Viv and Vin. They look like him. They have his powers. They share his grandest ambition (or is that obsession?) the unrelenting need to be ordinary. Behold the Visions! They’re the family next door, and they have the power to kill us all. What could possibly go wrong? Artificial hearts will be broken, bodies will not stay buried, the truth will not remain hidden, and the Vision will never be the same. Collecting: The Vision 1-6


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The Vision wants to be human, and what's more human than family? So he heads back to the beginning, to the laboratory where Ultron created him and molded him into a weapon. The place where he first rebelled against his given destiny and imagined that he could be more -that he could be a man. There, he builds them. A wife, Virginia. Two teenage twins, Viv and Vin. They look The Vision wants to be human, and what's more human than family? So he heads back to the beginning, to the laboratory where Ultron created him and molded him into a weapon. The place where he first rebelled against his given destiny and imagined that he could be more -that he could be a man. There, he builds them. A wife, Virginia. Two teenage twins, Viv and Vin. They look like him. They have his powers. They share his grandest ambition (or is that obsession?) the unrelenting need to be ordinary. Behold the Visions! They’re the family next door, and they have the power to kill us all. What could possibly go wrong? Artificial hearts will be broken, bodies will not stay buried, the truth will not remain hidden, and the Vision will never be the same. Collecting: The Vision 1-6

30 review for The Vision, Volume 1: Little Worse Than A Man

  1. 4 out of 5

    Anne

    Whoa. Nothing is creepier than the 'burbs. This seems to have fairly positive reviews, but there are those that thought this was pretty boring. And I can kinda understand where they're coming from. It's a slow moving story about androids. Sorry..synthezoids? Whatever. At any rate, I get why this might not be some people's cuppa. Also? Hype. Anything that gets too over-hyped tends to be a letdown to me. And this one has tons of rave reviews. So, there's that, as well. Lower your expectations. <--th Whoa. Nothing is creepier than the 'burbs. This seems to have fairly positive reviews, but there are those that thought this was pretty boring. And I can kinda understand where they're coming from. It's a slow moving story about androids. Sorry..synthezoids? Whatever. At any rate, I get why this might not be some people's cuppa. Also? Hype. Anything that gets too over-hyped tends to be a letdown to me. And this one has tons of rave reviews. So, there's that, as well. Lower your expectations. <--that's my motto! Ok, so what's this about? Well, it's certainly not a superhero story. So, if that's what you were hoping for, push that disappointment deep down in your psyche, and store it with all the other disillusionment that comes with adult life. What it is, is a slow-building horror story that sneaks up on you. Before the first issue ends, you know something is wrong. You also know this story isn't going to to have a happy ending. And you know it's going to be horrible when it does finally end. But you can't quite put your finger on how or why. Not right off the bat. To me, there was a very organic feel to the way the plot unfolded. One thing after another, after another, after another... Brrrr! To me, Little Worse Than a Man was great, and I can't wait to see where the story goes after this. However, if you're looking for a comic to introduce you to this character, I'd suggest you look elsewhere, because this Volume One is less origin story and more suburban horror story.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Jan Philipzig

    “I Have Said It. Therefore It Is Confirmed.” Whoa, that was fun! I mean, what a character, just listen to the guy: “To assert as truth that which has no meaning is the core mission of humanity.” Or: “Hmmm, yes, this is typical of most human endeavors. They change but they do not change.” Or: “The pursuit of a set purpose by logical means is the way of tyranny... The pursuit of an unobtainable purpose by absurd means is the way of freedom. This is my vision of the future. Of our future.” I hear ya “I Have Said It. Therefore It Is Confirmed.” Whoa, that was fun! I mean, what a character, just listen to the guy: “To assert as truth that which has no meaning is the core mission of humanity.” Or: “Hmmm, yes, this is typical of most human endeavors. They change but they do not change.” Or: “The pursuit of a set purpose by logical means is the way of tyranny... The pursuit of an unobtainable purpose by absurd means is the way of freedom. This is my vision of the future. Of our future.” I hear ya, Vision, I hear ya... Seriously, though, this is good stuff, the perfect vehicle for the character! I loved how accessible, well conceived and precisely executed everything was, loved the crisp pacing, the soap opera, the little cliffhangers, loved that there was hardly any fighting in the book. But I think at the end of the day what really won me over was how the story kept undermining its own tidy, well-adjusted, perfectly unsuspicious surface with a sardonic sense of humor and a chilling sense of doom. I don’t know, feels contemporary, I guess. Granted, the blackmailing father didn’t really work as a character (and there may have been a few more weak spots in the book’s second half), but what the hell—this was still a great read, my favorite new superhero title since... Aaron’s early Thor run, probably (not that I’ve read all that many since). The whole thing feels fresh and exciting (and inviting) enough for 4.5 stars... rounded up because, in the words of Vision: “I have said it. Therefore it is confirmed.”

  3. 4 out of 5

    Donovan

    Tom King’s Vision is literary sci-fi, dark and satirical, with sharp commentary on race and humanity, life and death, in a Marvel super hero comic. Extraordinary. "For a moment, as she listened to her family argue and laugh, Virginia felt content. She belonged here. They belonged here. Everything in the end would be good. This moment lasted 1.72 seconds." Tom King’s Vision is literary sci-fi, dark and satirical, with sharp commentary on race and humanity, life and death, in a Marvel super hero comic. Extraordinary. "For a moment, as she listened to her family argue and laugh, Virginia felt content. She belonged here. They belonged here. Everything in the end would be good. This moment lasted 1.72 seconds."

  4. 4 out of 5

    Dan Schwent

    The Vision builds himself a family and moves to the suburbs with them. Things are great until they aren't. After reading the first issue of The Vision via Marvel Unlimited, I knew I wanted to read the rest. Little Worse than a Man collects the first six issues. The Vision and his family experience prejudice from their human neighbors, Viv and Vin's classmates, and later, the cops. Virginia lies to the Vision once and it snowballs, sending their quiet suburban life out of control. I saw someone ref The Vision builds himself a family and moves to the suburbs with them. Things are great until they aren't. After reading the first issue of The Vision via Marvel Unlimited, I knew I wanted to read the rest. Little Worse than a Man collects the first six issues. The Vision and his family experience prejudice from their human neighbors, Viv and Vin's classmates, and later, the cops. Virginia lies to the Vision once and it snowballs, sending their quiet suburban life out of control. I saw someone refer to The Vision as the Breaking Bad of the Marvel Universe and I can definitely see it heading in that direction. The subdued art fits the story perfectly, and Tom King is going to be a big name in the future. The story's unknown (at first, anyway) narrator gives the book a tone not often seen in super hero comics. It raises questions about family and what it means to be human. Tom King and Gabriel Hernandez Walta have produced one of those quirky, powerful books I can't imagine Marvel taking a chance on ten years ago. I can't wait to see what the next volume holds. 4.5 out of 5 stars.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Dave Schaafsma

    "They seemed nice." I have no particular interest in Marvel’s world of the Avengers, but this one surprised me. Takes place in Alexandria, Virginia, where Avenger Vision moves with his wife and twins. Suburbia. Welcome to the neighborhood, toasters! A darkly satirical commentary on contemporary American society through a domestic comic! Here’s two key quotes that may get at the philosophy and somewhat robotic tone of it all from Vision, who spouts this kind of thing and in this kind of tone throu "They seemed nice." I have no particular interest in Marvel’s world of the Avengers, but this one surprised me. Takes place in Alexandria, Virginia, where Avenger Vision moves with his wife and twins. Suburbia. Welcome to the neighborhood, toasters! A darkly satirical commentary on contemporary American society through a domestic comic! Here’s two key quotes that may get at the philosophy and somewhat robotic tone of it all from Vision, who spouts this kind of thing and in this kind of tone throughout: “To assert as truth that which has no meaning is the core mission of humanity.” “The pursuit of a set purpose by logical means is the way of tyranny. . . The pursuit of an unobtainable purpose by absurd means is the way of freedom. This is my vision of the future. Of our future.” I liked King’s writing that draws on Shakespeare and robots (okay, they're not exactly robots)—and maybe he’s rethinking the Marvel universe and ours through Asimov and Bradbury here. I like Gabriel Walta's art work—it has the right tone of comic suburban horror. Great colors, too, sort of creates a little neon vertigo feel to it. It’s not completely unique in its satire, the story isn’t so original, some of the pieces are not so great—that blackmailing Dad story, maybe, but for a Marvel comic, and for sheer entertainment, I liked it quite a bit. Here’s a good one from twin teen Viv: “She belonged here. They belonged here. Everything in the end would be good. This moment lasted 1.72 seconds."

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sam Quixote

    I get into some spoilsies later in the review so I guess “be warned”. The short version of this review is that the book is overrated, boring and poorly written and I wouldn’t recommend it. Ok, on with the review proper! The Vision suddenly has a family! His wife is Virginia, his son is Vin and his daughter is Viv (oh the cute alliteration) and they reside at 616 Hickory Branch Lane (geddit, like Marvel-616, the main Marvel universe). Not a lot happens for most of the book until something does an I get into some spoilsies later in the review so I guess “be warned”. The short version of this review is that the book is overrated, boring and poorly written and I wouldn’t recommend it. Ok, on with the review proper! The Vision suddenly has a family! His wife is Virginia, his son is Vin and his daughter is Viv (oh the cute alliteration) and they reside at 616 Hickory Branch Lane (geddit, like Marvel-616, the main Marvel universe). Not a lot happens for most of the book until something does and then it’s over. So this was disappointing. I’ve heard nothing but praise for this series so I was really looking forward to it despite not being a Tom King fan. He’s a writer who can take interesting setups like Dick Grayson in a James Bond-esque series or a cop investigating a murder in 2004 Iraq like in The Sheriff of Babylon and somehow manage to suck all the excitement out of them (to be fair he co-wrote Grayson with Tim Seeley). I’d say he does the same here with The Vision, which is a similarly boring read, except the premise isn’t exciting to start with! When did Vision make a family? I read quite a lot of Marvel and don’t recall him doing or seeing any character mention this. More importantly, WHY did he make a family? Vision is one of those awkward characters who differs from writer to writer. Sometimes he desires to be more human, sometimes that’s never mentioned at all. I tend to read modern Marvel books and I’ve never once read a story where he talks about wanting to be human, though I understand back in the ‘70s that was one of his things. Moreover, it makes you wonder about the message this book sends out. Vision and his family are synthezoids but Vision, in this series, seems to desperately want acceptance among humans as one of them, despite the impossibility of ever being human. Especially in this day and age shouldn’t the message be less of achieving an arbitrary standard of “normalcy” and trying to fit in by subverting your true nature, and instead accept who you are and asking others to do the same? Why try be something you’re not? Vision is so unique and wonderful, why does he want to be as dull as his suburban human neighbours? It’s important to show the reader the creation of Vision’s family and his reasoning behind it because that’s the whole point of this book. It’s simply not good enough to claim that the reader should know all about The Vision and to have read Uncanny Avengers or whichever series it was established (if at all) that Vision wanted to create his own family; this needs to be done in THIS series and can’t be taken for granted. That’s one of King’s biggest failings with this book. However I could have forgiven all of that if there was an engaging story or the book said something clever or original about the 21st century Western middle class, except it doesn’t do any of those things. Maybe this series is intended to be a satire on suburbia? It’s not. It’s definitely no Shirley Jackson or Ira Levin commentary on the nightmare of the ‘burbs. What story there is, is underwhelming: Vin gets in trouble at school, Viv meets a boy she likes. Wow. Sure, it’s “normal”, which is what I guess Vision wants, but it’s not riveting storytelling either. Then a villain appears and Virginia ends up killing him because she was protecting her family. Fine - but why hide it from Vision? She was totally justified in killing him - he broke into her house with the intent of murdering her and her family; the dictionary definition of self-defence. But instead she hides his body and lies to Vision, and this provides the meatier side of the story despite being pure and utter stupid contrivance. Pure and utter stupid contrivance summarises what happens next as someone films Virginia burying the body and blackmails her, leading to a commentary on America’s useless and idiotic gun culture. Needless to say, the story is not impressive at all and the motivations behind the characters - particularly Vision’s with that final page reveal - are inscrutable and silly. King’s not a very good writer. The narration throughout is flat and boring - maybe intentionally robotic-sounding but definitely not enlivening to read - while the dialogue between Vision and Virginia is dry and dull. They literally have mundane conversations about semantics! King also inserts Shylock’s famous speech from The Merchant of Venice (“If you prick us, do we not bleed”) in a clichéd and pseudo-intellectual commentary on the neighbourhood’s perception of the Visions. It’s an obvious and uninspired choice that feels like something a high-schooler would think was clever. Also, King’s Vision claims to have saved the world 37 times, citing The Korvac Saga and The Phoenix Force as two such occasions - yeah, no-one else was involved in resolving those, just you, Vision, right? Gabriel Hernandez Walta’s art is fine but nothing special. Like in his Magneto series, he can sometimes bring out the horror in death which does give weight behind some of the scenes here, though otherwise his art style remains competent and somewhat drab. I had high hopes for this one but The Vision, Volume 1: Little Worse Than a Man turned out to be yet another poorly written and conceived Tom King comic that was a struggle to get through. I think this one is meant to be a prestige series on the same level as Fraction/Aja’s Hawkeye but it’s actually little worse than the usual craptastic superhero-punching-supervillains fare that makes up most of Marvel’s output.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Calista

    I like the idea of a volume about Vision and his family. I don't think it was all that well done. I don't know the character all that well, so maybe it is. The vision is their own family unit. They are fairly normal but school is tough for the kids. Villains do attack the house at some point. Vision is out with the Avengers saving the world much of the time too. All the pressure of having a family on present here and then some. It's not a bad volume, and it's not a great volume. I might read the I like the idea of a volume about Vision and his family. I don't think it was all that well done. I don't know the character all that well, so maybe it is. The vision is their own family unit. They are fairly normal but school is tough for the kids. Villains do attack the house at some point. Vision is out with the Avengers saving the world much of the time too. All the pressure of having a family on present here and then some. It's not a bad volume, and it's not a great volume. I might read the last volume, I might not. hmm.

  8. 5 out of 5

    Kemper

    They say that good fences make good neighbors, but what if your neighbor was an android with the ability to manipulate the density of his body so that he could simply phase through the fence? Vision decides he wants a family so he creates some more synthezoids to function as his wife and two children and moves to the suburbs of DC to lead a more ‘normal’ life. However, some of the neighbors are worried about what a family of robots will do the property values, and it turns out that his family hav They say that good fences make good neighbors, but what if your neighbor was an android with the ability to manipulate the density of his body so that he could simply phase through the fence? Vision decides he wants a family so he creates some more synthezoids to function as his wife and two children and moves to the suburbs of DC to lead a more ‘normal’ life. However, some of the neighbors are worried about what a family of robots will do the property values, and it turns out that his family have personalities and problems that don’t fit into Vision’s narrow idea of the American nuclear family. I’d heard about this title for a while, and I wish I’d gotten to it sooner. There’s a dark, almost Megan Abbott-esque kind of surban noir going on here, and it’s kinda crazy that we’re getting this kind of story centered on Vision. It reminds me a bit of Matt Fraction’s run on Hawkeye because that was another comic about an Avenger trying to have a normal life, but Clint Barton is just a regular guy who couldn’t ever keep his superhero stuff from leaking into his attempts at an everyday routine. Here, we see that it’s Vision’s family that may be the main problem even as he tries to make the people around them conform to his idea of normalcy. It’s intriguing stuff.

  9. 4 out of 5

    Chris

    I don't usually review any of the series I follow in single issues until they're released in trade, but I'm making an exception for The Vision as it's one of the best comic books I've ever read. Hell, the term "comic book" seems insufficient to describe Little Worse Than A Man. It's storytelling through sequential art at it's finest and I thought it was incredible from start to finish. Comic superstar-in-the-making Tom King teams with talented artist Gabriel H. Walta and fan-favourite colourist J I don't usually review any of the series I follow in single issues until they're released in trade, but I'm making an exception for The Vision as it's one of the best comic books I've ever read. Hell, the term "comic book" seems insufficient to describe Little Worse Than A Man. It's storytelling through sequential art at it's finest and I thought it was incredible from start to finish. Comic superstar-in-the-making Tom King teams with talented artist Gabriel H. Walta and fan-favourite colourist Jordie Bellaire to create something special with The Vision. I'm going to divulge as little of the plot as possible though, as I believe this story is one that needs to be experienced first-hand. From the superb first issue it's clear that the creative team are completely in sync. Walta and Bellaire are King's equals when it comes to conveying the narrative. (view spoiler)[The final panel of said issue is a prime example of this. The combination of King's line about the water vase, Walta's rendering of Viv's facial expression and the striking red background from Bellaire made for one of the most memorable moments I've ever seen. (hide spoiler)] . A sense of unease permeates the book that contradicts the seemingly mundane suburban setting and characters. It's almost uncomfortably engaging. There's a remarkable balance between quiet emotion and shocking dramatics, executed with masterful pacing. Some of the storytelling techniques are subtle and require re-reads to pick up on. Others are so direct that they'll feel like a shot straight to the gut. There wasn't a single issue here that I didn't need to discuss with someone immediately after reading it. As weird as it gets (and boy, does The Vision get weird) the story is always smartly-written, meaningful and rich with themes that will keep you thinking long after you've turned the final page. The most apparent is 'What does it mean to be human?', but it's possible to come away from this story feeling many different things. It may just be a "comic book", but Little Worse Than A Man makes exceptional use of the medium. As such, it comes with my highest possible recommendation and the hope that others enjoy it as much as I did. Truly outstanding.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Matthew Quann

    The hype is real! Aside from a select few comics I've switched from floppies to trade waiting in the wake of Marvel's Secret Wars. The comics are a bit more affordable in collection, and I don't feel as obligated to continue reading a series in trades if the first one isn't very good. But there's been a few series whose near unanimous praise has me itching to dig in, Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther and Tom King's The Vision. I'd heard the series was an amalgam of Breaking Bad and the wackiest stu The hype is real! Aside from a select few comics I've switched from floppies to trade waiting in the wake of Marvel's Secret Wars. The comics are a bit more affordable in collection, and I don't feel as obligated to continue reading a series in trades if the first one isn't very good. But there's been a few series whose near unanimous praise has me itching to dig in, Ta-Nehisi Coates' Black Panther and Tom King's The Vision. I'd heard the series was an amalgam of Breaking Bad and the wackiest stuff the Marvel Universe had to offer. I am also all-over the fact that this series will be 12 issues long, a proper maxi-series, that is not required to dive in and out of Universe-wide events. Luckily, the praise is well earned and I was both entertained and routinely surprised by The Vision's narrative. In brief: The Vision has crafted a synthezoid family in his image in an attempt to live amongst humans in the suburbs of Washington. Of course, this all goes horribly wrong by the end of the first issue that is as perfect an intro to a comic series as I've read. There is an unseen narrator (who is revealed by issue 3) who establishes the exceptionally dark and foreboding tone of the series. The reader is made aware from the first few pages that Vision's experiment will result in death and disorder, helping to build tension with each misstep the Visions make. Gabriel Walta's art is also highly consistent. He doesn't use the straight lines and well-shaped characters that you might see from someone like Jim Cheung, but his line-work is ideal for the unsettling story of The Vision. The colourist, Jordie Bellaire, also deserves accolades for being one of the best in the industry. His colour choices helps to establish the serious tone of the series and kept me feeling like doom lurked just around the next page. While the ending of this volume is a tad predictable and concerning (I hope the scope doesn't become too wide in the second, and final, volume), I was totally rapt up in the story the whole way through. I have so many questions I want answered. Whose brain patterns did Vision use to create Virginia? How will it all come crashing down? Will anyone make it out of this one alive? This isn't your typical superhero comic. The Vision makes good use of continuity, but requires no prior knowledge of the Marvel U other than that Vision is an android who is an Avenger. Its tone is so atypical of capes and spandex comics that it is worth the price of admission just to try a series under full sway a writer. File this one next to Fraction & Aja's Hawkeye for being a series that dares to do more with a superhero than the average fare. Highly recommended.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Scott

    "I am the astro-creep, a demolition-style hell American freak yeah . . . More human than human!" -- White Zombie Little Worse Than a Man was a breath of fresh air after reading a handful of bland, not particularly memorable graphic novels in the last week. Part of the uniqueness was its dark, sort of dreadful atmosphere -- it was like the twisting together of a Twilight Zone episode with a Richard Matheson short story, with a pinch of certain David Lynch films hinting at the evil lurking undernea "I am the astro-creep, a demolition-style hell American freak yeah . . . More human than human!" -- White Zombie Little Worse Than a Man was a breath of fresh air after reading a handful of bland, not particularly memorable graphic novels in the last week. Part of the uniqueness was its dark, sort of dreadful atmosphere -- it was like the twisting together of a Twilight Zone episode with a Richard Matheson short story, with a pinch of certain David Lynch films hinting at the evil lurking underneath U.S. suburbia. Vision may be a part of a superhero team, but this story doesn't feel like it has any heroes. So Vision, after procuring a government job, and his 'nuclear family' - lovely wife Virginia and teenage twins Viv and Vin - move in the D.C. suburbs and attempt to make an otherwise normal life for themselves. Said family are androids, but they are trying to live the American Dream. There is initially some humor - hey, they're just like us! - but then things turn ugly (a cautionary notice if you love animals), and then deadly. Don't bring these new neighbors a batch of home-baked cookies.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Bradley

    Holy Crap, I think I just P'd on my NP. Or rather, the reverse. Maybe a little phase-out. I don't know why I didn't read this when it first came out. It looked funny. It looked interesting. I mean, I never felt COMPELLED to read anything with Vision in it. Not really. But just looking at this cover, seeing the nominations and reviews it got, I really SHOULD have picked it up sooner. Well, color me shamed. I LOVED this. Super smart, super cray-cray, and with a big fat mirror held up to us all, prov Holy Crap, I think I just P'd on my NP. Or rather, the reverse. Maybe a little phase-out. I don't know why I didn't read this when it first came out. It looked funny. It looked interesting. I mean, I never felt COMPELLED to read anything with Vision in it. Not really. But just looking at this cover, seeing the nominations and reviews it got, I really SHOULD have picked it up sooner. Well, color me shamed. I LOVED this. Super smart, super cray-cray, and with a big fat mirror held up to us all, proving once and for all that there is no P. Merely NP. Forever. And the two shall forever be twain. :) I seriously laughed out loud four times in the first issue. Simple little comments like "nice" and "burn to death" kinda fills me with this warm glow. This synthetic family is seriously F**D up. I totally recommend it. I mean, sure, it looks like a nice little family thing, but I suspect it's really the end of the world. :)

  13. 5 out of 5

    Rory Wilding

    As the concept of artificial intelligence is becoming more of a reality in our current day and age, it is an idea that though has been used over the decades of science-fiction, the more relevant it becomes the more we feel fearful towards it. This is perfectly summed up in the first volume of Tom King’s solo comic about Marvel’s “synthezoid” superhero. Although he was created to be a weapon by the evil robot Ultron, the Vision’s greatest desire is to be human and what’s more human than family? Mu As the concept of artificial intelligence is becoming more of a reality in our current day and age, it is an idea that though has been used over the decades of science-fiction, the more relevant it becomes the more we feel fearful towards it. This is perfectly summed up in the first volume of Tom King’s solo comic about Marvel’s “synthezoid” superhero. Although he was created to be a weapon by the evil robot Ultron, the Vision’s greatest desire is to be human and what’s more human than family? Much to the reluctance of his fellow Avengers, Vision creates a wife named Virginia and two teenage twins named Viv and Vin, and move to a suburban household in Arlington County. Despite trying to be the family next door, they are not out of the ordinary and certainly their actions will shake up the neighbourhood. Like many of the Marvel characters, the Vision is born out of classic sci-fi tropes such as A.I. whilst under the guise of a superhero story. However writer Tom King is less concerned about the heroics – despite the Vision’s current status as part of the All-New, All-Different Avengers – and more interested about a family of androids trying to blend in as a typical all-American human family. However to quote Blade Runner, the Visions are becoming “more human than human” with their emotions getting more out of hand as each member is in a constant conflict in whatever shape or form and how they resolve them comes with a consequence. Although it strongly evokes the Vision’s rich history as he claims to have saved the world thirty-seven times, King keeps the story singular with its off-kilter tone that leans more towards suburban horror as there are surprisingly dark turns. As much as the Vision is known for his odd appearance, his idea to look more human is wearing ordinary clothes which in this case is the traditional shirt and tie to his role as the father of the Visions household. Artist Gabriel Hernandez Walta nails this basic odd visual of the character as well as the other Visions who are trying to look normal. When it comes to horror, there are pages here which will unsettle younger readers due to the few bloody moments throughout as Walta successfully gets under your skin. As for the initial half of Tom King’s twelve-issue run, The Vision is unlike any other Marvel comic as given its lack of superhero action, it makes up for its clever use of suburban horror which takes everyone’s favourite synthezoid into sinister territories.

  14. 5 out of 5

    Artemy

    You know the Vision? That red android from the Avengers, son of Ultron? That guy from the latest Avengers movie? Well, he decided to create himself a happy family, and it's gone very, very wrong. Yeah, I thought that premise was kinda dumb, too. Who knew this comic would be such a revelation. I am torn between this and Doctor Strange as Marvel's best new series of the year. This brilliant, creepy, haunting story is so good, I can't wait for the next issue every month. I would tell more about the You know the Vision? That red android from the Avengers, son of Ultron? That guy from the latest Avengers movie? Well, he decided to create himself a happy family, and it's gone very, very wrong. Yeah, I thought that premise was kinda dumb, too. Who knew this comic would be such a revelation. I am torn between this and Doctor Strange as Marvel's best new series of the year. This brilliant, creepy, haunting story is so good, I can't wait for the next issue every month. I would tell more about the plot, but I don't want to spoil anything, because each issue comes with a huge plot twist. But trust me, it's great. The artwork by Gabriel Hernandez Walta is good, it works with the story, and Jordie Bellaire's colours look great, as always. Covers by Mike del Mundo are probably the best thing about this book art-wise, though. Very cool stuff. It's a shame that writer Tom King signed an exclusive deal with DC to write Batman, because The Vision is by far his best work to date. Still, we will get six more issues that will conclude the story, and King claims he always intended it to end the series that soon. But anyway, I highly recommend this book. Go and read it. Seriously, bro.

  15. 5 out of 5

    James DeSantis

    Youtube Video Review - https://youtu.be/CK5UQwuwwbM Every once in a blue moon you read a graphic novel that blows away any expectations no matter how much good you heard about it. Earlier this year it was American Alien. The Vision is the second Graphic Novel made this year to blow me the FUCK away! Vision is building a home for his family. His wife, his kids, all he's trying to do is be normal. It's simple, for humans we try our best to achieve great things. For Vision he's saved the world a bun Youtube Video Review - https://youtu.be/CK5UQwuwwbM Every once in a blue moon you read a graphic novel that blows away any expectations no matter how much good you heard about it. Earlier this year it was American Alien. The Vision is the second Graphic Novel made this year to blow me the FUCK away! Vision is building a home for his family. His wife, his kids, all he's trying to do is be normal. It's simple, for humans we try our best to achieve great things. For Vision he's saved the world a bunch of times and now he wants to settle in and stay normal. The whole time you hope for the best but this gloomy fee.l from the start is telling a different story. When the first major twist happens you're in for a treat. By the end...you're jaw is on the floor and you want to quickly read the next volume. The story has a narrative by a mysterious person. As they're showing you the view of The Visions you get to see it all unfold through the events told and the further down the dark path you go the worse it gets. It's like Psycho meets Breaking Bad, and in all the best ways. I want to talk more but everything would feel like a spoiler so I urge you to pick this up and quickly get sucked in then wait and wait for the second part to come out. Truly a one of a kind story in the Marvel line up, don't miss out!

  16. 5 out of 5

    Chad

    Has the feel of a horror or thriller movie using Stephen King's common narrative device of alluding to things ending badly in the future. Covering up a mistake slowly snowballs out of control. Some people will say it moves to slow, but I thought the plot moved at the right speed. Tom King's best written work to date. Gabriel Hernandez Walta's art has grown in leaps and bounds. His style fits very well with this book. Has the feel of a horror or thriller movie using Stephen King's common narrative device of alluding to things ending badly in the future. Covering up a mistake slowly snowballs out of control. Some people will say it moves to slow, but I thought the plot moved at the right speed. Tom King's best written work to date. Gabriel Hernandez Walta's art has grown in leaps and bounds. His style fits very well with this book.

  17. 5 out of 5

    Cheese

    A lot darker in nature than I thought, but a well told story none the less. Lovely artwork, the story reminded me of a horror movie, but I can't quite think which one. Maybe the shining, when the wife has realised that her husband is crazy. It provokes some interesting debates about AI as well. Exterminate! A lot darker in nature than I thought, but a well told story none the less. Lovely artwork, the story reminded me of a horror movie, but I can't quite think which one. Maybe the shining, when the wife has realised that her husband is crazy. It provokes some interesting debates about AI as well. Exterminate!

  18. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Morrell

    The Vision tries to slice off a bit of Americana home life for himself, only things don't go entirely as planned. Interesting concept, and the last few panels were just exactly what we don't want in an overpowered AI-made-flesh. I thought it could have been more effective in a smaller space though, it felt like it plodded a bit, just to build up the ((gasp)) at the end. The Vision tries to slice off a bit of Americana home life for himself, only things don't go entirely as planned. Interesting concept, and the last few panels were just exactly what we don't want in an overpowered AI-made-flesh. I thought it could have been more effective in a smaller space though, it felt like it plodded a bit, just to build up the ((gasp)) at the end.

  19. 5 out of 5

    Jeannette Nikolova

    Also available on the WondrousBooks blog. From the moment I started reading The Vision, I felt that something was creeping in on me. I knew that this was mostly supposed to be a dark comedy, at least from most of what I had read or heard about it. However, that was not the feeling that I got from the volume itself. First and foremost, there is something that I really enjoyed: the ominous chill running through the entire volume. From the very beginning, I felt slightly disturbed by the characte Also available on the WondrousBooks blog. From the moment I started reading The Vision, I felt that something was creeping in on me. I knew that this was mostly supposed to be a dark comedy, at least from most of what I had read or heard about it. However, that was not the feeling that I got from the volume itself. First and foremost, there is something that I really enjoyed: the ominous chill running through the entire volume. From the very beginning, I felt slightly disturbed by the characters, perturbed by their way of interacting and of viewing the world. Most of all, I was always, to one degree or another, unsettled by Virginia. This part is clear enough from the very, very beginning of the story, with the little "At the end of the story... will happen." remarks. However, the more I read, the more I felt like I'm missing something. I was trying to get why this family bothers me so much. It took me a couple of attempts at guessing, until I realized that what really, really bothered me, is that The Vision is not a story of a family. It's a story of a lonely man who feels so disconnected from his world that he makes a new one for himself. It's also the story of an orphan. A man, or a little worse than one, who has been brought to this world but feels no connection to it. He has no roots, no family, he didn't grow, didn't become, he just was. Also, one who is very powerful, but also deeply misunderstood. One who will always be out of place. If you choose to see The Vision as I do, you'd realize that this is a coming-of-age story. Just a very unconventional one. And also very beautiful, yet tragic one. And I say tragic, because, in this volume, at least, I don't think that the Vision achieved what he wanted to. Despite all of his efforts, he stayed on the outside looking in. There were many great moments in the volume, to illustrate how sad it actually was, from Viv's talk with her lab partner in the courtyard, to the Vision's first lie and the reasons behind it, and most all, the entire "The Villainy You Teach Me" chapter. I absolutely loved this one, both the parallel between the story and the Shakespeare quote, and the choice of the quote itself. And, by sheer coincidence, I happened to be listening to the Hamilton musical while reading The Vision. Which was the one part of the story that came out of circumstance, but gave me a totally new viewpoint. I realized that the two could be compared so easily. If you feel I am going way out there, please bear with me. How does a bastard, orphan, son of a whore and a Scotsman, dropped in the middle of a forgotten Spot in the Caribbean by providence, impoverished, in squalor Grow up to be a hero and a scholar? And every day while slaves were being slaughtered and carted Away across the waves, he struggled and kept his guard up Inside, he was longing for something to be a part of The brother was ready to beg, steal, borrow, or barter Then a hurricane came, and devastation reigned Our man saw his future drip, dripping down the drain Alexander Hamilton My name is Alexander Hamilton And there’s a million things I haven’t done But just you wait, just you wait... *** When he was ten his father split, full of it, debt-ridden Two years later, see Alex and his mother bed-ridden Half-dead sittin' in their own sick, the scent thick *** Moved in with a cousin, the cousin committed suicide Left him with nothin’ but ruined pride, something new inside A voice saying “You gotta fend for yourself.”  “Alex, you gotta fend for yourself.” There would have been nothin’ left to do For someone less astute He woulda been dead or destitute *** You could never back down You never learned to take your time! When America sings for you Will they know what you overcame? Will they know you rewrote the game? The world will never be the same, oh If you want to experience The Vision, Vol. 1 the way I did, you can head over here: https://open.spotify.com/album/1kCHru...

  20. 4 out of 5

    Gary

    The Vision creates a synthezoid family for himself, moves into the suburbs of Washington D.C., and shit goes horribly wrong. I love, and I mean LOVE, the art in this book. The writing is smart, and I liked the suburban horror story angle. I'm a little concerned about the pacing - a sort of droning tone punctuated by brief but brutal incidents of violence - which has become a little redundant from chapter to chapter. Also, my expectations are a little deflated because I am fairly certain that the The Vision creates a synthezoid family for himself, moves into the suburbs of Washington D.C., and shit goes horribly wrong. I love, and I mean LOVE, the art in this book. The writing is smart, and I liked the suburban horror story angle. I'm a little concerned about the pacing - a sort of droning tone punctuated by brief but brutal incidents of violence - which has become a little redundant from chapter to chapter. Also, my expectations are a little deflated because I am fairly certain that the ultimate conclusion to this tale will succeed in retconning the whole thing out of existence. What spins out from the Vision's attempt at "normalcy" is too horrifying to allow this character to continue to exist if any of this stands. Still, it is very powerful at times, and frightening, and definitely worth reading.

  21. 4 out of 5

    Chelsea &#x1f3f3;️‍&#x1f308;

    Admittedly, I'm not King's biggest fan. His books are usually hit or miss with me (mostly miss). This one is somewhere in the middle. It's an interesting premise. I've said before, I don't really understand Vision as a character. I don't quite understand how he has emotions or forms attachments. Here, it's that issue x 4 with his "wife and two kids". I've read some critiques from die hard Wanda fans who hate Vision because of his treatment of Wanda. I never really formed an opinion on that becaus Admittedly, I'm not King's biggest fan. His books are usually hit or miss with me (mostly miss). This one is somewhere in the middle. It's an interesting premise. I've said before, I don't really understand Vision as a character. I don't quite understand how he has emotions or forms attachments. Here, it's that issue x 4 with his "wife and two kids". I've read some critiques from die hard Wanda fans who hate Vision because of his treatment of Wanda. I never really formed an opinion on that because, from what I've read, Vision was dealt a pretty rough hand what with Wanda leaving him for Simon a few times and then, during her breakdown, he was made to kill his friends. I'm sure I'm missing out on quite a bit of their history well, because I never really cared to know more about it. But, I just never thought of Vision as a monster. There is an issue here with Vision creating his "perfect little family", yet, I don't think I've ever seen him spend time with Billy and Tommy after their "deaths". He wanted a family so badly that he created one and never bothered to spend time with his real one? That's pretty shitty. Like, "my father left my mom for his perfect new family" shitty. Way to be a real man, Vision. Anyway, I digress. The premise behind this story is interesting. How fascinating that Vision is the least interesting part of his own story. I'm a little uncomfortable with the emphasis on how Vision's family is being unfairly persecuted. Is this supposed to be residual hatred against superhumans? I just don't recall Vision being hated before but, again, I tend not to pay attention to him. So, if this is your thing, it's a recommend. As comics go, it's an interesting plot, while I'm not super interested in the characters themselves.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Jesse A

    Very cool story with a very good series direction.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Shadowdenizen

    "Existenstial Horror." That's the best way to describe this unique maxi-series from Marvel, and it's a perfect example of the risks that Marvel is willing to take with titles, and it paid off in spades in this instance. There is little not to like about this title (which, as I write this, is 2/3rds of the way thru it's run of 12 issues); the writing, pacing and characterization are spot-on, though this is definitely a new vision for the characters (Pardon the bad pun), and certainly NOT the Vision "Existenstial Horror." That's the best way to describe this unique maxi-series from Marvel, and it's a perfect example of the risks that Marvel is willing to take with titles, and it paid off in spades in this instance. There is little not to like about this title (which, as I write this, is 2/3rds of the way thru it's run of 12 issues); the writing, pacing and characterization are spot-on, though this is definitely a new vision for the characters (Pardon the bad pun), and certainly NOT the Vision you know from the MCU, [which is for the btter, IMO]. Both the cover and interior art are immaculate, and add to the slightly menacing, yet oddly retro, feel of the title. And writer Tom King is someone to absolutely keep your eyes on; an absolute superstar-in-the-making. In short? READ. THIS. BOOK. You won't be disappointed.

  24. 5 out of 5

    Wing Kee

    My brain just blew up. World: The art is fantastic, it’s not as shiny and bright as I thought this series would have but wow does it ever work. There is a grounded muted pallet to to the tone and the color and design of the world which makes this special story mundane in the best possible way. The world building here is also fantastic, it draws on the past of the characters but quickly orients readers with the needed information and moves ahead with it’s own tale. Yes we know Vision is not human, My brain just blew up. World: The art is fantastic, it’s not as shiny and bright as I thought this series would have but wow does it ever work. There is a grounded muted pallet to to the tone and the color and design of the world which makes this special story mundane in the best possible way. The world building here is also fantastic, it draws on the past of the characters but quickly orients readers with the needed information and moves ahead with it’s own tale. Yes we know Vision is not human, yes he has a nonhuman family, yes they want to be human and that’s the stage that is set. Story: I can’t describe how blown away I was with this narrative, it reminds me of the best type of thrillers, the ones that slowly creepy up on you the ones that sets your fingers tingling, the ones that unsettle and worry and draw you in fully, this is that type of story. This feels like an episode of Twilight Zone mixed with the stepford wives with twin peaks and all those wonderful unsettling shows we all know and love. It’s got the unsettling feeling in the back of your neck like a H.P. Lovecraft book but has the beautiful tenderness of a wonderful family drama. There is teen angst, there is violence there is great joy and great sandness, there is drama. I can’t recommend this book enough, readers need to go into this blind with no knowledge and no expectations and let the story just take you. Don’t about the past of the character, don’t get bogged down by canon and the past, just enjoy this story of a family not so ordinary trying to be ordinary and be engrossed. Characters: The characters are so well done because the dialog is so amazing. These are not humans and they don’t come off as human, their dialog between each other and to humans is so well done, it’s well paced, wel written and every word is measured and thought about. I didn’t read King before I read his Batman run and wow, now I know why he got the Batman job. He humanizes things that you dont’ expect and he pulls out emotions that are not common in superhero books. I am not going into each family member here cause that would be spoiling it for readers, just read them, fall in love with this family. Blown away, my brain feels like mush in the best possible way. Onward to the next book!

  25. 5 out of 5

    Eric

    "The road to Hell is paved with good intentions," or so it's been said for who knows how long. It's one of those sayings where I always want to retort, as sarcastically as my voice can physically allow, Ah yes, it was good intentions that have led all the world's abusers, all the serial killers, all the serial rapists, all the career criminals, all the tyrants, and all the all-too-willing people who serve and enable them all astray towards Hell. Yet I must concede that Tom King, Gabriel Hernandez "The road to Hell is paved with good intentions," or so it's been said for who knows how long. It's one of those sayings where I always want to retort, as sarcastically as my voice can physically allow, Ah yes, it was good intentions that have led all the world's abusers, all the serial killers, all the serial rapists, all the career criminals, all the tyrants, and all the all-too-willing people who serve and enable them all astray towards Hell. Yet I must concede that Tom King, Gabriel Hernandez Walta, and Jordie Bellaire make a powerful counter-argument. All I knew about the Vision before reading these six issues was that he's one of the older Avengers, that he was created by Ultron, and that he has had a notoriously dysfunctional, tragic relationship with Wanda Maximoff (and I don't even know most of the details of their relationship). And I only learned of all this after watching Age of Ultron. After reading this I can assure all other casual and non-Marvel readers that this is all you need to know. As general rule I try to avoid summarizing a story's plot because, more often than not, the description on the back of a book is sufficient enough. Especially if the story within is phenomenal. "It's the journey, not the destination, that matters," is not one of those sayings that annoys me. And look at that cover. Tell me you don't find it just a bit unsettling. That cover, and the fact that I tagged this as Horror, is something I wish you wouldn't be aware of before you may read this, but this spoiler is kind of unavoidable. I'm sorry. I won't risk spoiling anything else because that whole journey saying especially applies to every phenomenally disturbing story. 4 3/4 stars

  26. 4 out of 5

    Char

    “To assert as truth that which has no meaning is the core mission of humanity.”

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jenny

    This story isn't what I expected at all. It's much deeper and more complex and philosophical than I anticipated. I thought it would be an action story. It's Marvel, after all. But it's also about Vision, a character I only knew about through Viv Vision in The Champions series by Mark Waid. Now that I know more about him and remember the story line of him being created by Ultron, it makes more sense that it involves complex questions about humanity and Otherness. When I first began reading, I didn This story isn't what I expected at all. It's much deeper and more complex and philosophical than I anticipated. I thought it would be an action story. It's Marvel, after all. But it's also about Vision, a character I only knew about through Viv Vision in The Champions series by Mark Waid. Now that I know more about him and remember the story line of him being created by Ultron, it makes more sense that it involves complex questions about humanity and Otherness. When I first began reading, I didn't understand why it was being narrated, "told and not shown," especially as a Marvel comic about a synthezoid (I understand fully at the end, and it's a great reason, but I also thought the story was being told in a dry, staccato manner to imitate the sort of speech we'd expect of a "robot" or to mimic the way a computer might convey events, so it works that way too). I wanted more direct action. I also felt like the story was building slowly, but I became interested as the story progressed, and I appreciated the connections King makes between the main action and concepts or subplots, depending on the circumstance. For instance, the narrator speaks about a vase that contains water but no plants, and the question is, "Why is the vase empty?" The answer is that the gas that makes the glass levitate is poisonous to all plants. The question then becomes, "Why make a vase that can't contain plants?" There are parallels drawn to the Visions themselves, of course--why do they exist if they cannot be filled with what is expected of people? What can they contain? Does what is poisonous to one thing harm another in the same way? These aren't questions I was expecting to consider when reading this comic! The story is well-developed. One thing leads to another in a clear fashion, but it's not a fully linear plot. There are the asides noted above and some subplots that I'm sure will be picked up in later issues. I like the characters. I feel like the story is mostly about Virginia Vision (don't call her Mrs. Vision) instead of Vision himself. She's a great character with extreme complexity. All the Visions want is to be normal, and for a large part of the story, Vision is oblivious to most of what makes his family feel decidedly abnormal. This puts the responsibility on Virginia (within the story and in a meta way) to deal with the major conflicts until the end of the volume, and then, Vision takes over (in more ways than one). My favorite aspect of this book is not that it's entertaining but that it made me think and taught me about the famous "P vs. NP" problem, which I'd never heard of before. It's fascinating to me, as most complex math/science problems are, even though I'm terrible at understanding most of them. This one basically involves the idea that P problems are easy to solve and easy to verify, whereas NP problems are easy to verify but not easy to solve. To find out if NP problems can be P problems (i.e. easy to solve as well as easy to verify) would essentially require too much math, too much time, etc., and so this remains an unsolved problem in computer science. The connection to this story is interesting because Vision is a computer. If NP does not equal P, there are problems that can never be easily solved. How does this make him feel? And if he finds that NP absolutely does not equal P, can he make a decision between accepting the unsolvable and working within that world or refusing to accepting it and continuing to try and prove that everything has a simple solution? In particular, the story asks its readers to confront the idea of humanity--what makes us human, what makes people Other, what can be expected of one group of people or of one species when the dominant one rejects it? Can we, like Shylock, only be expected to make its depravities our own? Or can we rise above and prove that we actually are different but that our differences actually make us better or stronger? By the way, the artwork is beautiful in this series (Gabriel Hernandez Walta), particularly the full-page images, most of which are issue covers, but some of which are full-length pages within the issues. I love the colors and the lines and the artistic choices over all--what's detailed, what's shadowed, etc. I recommend this volume to fans who want to know more about Vision but also to people who enjoy a well-plotted story that also involves layers of complexity and will stop to make you think. It does have action and character development and is entertaining as well. But there are also emotional scenes (anything with C.K, really, but especially the conversation between him and Viv and the scene when(view spoiler)[C.K.'s dad accidentally shoots his own son in attempting to shoot Virginia (hide spoiler)] , a couple of graphic scenes (that last spoiler scene, for one), and other aspects that mimic the harshness of reality. If that sounds like something you'd like, this could be the book for you.

  28. 5 out of 5

    Blindzider

    Let me start by tempering some expectations: There are no major super hero battles. This is a subtle, commentary on humanity, with a dose of horror. The Vision decides to create a family (wife and two kids) who are just like him and move to the suburbs and live a "normal" life. Through this setup, King examines what is a "normal" life? How far would you go to maintain the perception that your life is normal? Should/can everyone live a normal life? These questions and more are what King are asking Let me start by tempering some expectations: There are no major super hero battles. This is a subtle, commentary on humanity, with a dose of horror. The Vision decides to create a family (wife and two kids) who are just like him and move to the suburbs and live a "normal" life. Through this setup, King examines what is a "normal" life? How far would you go to maintain the perception that your life is normal? Should/can everyone live a normal life? These questions and more are what King are asking here and he gives a few answers as well. I give this an extra star because it made me think, and every once in awhile I like to read a comic that does just that. There is some setup for a larger conflict in the next volume which may bring this back to a more traditional superhero conflict, but hopefully King will use that to bring the story deeper into his examination.

  29. 4 out of 5

    Jerry Jose

    This comic has a laughable formula, and in first look is a quixotic attempt to sell the family life of an Avenger. Yes, Hawkeye worked, but here the variables are entirely different. Vision is a synthezoid, and probably everyone's least favourite. King's take on Vision reminded me of Gaiman's Black Orchid run, reinventing a not so mainstream character, by embracing the original handicaps with fresh perspectives. I read a little deep into fan letters and found these words of King himself "For me, This comic has a laughable formula, and in first look is a quixotic attempt to sell the family life of an Avenger. Yes, Hawkeye worked, but here the variables are entirely different. Vision is a synthezoid, and probably everyone's least favourite. King's take on Vision reminded me of Gaiman's Black Orchid run, reinventing a not so mainstream character, by embracing the original handicaps with fresh perspectives. I read a little deep into fan letters and found these words of King himself "For me, Vision is the chance to explore the alienation that sometimes attract people to comics, the tension that comes from not being normal in a society that demands normality". This summarizes the series so perfectly, comic is still a misfits medium, despite the cameo popularity during major movie releases. Vision maybe an Avenger, who has saved the world multiple times; but he is always an outsider to societal standards, and is forced to make do with that. Vision felt less Marvel and more Vertigo or Image in execution. Virginia's mental struggle to balance morality and motherhood, Viv and Vin's longing for acceptance in normalcy and image of Vision torn between his identity, loyalty and family are going to stay with me for a long while. The story had a running monologue in flashback, though the panels moved in real time. This monologue in initial issues were illustrated in 'purple' boxes with creativity and affection. Towards the final issues the independence represented by 'purple' colour gave way to aggressiveness of 'red'. This synesthetic approach managed to maintain a whole universe with its intricacies in background, which could have easily overshadowed the former narrative. I adored the pace, and cross tie in elements and throw backs. Though introduced via Agatha's prophecy the disturbing Wanda storyline from golden ages formed a strong physiological backing here, and it was devastatingly beautiful. To conclude things with brevity, King's miniseries is more than just paranoid people making androids paranoid. It is Vision's Planet Hulk.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Frédéric

    Do synthezoids dream of electric sheeps? Ok, an easy one but well deserved to cover the sad and doomed attempts of the Vision to live a "normal" life with a "normal" family. Well, this is not a "normal" Marvel comic book. No huge fights, no overboobed babes in spandex, no runts snikting their claws... Rather a grim suburb, a poisoned atmosphere and lots of text. And it's great, too! I tip my hat to Marvel for endorsing such a different and interesting use of super heroes. Do synthezoids dream of electric sheeps? Ok, an easy one but well deserved to cover the sad and doomed attempts of the Vision to live a "normal" life with a "normal" family. Well, this is not a "normal" Marvel comic book. No huge fights, no overboobed babes in spandex, no runts snikting their claws... Rather a grim suburb, a poisoned atmosphere and lots of text. And it's great, too! I tip my hat to Marvel for endorsing such a different and interesting use of super heroes.

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