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Grasp the Majesty, Beauty, and Significance of God's Dwelling Places At various points in Israel's history, God dwelt in specific, significant places, most notably in the tabernacle and the temple. These structures, meticulously planned, extravagantly furnished, and regularly frequented by the devout, were more than just places of worship and sacrifice. They were pictures o Grasp the Majesty, Beauty, and Significance of God's Dwelling Places At various points in Israel's history, God dwelt in specific, significant places, most notably in the tabernacle and the temple. These structures, meticulously planned, extravagantly furnished, and regularly frequented by the devout, were more than just places of worship and sacrifice. They were pictures of God's relationship with his chosen people and of the atoning work that would be done by the Messiah. To understand the tabernacle and the temple, then, is to understand how we are brought into God's family through the sacrifice of his only Son, Jesus. Visually stunning and theologically rich, this full-color resource brings together the latest scholarship and archeological discoveries to bring God's dwelling places alive for modern believers. It places these important structures in their historical and theological contexts, connects them with the overall biblical story, and shows how they bring meaning and depth to the faith of Christians today.


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Grasp the Majesty, Beauty, and Significance of God's Dwelling Places At various points in Israel's history, God dwelt in specific, significant places, most notably in the tabernacle and the temple. These structures, meticulously planned, extravagantly furnished, and regularly frequented by the devout, were more than just places of worship and sacrifice. They were pictures o Grasp the Majesty, Beauty, and Significance of God's Dwelling Places At various points in Israel's history, God dwelt in specific, significant places, most notably in the tabernacle and the temple. These structures, meticulously planned, extravagantly furnished, and regularly frequented by the devout, were more than just places of worship and sacrifice. They were pictures of God's relationship with his chosen people and of the atoning work that would be done by the Messiah. To understand the tabernacle and the temple, then, is to understand how we are brought into God's family through the sacrifice of his only Son, Jesus. Visually stunning and theologically rich, this full-color resource brings together the latest scholarship and archeological discoveries to bring God's dwelling places alive for modern believers. It places these important structures in their historical and theological contexts, connects them with the overall biblical story, and shows how they bring meaning and depth to the faith of Christians today.

30 review for The Temple and the Tabernacle: A Study of God's Dwelling Places from Genesis to Revelation

  1. 5 out of 5

    Nick

    If you are the kind of person that judges a book by its cover, then you will love this book! It is is beautifully done. The pages are glossy textbook style with color pictures and illustration galore! But this book isn't all style, it has great substance as well. After a quick overview of the themes at hand, Dr. Hays starts in Genesis and traces the idea of God's presence among His people in Eden, the Tabernacle, Solomon's Temple, the Second Temple, and, finally, Jesus and the Church. I found th If you are the kind of person that judges a book by its cover, then you will love this book! It is is beautifully done. The pages are glossy textbook style with color pictures and illustration galore! But this book isn't all style, it has great substance as well. After a quick overview of the themes at hand, Dr. Hays starts in Genesis and traces the idea of God's presence among His people in Eden, the Tabernacle, Solomon's Temple, the Second Temple, and, finally, Jesus and the Church. I found the sections on how the tabernacle and Solomon's temple differed to be quite interesting. Did you know that the menorah in the Tabernacle possibly looked quite different from the one made for Solomon's temple? While this brief study on the subject doesn't go into incredible detail on any one of the locations, the power of this book is in it's comparative nature. It is a great resource for anyone in ministry or Bible teaching.

  2. 4 out of 5

    James

    The significance of temple and tabernacle cannot be understated. The theme runs right through the biblical story. It describes the place(s) where God dwells with his people. In The Temple and the Tabernacle: a Study of God's Dwelling places from Genesis to Revelation , J. Daniel Hays traces the theme of God's presence with His people from Creation ('God's garden temple') to the New Heaven and New Earth of Revelation 21-22 (where God dwells with his people on earth as it is in heaven). Hays wal The significance of temple and tabernacle cannot be understated. The theme runs right through the biblical story. It describes the place(s) where God dwells with his people. In The Temple and the Tabernacle: a Study of God's Dwelling places from Genesis to Revelation , J. Daniel Hays traces the theme of God's presence with His people from Creation ('God's garden temple') to the New Heaven and New Earth of Revelation 21-22 (where God dwells with his people on earth as it is in heaven). Hays walks us through this material chronologically (though he saves Ezekiel's prophetic temple vision in Ezekiel 40-48 until his discussion of the eschatology in his 'New Testament' chapter). Hays notes God's presence with (or absence from) His people throughout the biblical narrative. The Garden of Eden in Genesis 1-2 describes a 'garden Temple' where God dwells with his people. When Adam and Eve's sin cause them to be evicted from the garden, they fell cut off from God. Between humanity's eviction  from the garden and the building of the tabernacle, God does sometimes meet with his people and promise to dwell with them (i.e. his Covenant with Abraham, meeting Moses at the burning bush and Israel at Sinai); however the tabernacle becomes a portable dwelling for God's presence, so that God would be with his people all along the wilderness way. Hays describes the physical features of the Tabernacle and the Ark of the Covenant that dominate the latter half of  Exodus. He describes the architecture, design and significance of each item or tabernacle feature. The Israelite's gave generously and willfully to construct the tabernacle and when it was finished, God's presence fills the tabernacle(59).  Hays chapter on Solomon's temple describes a different dynamic entirely. He eschews a shallow surface reading of the Solomon story that treats him as a mostly good king who loses his way toward the end of his life. There are troubling aspects of Solomon's life all along and Hays points out where this is evident in the construction of the Temple. This is  evident when reading the construction of Solomon's temple against the backdrop of the construction of the tabernacle as described in Exodus. Exodus had described the role of God in the construction of the tabernacle (68). Conversely, 1 Kings emphasizes the directives of Solomon and his craftsmen from Tyre rather than God's role (73). In constructing the tabernacle, the Israelites gave freely and participated willingly in the construction; but Solomon conscripts 30,000 Israelites into slavery, plus 150,000 other workers whose ethnicity is not specified (77-78).  In the Exodus, much is made of God's selection and Spirit's infilling of Bezalel son of Uri, and the appointment of Oholiab son of Ahisamak and other skilled workers (79-80); yet Solomon appoints a foreigner, Huram of Tyre, based on his reputation (constructing other temples?)(81). These differences are startling. Furthermore, Hays points out other differences between Solomon and his fore-bearers which show his drift (use of 'the cedars of Lebanon' as building material, reference to Canaanite months, possible Canaanite influence in the depiction of the temple Cherubim, etc). God's presence fills the temple, but God's endorsement of Solomon is merely conditional and tentative (101). Solomon's temple is the last structure that God's glory fills. The rest of the book of Kings tells the story of this temple's downfall and destruction. Ezekiel describes the departure of God's presence from the temple (Ezekiel 8-11) before the Babylonian destruction. Ezra and Haggai describes the rebuilding of the temple, but God does not take up residence there (130-31).  Nor does God indwell Herod's temple. The renewal of God's presence with his people comes with Jesus who 'tabernacles with his people' (John 1:14) and ultimately the eschatological vision of Revelation's closing chapters.Hays conclusion points us towards the implication of his study on the Temple/tabernacle for our worship and our focus on God's indwelling presence. Hays has done a wonderful job laying out the history of temple and tabernacle and their theological significance. With glossy pages, charts, photographs and diagrams, this book is beautiful as well as informative. It is nice that a book  about the temple and tabernacle has a pleasing aesthetic (though a hardcover might have been nice). Hays offers a d literary sensitive reading of the  tabernacle/temple narratives and clearly  keeps abreast of scholarly discussions; however he does occasionally reference other interpretations (scholarly or otherwise) opaquely. For example,  he acknowledges that the ancient tabernacle points forward to Christ but faults "various writers and speakers" who "simply let their imaginations run free and look for any kind of similarity between even the smallest details of the tabernacle and Christ"(61). He gives  examples of some writers pointing to a fanciful and spiritual significance of the tabernacle tent pegs (61-62), but he leaves us guessing as to which writers or speakers interpretation he is referencing. This book is not without footnotes, but here is one place where they are sorely lacking. Of course not every reader will want to track down these arguments (I may be odd that way). Hays has done the church a tremendous service in helping us recapture the significance of temple and tabernacle: God's dwelling place with his people. I give this book an enthusiastic four stars. Note: I received this book from Baker Books in exchange for my honest review.      

  3. 5 out of 5

    Bob

    Summary: An exploration of God's dwelling places as described throughout the Bible from Eden to tabernacle, to the first and second temples, the question of Ezekiel's temple, and the temple in John's Revelation. For many of us, reading the details of the layout and construction of the tabernacle, or the descriptions of the building of Solomon's temple was "fly over" country. In addition, it all seems from another time, foreign to our own experiences of worship. This book was a refreshing beam of Summary: An exploration of God's dwelling places as described throughout the Bible from Eden to tabernacle, to the first and second temples, the question of Ezekiel's temple, and the temple in John's Revelation. For many of us, reading the details of the layout and construction of the tabernacle, or the descriptions of the building of Solomon's temple was "fly over" country. In addition, it all seems from another time, foreign to our own experiences of worship. This book was a refreshing beam of light on material I've neglected, that in fact is quite important to the story of not only Jewish, but Christian faith. It brought alive the significance of 'tabernacle' and 'temple' as dwelling places where God encounters and relates to his people and also the physical construction, and layout of the successive structures in Israel's history where they hoped to encounter the living God. Not only that, the clear verbal description is accompanied by lavish illustrations printed on high quality paper, making this book a delight to handle, to look at, and to read. Hays begins with an overview, looking at the Hebrew and Greek words used for tabernacle and temple, and noting how these all have in common the idea of a dwelling place, whether a movable tent or a royal palace. He surveys the successive places that served this role in scripture beginning with the garden temple of Genesis, following John Walton and others, noting the themes of the tree of life, a river flowing from the garden and gold and precious stones, that will turn up in later accounts. He then turns to the ark and tabernacle of the exodus, considering each object and its significance, and the overall layout of the tabernacle, emphasizing as it does the holiness of God. Hays brings out as well as any I've read the ambivalence of the accounts of the temple of Solomon. He contrasts this with the tabernacle construction, noting that the tabernacle, in all its detail was built according to God's command. Neither the temple itself, nor its construction details were commanded. Instead of voluntary and enthusiastic work by Jewish craftsmen, foreigners and conscript labor build Solomon's temple. And while God initially shows favor upon Solomon, as Solomon disobeys God in multiplying wives, chariots, and gods, God turns from him. A sorry story indeed, for it ends in the sacking and destruction of this temple and the loss of the ark. He then considers the post-exilic temple, and particularly Herod's reconstruction of that temple. Great attention is focused on the latter, and Hays helped us see not only that this was indeed an incredible sight for the disciples of Jesus, but also for anyone in the Roman empire, as the greatest of the four temples Herod built, and one of the greatest construction feats of the Roman empire. He includes diagrams showing the locations where various incidents in the gospels and Acts occur. Yet in 70 AD, this structure was razed, with only portions of the foundations, notably the Western (Wailing) Wall remaining. Yet the truth was that God never visibly showed his presence in this temple. God's dwelling among his people was fulfilled in Christ, whose death opens the way to relationship with the Holy God, symbolized in the rent curtain in the temple. In the heavenly city of Revelation 22, there is no temple, for God and the Lamb are the temple. And the truth is the church, the people of God are a temple, a dwelling place for the Spirit of God upon earth. Thus, Hays does not think in terms of a literal fulfillment of Ezekiel's temple, but rather sees this fulfilled in the New Jerusalem. I thought this book was a great example of biblical theology written in service of the people of God. It is rooted in careful scholarship, yet in writing and illustration helps any thoughtful lay person grasp the wonderful truth of how it can be that a holy God dwells with his people, and how Christ fulfills what the tabernacle foreshadowed nearly a millenium and a half earlier. The careful reader will be rewarded with an enriched understanding of one of the great themes that literally runs from Genesis 1 to Revelation 22, and taking it to heart will find themselves worshiping the Holy God, who incredibly has chosen to dwell with such as us! ______________________________ Disclosure of Material Connection: I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review. The opinions I have expressed are my own.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kyle Rapinchuk

    This book tells the story of Scripture as the story of God’s presence among His people. Hays does this by giving detailed explanation of the presence of God in the garden, tabernacle, temple, Jesus, the Church, and the New Jerusalem. The text is supplemented by beautiful and helpful illustrations of the tabernacle and temple buildings. Along the way, however, Hays does not lose sight of the main purpose of these structures and constantly points the reader back to the significance of God’s presen This book tells the story of Scripture as the story of God’s presence among His people. Hays does this by giving detailed explanation of the presence of God in the garden, tabernacle, temple, Jesus, the Church, and the New Jerusalem. The text is supplemented by beautiful and helpful illustrations of the tabernacle and temple buildings. Along the way, however, Hays does not lose sight of the main purpose of these structures and constantly points the reader back to the significance of God’s presence with His people. Excellent work.

  5. 5 out of 5

    Arwin

    Placeholder review : insightful read, lots of illustrations (beautiful), covers a lot of ground with concise writing, thoroughly enjoyable. Especially enjoyed the comparison of the construction of the tabernacle vs Solomon's temple, and the expansion and demise of the 2nd temple during Herod's reign, and the final chapter about the presence of God after Christ ascended. The section about the role of cherubims was the only section that felt a little long. Placeholder review : insightful read, lots of illustrations (beautiful), covers a lot of ground with concise writing, thoroughly enjoyable. Especially enjoyed the comparison of the construction of the tabernacle vs Solomon's temple, and the expansion and demise of the 2nd temple during Herod's reign, and the final chapter about the presence of God after Christ ascended. The section about the role of cherubims was the only section that felt a little long.

  6. 5 out of 5

    John Dube

    J. Daniel Hays is dean of the School of Christian Studies and professor of biblical studies at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. Hays is well known for his popular text book on hermeneutics Grasping God’s Word (coauthored with his colleague J. Scott Duvall). In this well written volume he tracks the story of the Bible through the lens of the temple and the tabernacle. The content of the book moves chronologically, “examining theologically how God’s presence, power, and holine J. Daniel Hays is dean of the School of Christian Studies and professor of biblical studies at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. Hays is well known for his popular text book on hermeneutics Grasping God’s Word (coauthored with his colleague J. Scott Duvall). In this well written volume he tracks the story of the Bible through the lens of the temple and the tabernacle. The content of the book moves chronologically, “examining theologically how God’s presence, power, and holiness engage with people through ‘temples,’ or ‘temple-like’ places” (11). The author begins in the first chapter with a study of the Hebrew and Greek words used to refer to the tabernacle and temple. As a result of this study it is determined that the words used for the tabernacle and temple stress the presence, power, holiness, and worship of God (18). This preliminary lexical study is helpful as it lays the foundation for the chapters that follow. Hays builds on this foundation by explaining how the Garden of Eden functioned much like a sanctuary or temple would, “a place where God’s presence dwells in a special kind of way so that his people can be with him and worship him” (21). The author moves to prove this with nine convincing reasons (22-24). The eviction of Adam and Eves from God’s garden temple proves the need for a new dwelling place for God’s presence. And, it is the details of these dwelling places (both real and supposed) that the author explains in chapter 3-7 of the book. Chapter three covers the tabernacle, chapter 4-5 Solomon’s temple and the departure of Yahweh from the temple, chapter 6 the second temple, and chapter 7 deals with the temple of God in the New Testament. The author begins his discussion on the tabernacle in chapter 3 by explaining the major themes of deliverance and presence from the book of Exodus. The point is made throughout the book that as one draws closer to the presence of God, the intensity of holiness increases (34). This is the reason God’s instruction to Moses concerning the tabernacle starts with the ark (Exod. 25:10-22), moves outward to the table (Exod. 25:23-30), and then the lampstand (Exod. 25:31-40). The author spends adequate time talking through the details of the ark (esp., materials used, design, decoration, and contents), table, golden lampstand, incense altar tabernacle proper, curtains, alter of burnt offering, basin for washing and courtyard. In nearly every case the author is well balanced in his conclusions regarding symbology or prophetic connections found in the tabernacle and its accoutrements. This reviewer was particularly impressed with the explanation and details regarding the golden lampstand. The author reminds us that the treelike appearance of the tabernacle lampstand “is quite different from the traditional seven-branched candelabrum that is the national symbol of Israel” (44). The author explains the unique details regarding the stone or clay “lamps” used on the lampstand, the metallurgical details of the lampstand, the method of its construction and its dimensions. Finally, the author draws a connection between the Garden of Eden (the garden dwelling place of God) and the tabernacle, saying, “A sacred or holy tree in the very presence of God is suggestive of the tree of life that was in the garden” (47-48). Chapter 3 ends by addressing the symbolism in the tabernacle and its connection to Christ. Hays confronts the issue directly, “We do not have the liberty to let our imaginations run wild and dream up prophetic connections about every little detail of the tabernacle” (60). The author says rightly, “The primary and correct way to study Christ in the tabernacle is to observe how all the major theological themes in the tabernacle find their ultimate fulfillment and completion in Christ” (60). Therefore, the tabernacle’s limited access to the presence of God is overshadowed by Christ, who provides direct access to the presence of God through his atoning sacrifice. “The tabernacle was a shadow; Christ is the reality. This is the correct approach to understanding how Christ relates to the tabernacle” (61). In chapter four the author undertakes the topic of Solomon’s temple. The strength of this chapter is not found in the authors lucid explanation of the temple construction and its details, but in the comparison between that temple and the tabernacle. Hays builds on his article “To Praise Solomon or to Bury Him” (JSOT 28.2 [2003]: 149-74), suggesting that the narrative details concerning the temple construction are pejorative toward Solomon and his building of the temple. The author defends this claim on the following significant differences between the tabernacle and temple destruction in Exodus and 1 Kings respectively: (1) God’s role in the construction accounts, (2) Israel’s participation in the construction accounts, (3) the primary craftsmen’s identity and training, (4) the materials used, and (5) the time dedicated to their construction. The author summarizes his conclusions, The physical temple that Solomon builds, the high point of his reign, is spectacular from a human point of view, but theologically it is clouded with numerous negative connotations from the beginning. It is not a step forward in Israel’s relationship with God, a supposed improvement on the tabernacle, but rather a step backward (87). Yahweh’s departure from Solomon’s temple is covered in chapter 5. Hays applies clear and fluid exegesis throughout the chapter and makes very helpful observations regarding the cherubim attending to the presence of God and their involvement in Yahweh’s departure from Solomon’s temple. The author does such an excellent job of explaining who these divine attendants are, that pp. 111-126 of this volume provide a better Angelology than most monographs dedicated to the subject. The second temple is the subject of the sixth chapter, which is replete with helpful background information relevant to second temple Israel. The author traces the history of Israel from Ezra to Herod, explains the rise of the synagogue, and explores the details of Herod’s temple and the various courtyards and gates surrounding it. In chapter seven Hays moves from the Old Testament era to the New and addresses the “temple” issues as they reach their consummation in Jesus Christ. Hays rightly reminds the reader that the presence of God did not dwell in the second temple, “until Jesus Christ walks in through its gates” (167). Hays explains Jesus as the temple (John 2:19) and how “each Christian believer becomes a temple of God, since God does indeed dwell within each of them” (178). Hays explains Ezekiel’s temple vision in this chapter. He says Ezekiel’s vision is prophetic, “pointing figuratively and representatively to realities brought about by Jesus Christ in the New Testament and probably realized in the new Jerusalem” (182). Hays founds his figurative view on the hydrological challenges of a river flowing from the entrance of the temple to the Dead Sea and the difficulty of “reestablishing the Levitical blood-sacrifice system” (182). Hays does explain the literal view and is charitable towards it. In addition to the great content offered by Hays, this volume offers many helpful images, tables, and graphs—all printed on high quality glossy paper. One such example is a map of the second temple with numbered locations and explanations from Acts (174-75). The book contains a bibliography and subject and Scripture index, which makes the book a helpful resource tool for the Bible student and exegete. This reviewer recommends this book to anyone desiring to explore issues related to the temple and tabernacle. Additionally, this volume contributes to the subject of Old Testament theology as it functions as an Old Testament theology viewed thorough the lens of the temple and the tabernacle.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Gini

    First impressions count. Academic comes to mind when I first looked at this book. And in some respects it is, but don’t let that scare you off. Hays has written a book that is informative, thought provoking, and accessible to folks like me (a non-academic) and only about 200 pages long. There are no five questions for discussion at the end of each chapter either and that is a plus for a work like this one. A bibliography for those that want to know who this author consulted and endnotes for even First impressions count. Academic comes to mind when I first looked at this book. And in some respects it is, but don’t let that scare you off. Hays has written a book that is informative, thought provoking, and accessible to folks like me (a non-academic) and only about 200 pages long. There are no five questions for discussion at the end of each chapter either and that is a plus for a work like this one. A bibliography for those that want to know who this author consulted and endnotes for even more information are included. Pictures, charts, and graphic renderings break the narrative at appropriate spots and help the reader to more fully grasp the discussion that surrounds them. The content covers not only the tabernacle and temple architecture and furnishings, but also the history from each of the periods they represent. That’s the strength of this book for me. Hays focuses on the structures as God’s dwelling places among his people and the history that structure witnessed. As the structures become more elaborate and costly the history of the people of God descends into darker and darker periods. Hays spends no little amount of time looking between the lines of the biblical account of the reign of Solomon ferreting out the differences in the motive and means of temple construction during his tenure as compared to the same of the tabernacle during Moses’ time. Interesting reading and I’m still mulling his take on it. Of course, there’s more to come after Solomon’s temple and that is not ignored, but as in the history itself nothing until Herod’s structure comes close to the grandeur that was Solomon’s. Synagogues are not the temple or the tabernacle, but they have become the local gathering place for the people of God in the intervening years. Churches of today have some connection to the synagogues of that period. Herod’s temple stood as a reminder of the glory of yesteryear, but served as the focal point of institutionalized religion. The glory had departed much earlier. Hays’ last chapter covers the “so what” for the present time. This chapter, while a nice way to round out the dwelling places of God theme, felt hurried and incomplete. All the fun factoids related to the history of the temple and tabernacle had been used. The current dwelling place is still under construction and the visions of the completed structure are still difficult to describe. A look forward to Revelation sustains the people’s hope of the future dwelling place of God. I recommend this book for its readability and succinct coverage of a rather large topic. I received this book from the publisher in return for a review.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Luke

    This book presents a biblical-theology of the temple, and does it very well. The book is well written, and beautiful. Besides a solid Biblical presentation, there are many tables, detailed diagrams and pictures throughout to help visualize and explain. I even appreciated the high-quality paper used in this printing. One of the key arguments was that Israel's moving away from God can be seen in the transition from tabernacle to Solomonic-temple to Post-exile temple to Herod's temple. Hays shows fr This book presents a biblical-theology of the temple, and does it very well. The book is well written, and beautiful. Besides a solid Biblical presentation, there are many tables, detailed diagrams and pictures throughout to help visualize and explain. I even appreciated the high-quality paper used in this printing. One of the key arguments was that Israel's moving away from God can be seen in the transition from tabernacle to Solomonic-temple to Post-exile temple to Herod's temple. Hays shows from Scripture that the detailed design of the tabernacle was given to Moses by God, it was not man's design. It was given as a reflection of its heavenly reality. Moses then had the tabernacle built exactly to those specifications. The builders of the tabernacle were Jews filled with the Spirit. The resources for the tabernacle's construction were given by the people, willingly and sacrificially. By contrast Solomon built the first temple to David's specifications, not God's. The design reflected some pagan influences. The chief artisans were not Jewish. The resources were gained through conscription. While God did come and dwell within Solomon's temple as He had done to the tabernacle, such is not the case in subsequent temples. While the temple of Jesus' day out shown all before it, it had been was built by Herod, himself an Idumean, and a builder of temples to several gods. Herod was a thoroughly evil man. From the exile until Jesus' entry as a baby God does not dwell with his people in the temple as he had in former time. The book records many other interesting insights from the "garden temple" to the details of the temple furniture, to Ezekiel's vision, to Jesus' statements regarding the temple, implications to the Church, and the NT believer, as well as eschatological insights and much more. I'm not fully prepared to agree with everything that is proposed, but this book presents a compelling argument that is worthy of consideration, and undoubtedly will change the way I consider this topic.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Lindsay Kennedy

    Review here http://mydigitalseminary.com/the-temp... Review here http://mydigitalseminary.com/the-temp...

  10. 5 out of 5

    Timothy

    I heartily recommend this book to anyone. While at times it can seem confusing because there are many details to consider with the temple and tabernacle, I found the author to be quite helpful in answering the what and why questions of the tabernacle and temple. He pulled the relevant passages together to help us see the great significance of God's dwelling place, and then he took us to Jesus and the final consummation. There were only two points of disappointment with the book: 1) He did not spe I heartily recommend this book to anyone. While at times it can seem confusing because there are many details to consider with the temple and tabernacle, I found the author to be quite helpful in answering the what and why questions of the tabernacle and temple. He pulled the relevant passages together to help us see the great significance of God's dwelling place, and then he took us to Jesus and the final consummation. There were only two points of disappointment with the book: 1) He did not spend as much time on the New Testament theme as he did on any one theme in the Old Testament. I thought he could have expanded. 2) In writing about Solomons temple, he suggests Solomon's lack of concern for God. He also expresses that David was told an offspring would build the temple. I thought the author was suggesting Jesus was the offspring. Yet, he never got to that point. These two minor points do not diminish the great help this book gives to people trying to learn about the tabernacle and this important theme throughout the Bible. My thanks to the author!

  11. 4 out of 5

    Mark Alexander

    This book will illuminate much of the Old Testament and Jesus' actions in the gospels. Hays traces the unfolding motif of the God dwelling with his people throughout the contours of the Old Testament, and finishes with the future promise of a new and better temple. It starts with the protological example in Eden, then progresses to God's presence in the Tabernacle, followed by the Temple. As part of his work he explains the role of the Cherubim as they relate to the presence of God. He rounds of This book will illuminate much of the Old Testament and Jesus' actions in the gospels. Hays traces the unfolding motif of the God dwelling with his people throughout the contours of the Old Testament, and finishes with the future promise of a new and better temple. It starts with the protological example in Eden, then progresses to God's presence in the Tabernacle, followed by the Temple. As part of his work he explains the role of the Cherubim as they relate to the presence of God. He rounds off the book with a look at the Herod's temple (and the synagogues) in the Gospels, Acts, and Revelation, drawing attention to how areas of the temple may add light to our understanding of what the Bible teaches.

  12. 5 out of 5

    Nate Offord

    The theme of God dwelling with humanity is a biblical narrative that has grabbed my attention for a few years now. So I was excited for this book. Helpful historical and biblical contexts connecting the garden to the tabernacle to the temple to Jesus to the church to the new Jerusalem. Although I wanted a little bit more of the redemption story via God’s dwelling to be emphasized, that might just be a personal taste thing. Also a helpful resource in discussing the uniquely “human” elements invol The theme of God dwelling with humanity is a biblical narrative that has grabbed my attention for a few years now. So I was excited for this book. Helpful historical and biblical contexts connecting the garden to the tabernacle to the temple to Jesus to the church to the new Jerusalem. Although I wanted a little bit more of the redemption story via God’s dwelling to be emphasized, that might just be a personal taste thing. Also a helpful resource in discussing the uniquely “human” elements involved with the constructing of the temple, the second temple, and the temple as it stood during Herod’s time. Brought up many points and questions I hadn’t considered before.

  13. 5 out of 5

    Mark

    God’s relating to his people in his gracious covenant love is “one of the most central and important themes of the Bible“. Hays does a masterful job exploring and unpacking this truth from Genesis chapter 1 all the way through to Revelation chapter 22. Knowing and understanding this thread as it weaves through the Bible will strengthen your faith. It allows us to see the tremendous benefit received and efforts God goes to in order that he may be Immanuel through all of history and into the escha God’s relating to his people in his gracious covenant love is “one of the most central and important themes of the Bible“. Hays does a masterful job exploring and unpacking this truth from Genesis chapter 1 all the way through to Revelation chapter 22. Knowing and understanding this thread as it weaves through the Bible will strengthen your faith. It allows us to see the tremendous benefit received and efforts God goes to in order that he may be Immanuel through all of history and into the eschaton!

  14. 5 out of 5

    Jonathan Roberts

    Spectacular book!! Lots of great info and super challenging with how I view both the OT passages on the temple and also the NT references. I have thoroughly marked up this book and look forward to using it in class in the future!! Highest recommendation

  15. 5 out of 5

    Brandon

    Mighty insightful. Hays runs through the biblical narrative from the perspective of the changing temple metaphors for the presence of God. Learned a lot and would definitely recommend it. A great starting place for learning about the significance of the temple.

  16. 5 out of 5

    Zach Fischer

    Eye opening One of the most informative and practical books I've ever read. Turned what seems immensely complicated into something readily understandable. Eye opening One of the most informative and practical books I've ever read. Turned what seems immensely complicated into something readily understandable.

  17. 4 out of 5

    Ginger

    This is an excellent book.

  18. 4 out of 5

    Terry Murphy

    A respectable resource for understanding the tabernacle and its relationship with the temples that followed. Rich with historical background, but I was hoping for more life application.

  19. 4 out of 5

    Greg Busch

    This is an excellent book. I thought the scholarship was good and arguments well made. I like the linkage with the garden, the discussion of Ezekiel's temple and I know I will have a hard time viewing Solomon favorably from this point forward. Read it and see what you think. This is an excellent book. I thought the scholarship was good and arguments well made. I like the linkage with the garden, the discussion of Ezekiel's temple and I know I will have a hard time viewing Solomon favorably from this point forward. Read it and see what you think.

  20. 4 out of 5

    Sarah B

    Very insightful study of the tabernacle and the temple and the presence of God throughout the Bible. It really helped bring some if those old, hard to read passages to life.

  21. 5 out of 5

    Peter

    Hays provides a very accessible book outlining the various forms of God's dwelling places throughout Biblical history. I found the sections describing the history and Biblical theology of the garden, tabernacle, and temple to be very informative and insightful. I recommend reading the book if you're interested in understanding the parallels between the garden, tabernacle, temple, Jesus bringing the presence of God into a human dimension, and ultimately the indwelling of the Holy Spirit. Unfortuna Hays provides a very accessible book outlining the various forms of God's dwelling places throughout Biblical history. I found the sections describing the history and Biblical theology of the garden, tabernacle, and temple to be very informative and insightful. I recommend reading the book if you're interested in understanding the parallels between the garden, tabernacle, temple, Jesus bringing the presence of God into a human dimension, and ultimately the indwelling of the Holy Spirit. Unfortunately, Hays fails to dig deeply into what the Bible reveals and says about the ongoing relevance of the temple, even into the days of the apostles. He essentially recites the Christian assumption of the irrelevance of the temple after the death and resurrection of Jesus, with very brief scriptural support from the gospels or the epistles (especially Hebrews) provided. He does not unpack the larger context of these passages, which would reveal that the apostles remained devoted Jews who saw no contradiction between following Jesus as Messiah and continuing in full temple worship, and never would have believed that the temple could become irrelevant. If only Hays would be bold enough to explore the implications of passages like Exodus 29:9: "......And the priesthood shall be theirs by a statute forever...", and Jeremiah 33:18: "the Levitical priests shall never lack a man in my presence to offer burnt offerings, to burn grain offerings, and to make sacrifices forever.” Jesus made his understanding of the law perfectly clear in Matthew 5:18: "...until heaven and earth pass away, not an iota, not a dot, will pass from the Law until all is accomplished...".

  22. 5 out of 5

    David Steele

    J. Daniel Hays, The Temple and the Tabernacle: A Study of God’s Dwelling Places From Genesis to Revelation Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2016, 208 pp. $11.89 A good book review will help readers determine the good, the bad, and the ugly in a given title. There is nothing bad or ugly in J. Daniel Hays’ new work, The Temple and the Tabernacle. In fact, describing the contents of this book as “good” would be a massive understatement. Dr. Hays sets out to explore the majesty and importance of the dwelli J. Daniel Hays, The Temple and the Tabernacle: A Study of God’s Dwelling Places From Genesis to Revelation Grand Rapids: Baker Books, 2016, 208 pp. $11.89 A good book review will help readers determine the good, the bad, and the ugly in a given title. There is nothing bad or ugly in J. Daniel Hays’ new work, The Temple and the Tabernacle. In fact, describing the contents of this book as “good” would be a massive understatement. Dr. Hays sets out to explore the majesty and importance of the dwelling places of God. Beginning in the Old Testament, the author works he way to the culmination of Redemptive history where we find the people of God gathered before his throne, worshipping him in the new heavens and the new earth. A Brief Synopsis Six features make The Temple and the Tabernacle especially noteworthy. First, this is an absolutely beautiful book. The pages are high quality and high quality photographs and artwork are seen throughout, illustrating different facets of the temple and the tabernacle. Second, this work is written with different learning levels in mind. Everyone from first year Bible students to seasoned pastors will benefit from the clear writing, throughout. Third, this work adheres to the testimony of Scripture. The author is careful to cling to the biblical record as he unpacks the various aspects of the temple and the tabernacle. Fourth, this work explains the big picture, without discounting the details. Hays notes, “Remember that the whole point of building the tabernacle is to create a proper place for the presence of God to dwell in the midst of his people and to travel with them.” Fifth, this work is Christ-centered. In a book like this, it would be easy to get caught up in the minutia by focusing on the finer elements of the temple and tabernacle. The author does spend a considerable amount of time helping readers understand these things. But as he observes at the beginning of the book, “We want to move beyond the ‘stones’ to grasp the eternal theological truths being revealed to us about God through his presence in the temple/tabernacle.” The author clearly describes the distinction between an Old Testament economy and the beauty of the new covenant: "The system of encountering the presence of God that Christ inaugurates is superior to the old tabernacle system at every point. His one perfect sacrifice eliminates the need for any more blood sacrifices, and through this sacrifice Christ provides perfect cleansing for his people, declaring them to be completely ‘holy’ before God … Thus the sacrifice of Christ and the new covenant that he inaugurated enable Christians today to encounter the presence of God in worship and service in a direct manner. He dwells inside each of us." Finally, this work exalts God in his majestic holiness. Readers will immediately be struck with awe as they encounter the Old Testament portrait of God, learn of his absence due to Israel’s apostasy, and filled with wonder as they come face-to-face with Jesus in his return to the temple. The author notes, “When the second temple is built, first during the time of Haggai and then by King Herod the Great, there is no mention of the return of the presence of God to dwell in the temple. The presence of God does not return to the temple until Jesus Christ walks through its gates.” The Temple and the Tabernacle is a book I’ve waited for since my days as a Bible College student. The scholarship is impeccable, and the high points of the Christian worldview appear throughout. Readers will be encouraged as they are reminded of the great reality of the temple and tabernacle. But more than this, they will be motivated to worship God in all his holiness. I received this book free from the publisher. I was not required to write a positive review.

  23. 5 out of 5

    Michelle

    `The Temple and the Tabernacle` is a reference book written by author J. Daniel Hays. Author J. Daniel Hays is dean of the school of Christian studies and professor of biblical studies at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. The tagline of this book says it's a study of God's dwelling places from Genesis to Revelation. The author's purpose in writing this book is to inform with visually stunning, full-color graphics and archaeological discoveries. I like the glossy pages, the c `The Temple and the Tabernacle` is a reference book written by author J. Daniel Hays. Author J. Daniel Hays is dean of the school of Christian studies and professor of biblical studies at Ouachita Baptist University in Arkadelphia, Arkansas. The tagline of this book says it's a study of God's dwelling places from Genesis to Revelation. The author's purpose in writing this book is to inform with visually stunning, full-color graphics and archaeological discoveries. I like the glossy pages, the colorful graphics and the easy to read script. The jist of the book is only 189 pages. However, the closing pages contain notes, bibliography, index of subjects and index of scripture and other ancient sources. Scripture references, throughout the book, come either from the New International Version (NIV), or the English Standard version (ESV). Each chapter begins with an overview, then subtitles with several colorful graphics. I enjoyed the use of the graphics while learning about the tabernacle. I also saw how the Old Testament intertwined with the New Testament. On page 29 it explains that the exodus event is to the Old Testament what the death and resurrection of Christ is to the New Testament. The Temple and the Tabernacle reads more like a reference book than a novel. There are plenty of references to scripture, sometimes making it hard to follow unless you look up each verse. I recommend this book to pastors and laypersons steeped in the Word of God. Disclaimer: I received `The Temple and the Tabernacle` complimentary for review

  24. 4 out of 5

    Katherine Wacker

    In his book, The Temple and the Tabernacle: A Study of God’s Dwelling Places from Genesis to Revelation, J. Daniel Hays chronicles the sites where God dwelt with His people. Beginning in The Garden of Eden, and culminating with the New Heavens and New Earth, Hays takes the reader on an enlightening journey through the biblical record and examines the different vessels through which God displays His Presence. The Temple and the Tabernacle is incredibly well written. Hays takes pains to be clear a In his book, The Temple and the Tabernacle: A Study of God’s Dwelling Places from Genesis to Revelation, J. Daniel Hays chronicles the sites where God dwelt with His people. Beginning in The Garden of Eden, and culminating with the New Heavens and New Earth, Hays takes the reader on an enlightening journey through the biblical record and examines the different vessels through which God displays His Presence. The Temple and the Tabernacle is incredibly well written. Hays takes pains to be clear and concise while drawing distinctions between the Temple and the Tabernacle, and the Old and New Covenants. Without being overly academic, Hays remains true to the context and detail of Scripture, and the logic of the arguments is easy to follow. This is an accessible volume for anyone seeking to enhance his biblical awareness. The theological concepts presented are not only helpful in understanding the Bible as a whole, but also in explaining how these fundamental truths apply to believers today. The Temple and the Tabernacle is a fascinating read and an invaluable resource to any believer who wants to increase his knowledge and understanding of God’s presence in ways that may not have been considered. Hays demonstrates that every verse in the Bible is divinely inspired, and every detail in Scripture fits into God’s redemptive plan. For these reasons, I highly recommend The Temple and the Tabernacle. I received a complimentary copy of this book in exchange for my honest review.

  25. 4 out of 5

    Leasha

    I received this book free from Baker Books through a Goodreads giveaway, and I am so thankful! I saved it to read over Christmas, and it was a perfect way to remember that the whole point - tabernacle, temple, Christmas, is God's drawing near. Hays never disappoints. In The Temple and the Tabernacle, he does a tremendous job of covering such a broad, intimidating topic in a wat that is both thorough and accessible. This book is not only the perfect introduction to the topic, but also an excellent I received this book free from Baker Books through a Goodreads giveaway, and I am so thankful! I saved it to read over Christmas, and it was a perfect way to remember that the whole point - tabernacle, temple, Christmas, is God's drawing near. Hays never disappoints. In The Temple and the Tabernacle, he does a tremendous job of covering such a broad, intimidating topic in a wat that is both thorough and accessible. This book is not only the perfect introduction to the topic, but also an excellent reference for those who are more familiar with the practical and theological functions of God's dwelling-places. The structure of the book makes it easy to use, but Hays' ability to communicate effectively makes it easy to read. Both the big picture (historical context-wise and theologically) and the details are identificable within the text. The minutiae are there, and Hays explains AND relates them, not only enlightening the curious reader, but making ALL readers aware of their importance. Still, however, he doesn't become bogged down in presenting every single detail to the detriment of the big picture. From a presentation perspective, I love the way Baker has introduced this series of books the pictures and quote inserts; reading about history feels much more productive when, as a reader, you're able to picture (and thereby understand better) this foreign time and place. I plan to loan this out a LOT.

  26. 5 out of 5

    Debbie

    This book examines what the tabernacle and temples looked like, their purpose, and their theological significance. The author started by looking at the purpose of a temple and how the Garden of Eden fulfilled that role. He then looked at how the ark and tabernacle were built, their function, and some of their symbolic aspects. He contrasted this with how Solomon went about building the temple and what it looked like. I found this contrast enlightening as I'd never stopped to think about how diff This book examines what the tabernacle and temples looked like, their purpose, and their theological significance. The author started by looking at the purpose of a temple and how the Garden of Eden fulfilled that role. He then looked at how the ark and tabernacle were built, their function, and some of their symbolic aspects. He contrasted this with how Solomon went about building the temple and what it looked like. I found this contrast enlightening as I'd never stopped to think about how different Solomon's Temple was from the tabernacle. The author also discussed God's departure from the temple (Ezekiel 8-11), the rebuilding of the temple, Herod's additions to temple area, and the future temple (Ezekiel 40, Rev. 21-22). We get a detailed description of what the temple looked like at various times based on descriptions in the Bible and from other sources. The author generally avoided speculation and stuck to the symbolism pointed out in the Bible itself. However, he did speculate about what the lamp stand, for example, might have originally looked like. Overall, I found this book very interesting and would recommend it to anyone interested in a detailed study of the tabernacle and the temples. I received an ebook review copy of this book from the publisher through NetGalley.

  27. 4 out of 5

    Brittany

    The presence of God among humankind is a topic present throughout the Bible and our history. Throughout the Biblical narrative, we see the different places in which God approaches people. Whether it is the Garden of Eden, the Temple, or our modern day churches, God's presence is an important topic of discussion. In The Temple and the Tabernacle: A Study of God's Dwelling Places from Genesis to Revelation, J. Daniel Hays takes an in depth look at God's dwelling places. Each chapter takes an in de The presence of God among humankind is a topic present throughout the Bible and our history. Throughout the Biblical narrative, we see the different places in which God approaches people. Whether it is the Garden of Eden, the Temple, or our modern day churches, God's presence is an important topic of discussion. In The Temple and the Tabernacle: A Study of God's Dwelling Places from Genesis to Revelation, J. Daniel Hays takes an in depth look at God's dwelling places. Each chapter takes an in depth look at God's dwelling places, including: scriptures, charts, pictures, and diagrams.Hays connects the chapters and shows the similarities and differences in each of the locations. He stays close to scripture and even delves into some word study to further clarify the concept behind the words. This book meets somewhere between the layman realm and the world of academia without being too much of either. It is simple enough to understand, and provides enlightening viewpoints on its subject. There is something in here for everyone. Disclosure: I received this book free from Baker Books through the Baker Books Bloggers http://www.bakerbooks.com/bakerbooksb... program. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255.

  28. 4 out of 5

    Steven

    In The Temple and the Tabernacle author J. Daniel Hays gives a thorough review of the theme of God's dwelling places drawing on the most recent scholarship and making it accessible for a nonacademic reader. The book first addresses Greek and Hebrew terms used to refer to temple and tabernacle in the Old and New Testaments while tracing out an overview of what the book will cover. Hays in the following chapters of the book walks the reader from the Garden of Eden to the New Heavens and New Earth. T In The Temple and the Tabernacle author J. Daniel Hays gives a thorough review of the theme of God's dwelling places drawing on the most recent scholarship and making it accessible for a nonacademic reader. The book first addresses Greek and Hebrew terms used to refer to temple and tabernacle in the Old and New Testaments while tracing out an overview of what the book will cover. Hays in the following chapters of the book walks the reader from the Garden of Eden to the New Heavens and New Earth. There has been much written on the themes of temple, tabernacle, and God's presence in recent years. This resource bridges the gap between the academy and the layperson in the particular area of biblical studies. If you're a pastor or Sunday school teacher looking for a resource to broaden your understanding of the temple and tabernacle I would commend this resource to you. Disclosure: I received this book free from the publisher for providing this review. The opinions I have expressed are my own, and I was not required to write a positive review. I am disclosing this in accordance with the Federal Trade Commission’s 16 CFR, Part 255 http://www.access.gpo.gov/nara/cfr/wa...

  29. 5 out of 5

    Travis Heystek

    “The Temple and the Tabernacle” was a surprisingly good read. As a pastor I’m always looking for resources to help me develop a better understanding of what I’m looking at while reading the Old Testament. All throughout the Old Testament there is frequent mention of the temple and the tabernacle and I always knew it held a lot of meaning, but this book really helped to bring the information to the forefront. I was afraid this book would read like a textbook, but it was a fairly easy read. I did “The Temple and the Tabernacle” was a surprisingly good read. As a pastor I’m always looking for resources to help me develop a better understanding of what I’m looking at while reading the Old Testament. All throughout the Old Testament there is frequent mention of the temple and the tabernacle and I always knew it held a lot of meaning, but this book really helped to bring the information to the forefront. I was afraid this book would read like a textbook, but it was a fairly easy read. I did find it somewhat repetitive at moments, but when covering the theology and purpose behind the Tabernacle, Solomon’s Temple, Herod’s Temple, and us as the temple there is bound to be some repetition and cross-over. I found the illustrations helpful for the most part, and they really put some things into perspective. I can’t wait to read the bible with a deeper knowledge of the Temple/Tabernacle. I think even just knowing the setting and organization of the buildings better will bring some of the stories to life. I would strongly recommend this to anybody who plans on teaching the bible, and I recommend it to anyone looking to bolster their knowledge of the bible. It may get hard in a few spots, but push through.

  30. 4 out of 5

    Michelle Jinnette

    This book is a wonderful reference book focusing on the tabernacle constructed by Moses, the first temple built by Solomon, the reconstructed temple after the Israelites returned from Babylonian captivity, the expanded temple built by Herod and the temple in heaven mentioned in Revelation. The author does an excellent job explaining each detail and comparing the temples to the tabernacle. There were things I had never considered or even thought about such as the different building materials used This book is a wonderful reference book focusing on the tabernacle constructed by Moses, the first temple built by Solomon, the reconstructed temple after the Israelites returned from Babylonian captivity, the expanded temple built by Herod and the temple in heaven mentioned in Revelation. The author does an excellent job explaining each detail and comparing the temples to the tabernacle. There were things I had never considered or even thought about such as the different building materials used, the men in charge of each building projects and the events surrounding each one. Sometimes the author was repetitive but it helped keep me from forgetting facts and information mentioned earlier. The drawings and pictures included were very helpful in getting a visual of what each item and structure looked like and where they were placed. If you are interested in learning more about God's tabernacle and temples, or just getting a better understanding of the meaning behind them, this book would be a tremendous asset. It was very easy to understand, written for the common man not just biblical scholars. I really enjoyed this book and plan to keep it in my library. This book was provided by Baker Books for review without compensation.

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