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Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? Police Violence and Resistance in the United States

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What is the reality of policing in the United States? Do the police keep anyone safe and secure other than the very wealthy? How do recent police killings of young black people in the United States fit into the historical and global context of anti-blackness? This collection of reports and essays (the first collaboration between Truthout and Haymarket Books) explores police What is the reality of policing in the United States? Do the police keep anyone safe and secure other than the very wealthy? How do recent police killings of young black people in the United States fit into the historical and global context of anti-blackness? This collection of reports and essays (the first collaboration between Truthout and Haymarket Books) explores police violence against black, brown, indigenous and other marginalized communities, miscarriages of justice, and failures of token accountability and reform measures. It also makes a compelling and provocative argument against calling the police. Contributions cover a broad range of issues including the killing by police of black men and women, police violence against Latino and indigenous communities, law enforcement's treatment of pregnant people and those with mental illness, and the impact of racist police violence on parenting, as well as specific stories such as a Detroit police conspiracy to slap murder convictions on young black men using police informant and the failure of Chicago's much-touted Independent Police Review Authority, the body supposedly responsible for investigating police misconduct. The title Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? is no mere provocation: the book also explores alternatives for keeping communities safe. Contributors include William C. Anderson, Candice Bernd, Aaron Cantú, Thandi Chimurenga, Ejeris Dixon, Adam Hudson, Victoria Law, Mike Ludwig, Sarah Macaraeg, and Roberto Rodriguez.


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What is the reality of policing in the United States? Do the police keep anyone safe and secure other than the very wealthy? How do recent police killings of young black people in the United States fit into the historical and global context of anti-blackness? This collection of reports and essays (the first collaboration between Truthout and Haymarket Books) explores police What is the reality of policing in the United States? Do the police keep anyone safe and secure other than the very wealthy? How do recent police killings of young black people in the United States fit into the historical and global context of anti-blackness? This collection of reports and essays (the first collaboration between Truthout and Haymarket Books) explores police violence against black, brown, indigenous and other marginalized communities, miscarriages of justice, and failures of token accountability and reform measures. It also makes a compelling and provocative argument against calling the police. Contributions cover a broad range of issues including the killing by police of black men and women, police violence against Latino and indigenous communities, law enforcement's treatment of pregnant people and those with mental illness, and the impact of racist police violence on parenting, as well as specific stories such as a Detroit police conspiracy to slap murder convictions on young black men using police informant and the failure of Chicago's much-touted Independent Police Review Authority, the body supposedly responsible for investigating police misconduct. The title Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? is no mere provocation: the book also explores alternatives for keeping communities safe. Contributors include William C. Anderson, Candice Bernd, Aaron Cantú, Thandi Chimurenga, Ejeris Dixon, Adam Hudson, Victoria Law, Mike Ludwig, Sarah Macaraeg, and Roberto Rodriguez.

30 review for Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? Police Violence and Resistance in the United States

  1. 5 out of 5

    sj

    (havent read this yet) this is free to download from https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/... until the 5th june btw !! (havent read this yet) this is free to download from https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/... until the 5th june btw !!

  2. 4 out of 5

    J.P.

    Great book! It's an anthology of essays by various writers and activists that addresses many issues that they fight for. Police brutality is the obvious issue, but also, what does it mean to be free, to fight for freedom? Who all is included in that freedom? That is definitely an important question. What does it mean to transform what justice is, to transform society, especially in the face of a society that will fight to do anything but change? What do solutions and alternatives look like? All Great book! It's an anthology of essays by various writers and activists that addresses many issues that they fight for. Police brutality is the obvious issue, but also, what does it mean to be free, to fight for freedom? Who all is included in that freedom? That is definitely an important question. What does it mean to transform what justice is, to transform society, especially in the face of a society that will fight to do anything but change? What do solutions and alternatives look like? All of these questions, issues and more are addressed in this book. Where the book really shines is where it addresses people who should be included in black liberation or be in solidarity with it because of the issues they face not unlike our own, that aren't simply heterosexual black males. They all face the same issues that heterosexual black males face when dealing with police, but other people face issues unique to them, especially black women. What issues do black women face along the lines of gendered violence when faced with police? What do they deal with in regards to medical issues, things unique to women, particularly pregnancy & what that means for how they are treated when they are stopped, frisked, arrested & detained, especially unlawfully and unjustly? That brings to mind Korryn Gaines and her miscarriage shortly before her death. It is also brought up what it means to be in solidarity with others and why it is so necessary, whether it is indigenous or native people or brown people, who also face discrimination and racism. How our histories with them, while complicated and with a few conflicts and seeming betrayals, are intertwined and how we were essentially separated because the state recognizes the power in our unity and solidarity. It is also important to recognize BLACK lgbtqia people in liberation. They do not and should not have to choose their blackness at the expense of their sexuality or identities especially when they are oppressed and deal with violence because of those things in addition to being black, especially if toxic masculinity is factored into the mix. Various community solutions and alternatives are cited toward the end of the book, which is great if the goal is to get away from policing in society and also because there are and will still be other issues that need to be addressed that will not be helped with the way police escalate and introduce violence. It is because of these other issues that despite recognizing the problem of police brutality, some do not want police or policing to go away altogether. There can be & are other ways and those will definitely be necessary in addressing various community issues, particularly as it pertains to protecting women, LGBTQIA people and taking on medical situations that aren't emergencies. All in all, this is a great book. A must read for those interested in liberation and justice, the abolishment of police and community alternatives for and involvement in our well-being.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Rachel

    This book gave me a lot to think about. "Challenging the police as an institution must involve asking big and unsettling questions. What does being safe mean? How many of our society's assumptions about safety are grounded in racism, injustice, and violence? If we can't count on an ever-present state "service" to "protect" us, what can we count on?" This book gave me a lot to think about. "Challenging the police as an institution must involve asking big and unsettling questions. What does being safe mean? How many of our society's assumptions about safety are grounded in racism, injustice, and violence? If we can't count on an ever-present state "service" to "protect" us, what can we count on?"

  4. 5 out of 5

    Linda

    necessary reading

  5. 4 out of 5

    Joe Xtarr

    This is a great collection of writing, from multiple authors, that delivers a very concise introduction to our current policing system in the US. It's a perfect mix of data and personal experience. The last half is wonderfully inspiring, offering concrete solutions instead of just lofty ideals. Get mad. Get involved. This is a great collection of writing, from multiple authors, that delivers a very concise introduction to our current policing system in the US. It's a perfect mix of data and personal experience. The last half is wonderfully inspiring, offering concrete solutions instead of just lofty ideals. Get mad. Get involved.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Sarah Ames-Foley

    PSA: The ebook version is currently FREE on the publisher's website! PSA: The ebook version is currently FREE on the publisher's website!

  7. 5 out of 5

    Annika (whatannikareads)

    4.5/5! Very informative read. I liked the diversity of the different essays in this anthology. I think it touched upon very different aspects of police brutality and violence in many communities. I also enjoyed the practical ways that people have switched away from relying on the police and the essays on the different community building actions. I highly recommend for anyone to be honest! Content warning: mention of various Black and Latinx folks who were killed by police and how they were killed. 4.5/5! Very informative read. I liked the diversity of the different essays in this anthology. I think it touched upon very different aspects of police brutality and violence in many communities. I also enjoyed the practical ways that people have switched away from relying on the police and the essays on the different community building actions. I highly recommend for anyone to be honest! Content warning: mention of various Black and Latinx folks who were killed by police and how they were killed. Really heavy content that is necessary to read, but a content warning in case you are particularly prone to distress from reading those things.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Charlotte

    I especially liked the second half that explored alternatives to policing, and had a chapter on forging allyship between Black and Indigenous people.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Maddie McBlain

    A really excellent collection of pieces by community organizers who have been doing work to advance healthier + safer + more just alternatives to policing, since way before it was trendy. It was really encouraging to read about practical solutions and real communities.

  10. 4 out of 5

    Joy Messinger

    Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? is an excellent primer for those who are new to learning about police violence and abolition and also has something to offer for those who have been working in these arenas for many years. Regular readers of TruthOut will be familiar with the pieces in this anthology (full disclosure: I'm a donor!) but even for those who know these essays and these authors, I find them worth multiple reads, and appreciate how the combination of them provides important contex Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect? is an excellent primer for those who are new to learning about police violence and abolition and also has something to offer for those who have been working in these arenas for many years. Regular readers of TruthOut will be familiar with the pieces in this anthology (full disclosure: I'm a donor!) but even for those who know these essays and these authors, I find them worth multiple reads, and appreciate how the combination of them provides important context and thinking about how to address the centuries of violence from the criminal legal system. The book is laid out so that you can read everything in the order presented or jump around from essay to essay based on your interests without losing sight of the full context.

  11. 5 out of 5

    Sarah

    This is a collection of essays about police brutality and alternatives to policing for community safety. The first half of the book addresses police brutality against Black and brown people in the United States. The article about police treatment of pregnant people (including references to multiple women whose fetuses were assigned lawyers while they themselves were not!) was particularly infuriating. The second half suggests alternatives to police and steps that communities can take to move awa This is a collection of essays about police brutality and alternatives to policing for community safety. The first half of the book addresses police brutality against Black and brown people in the United States. The article about police treatment of pregnant people (including references to multiple women whose fetuses were assigned lawyers while they themselves were not!) was particularly infuriating. The second half suggests alternatives to police and steps that communities can take to move away from police being the first responders in any crisis. Overall it's a good introduction if you're starting to read in the news about abolition of the police and are wondering why, or what that would look like.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Ella

    An interesting and eye-opening book that explores the issue of police/state sanctioned violence against people of colour from various angles. The writing style of some chapters isn't the most engaging, reading more as a list of facts/stats, but overall an important read that is useful to anyone wanting to learn more about the US police system. An interesting and eye-opening book that explores the issue of police/state sanctioned violence against people of colour from various angles. The writing style of some chapters isn't the most engaging, reading more as a list of facts/stats, but overall an important read that is useful to anyone wanting to learn more about the US police system.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Alan Mills

    Short version: great book. Longer version: stay tuned.

  14. 4 out of 5

    Joe

    Just one man's opinion but I think this came out pretty well. Just one man's opinion but I think this came out pretty well.

  15. 4 out of 5

    Jasmine Serrano

    I think this book is a great introduction for someone (like me) who is new to conversations about police abolition, transformative justice, or community safety. As a collection of essays, this book provides the reader a wide, but related and intersectional, array of perspectives on these topics. I especially appreciated the centering of Black women and WOC, LGBTQIA, and Native perspectives. It’s always tough to know where to start when familiarizing yourself with a movement, but this book offers I think this book is a great introduction for someone (like me) who is new to conversations about police abolition, transformative justice, or community safety. As a collection of essays, this book provides the reader a wide, but related and intersectional, array of perspectives on these topics. I especially appreciated the centering of Black women and WOC, LGBTQIA, and Native perspectives. It’s always tough to know where to start when familiarizing yourself with a movement, but this book offers several points of entry into deeper knowledge and further education beyond this text.

  16. 5 out of 5

    David Hernández

    An important anthology on systemic police violence but also the ways in which we might wean ourselves off of our over reliance on police and prisons and transition towards community based solutions. Including so many voices and perspectives, though unusual, turned out to be a huge strength for this book.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Megan Sanks

    I really love that Haymarket Books has been giving this ebook away for free at the moment. I appreciated that this book was split up into two parts: the first focused on the problems of policing and then the second looked at solutions and alternatives.

  18. 5 out of 5

    Emma Langlois

    A really interesting collection. The essays, written by a wide variety of authors, covered a lot of different but related topics. This was great to see a large range of perspective, but also leaves more room for knowledge gaps. I have research to do!! I enjoyed the two part structure, and learned a lot from every essay. Would recommend!!

  19. 5 out of 5

    Sophie

    You can get this as a free ebook until June 5th I think! If you don't have time to read it now, download it and save it until you can. You can get this as a free ebook until June 5th I think! If you don't have time to read it now, download it and save it until you can.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Meg 🌞

    so pertinent right now - if you're looking for a resource to educate yourself would highly recommend picking this up so pertinent right now - if you're looking for a resource to educate yourself would highly recommend picking this up

  21. 4 out of 5

    Theodore

    i personally wouldn't call myself an abolitionist yet. frankly haven't done the work or reading to fully land on that position but it's hard as hell not to when you read these essays. such a stellar, enraging, though provoking book that covers such a broad range of issues in policing. this book will guide you into thinking about how we should reexamine policing in this country. i personally wouldn't call myself an abolitionist yet. frankly haven't done the work or reading to fully land on that position but it's hard as hell not to when you read these essays. such a stellar, enraging, though provoking book that covers such a broad range of issues in policing. this book will guide you into thinking about how we should reexamine policing in this country.

  22. 4 out of 5

    Isaac Jensen

    A collection of essays by activists, journalists, and organizers loosely centered around the Movement for Black Lives and opposition to state violence perpetuated by police against people of color, particularly Black and Indigenous people. Individual essays dive deeply into the granular work of organizing, draw connections between particular events and larger societal forces, and lay out the intersectional nature of movement work. Well worth the read. “In activist and progressive communities, we’ A collection of essays by activists, journalists, and organizers loosely centered around the Movement for Black Lives and opposition to state violence perpetuated by police against people of color, particularly Black and Indigenous people. Individual essays dive deeply into the granular work of organizing, draw connections between particular events and larger societal forces, and lay out the intersectional nature of movement work. Well worth the read. “In activist and progressive communities, we’re accustomed to attending one training or reading one essay and then declaring ourselves leaders and educators on an issue. I believe that the notion of instant expertise is contrary to our liberatory values. Safety is not a product that we can package and market. Community safety is not a certification we can put on our resumes. We have the invitation to practice with one of our most precious resources, our lives.” -Ejeris Dixon, from the chapter Building Community Safety: Practical Steps Toward Liberatory Transformation

  23. 4 out of 5

    Faaiz

    I'd recommend this book to those not informed about the many and intricate ways in which policing in the US brutalizes Black and Brown and low-income communities in particular, along with all the intersecting avenues where gender, class, legal status, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, etc. meet with disproportionate force from police. But while non-White people are killed and brutalized by the police at a disproportionate rate, the lack of any attention in the book to the various ways W I'd recommend this book to those not informed about the many and intricate ways in which policing in the US brutalizes Black and Brown and low-income communities in particular, along with all the intersecting avenues where gender, class, legal status, sexual orientation, religious affiliation, etc. meet with disproportionate force from police. But while non-White people are killed and brutalized by the police at a disproportionate rate, the lack of any attention in the book to the various ways White people are impacted by the police (even if they are not affected because they're White; or are affected despite being White, however one wants to frame it...) leaves any conversation about policing in the US incomplete. Of course, we are currently in a moment where police brutality is again in the spotlight. The focus on how police target and kill Black people at a disproportionate rate has undoubtedly galvanized the masses, leading to widespread revolt and uprising which is awe-inspiring. However, from my position, the institution of police will not become palatable if the rate of murder by police of Black and Brown people fall down to their "proportionate" levels from the current "disproportionate" levels. With that recognition, it becomes clear that police abolition is the goal in and of itself, not just one that is predicated on the fact that it targets some more so than others which it undoubtedly does. My point is not to disparage the immensely profound and real violence committed against Black and Brown bodies, but to build on from the premise that we need a world free of the police. If the disproportionate murder of Black and Brown folks by the police helps others arrive at that premise then so be it, as long as we move towards a radically different future without the violence and brutality of the police in it. Therefore, there is a need to focus on broader coalition building against policing as an instrument of control and oppression unleashed against the masses and in protection of private property. As such, this book doesn't build towards a firm stance in favor of police abolition or a radical restructuring of society without police.

  24. 4 out of 5

    Evan Balikos

    This review has been hidden because it contains spoilers. To view it, click here. Phenomenal collection. All of these articles are expertly written and thoroughly poignant. These stories about law enforcement failing to protect the communities that they serve is a dominant vindication for much of the radical and transformative ideals that are brought up and persuaded to readers in hopes of universal change. My favorite is “Our Dreams, Our History”—which talked about the intersection of Black People and Native Americans. Not only was it insightful and well-written, but it was Phenomenal collection. All of these articles are expertly written and thoroughly poignant. These stories about law enforcement failing to protect the communities that they serve is a dominant vindication for much of the radical and transformative ideals that are brought up and persuaded to readers in hopes of universal change. My favorite is “Our Dreams, Our History”—which talked about the intersection of Black People and Native Americans. Not only was it insightful and well-written, but it was frightening evidence that Native Americans—a marginalized group who have been colonized and subsequently brutalized by police—are just as displaced and terrorized as Black and Latinx people. Whether it be context about the ongoing corruption of Chicago Police Departments or the additional punishment that pregnant women face in our legal system, this book is successful in presenting detailed stories about marginalized groups that are facing an ongoing battle with police who simply don’t serve to protect them. It’s a harrowing but immensely important read.

  25. 5 out of 5

    Rachel Willis

    An excellent collection of essays from Truthout regarding the inherent violence in the police state toward communities of color.

  26. 4 out of 5

    Hannah

    This was an incredible collection of writing, I was so drawn in I finished it in a day. Deeply important stuff on heavy subjects, with hugely important perspectives.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Jake

    An important anthology of work from reporters and activists about movements for Black lives and abolishing police states. The various perspectives, data, anecdotes, analyses, and calls-to-action overview the U.S.'s historically racist and violent systems of policing and beckon readers to imagine transformative notions of safety and justice. E-book available for free download at this link! https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/... A few quotes: “The conflict that has driven history in the New World i An important anthology of work from reporters and activists about movements for Black lives and abolishing police states. The various perspectives, data, anecdotes, analyses, and calls-to-action overview the U.S.'s historically racist and violent systems of policing and beckon readers to imagine transformative notions of safety and justice. E-book available for free download at this link! https://www.haymarketbooks.org/books/... A few quotes: “The conflict that has driven history in the New World is Black people’s struggle to hold onto their humanity against a culture that objectifies them as property” (N. Powers). “Slavery built modern capitalism and enriched a vast network of slaveholders, stock traders, banks and corporations. Slaveholders’ number one fear was slave rebellion, since that would disrupt or collapse the system. Thus, terrorizing slaves through torture and other violence was a way to control them, prevent insurrection and uphold the slave-built economic system" (A. Hudson). “According to FBI data, a white police officer kills a Black person almost twice a week” (A. Hudson). “Police officers who brutalize Black and Brown people often try to protect themselves from scrutiny or reprimand by charging their victims with felonies afterward. In court, district attorneys then offer to reduce the charges against victims of brutality to misdemeanors, permitting them to plead guilty and walk away with no time or time served. After the victims plead guilty rather than face the possibility of many years in prison, the officers who beat them incur virtually no risk of being brought up on charges or losing in the event of a lawsuit" (R. Rodriguez). “The African diaspora is everywhere, and we are complex. Our range of responses to anti-Blackness should mirror our existence" (W. C. Anderson). “Most importantly, it will push us beyond police reform to a radical reimagination of public safety. When we begin to understand that police are a significant source of violence against women and LGBTQ people of color—even as they are promoted as our protectors—we must question whether countering police violence is really a question of dealing with a few “bad apples” or problematic policies. Challenging police violence requires a challenge to the institutional structure itself, which is deeply rooted in policing the boundaries of race, gender, sexuality, poverty and nation. Going forward, our charge is not only to protest the killings, demand policy changes and call for accountability but also to nurture values and structures that will truly produce safety for all of us" (A. J. Ritchie). " 'Pregnant women are viewed as deserving of this kind of violence. Women are brutally arrested, shackled, placed in solitary confinement and threatened with violence.' But, she is quick to add, arrests can lead to violence which is less visible yet no less damaging. 'The coercion to end your pregnancy or to give up your medical privacy because of the risk of having your child taken from you, all of these things basically force women’s cooperation to something that they don’t really consent to. This is coerced, whether you want to call it police violence or medical violence or both' "(K. Hayes). “Police officers are all individuals, and it’s impossible to say that they are all bad at their jobs. However, police have all sworn to uphold laws that systematically disenfranchise marginalized and working people for the benefit of the rich and powerful" (M Ludwig). "Transformative justice and community accountability are terms that describe ways to address violence without relying upon police or prisons. These approaches often work to prevent violence, to intervene when harm is occurring, to hold people accountable, and to transform individuals and society to build safer communities. These strategies are some of the only options that marginalized communities have for addressing harm" (E. Dixon).

  28. 4 out of 5

    Erin Williams

    Ever since I was little my passion in life was to help people. Having a specific interest in child welfare, that passion manifested into wanting to work as a Detective in the Crimes Against Children Unit of a police department. I had, of course, heard about instances of police brutality, but being the naive optimist I am, I thought I would be able to fix the system from the inside. Lately, I've begun to realize that it isn't possible. It's more than fixing the system. It's reimagining and recons Ever since I was little my passion in life was to help people. Having a specific interest in child welfare, that passion manifested into wanting to work as a Detective in the Crimes Against Children Unit of a police department. I had, of course, heard about instances of police brutality, but being the naive optimist I am, I thought I would be able to fix the system from the inside. Lately, I've begun to realize that it isn't possible. It's more than fixing the system. It's reimagining and reconstructing it. I have been naive and ignorant, and I am sorry for not educating myself a long time ago. Lately, I've been trying my best to educate myself on the experiences black and brown people have with the criminal justice system. Part of this is learning to reimagine how we can live in a world with limited police presence (or with no presence at all). Based on a friend's recommendation, I read the book "Who Do You Serve, Who Do You Protect?". This collection of essays covers a wide range of topics from instances of police brutality to alternatives to calling 911 in emergency situations. It would absolutely recommend it to anyone who is trying to educate themselves on alternative to policing. (BONUS: the e-book version of this book is free on Haymarket Book's website right now!)

  29. 4 out of 5

    Vanessa

    This was an enlightening and at times very heavy read. I didn't love most of the essays in this collection as I didn't think all of them were particularly brilliantly written, and especially in the first section it just felt like I was reading long lists of statistics rather than a nuanced argument. But there were some real standouts that I felt taught me a lot: Your Pregnancy May Subject You to Even More Law Enforcement Violence by Victoria Law. Say Her Name: What It Means to Center Black Women's This was an enlightening and at times very heavy read. I didn't love most of the essays in this collection as I didn't think all of them were particularly brilliantly written, and especially in the first section it just felt like I was reading long lists of statistics rather than a nuanced argument. But there were some real standouts that I felt taught me a lot: Your Pregnancy May Subject You to Even More Law Enforcement Violence by Victoria Law. Say Her Name: What It Means to Center Black Women's Experiences of Police Violence by Andrea J. Ritchie. Black Parenting Matters: Raising Children in a World of Police Terror by Eisa Nefertari Ulen. Our History and Our Dreams: Building Black and Native Solidarity by Kelly Hayes. I also found the second section, which focused more on alternatives to modern policing focused around community focused activities and support systems, to be really engaging and uplifting, and it showed me a different side to standard policing that I hadn't really thought about before. Although it has to be noted that this was published in 2016, and we are four years on from the subjects dealt with in the essays collected here. And so at the end I felt both hopeful and a little hopeless at the same time. This collection is probably just as relevant in 2020 as it was when it was first published, and usually I'd say a book's enduring relevance is a good thing but not so much here.

  30. 5 out of 5

    Radia

    Good anthology of essays. Favorites were 6. Killing Africa 8. Your Pregnancy May Subject You to Even More Law Enforcement Violence 13. Our History and Our Dreams : Building Black and Native Solidarity. I liked 6 bc it talks about anti-blackness as a transnational issues and how racism in the US is in some ways unique and some ways not at all. I liked 8 because I learned about the treatment of incarcerated pregnant women, and how pregnant women can be incarcerated for trying to get off drugs or e Good anthology of essays. Favorites were 6. Killing Africa 8. Your Pregnancy May Subject You to Even More Law Enforcement Violence 13. Our History and Our Dreams : Building Black and Native Solidarity. I liked 6 bc it talks about anti-blackness as a transnational issues and how racism in the US is in some ways unique and some ways not at all. I liked 8 because I learned about the treatment of incarcerated pregnant women, and how pregnant women can be incarcerated for trying to get off drugs or even for miscarrying ! I liked 13 bc it talked about the cross-narrative between indigenous and Black communities. I've been thinking about this in regards to the term "BIPoC" that I've noticed being used more recently - not a full thought just want to get it out This book really lays out the issues with police violence, flushing out specific examples and the community organizing surrounding them. Talks about police aboliton a bit but mostly covers history, community action and responses to violence.

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