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Reactive Web Applications: Covers Play, Akka, and Reactive Streams

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Summary Reactive Web Applications teaches web developers how to benefit from the reactive application architecture and presents hands-on examples using the Play framework. Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications. About the Technology Reactive applications build on top of components that communicate asynchronou Summary Reactive Web Applications teaches web developers how to benefit from the reactive application architecture and presents hands-on examples using the Play framework. Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications. About the Technology Reactive applications build on top of components that communicate asynchronously as they react to user and system events. As a result, they become scalable, responsive, and fault-tolerant. Java and Scala developers can use the Play Framework and the Akka concurrency toolkit to easily implement reactive applications without building everything from scratch. About the Book Reactive Web Applications teaches web developers how to benefit from the reactive application architecture and presents hands-on examples using Play, Akka, Scala, and Reactive Streams. This book starts by laying out the fundamentals required for writing functional and asynchronous applications and quickly introduces Play as a framework to handle the plumbing of your application. The book alternates between chapters that introduce reactive ideas (asynchronous programming with futures and actors, managing distributed state with CQRS) and practical examples that show you how to build these ideas into your applications. What's Inside Reactive application architecture Basics of Play and Akka Examples in Scala Functional and asynchronous programming About Reader Description For readers comfortable programming with a higher-level language such as Java or C#, and who can read Scala code. No experience with Play or Akka needed. About the Author Manuel Bernhardt is a passionate engineer, author, and speaker. As a consultant, he guides companies through the technological and organizational transformation to distributed computing. Table of Contents PART 1 GETTING STARTED WITH REACTIVE WEB APPLICATIONS Did you say reactive? Your first reactive web application Functional programming primer Quick introduction to Play PART 2 CORE CONCEPTS Futures Actors Dealing with state Responsive user interfaces PART 3 ADVANCED TOPICS Reactive Streams Deploying reactive Play applications Testing reactive web applications


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Summary Reactive Web Applications teaches web developers how to benefit from the reactive application architecture and presents hands-on examples using the Play framework. Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications. About the Technology Reactive applications build on top of components that communicate asynchronou Summary Reactive Web Applications teaches web developers how to benefit from the reactive application architecture and presents hands-on examples using the Play framework. Purchase of the print book includes a free eBook in PDF, Kindle, and ePub formats from Manning Publications. About the Technology Reactive applications build on top of components that communicate asynchronously as they react to user and system events. As a result, they become scalable, responsive, and fault-tolerant. Java and Scala developers can use the Play Framework and the Akka concurrency toolkit to easily implement reactive applications without building everything from scratch. About the Book Reactive Web Applications teaches web developers how to benefit from the reactive application architecture and presents hands-on examples using Play, Akka, Scala, and Reactive Streams. This book starts by laying out the fundamentals required for writing functional and asynchronous applications and quickly introduces Play as a framework to handle the plumbing of your application. The book alternates between chapters that introduce reactive ideas (asynchronous programming with futures and actors, managing distributed state with CQRS) and practical examples that show you how to build these ideas into your applications. What's Inside Reactive application architecture Basics of Play and Akka Examples in Scala Functional and asynchronous programming About Reader Description For readers comfortable programming with a higher-level language such as Java or C#, and who can read Scala code. No experience with Play or Akka needed. About the Author Manuel Bernhardt is a passionate engineer, author, and speaker. As a consultant, he guides companies through the technological and organizational transformation to distributed computing. Table of Contents PART 1 GETTING STARTED WITH REACTIVE WEB APPLICATIONS Did you say reactive? Your first reactive web application Functional programming primer Quick introduction to Play PART 2 CORE CONCEPTS Futures Actors Dealing with state Responsive user interfaces PART 3 ADVANCED TOPICS Reactive Streams Deploying reactive Play applications Testing reactive web applications

52 review for Reactive Web Applications: Covers Play, Akka, and Reactive Streams

  1. 5 out of 5

    Sebastian Gebski

    (I've reviewed MEAP version with all chapters but before final tuning) It's better than you may have thought. I've spoken with Manuel earlier this year in Cracow, so I knew it's gonna be good, but it's better than I thought too. What's so good about it? 1. It's an epic "igniter" book & this paradigm works better for paradigms / methods than particular technologies. "Igniter" is a book that gives you the overall concept, foundation & enough of content to push you towards a proper direction. Don't u (I've reviewed MEAP version with all chapters but before final tuning) It's better than you may have thought. I've spoken with Manuel earlier this year in Cracow, so I knew it's gonna be good, but it's better than I thought too. What's so good about it? 1. It's an epic "igniter" book & this paradigm works better for paradigms / methods than particular technologies. "Igniter" is a book that gives you the overall concept, foundation & enough of content to push you towards a proper direction. Don't underestimate the last part - many books just give some basic theory & the reader is left with completely no idea how to apply it or where to apply it. RWA does it much better - it helps you to make a first step, but it doesn't either babysit you or pretend that the whole topic has been covered. 2. It's full End-to-End book. It doesn't ignore the front-end specifics of web applications, but gives an idea of approach you could take. 3. It's very practical - it doesn't really follow the bare hype of "everything reactive" - based on what you read, you have a full perspective on what's different in the presented approach. 4. Reactive Streams - 'nuf said. Cons: Yes, some. 1. As the book is going through a wide spectrum of technologies, author didn't assume prior knowledge, so there are primers on functional programming, actor model, Play framework, etc. To be honest, it's not a problem & I've read the majority of those even if I didn't need to. Well written. 2. Scala.js? OMG, a step too far ... :) 3. While some chapters are really rich in content (fortunately the most critical ones - like the "Dealing with state" one), some are definitely lacking. I can imagine that author wanted a complete image, but both Deployment & Testing chapters are just too brief (the latter has some interesting ideas though). Recommended, this is a very good shit.

  2. 5 out of 5

    Florian Hopf

    Useful book to learn about the concepts of the play framework. I'm mostly using it from Java but most of the code examples are easily transferrable. Even as it's an older version of the framework that is discussed many of it will still hold true. But being interested in the concepts also means instead of learning topics like how to integrate libraries in the exotic scala.js I would have preferred to learn more about higher level concepts, e.g. in this case maybe more on the impact of reactive on Useful book to learn about the concepts of the play framework. I'm mostly using it from Java but most of the code examples are easily transferrable. Even as it's an older version of the framework that is discussed many of it will still hold true. But being interested in the concepts also means instead of learning topics like how to integrate libraries in the exotic scala.js I would have preferred to learn more about higher level concepts, e.g. in this case maybe more on the impact of reactive on frontend development.

  3. 4 out of 5

    Frank

    Good, hard to keep up with changes. Chapter on angular is out of date.

  4. 5 out of 5

    Su

  5. 4 out of 5

    L0173

  6. 5 out of 5

    D. A. Hosek

  7. 4 out of 5

    Lance Newman

  8. 5 out of 5

    Eduardo Díaz

  9. 5 out of 5

    Billy Yuan

  10. 4 out of 5

    Alex

  11. 4 out of 5

    Adarsh Singh

  12. 5 out of 5

    Sergiy

  13. 4 out of 5

    Ventsislav Buhlev

  14. 5 out of 5

    Marcelo Cenerino

  15. 4 out of 5

    Renanreismartins

  16. 5 out of 5

    Jernej

  17. 4 out of 5

    Bogdan

  18. 4 out of 5

    Nabeel Ahamed

  19. 4 out of 5

    Josh

  20. 4 out of 5

    Victor Tsvetkov

  21. 4 out of 5

    Nico Serfontein

  22. 5 out of 5

    Danilo

  23. 4 out of 5

    Ferzerkerx

  24. 5 out of 5

    Matthias

  25. 4 out of 5

    Bart De

  26. 4 out of 5

    Jorge Alonso

  27. 5 out of 5

    Jordi Masip

  28. 5 out of 5

    Wayne Tanner

  29. 5 out of 5

    Zdravko Stoychev

  30. 4 out of 5

    José Rivera

  31. 5 out of 5

    Juan Bono

  32. 4 out of 5

    Andrey

  33. 5 out of 5

    Chris Schuhmann

  34. 4 out of 5

    Chris

  35. 4 out of 5

    Jaunius

  36. 4 out of 5

    Александр Гриценко

  37. 4 out of 5

    Leonardo Simões

  38. 5 out of 5

    Matija

  39. 4 out of 5

    mv1893

  40. 4 out of 5

    Harri

  41. 4 out of 5

    Bartek

  42. 4 out of 5

    Tihomir Radosavljević

  43. 4 out of 5

    Vasiliy Sushko

  44. 5 out of 5

    Orest Ivasiv

  45. 4 out of 5

    Mykola Guidash

  46. 5 out of 5

    Yuriy Plysyuk

  47. 5 out of 5

    Bruno Lellis

  48. 5 out of 5

    Wwyy

  49. 4 out of 5

    Andrew

  50. 5 out of 5

    Alex

  51. 4 out of 5

    Jeff

  52. 5 out of 5

    Ido Shamun

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