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Out of the Everywhere, and Other Extraordinary Visions

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Ballantine Del Rey, paperback original, first printing 1981. Collection of science fiction stories, two of which are original. STORIES: Angel Fix (1974); Beaver Tears (1976); Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light! (1976); The Screwfly Solution (1977); Time-Sharing Angel (1977); We Who Stole the Dream (1978); Slow Music (1980); A Source of Innocent Merriment Ballantine Del Rey, paperback original, first printing 1981. Collection of science fiction stories, two of which are original. STORIES: Angel Fix (1974); Beaver Tears (1976); Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light! (1976); The Screwfly Solution (1977); Time-Sharing Angel (1977); We Who Stole the Dream (1978); Slow Music (1980); A Source of Innocent Merriment (1980); Out of the Everywhere; With Delicate Mad Hands.


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Ballantine Del Rey, paperback original, first printing 1981. Collection of science fiction stories, two of which are original. STORIES: Angel Fix (1974); Beaver Tears (1976); Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light! (1976); The Screwfly Solution (1977); Time-Sharing Angel (1977); We Who Stole the Dream (1978); Slow Music (1980); A Source of Innocent Merriment Ballantine Del Rey, paperback original, first printing 1981. Collection of science fiction stories, two of which are original. STORIES: Angel Fix (1974); Beaver Tears (1976); Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light! (1976); The Screwfly Solution (1977); Time-Sharing Angel (1977); We Who Stole the Dream (1978); Slow Music (1980); A Source of Innocent Merriment (1980); Out of the Everywhere; With Delicate Mad Hands.

30 review for Out of the Everywhere, and Other Extraordinary Visions

  1. 5 out of 5

    Martin

    Ten tantalizing tales of Man, Woman and Child - and their cosmic connections. This collection contains the following short stories; Angel Fix Beaver Tears Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light! The Screwfly Solution Time-Sharing Angel We Who Stole the Dream Slow Music A Source of Innocent Merriment Out of the Everywhere With Delicate Mad Hands When reviewing a collection of stories it is best to simply describe the most enjoyable story. This without a doubt "The Screwfly Solution" Ju Ten tantalizing tales of Man, Woman and Child - and their cosmic connections. This collection contains the following short stories; Angel Fix Beaver Tears Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light! The Screwfly Solution Time-Sharing Angel We Who Stole the Dream Slow Music A Source of Innocent Merriment Out of the Everywhere With Delicate Mad Hands When reviewing a collection of stories it is best to simply describe the most enjoyable story. This without a doubt "The Screwfly Solution" Just as we think nothing of disrupting nature in order to remove a pest from our lives so do aliens act on humanity. Humans were hard at work removing the screwflies which infected and killed children. Earth is having its current tenants removed so that aliens can live there. Without even a shot being fired. Slowly, at first, men all over the world kill their loved ones leaving Earth ready for the aliens! Long before climate change and the Green party were talked about James Tiptree was writing thought provoking stories on these themes. They are simply "extraordinary visions" Enjoy!

  2. 5 out of 5

    Baal Of

    I've got at least one hardcover collection by Tiptree (real name Alice Bradley) and I remember quite liking her stories. So now I've got this got stack of old SF/Fantasy paperbacks that a friend gave me, and there are at least 4 Tiptree short story collections, and this is the first I've selected. The opening story was a humorous alien encounter story with a twist. A rather enjoyable start, followed up with a very short, sharp story Beaver Tears which manages to be both sad and funny at the time I've got at least one hardcover collection by Tiptree (real name Alice Bradley) and I remember quite liking her stories. So now I've got this got stack of old SF/Fantasy paperbacks that a friend gave me, and there are at least 4 Tiptree short story collections, and this is the first I've selected. The opening story was a humorous alien encounter story with a twist. A rather enjoyable start, followed up with a very short, sharp story Beaver Tears which manages to be both sad and funny at the time. And then the third story Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled Of Light! comes in with a massive punch to gut. Holy shit, what a powerhouse of story dealing with mental illness and skewed perceptions of reality and a world destroyed by uncontrolled technology. The ending is just terribly tragic, but utterly perfect for delivering Tiptree's message. I have a vague memory of having read this specific story something like 15 years ago, and I'm glad to have come back to it again. Only 3 stories into this collection and I'm already impressed again by her creativity. I had for some reason a vague memory of Tiptree's work being frequently humorous, but that must have been a confusion with some other author's work. Her stories are almost unrelentingly sad and tragic, and not in a hammy way. She is peculiarly adept at taking SF motifs and evoking deeply complex emotions from the wild speculations. The penultimate story Out Of The Everywhere is a heartbreaking examination of on utterly alien child intelligence being stranded in a human baby and the transgressive relationship with the human father, with a host of characters many of whom had their own outsider aspects. The final story With Delicate Mad Hands starts as a feminist examination and critique of male-dominated space exploration and warps into a violent murder/revenge tale and then finally into a hopeless and desperate love story that bears no resemblance to anything remotely romantic. And death always death. These stories have left me reeling, and I'm glad that I have at least three more of Tiptree's anthologies sitting on my shelf, waiting to be read.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Matt Shaw

    I hadn't read any Tiptree before this; her stories are strong, and this anthology makes me want to read more. This is a good collection, reflecting a strong, wry wit and a healthy discomfort with a bellicose and sexist society. Only one story here dragged for me; I found "Slow Music" both drawn out and trite, a long doggerel a bit too precious and without much final pay-off. The last two stories are pretty brilliant, the first ("Angel Fix") is flat-out funny, and "We Who Stole the Dream" is ruef I hadn't read any Tiptree before this; her stories are strong, and this anthology makes me want to read more. This is a good collection, reflecting a strong, wry wit and a healthy discomfort with a bellicose and sexist society. Only one story here dragged for me; I found "Slow Music" both drawn out and trite, a long doggerel a bit too precious and without much final pay-off. The last two stories are pretty brilliant, the first ("Angel Fix") is flat-out funny, and "We Who Stole the Dream" is ruefully memorable. This merits a bit more than a 4 and not quite a 5, but definitely worth recommending.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Kay

    James Tiptree was the nom de plume of Alice Sheldon, who adopted a male pseudonym as at the time she wrote, sci-fi/fantasy was thoroughly male territory. This is a collection of some of her best short stories and one novella. If you like Ursula LeGuin, you'll probably also enjoy Tiptree. Her characters are multi-dimensional and she deals with complex social issues, sometimes with a hint of satire and keen wit. This is not your typical rocket blaster/ray gun sci fi. James Tiptree was the nom de plume of Alice Sheldon, who adopted a male pseudonym as at the time she wrote, sci-fi/fantasy was thoroughly male territory. This is a collection of some of her best short stories and one novella. If you like Ursula LeGuin, you'll probably also enjoy Tiptree. Her characters are multi-dimensional and she deals with complex social issues, sometimes with a hint of satire and keen wit. This is not your typical rocket blaster/ray gun sci fi.

  5. 4 out of 5

    Lauren

    There are a lot of great stories in this collection, though my favorite is definitely "With Delicate Mad Hands." I can read it multiple times and cry at the end of each. I'm going to include a brief summary of each of the stories, both for myself and others. **Warning**: there will be spoilers as I'm going to give away the ending. "Angel Fix:" Alien comes to earth and finds "good" people and offers them a portal to a fabulous vacation world and is like "don't tell people about it" except the alie There are a lot of great stories in this collection, though my favorite is definitely "With Delicate Mad Hands." I can read it multiple times and cry at the end of each. I'm going to include a brief summary of each of the stories, both for myself and others. **Warning**: there will be spoilers as I'm going to give away the ending. "Angel Fix:" Alien comes to earth and finds "good" people and offers them a portal to a fabulous vacation world and is like "don't tell people about it" except the aliens' plan is for the earthlings to all leave earth for the wonder land and they can sell earth for a profit after the bad people ruin it. This one was very Tiptree, in that Tip liked to write about aliens manipulating humans into ruining the earth so they can sell it (see "The Screwfly Solution"). -- "Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light!" Girl thinks she's walking through a dystopian world as a messenger, but she's actually a regular woman who went a little crazy and is just walking through the streets. She gets "eaten by dogs"/raped and beaten by men. This story was at once both beautiful and terrible at the same time, because it was more or less about women's journey through the world and the dangers they face. -- "Beaver Tears:" Guy watches a documentary about relocated beavers, and then he and his neighbors are relocated by aliens. This one was a little meh: interesting, but not as great as some of Tip's other stories. -- "The Screwfly Solution:" Alien realtors infect men with a strong desire to murder all women so they can sell the earth. This. One. Is. Amazing. I've read it several times and it's horrifying because it goes in a sort of "Handmaid's Tale" direction where women are subjugated by men, except it goes a step further because the men kill them all. -- "Time-Sharing Angel:" Alien sends a "solution" to earth because this lady is sad that the earth is being overrun, and his solution is a thing that puts all but 1 child in a family asleep at a time, and they don't age so it slows population growth (and will eventually end up with far fewer humans). I personally enjoy all the different ideas Tiptree comes up with on how to fix overpopulation and pollution. This story is a very "be careful what you wish for" tale. -- "We Who Stole the Dream:" An enslaved race steals a ship, flies it toward where it thinks its people are, discovers they produce the torture juice the slavers enjoyed. This was fascinating, thrilling, and ultimately depressing since the freedom the slaves thought they were getting was tainted. -- "Slow Music:" The last woman and man want to stay on earth and do obsolete human things, everyone has been uploaded to a "river." The man and woman fail and ultimately join the flow as well. This story sort of dragged on? It was interesting, as usual, but not as great as the others. -- "With Delicate Mad Hands:" Carol Page aka Cold Pig goes to space and commandeers the space ship to fly toward where she has always heard a voice calling to her. She doesn't expect it to be real, but she finds a planet. This one I won't spoil because the ending means so much to me and I want others to be overwhelmed by the result of Carol's journey. Suffice to say, I love it very very much. -- "A Source of Innocent Merriment:" Guy talks about how he flew over a planet, and it was somehow alive and showed him things in his mind including a beautiful woman of his dreams that he then could never see again. Another example of Tiptree finding joy in space and then wrenching it away. -- "Out of the Everywhere:" This one contains incest, so if that's a big "no" from you, I'd skip this one. An alien has to hide in an iceberg on earth and splits its consciousness into three connected folks, including a father and daughter; the daughter seduces the dad (I totally called it) and ultimately the three people arrange to haul the iceberg to California and the alien is released, only to be tempted by another alien but the little girl saves him and joins his consciousness, and now the alien wants to study life on other planets. Aside from the truly messed up father/daughter incest in this story (also the daughter is like 11 when she seduces her dad so it's also pedophilia), this is a really cool story about how aliens interact with earth. For the most part, earth and its humans are insignificant specks in the cosmos (a feeling Tiptree carried with him/her all their life) and Tiptree really enjoys telling stories that reinforce that perspective.

  6. 5 out of 5

    Briar Page

    I was psyched to find this collection for $2 at my local used book store! I had already read most of the stories in it, and all of the really outstanding ones, but it's an excellent collection overall. I will never get tired of re-reading classics like "The Screwfly Solution", "Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light!", and "With Delicate Mad Hands" (which, bite me, is one of my favorite Tiptree works; a lot of people seem to be turned off by either the relentless abuse and despair I was psyched to find this collection for $2 at my local used book store! I had already read most of the stories in it, and all of the really outstanding ones, but it's an excellent collection overall. I will never get tired of re-reading classics like "The Screwfly Solution", "Your Faces, O My Sisters! Your Faces Filled of Light!", and "With Delicate Mad Hands" (which, bite me, is one of my favorite Tiptree works; a lot of people seem to be turned off by either the relentless abuse and despair and degradation of the beginning or by the somewhat sappy ending, which presents an arguably disturbing situation as unironically sweet and romantic, but I love the way those two emotional extremes give texture to one another and sketch what to me feels like a very truthful portrait of trauma and alienation and yearning). I'd never read "Out of the Everywhere", the title story. It's all right, but a little longer than it needs to be. I wasn't expecting it to take a hard turn into alien-induced father/underage daughter incest halfway through, and I'm not sure how I feel about that particular twist-- at least the daughter initiates it, and both parties perceive their encounters as enthusiastically consensual and enjoy themselves? Or maybe that makes it *more* troubling, from an analytical standpoint if not a visceral one...anyway, apart from this strange plot device, the overarching narrative is engaging but a bit predictable in a way where at certain points I found myself wishing the story would hurry up and get to the climax I knew was coming (no pun intended). My favorite new-to-me story in the collection is one of the shortest and slightest, "A Source of Innocent Merriment". I can't really explain the plot without spoiling the whole thing, but it strikes a perfect balance of melancholy, romance, cosmic awe, and a faint tinge of horror. Shades of SOLARIS and of Bradbury in his most elegiac and whimsical mode.

  7. 4 out of 5

    Cheryl

    Actually, the only story I didn't finish was the last, the novellette 'With Delicate Mad Hands," because by that time I'd had enough Tiptree (this collection confirms that I'm not a fan) and I found a review online that described it well enough to me that I felt comfortable abandoning. And that's all I can say. Oh, and I can add that the title of the collection is from a poem called "Baby" by the wonderful George MacDonald. Actually, the only story I didn't finish was the last, the novellette 'With Delicate Mad Hands," because by that time I'd had enough Tiptree (this collection confirms that I'm not a fan) and I found a review online that described it well enough to me that I felt comfortable abandoning. And that's all I can say. Oh, and I can add that the title of the collection is from a poem called "Baby" by the wonderful George MacDonald.

  8. 4 out of 5

    Mea

    "Slow music" makes this worth looking for. An enigmatic young girl plans to stay behind when all the other humans have left on the "river" a beam of unknown energy brought down to earth by an alien intelligence. Eternal life is promised to those who enter, but at what cost? Tiptree writes beautifully, and "Slow Music" is one of her best; poetic and poignant, and a very novel story as well. "Slow music" makes this worth looking for. An enigmatic young girl plans to stay behind when all the other humans have left on the "river" a beam of unknown energy brought down to earth by an alien intelligence. Eternal life is promised to those who enter, but at what cost? Tiptree writes beautifully, and "Slow Music" is one of her best; poetic and poignant, and a very novel story as well.

  9. 5 out of 5

    Jasmine

    It is perhaps not 100% fair to say I read this, but I read all of it that I'm going to..Tiptree was actually a woman, and a very talented woman, but my goodness, a woman with an extraordinarily grim turn of sci-fi-writing. It is perhaps not 100% fair to say I read this, but I read all of it that I'm going to..Tiptree was actually a woman, and a very talented woman, but my goodness, a woman with an extraordinarily grim turn of sci-fi-writing.

  10. 5 out of 5

    Snowfire

    Ended up reading this by accident. The story quality is rather erratic, and some parts are definitely dated (as would be expected with older sci-fi short stories). Still, there are definitely some way cool ideas in it, even if I didn't entirely like where Tiptree went with 'em. So still interesting, all in all. Also, is it just me, or does Tiptree have some severe hang-ups over the place of women in society? I suppose sexism was a much worse problem in the 60s and 70s, but still, there's lots of Ended up reading this by accident. The story quality is rather erratic, and some parts are definitely dated (as would be expected with older sci-fi short stories). Still, there are definitely some way cool ideas in it, even if I didn't entirely like where Tiptree went with 'em. So still interesting, all in all. Also, is it just me, or does Tiptree have some severe hang-ups over the place of women in society? I suppose sexism was a much worse problem in the 60s and 70s, but still, there's lots of messed-up things going on in these stories and rapes and the like. Roger Zelazny, my other main exposure to 60s-70s sci-fi short stories, is definitely better, but that's probably an unfair comparison.

  11. 4 out of 5

    Data

    It's been a long time since I came back to this old friend, and revisited the idea that we might be here on earth at someone else's sufferance. There is a story in here that has stayed with me; a strong clear vision built in my head of the characters and the world they live in. Slow Music may not have the fast pace of some stories, but it has a fully formed dream that has a twist that makes one think. The theme that runs through all these stories is how we might come to our ends, not through war, It's been a long time since I came back to this old friend, and revisited the idea that we might be here on earth at someone else's sufferance. There is a story in here that has stayed with me; a strong clear vision built in my head of the characters and the world they live in. Slow Music may not have the fast pace of some stories, but it has a fully formed dream that has a twist that makes one think. The theme that runs through all these stories is how we might come to our ends, not through war, but a kind of deception, perhaps aided by our own desires. I had to up this to four stars; each of the stories really does present some unique idea or twist.

  12. 4 out of 5

    Hiroki

    「ラセンウジバエ解決法」 The Screwfly Solution (1977)  突如男性が女性を殺害する事件が続発し、急速に世界的な広まりを見せる。傑作。性衝動/暴力の関連性がモチーフになっているが、達観した視点から冷笑的に物語を語っている印象を受ける。手紙や新聞の切り抜きの抜粋が多く用いられ、クライマックスでは3つの手記を連ねて、後から現れる手記に前の文書が内包されてゆくという構造に鳥肌が立つ。

  13. 4 out of 5

    Chester

  14. 4 out of 5

    Charles

  15. 4 out of 5

    Maggie

  16. 4 out of 5

    Alison C

  17. 5 out of 5

    Ansate

  18. 4 out of 5

    Amy

  19. 4 out of 5

    Stevelvis

  20. 5 out of 5

    Ellen Shull

  21. 5 out of 5

    Mark

  22. 5 out of 5

    Keith

  23. 5 out of 5

    Charles

  24. 5 out of 5

    Terry

  25. 5 out of 5

    James Proctor

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jim Shea

  27. 5 out of 5

    Clio Windust

  28. 5 out of 5

    Jane

  29. 4 out of 5

    Stefan

  30. 4 out of 5

    Carl

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