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The Religion of Tomorrow: A Vision for the Future of the Great Traditions-More Inclusive, More Comprehensive, More Complete-with Integral Buddhism as an Example

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A provocative examination of how the great religious traditions can remain relevant in modern times by incorporating scientific truths learned about human nature over the last century. A single purpose lies at the heart of all the great religious traditions: awakening to the astonishing reality of the true nature of ourselves and the universe. At the same time, through cen A provocative examination of how the great religious traditions can remain relevant in modern times by incorporating scientific truths learned about human nature over the last century. A single purpose lies at the heart of all the great religious traditions: awakening to the astonishing reality of the true nature of ourselves and the universe. At the same time, through centuries of cultural accretion and focus on myth and ritual as ends in themselves, this core insight has become obscured. Here Ken Wilber provides a path for reenvisioning a religion of the future that acknowledges the evolution of humanity in every realm while remaining faithful to that original spiritual vision. For the traditions to attract modern men and women, Wilber asserts, they must incorporate the extraordinary number of scientific truths learned about human nature in just the past hundred years--for example, about the mind and brain, emotions, and the growth of consciousness--that the ancients were simply unaware of and thus were unable to include in their meditative systems. Taking Buddhism as an example, Wilber demonstrates how his comprehensive Integral Approach--which is already being applied to several world religions by some of their adherents--can avert a -cultural disaster of unparalleled proportions- the utter neglect of the glorious upper reaches of human potential by the materialistic postmodern worldview. Moreover, he shows how we can apply this approach to our own spiritual practice. This, his most sweeping work since Sex, Ecology, Spirituality, is a thrilling call for wholeness, inclusiveness, and unity in the religions of tomorrow.


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A provocative examination of how the great religious traditions can remain relevant in modern times by incorporating scientific truths learned about human nature over the last century. A single purpose lies at the heart of all the great religious traditions: awakening to the astonishing reality of the true nature of ourselves and the universe. At the same time, through cen A provocative examination of how the great religious traditions can remain relevant in modern times by incorporating scientific truths learned about human nature over the last century. A single purpose lies at the heart of all the great religious traditions: awakening to the astonishing reality of the true nature of ourselves and the universe. At the same time, through centuries of cultural accretion and focus on myth and ritual as ends in themselves, this core insight has become obscured. Here Ken Wilber provides a path for reenvisioning a religion of the future that acknowledges the evolution of humanity in every realm while remaining faithful to that original spiritual vision. For the traditions to attract modern men and women, Wilber asserts, they must incorporate the extraordinary number of scientific truths learned about human nature in just the past hundred years--for example, about the mind and brain, emotions, and the growth of consciousness--that the ancients were simply unaware of and thus were unable to include in their meditative systems. Taking Buddhism as an example, Wilber demonstrates how his comprehensive Integral Approach--which is already being applied to several world religions by some of their adherents--can avert a -cultural disaster of unparalleled proportions- the utter neglect of the glorious upper reaches of human potential by the materialistic postmodern worldview. Moreover, he shows how we can apply this approach to our own spiritual practice. This, his most sweeping work since Sex, Ecology, Spirituality, is a thrilling call for wholeness, inclusiveness, and unity in the religions of tomorrow.

30 review for The Religion of Tomorrow: A Vision for the Future of the Great Traditions-More Inclusive, More Comprehensive, More Complete-with Integral Buddhism as an Example

  1. 4 out of 5

    Ian Felton

    Making thousands of vaporous assumptions while using capital letters for every other word while repeating the same amorphous concepts doesn't make for an intelligent read, or an enjoyable read. Take the following single sentence, capitalization all Wilbur's: "Since Reality is the union of Emptiness and Form, to discover Emptiness is to be free of any specific or isolated Form, and instead to become one with ALL Form, a radical Fullness that is the Form side of the radical Freedom of Emptiness-with Making thousands of vaporous assumptions while using capital letters for every other word while repeating the same amorphous concepts doesn't make for an intelligent read, or an enjoyable read. Take the following single sentence, capitalization all Wilbur's: "Since Reality is the union of Emptiness and Form, to discover Emptiness is to be free of any specific or isolated Form, and instead to become one with ALL Form, a radical Fullness that is the Form side of the radical Freedom of Emptiness-with infinite and finite, nirvana and samsara, Emptiness and Form, Freedom and Fullness, all nondual." Surely this was written as a joke! I have never wanted to run a book to the used book store to sell, but that's what I want to do right now with this book. I don't want this book in my house. If there is a hell in Wilbur's religion of tomorrow, it will be a chapel with hard seats, full of head-nodding people in nice clothes, listening to a droning preacher reading page after page of this book.

  2. 4 out of 5

    Cian Kenshin

    Just finished reading this 800 page tome. It's a treatise on consciousness, but also more generally the human condition. He makes a case for evolving the technology that we use to grow up (psychology), wake up (conciseness), and clean up (Shadow work) as an integrated process instead of disparate. He gives solid examples and frameworks for others to develop their own systems that will be more inclusive of the different aspects of reality. It's not a rejection of Science or any religion. In fact Just finished reading this 800 page tome. It's a treatise on consciousness, but also more generally the human condition. He makes a case for evolving the technology that we use to grow up (psychology), wake up (conciseness), and clean up (Shadow work) as an integrated process instead of disparate. He gives solid examples and frameworks for others to develop their own systems that will be more inclusive of the different aspects of reality. It's not a rejection of Science or any religion. In fact it's an integration, an inclusion of all lines of human development, a meta framework that transcends and includes them all. A pleasant surprise was the reference to Mondo Zen/Hollow Bones Zen by Junpo Denis Kelly in the latter half of the book. This is where he recognizes emerging traditions that have had a rethink, and have been designed to be more inclusive of all aspects of human development. He also mentioned how impressed he was at how quickly these new process were at transmitting states of consciousness to new students. I certainly can vouch for that myself, from both sides of the equation! Highly recommend!

  3. 5 out of 5

    Alan Araújo

    It was great to see Wilber's ideas on integral thought to be even more developed, fine-tuned, and updated in this tome. Yes, there is a lot of repetition of key concepts, and reviews of those repetitions, but they are meant to really drive the point home. The description of the "religion of tomorrow" is in somewhat broad terms, within integral parameters, with lots of room for higher perspectives, and malleable enough to be applied to any spiritual tradition. Lots of attention on technical detai It was great to see Wilber's ideas on integral thought to be even more developed, fine-tuned, and updated in this tome. Yes, there is a lot of repetition of key concepts, and reviews of those repetitions, but they are meant to really drive the point home. The description of the "religion of tomorrow" is in somewhat broad terms, within integral parameters, with lots of room for higher perspectives, and malleable enough to be applied to any spiritual tradition. Lots of attention on technical details. I wish there were more of Wilber's passionate, poetic paragraphs -- in particular when he describes the drives of the Kosmos and the role of the individual reader in the evolutionary process (Eros). Big fan.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Ramo Boer

    Well, just started and like I've experienced with most of Ken's books, it is like coming home! Well, just started and like I've experienced with most of Ken's books, it is like coming home!

  5. 5 out of 5

    Eugene Pustoshkin

    This 800-page book is a groundbreaking achievement of a supramentally-streaming mind, heart, and soul. I just finished translating it to Russian (the translation will be published in 2021), and I will never be the same again. It has been a long journey, I have spent two years translating the text, but, really, I had never felt so serene and peaceful after translating or editing any book or any text whatsoever as I felt once I translated the last words of the book. The material is very practical. This 800-page book is a groundbreaking achievement of a supramentally-streaming mind, heart, and soul. I just finished translating it to Russian (the translation will be published in 2021), and I will never be the same again. It has been a long journey, I have spent two years translating the text, but, really, I had never felt so serene and peaceful after translating or editing any book or any text whatsoever as I felt once I translated the last words of the book. The material is very practical. There is no one who writes with such breadth and depth as Ken Wilber, while going directly to the heart matter of Integral supramentally unitive vision of the Kosmos. I am so grateful I am alive at this time in history when I could read such a text and partake in the evolutionary unfolding of humanity.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Debby Hallett

    Ken Wilber's work has changed my life. I started reading his books in the 1990's. I keep buying his books looking for something new to inspire me and change my life further, but am repeatedly disappointed. His books have changed my life, but I didn't see much new in this one (I read about 75% 0of it and it was much the same message as his previous works.) I *would* like to see him publish more frequent, shorter works that would help to explain the world's events in terms of his model. I would ke Ken Wilber's work has changed my life. I started reading his books in the 1990's. I keep buying his books looking for something new to inspire me and change my life further, but am repeatedly disappointed. His books have changed my life, but I didn't see much new in this one (I read about 75% 0of it and it was much the same message as his previous works.) I *would* like to see him publish more frequent, shorter works that would help to explain the world's events in terms of his model. I would keep buying them...

  7. 5 out of 5

    Joseph Knecht

    This is the magnum opus of Ken Wilber. It probably took him his whole life to integrate all different development models, spiritual traditions and personal insights. That said, this is not an easy read. Wilber talks about the spiritual evolution of man through growth in structures and states. Structures are permanent, states are temporary. Structures are earned, states are given for free. One evolves through the structures, and one uses the peak states to evolve faster. Ken divides Structures in This is the magnum opus of Ken Wilber. It probably took him his whole life to integrate all different development models, spiritual traditions and personal insights. That said, this is not an easy read. Wilber talks about the spiritual evolution of man through growth in structures and states. Structures are permanent, states are temporary. Structures are earned, states are given for free. One evolves through the structures, and one uses the peak states to evolve faster. Ken divides Structures into 3tiers. He calls them, GROWING UP, WAKING UP, CLEANING UP. 1st tier. Growing up is the state of development where the id and the ego evolve through the awareness of self separate from the world. 2nd tier: Waking up is the state of development where the ego dissolves into the world and becomes aware that there is a Higher Self. 3rd tier: Cleaning up is the state of development where the Higher Self becomes aware of the Supreme Mind and recognizes there was no ego, nor Self but only Mind. The biggest value of this book is the shadow work material. Wilber describes the most common way people fall into their own shadows. They reject parts of themselves that would allow them to reach their Higher Self. He does this for all levels of development. If you are stuck in your spiritual journey, here you might find the answer you have been looking for. For me, it took about 500 pages of reading to find the answer I needed. So perseverance paid off. Wilber also argues the need for semiotics where words can be linked to a well-defined state of description. Oftentimes he fails to describe these words himself. He uses many words, ex. Suchness, Isness, Thusness without no common definition. If you yourself have a subjective experience of these states, you understand their meaning. But if you don't, you won't understand much. But at the end, I am grateful to Ken Wilber for creating the map of spiritual evolution. Like any map, it's not perfect, but it can show us where we are and where we are headed. I really enjoyed his summary chapters where he spoke more from the soul. Some other quotes I really enjoyed: -As long as you are identified with your present self, your present subject, you can’t let go of it and make room for the next higher subject, or relative self, and thus you derail your chances of reaching your Absolute Subjectivity, or Real Self and True Nature, let alone your Supreme Identity -all the languages ever produced; every form of mathematics and logic; and so on and so on and so on. ALL of those were produced during involution and hidden in the higher unconscious, and evolution is nothing but an unfolding of those already created forms that are lying in our unconscious, or in Spirit, and awaiting their turn to emerge. -What you most deeply are, and what I AM as well, is looking out of the eyes of each and every being in the entire world: every ant, deer, lion, Mexican, German, Canadian, Russian, Iranian, Israeli, all one and the same I AMness, one Spirit, one Self. As Erwin Schrödinger, cofounder of modern quantum mechanics, put it, “Consciousness is a singular of which the plural is unknown.” -Consciousness is not a thing, process, event, or system, but the opening or clearing in which things, processes, events, and systems appear or arise. Consciousness, in its ultimate sense, is the empty clearing or opening in which manifestation occurs. -The world is not physical; it is psychophysical, all the way up, all the way down—every single Right-hand event in the world has a correlative Left-hand dimension, bar none. -For Ramana, that which is not ever-present cannot be ultimately real; the ultimately real is not something that can have a beginning in time, since that would make it strictly temporal, not timeless or eternal; and that which is not eternal is not ultimately worth seeking or desiring, since it will eventually decompose one way or another, leaving its holder deeply disappointed and unhappy. -We forget the Whole, and grasp for parts. Only the Whole is Full (its parts are all pieces); only the Whole itself doesn’t suffer (its parts all suffer); only the Whole doesn’t die (its parts all die); only the Whole embraces all time within it (its parts exist only within time). -with great effort, since each new and higher stage of development (structure or state) is bought only by learning new lessons that are not contained in the soul’s accumulated “wisdom” and “virtue” thus far (and included in its set point). So each stage that the self manages to attain in the new life, beyond the set-point stage, occurs by the self learning new and higher wisdoms and virtues, which are then stored in its “eternal drop” and become part of the new set point in its next life -Ironically, by allergically avoiding and denying the ego, the ego remains embedded in consciousness, distorting both the subtle soul and subtle Awareness -If you want to know what you were thinking yesterday, look at your body today; if you want to know what your body will look like tomorrow, look at your thinking today.” -Old paradigms die when the believers in old paradigms die,” which I have summarized as “The knowledge quest proceeds funeral by funeral -YOU, my friend—by every Integral thought that you have, conceive, read, write, share, hear, pass on, dream, or envision, by the very fact of your interiorly entertaining that Integral object of awareness—YOU are driving a progress that will one day bring the world to a shuddering surrender of gratitude and grace and all-caring embrace.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Amy

    This is an awful book, especially for something that Amazon bills as a textbook. I didn't have a problem with the author sharing his personal religious history or his use of buddhism as an example throughout the book. What I had a problem with was the fact that the topic (how religions can be more inclusive and respond to today's issues for tomorrow's survival) was not approached in anything even remotely like an academic context. This was a lot - 30+ hours worth! - of meaningless jargon strung This is an awful book, especially for something that Amazon bills as a textbook. I didn't have a problem with the author sharing his personal religious history or his use of buddhism as an example throughout the book. What I had a problem with was the fact that the topic (how religions can be more inclusive and respond to today's issues for tomorrow's survival) was not approached in anything even remotely like an academic context. This was a lot - 30+ hours worth! - of meaningless jargon strung together in fluffy, impressive-sounding, but ultimately meaningless sentences. For anyone who understands that the words are empty and the concepts themselves are twisted, The Religion of Tomorrow is worthless. There are definitely things that today's religions should try to change if they want to attract and keep members, but this book will do very little to help guide those religions and religious leaders that are interested in doing so. Also, I did not appreciate the author's desperation-tinged repetitions that religion has to survive because it is necessary in some vague way (for morals, for social good, for culture - the exact reason changes in various places). I am not blind to the fact that Wilber is basically saying the increase in secularism is a horrible plague and that atheists are fundamentally lacking in morals, do not make for good citizens, and are bad for culture on a whole. Not only is this WRONG - countries with the highest social health ratings are, with the glaring exception of the US, the most secular countries (see more here: http://www.oecdbetterlifeindex.org/#/...) - but it is deliberately offensive to a very specific group of readers that the author sees as an acceptable target, doesn't care about, and/or doesn't think will be reading his book. I, personally, don't think there is evidence for the existence of any gods, and don't think any belief system built on lies is necessary to any scale of well-being, so this premise - and the fact that he kept bringing it up - irritated me. I picked up this book because it seems like most people do not share my view of religions, and I wanted to learn more about how religions could adapt to the modern world. What I got instead of a flimsy, whiny, hollow diatribe, and I that I got progressively more and more angry with. The only reason I finished out the book was because I didn't feel right about leaving a review if I hadn't finished the book. But The Religion of Tomorrow is certainly not something I will recommend; it was a waste of 30+ hours of time and 1 Audible credit.

  9. 4 out of 5

    ManGar

    This is not a criticism but a description of my experience in engaging with this book. “The Religion of Tomorrow” is a very seductive title. I was familiar with Ken Wilber from some of his material that focused on the US foray into Iraq in 2003. I remember a characterization of the US move as founded at the Red level. It was a logical, rational discussion delivered in the context of Spiral Dynamics. Having an interest in all things spiritual I launched into reading this book. This decision was a This is not a criticism but a description of my experience in engaging with this book. “The Religion of Tomorrow” is a very seductive title. I was familiar with Ken Wilber from some of his material that focused on the US foray into Iraq in 2003. I remember a characterization of the US move as founded at the Red level. It was a logical, rational discussion delivered in the context of Spiral Dynamics. Having an interest in all things spiritual I launched into reading this book. This decision was also based on the writer's association with other writers that I respect, such as Thomas Keating and Richard Rohr. This adventure has been a challenge because the writer has chosen a method of communication that uses a plethora of terms delivered with quotation marks, italics, dashes, yet is often delivered via endless sentences with numerous clauses that go on for entire pages. The book itself is an epic work that encompasses a lot of material that I found difficult to digest at times. Many insightful concepts are introduced that I found engaging; yet I found myself caught up in the challenges in the format the writer used for delivery. In my view, if I were to teach this material trying to achieve a thorough grasping by the student, I would provide: 1. A thorough glossary to all the terms that the writer takes for granted. 2. Go simply and clearly through all terms listed in Figure 4.1 "Some details from the 4 quadrants.” 3. Go simply and clearly through each term used in Figures 6.1 and "Some major developmental lines." and 6.2 "Some further developmental lines (plus meditative states). Those figures capture the gist of the book elegantly. I first checked out this book around May of 2019. I have now finished as of October 8, 2020. I had to renew the book multiple times, of course. Did I read every word? Absolutely not. I read the first few chapters, maybe the first third of the book; then I "speed read" the next third. After that I limited myself to reading the first line of each paragraph. I did read the Conclusion. Overall the book delivers innovative thinking about the transformative potential of mankind and how it fits into the Cosmos.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Jamie Zigelbaum

    DNF — incredible insights of the highest calibre buried in one of the most poorly, carelessly constructed books I’ve ever read. Wilber can be a wonderful writer, but this felt more like an unedited dump of notes than a book. I struggled through and found many gems and plan to keep coming back at least until he published volume 2 of his Kosmos trilogy, but it’s a hard book to recommend. I’d love a concise edited version. It’s 5 stars for the insights and 1 star for the writing — but the insights DNF — incredible insights of the highest calibre buried in one of the most poorly, carelessly constructed books I’ve ever read. Wilber can be a wonderful writer, but this felt more like an unedited dump of notes than a book. I struggled through and found many gems and plan to keep coming back at least until he published volume 2 of his Kosmos trilogy, but it’s a hard book to recommend. I’d love a concise edited version. It’s 5 stars for the insights and 1 star for the writing — but the insights are so good I have to give it 4 stars. It clarified much of his previous work for me.

  11. 5 out of 5

    William Bryant

    Ken Wilbur is a visionary genius. I love his integral approach to... well, everything. I love his philosophy to take the gold from millions of different perspective and come up with integral inclusive models of reality and everything within it. This is a very dense book and very deep. I love the premise but it was a little too much right now since I have a few other books I just can't wait to read and this book would slow down my progress in those books by at least a couple weeks. Ken Wilbur is a visionary genius. I love his integral approach to... well, everything. I love his philosophy to take the gold from millions of different perspective and come up with integral inclusive models of reality and everything within it. This is a very dense book and very deep. I love the premise but it was a little too much right now since I have a few other books I just can't wait to read and this book would slow down my progress in those books by at least a couple weeks.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Alex Giurgea

    Am studiat opera lui Wilber incepand cu primele aparitii din anii '70 si pana astazi. Fiecare carte publicata a daramat si reconstruit ceea ce constituia viziunea lui asupra lumii in acel moment. Aceasta este publicata in 2017 si continua aceeasi serie de demolari si reconstructii catre o imagine cat mai detaliata asupra a fenomenelor interioare si exterioare, subiective si obiective. Cartea este dificila si foarte lunga (peste 800 de pagini) dar e plina de claritate. Am studiat opera lui Wilber incepand cu primele aparitii din anii '70 si pana astazi. Fiecare carte publicata a daramat si reconstruit ceea ce constituia viziunea lui asupra lumii in acel moment. Aceasta este publicata in 2017 si continua aceeasi serie de demolari si reconstructii catre o imagine cat mai detaliata asupra a fenomenelor interioare si exterioare, subiective si obiective. Cartea este dificila si foarte lunga (peste 800 de pagini) dar e plina de claritate.

  13. 4 out of 5

    Feike

    Contains very interesting information for those that have already done quite some work on the spiritual path and are looking for more material to work with, or for those that want an inspiring overview of what is possible in human development. The book has given me a lot of inspiration for things to do shadow work with. The writing style is something to get used to (a lot of long side notes between parantheses).

  14. 4 out of 5

    David

    I have not evolved enough to fully comprehend this book but I made it through all 800 pages! Ken has this incredible gift of integrating many schools of thought. There is so much in this tome to unpack and contemplate. I just wish he could have written this in a more accessible way to the ordinary reader. It's more a textbook than a spiritual guidebook. I have not evolved enough to fully comprehend this book but I made it through all 800 pages! Ken has this incredible gift of integrating many schools of thought. There is so much in this tome to unpack and contemplate. I just wish he could have written this in a more accessible way to the ordinary reader. It's more a textbook than a spiritual guidebook.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Voldi

    One of the most impressive books I've read. Long, repetitive and it's perfect that it is this way. The concepts presented are worth hearing again and again, as they might not be easy to really get properly at first, but are sure worth it. One of the most impressive books I've read. Long, repetitive and it's perfect that it is this way. The concepts presented are worth hearing again and again, as they might not be easy to really get properly at first, but are sure worth it.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Paul Brooks

    Tomorrow's Bible. No joke. Hopefully a free of our grandchildren will find this book Tomorrow's Bible. No joke. Hopefully a free of our grandchildren will find this book

  17. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    More integral theory, this more closely tied to a spirituality that is based on current and perhaps future human development.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Necla

    Better to read on paper!

  19. 4 out of 5

    Daniel C Haas

    Mind blowing Vision Thank goodness for Evolution’s drive toward inclusiveness In spite of our best efforts to the contrary. This is a must read for anyone on a spiritual journey.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Teo 2050

    2019.06.30–2019.07.12 Contents Wilber K (2017) (30:17) Religion of Tomorrow, The - A Vision for the Future of the Great Traditions—More Inclusive, More Comprehensive, More Complete Introduction Part I: A Fourth Turning of the Dharma 01. What Is a Fourth Turning? 02. What Does a Fourth Turning Involve? • An “Integral” View • Freedom and Fullness: WAKING UP and GROWING UP • Spiritual Intelligence versus Spiritual Experience • Summary • Understanding the “Culture Wars” • Shadow Work • Concluding Remarks Part II: 2019.06.30–2019.07.12 Contents Wilber K (2017) (30:17) Religion of Tomorrow, The - A Vision for the Future of the Great Traditions—More Inclusive, More Comprehensive, More Complete Introduction Part I: A Fourth Turning of the Dharma 01. What Is a Fourth Turning? 02. What Does a Fourth Turning Involve? • An “Integral” View • Freedom and Fullness: WAKING UP and GROWING UP • Spiritual Intelligence versus Spiritual Experience • Summary • Understanding the “Culture Wars” • Shadow Work • Concluding Remarks Part II: States and Structures of Consciousness 03. The Fundamental States of Consciousness • States and Structures • States of Consciousness • • The Natural States of Consciousness • • Meditative States of Consciousness • • The Stages of Meditative States • • Transcend and Include • • Subjects Becoming Objects • States and Vantage Points 04. The Gross and Subtle States of Consciousness • The Gross (or Physical) State • The Subtle State • • The Low Subtle • • The Middle Subtle • • The High Subtle 05. The Causal, Empty Witness, and Nondual States of Consciousness • The Causal State • • Involution/Efflux and Evolution/Reflux • • The High Causal • • The Low Causal • The Supracausal Empty Witness or Consciousness as Such • The Nondual State • • The Experience of Nonduality • • The 1-2-3 of Spirit 06. The Hidden Structures of Consciousness • The Importance of Structures of Consciousness in Spirituality • Ladder, Climber, View 07. The Structure-Stages of Development • Types of Spirituality • Spiritual Intelligence and Development in 1st and 2nd Tiers • Spiritual Intelligence and Development in 3rd Tier • • Indigo Para-Mind • • Violet Meta-Mind • • Ultraviolet Overmind • • White Supermind Part III: Dysfunctional Shadow Elements in Development 08. Shadow Work • Addictions and Allergies • The 3-2-1 Process • “Flourishing” and Journaling • More on Shadow Material • The 3-2-1-0 Process, or Spiritual Transmutation 09. Dysfunctions of the 1st-Tier Structure-Views • Overview • Infrared Archaic • Magenta Magic • Red Magic-Mythic • Amber Mythic • The Amber/Orange Mythic-Rational • Orange Rational • Green Pluralistic 10. Dysfunctions of the 2nd-Tier Structure-Views • Teal Holistic and Turquoise Integral • How Many Levels Are There? 11. Dysfunctions of the 3rd-Tier Structure-Views • Overview • Spiritual Bypassing • Indigo Para-Mind • Violet Meta-Mind • Ultraviolet Overmind • White Supermind • Conclusion 12. Dysfunctions of the Gross and Subtle States • Gross-State Dysfunctions • • Problems Involving Higher States • • Necessity of a New Culture of Spirituality • • Structure-Related Problems • Subtle-State Dysfunctions • • Gross-to-Subtle Dysfunctions • • Subtle-to-Causal Dysfunctions • • The Need for a Soul Culture 13. Dysfunctions of the Causal, Empty Witness, and Suchness States • Causal-State Dysfunctions • • Subtle/Causal and Causal Dysfunctions • • Causal-to-Emptiness Dysfunctions • The Empty Witness Realm • • Causal-to-Emptiness Dysfunctions • • Witness-to-Suchness Dysfunctions • Suchness Dysfunctions • • Dysfunctional Structures Interpreting States • • Suchness Dysfunctions Themselves • Energy Malfunctions • Healthy and Unhealthy Drives • The Importance of Transference • Concluding Remarks on the Shadow Part IV: Elements of an Integral Spirituality 14. Structures and States • Structures and Structure-Stages of Development • • Stages in Buddhism Itself • • 3rd-Tier Spiritual Intelligence • • On the Way to the Conveyor Belt • States and State-Stages (or Vantage Points) 15. Shadow Work, Quadrants, and Developmental Lines • Shadow Work • The 4 Quadrants • The 1-2-3 of Spirit • Developmental Lines (including Multiple Intelligences) 16. Miscellaneous Elements • Typologies • Polarity Therapy • Subtle Energy Dimensions • • Nine Subtle Energy Systems • Network Sciences • Accelerated Developmental Approaches • The Technological Tie-In • The Miracle of “We” • A Higher “We” 17. Integral Semiotics and a New God-Talk • Integral Semiotics • Languages of the Divine • The Real Impact of Interior Thinking Conclusion: The Evolution of Nonduality Notes Bibliography Index

  21. 4 out of 5

    Alê Ometto

    Neste livro, para alcançar o objetivo de apresentar as características necessárias para uma religião de massas permanecer relevante nos dias de hoje, Ken Wilber traz um abrangente panorama da Teoria Integral, com seus diferentes prismas e referências. Leitura excelente tanto para quem está interessado em conhecer a Teoria Integral em profundidade, quanto para o entusiasta que quer se reciclar, atualizar e inspirar.

  22. 5 out of 5

    Carl Buschmann

  23. 4 out of 5

    Morgan Harris

  24. 4 out of 5

    Paul Vittay

  25. 4 out of 5

    Dominic Fay

  26. 4 out of 5

    Egor Azanov

  27. 5 out of 5

    Harvesa

  28. 4 out of 5

    Dana Revnic

  29. 5 out of 5

    Devin Martin

  30. 5 out of 5

    Michelle Mathias

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